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Buona Italia to Open in Chelsea Market

Sep 25, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Ingredients

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Nocciola (hazelnut praline ice cream) on the back porch for lunch. Yes I know it's Fall but it's 89°/32°C and this fabulous ice cream called to me from the freezer. I made it yesterday for dear friends who were visiting from Philadelphia. I promised that if the Agrimontana praline paste arrived from Europe in time I would make the ice cream. This praline paste is made with hazelnuts from the famed Piedmont region of Italy--60% pure hazelnuts and 40% caramelized sugar. It has no equal.

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My dear long-time friend Mariella Esposito, of Fante's, and me enjoying the ice cream and sunset last night. Nocciola is her husband Lee's favorite, which is why I made it.

This Thursday, September 28, Buon Italia will be opening in Chelsea Market in New York City but they also have an online site. And they carry, among other things, the Agrimontana praline paste and their 100% pure pistachio paste. Those of you who love these flavors of ice cream will be nothing short of astounded at the difference these quality ingredients make!

And for those of you concerned about my summer-long defection to ice creaming, i'll be back to baking, mixing the dough for a pane nero this very afternoon (posting to come about this special Sicilian flour imported by Gustiamo).

How Sweet it Is

Sep 20, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Review

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Sweet: Desserts from London's Ottolenghi

Yes, these are both the same book, but the first photo is the UK edition and it's the one that Yotam Ottolenghi sent me with the loveliest inscription from both him and co-author Helen Goh.

As a huge Ottolenghi fan (I sent both my brother and his wife, and my cousin Joan to his restaurant when they were visiting London--wishing it could have been me) it means so very much to me to be credited in this gorgeous book for my contribution on page 181, which is an adaptation of my "Perfect Pound Cake." Their version has both cardamom and coffee, and I'm really looking forward to trying it because cardamom is my favorite spice and coffee my favorite beverage!

I'm also delighted to see that the "Lemon Poppyseed Cake" is the one Helen would take to a desert island, because that happens to be my signature cake as well.

And I'm dying to try the "Take-home Chocolate Cake," on page 152, because the descriptor "the world's best chocolate cake" always calls to me.

Having cooked from Yotam's savory books, it is really exciting to be in possession of his first book devoted to sweets--after all, he started off as a pastry chef! I hope some day to meet him and Helen in person and in the meantime, I cherish their book.

Orange Appeal

Sep 19, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Review

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Orange Appeal: Savory and Sweet

When I was growing up, my grandmother, who lived with us, squeezed me fresh orange juice every morning for breakfast. Nowadays, when I go to a restaurant for lunch, and don't want to fall asleep for the rest of the afternoon, I decline a glass of wine in favor of freshly squeezed orange juice if they have it. My husband tells me that the moment an orange is squeezed the vitamin C flies right out. I drink it quickly because it is so delicious. I don't really care if it's healthful or not! To me, the flavor of orange is an irresistibly satisfying balance of sweetness and zinginess. I have used it in just about every one of my own books. ("Orange Glow Chiffon" and "Love of Three Oranges" springs to mind, not to mention "Orange Buttercream.")

So you can imagine how excited I was to meet Jamie Schler this past April, at the International Association of Culinary Professionals conference in Kentucky, and to learn that she was about to publish her first book Orange Appeal. If that isn't a sexy title I don't know what is!

Jamie grew up in Florida, where, when it came to oranges, she had a lot more than a glass of orange juice every morning. She now lives in one of my favorite places in the world--Chinon, France, where she and her husband own Hôtel Diderot.
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When Orange Appeal arrived, it was a hard choice which two recipes to make as soon as possible so that I could share my thoughts about the book with you. Since I'm virtually surrounded by sweets every day, my first choice was a savory dish: "Orange-Braised Belgian Endives with Caramelized Onions and Bacon." She writes: Searing gently caramelizes the endives, braising in orange juice tames the bitter bite leaving just a hint of piquancy that marries well with the sweetness of the orange and the smoky, salty finishing touch of the caramelized onion and the lardons or bacon. And it was so fabulous I wanted to lick the plate (I used my finger to be polite since I wasn't alone). I will be making this dish again and again and again.

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I happen to adore financiers--the little two-bite egg white, almond flour, and butter cakes that are tender and flavorful so how could I resist one made with orange zest and orange flower water, and yes--they were divine.

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Jamie and her wonderful new book have become cherished friends and I look forward to the day when I can visit her in her paradise in Chinon. Meantime, there are lots more recipes to try. Mussels, orange juice, and fennel next in the hopper!
You can also visit her on her website.

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It's about TIME

Aug 27, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Equipment

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TimeStack by Thermoworks is the ultimate timer.

I've always wanted a timer that had mutliple time settings but feared I would get confused as which was timing what. The TimeStack quadruple timer has 4 time settings, each with a different sound, but the best part is that there is a voice recorder so that you can record your own message for each time setting. For example: Check the risen bread!, or Preheat the oven!

The TimeStack has many other useful features. There is a back light button and also an adjustable volume button. And it comes in 9 attractive colors. Some great engineering went into the design of this sturdy and superbly functional timer. It will time up to all of 99 hours! You will love it!

One of My Most Important Techniques for Maximizing Texture and Flavor

Aug 11, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Did You Know

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I've referred to it in every one of my books and have always wanted to put it all together in one place. Here it is now on Food52.

