Welcome to Real Baking with Rose, the personal blog of author Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Watch the Baking Bible
Come Alive
BEN FINK

Spend A Moment with Rose, in this video portrait by Ben Fink.

Check out my new creations




Rose's Alpha Bakers

Rose's Alpha Bakers for the Bread Bible

RSS AND MORE



Get the blog delivered by email. Enter your address:

Eat your books
Previous Book

Roses' Cookbooks

The Baking Bible

The Baking Bible

Buy from Amazon: USA | Canada | France | Germany | UK

Buy from IndieBound

Next Book

Current Announcements

FREE SHIPPING Book Sale anywhere within the continental USA on orders of $25 or more: Contact Woody at woody321@ptd.com for him to email you the information.

Erin Jean McDowell--The Fearless Baker

Jul 06, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

ERIN.jpeg

Erin has just posted a stunning promotional video for her upcoming book The Fearless Baker. Of course it is stunning--it was shot by photographer Ben Fink!

The book is available for preorder on Amazon and will be published this Fall. I love Erin and the book so much I wrote the foreword!

The Fearless Baker: Simple Secrets for Baking Like a Pro

Berry Dangerous Beauties

Jun 28, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

berries.jpg

Black raspberries have the hardest seeds of any berry I know. I've always enjoyed picking the wild berries that grow down the road and eating them--some on the spot and others with yogurt or ice cream. But this Sunday something really bad happened and I want to warn you. One of the berry seeds cracked one of my perfectly healthy teeth.

Channeling my mother, who was dentist, I immediately contact her beloved replacement, Dr. Kellen Mori, who arranged to have me come in the very next day. This was so fortunate because she was able to save the tooth even though it had cracked very deeply. One day later would have been too late. I now have a temporary crown and we are hoping no root canal will be needed.

I will never again chomp on a black raspberry, however, there is a silver lining to the story: I have frozen the rest of our berry harvest to make into ice cream. It will be in the upcoming ice cream book. And I no longer have to look at the berries as enemies.

Amazon Kindle Bread Bible $1.99!

Jun 22, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

Barbie in FL just posted about this incredible deal so I wanted to make sure you didn't miss it!
Thank you Barbie!


The 100 Greatest Cooks of ALL Time

Jun 12, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

Screen_Shot_Epicurious.jpg

Thank you Epicurious! I am so honored to be included in this illustrious group of so many of my favorite friends and colleagues not to mention celebrities. And I am quite simply over the moon by what you wrote about my work. Also to find myself right under my favorite food writer of all time: MFK Fisher--life doesn't get better....

Epicurious

Dessert Professional Annual Extravaganza

Jun 10, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Special Stories 2017

RORY.jpg

We look forward every June to the annual Dessert Professional Top Ten Pastry Chefs of America event, held at ICE (the Institute of Culinary Education) in New York City.

The appetizers prepared by ICE and the desserts prepared by each of the honorees are always a delightful treat but my favorite part of the event is getting to see and catch up with so many friends and colleagues I've known through the years and also to meet new ones.

This year, what captured our attention dessert-wise, were the delectable kouigns amann. This is one of our favorite recipes, in fact, we chose it for the cover of The Baking Bible. Chef Rory's version was not only wondrously buttery and flaky, it was layered with rhubarb compote in addition to the traditional sugar. This served as a lovely, tangy counterpoint to the sugar. Bravo Chef Rory Macdonald, executive chef of Patisserie Chanson in New York City. We will be sure to visit the bakery next time in New York.

My Passion is Ice Cream

Jun 03, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Review

Hello.jpg

I love ice cream (don't we all?). But I also love making it to my own taste and texture. As many of you know, I am working on an ice cream book which is about two years from publication. In the process of researching ideas I have just discovered a recently published book that has really impressed me. Hello, My Name Is Ice Cream, is written by Dana Cree, a pastry chef at Publican in Chicago.


Pastry-Chef-Dana-Cree2-413x620.jpg


Dana gracefully rides the cusp of hardcore scientist and fun filled best friend. And dear to my precision loving heart each ingredient is listed with its percentage of the entire base and under it is first the weight in grams and then the volume. How could I not feel right at home with this book!

Dana has addressed the great nemesis of homemade ice cream: iciness. Each recipe offers a choice of 4 different "texture agents" from commercial to cornstarch. They are numbered at the bottom of the page and the number and technique corresponds to where it appears in the recipe. This is design brilliance at its best and reflects the approach of a brilliant and original author.

In the front section of the book, Dana explains why the volume often does not correlate with the gram weight by saying: they are not direct conversions of each other; it didn't make sense to end up with wonky things like "1 cup minus a tablespoon plus a quarter teaspoon. I balanced each recipe within its own discipline....If you want the nuanced textures as I designed them, use a scale and measure your ingredients in grams. Otherwise stick with cups and spoons, which are a little more approximate. The ice cream will be no less delicious, just a touch less perfectly textured.

In a phone conversation, Dana told me that all the recipes were tested both by weight and by volume.