The Art of Flavor--Happy Pub Date!

Aug 01, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Review

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The Art of Flavor: Practices and Principles for Creating Delicious Food


I have lived my entire life, for as long as I can remember, following my nose and devoted to flavor. Aroma and flavor are everything to me. So I can't help feeling that this treasure of a book, by my friends renowned chef Daniel Patterson and perfumer extraordinaire Mandy Aftel, was written with me in mind (and all of you who are reading this).

Some of the best and most inspiring meals I've ever had were at Daniel's former restaurant Coi, in San Francisco, and in his home. Such is my esteem for Daniel, that years ago I flew to the west coast to make his wedding cake and it became the most beautiful photo in my book Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I refer to it casting cake on the water. I met Mandy at Daniel's wedding and have been following her magical work ever since. She even created a special perfume for me based on my favorite aromas. And I dubbed her a woman of uncommon scents.

Their new book, The Art of Flavor, is beautifully written in one voice as a result of the perfectly harmonious blending of the two authors' highly tuned sensibilities.

I am reading my way through the entire book as one would a novel, and learning so much. It's hard not to fill this posting with quotes from the book, because this book speaks for itself, so I will choose just a few of my top favorites:

from Flavor Facets: ...The flavor of a given ingredient is determined not by one or a few dominant molecules but by an entire constellation of what might be hundreds of molecules, some of them present only as traces. Becoming alert to the unique possibilities of a given ingredient means becoming aware of its nuances as much as its overall character. We call these nuances facets. Mandy thinks of them as little wings attached to the ingredients.

I also love The Four Rules of Flavor, each of which precedes recipes that exemplify it: An ingredient doesn't start to become a dish until it's combined with other ingredients. But how do we choose them?

1. Similar ingredients need a contrasting flavor.

2. Contrasting ingredients need a unifying flavor.

3. Heavy flavors need a lifting note.

4. Light flavors need to be grounded.

Along with the poetic and defining descriptions of ingredients is invaluable information on what they contribute to a dish. Here is an example from the headnote of what is so far my favorite recipe cooked from the book:

Duck Breasts with Endive, Honey, Cinnamon, and Basil:
Duck breast is a slightly gamey, extremely flavorful, and versatile ingredient that has more in common with red meat than with chicken and most other poultry, and requires stronger accompaniments....glazed with a mixture of honey, vinegar, cinnamon, salt, and black pepper....The honey rounds out the vinegar, making it less aggressive, and the vinegar takes away some of the sweetness of the honey, leaving the floral, aromatic notes on the top. Endive lends a welcome bitter note.
Yes! I will now always make duck breast with this glaze!

And another winner: Orecchiette with Stewed Broccoli, Olive Oil, and Parmesan: ....chopping the broccoli into small pieces and stewing them slowly and completely bring out their sweetness. The broccoli melts into the sauce and creates a lock with the lemon and olive oil to make a merged, delicious whole....Thin slices of raw, crunchy broccoli stem add a welcome contrasting freshness and texture.
They did indeed!

The Art of Flavor is a treasure. It is so much more than just another recipe book--not only is it filled with enticing recipes, it is an ode to the understanding of flavor and will empower you to cook with a new freedom, confidence, and enjoyment.

Icing Smiles--an Inspiration

Jul 29, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Special Stories 2017

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My friend, Lenny Taub, send me these photos of cakes created by his friend Aimee Lambing for a special charity. He wrote that Aimee has never had a baking lesson but loves to bake and took a cake decorating class at a community college. Not only is the quality of her work impressive, her generosity is on equal par: She is creating these cakes for a charity called Icing Smiles that delivers cakes to critically ill children.

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Erin Jean McDowell--The Fearless Baker

Jul 06, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookbooks

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Erin has just posted a stunning promotional video for her upcoming book The Fearless Baker. Of course it is stunning--it was shot by photographer Ben Fink!

The book is available for preorder on Amazon and will be published this Fall. I love Erin and the book so much I wrote the foreword!

The Fearless Baker: Simple Secrets for Baking Like a Pro

Berry Dangerous Beauties

Jun 28, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Ingredients

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Black raspberries have the hardest seeds of any berry I know. I've always enjoyed picking the wild berries that grow down the road and eating them--some on the spot and others with yogurt or ice cream. But this Sunday something really bad happened and I want to warn you. One of the berry seeds cracked one of my perfectly healthy teeth.

Channeling my mother, who was dentist, I immediately contact her beloved replacement, Dr. Kellen Mori, who arranged to have me come in the very next day. This was so fortunate because she was able to save the tooth even though it had cracked very deeply. One day later would have been too late. I now have a temporary crown and we are hoping no root canal will be needed.

I will never again chomp on a black raspberry, however, there is a silver lining to the story: I have frozen the rest of our berry harvest to make into ice cream. It will be in the upcoming ice cream book. And I no longer have to look at the berries as enemies.

The 100 Greatest Cooks of ALL Time

Jun 12, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

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Thank you Epicurious! I am so honored to be included in this illustrious group of so many of my favorite friends and colleagues not to mention celebrities. And I am quite simply over the moon by what you wrote about my work. Also to find myself right under my favorite food writer of all time: MFK Fisher--life doesn't get better....

Epicurious

Rose's Chocolate Baking Essentials on Craftsy

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