The first recipe I have tried from the book is the banana ice cream. The technique of infusing the very ripe (read blackened) banana in the dairy mixture intrigued me. On my first try, the flavor was blissfully pure banana but the texture was icy--my fault--I thought I could get away without a texturing agent. Dana recommended the cornstarch slurry "texture agent" to bind up some of the water, advising that if that didn't work fully to my satisfaction, I should simmer the dairy mixture for 2 to 5 minutes before adding the cornstarch slurry (to evaporate the water that turns to ice crystals). Since I only had one more black banana at the ready I did both, which produced a beautifully thickened base and sure enough--dense and creamy with not a trace of iciness. (My middle name is concentrating juices so why didn't I think of that?!)

BananaIceCream.jpg

I thought I knew all about ice cream, having included many recipes in several of my books. In recent years I've added the technique of using glucose syrup for smoother texture, as does Dana. But reading this book is an exciting new frontier to explore and I'm so glad I was introduced to it before finishing my own book on the subject. I also am pleased to know of a colleague who is so delightfully talented, devoted to the success of the home baker as well as the professional, and feel like I've found a new and treasured kindred spirit and friend.

Hello, My Name Is Ice Cream: The Art and Science of the Scoop

Bull's Eye: My New Fagor Induction Portable Burner and Anolon Skillet!

May 13, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Equipment

FAGOR.jpg

I entered a contest on Bonnie Tandy LeBlang's uber informative website Bite of the Best. (She regularly runs contests for equipment and anyone can enter.) In order to enter, it was required to write how the induction burner would be used. My entry stated that it would be ideal for making lemon curd, without having to use a double boiler, because it controls the heat so evenly and the sides of the pan don't heat nearly as much.

For many months, I read emails of other entries saying they would use it for stir frying and other more commonly used techniques in cooking, so I thought I didn't stand much of a chance with my more esoteric lemon curd idea. But low and behold, and to my delight, my entry was the winner!

This cooktop is so well designed and easy to use. One can select a specific temperature, or press one of the buttons to choose equally precise and intuitive settings such as simmer, boil, rapid boil, sear, brown, or stir fry and the corresponding temperature will appear on the readout. And when changing settings it responds instantly.

15" Induction Cooktop with 1 Burner Finish: Desert Sand

I'm using the Fagor induction burner for a lot more than an occasional lemon curd. For example, it makes a perfect over easy egg in my new Analon Nouvelle Copper pan. Not only is the pan induction friendly, it has a copper core, is nonstick, even can be used with metal utensils, and is oven safe up to 500°F/260°C. This 8.5 inch french style skillet will be my go to every day pan for small items. I am tempted to get the 10 inch one as well!

Anolon 82525 Nouvelle Copper Hard Anodized Nonstick Open Skillets, 8-Inch and 10-Inch, Twin Pack

Baking Basics Production Phase 8: Beauty Photo Shoot

May 06, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Production


1.jpg

Research
In late January, we met with our photographer, Matthew Septimus, at the ICC (International Culinary Center) library in New York City to do research for our style/beauty shots sessions in April. Librarian, Sara Quiroz, made us feel at home, helping us find various books and magazines to flip through for inspiration and ideas for composition. Matthew photographed them for reference and also sent them to my editor Stephanie Fletcher for our upcoming conference call.

2.jpg

In 2013, we had the good fortune to have had my dear friend Caitlin Williams Freeman come from the West coast to style The Baking Bible, but that was not a possibility for this upcoming book because now she has two children under the age of two. Erin McDowel had been assistant to Caitlin, for The Baking Bible, which gave me the opportunity to see from her baking know-how and her artistry in styling that she would be perfect for this book. Then a series of synchronous events unfolded. Erin has become a much in demand stylist for publications and companies including Food 52 and King Arthur Flour. She is currently finishing up on her first book: The Fearless Baker, with the same publishing house as mine: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. The day on which she asked me if I would consider writing the foreword for her book was the very day on which I asked her if she would consider being the stylist for mine. It is hard to measure which one of us was more delighted!

The Fearless Baker: Simple Secrets for Baking Like a Pro

While our baking kitchen in Hope, New Jersey, served as the ideal place for the step-by-steps photos, it would not work ideally for the style/beauty shots sessions as it was mutually agreed upon that most of the shots should be done with natural light. Erin came up with the perfect location: The Prop Workshop in the Flatiron district of Manhattan, New York. The workshop's studio had plenty of sunlight filled floor space for Matthew and his assistant, Pedro Espinoza, to set up the photography stage, and for Erin to have access to hundreds of props and table space to do her styling craft.

3B.jpg

4.jpg

9B.jpg

9D.jpg

The kitchen area provided space for Woody and Erin's, assistant Katie Wayne, to prep and make our selected full-page "beauty shots" recipes.

5.jpg

The Prop Workshop also has a huge showroom with thousands of props, surfaces, and equipment for rent, just a hallway away.

Erin and I put together a schedule of our selected recipes for the intense 4 days of photography. First day was to start with made ahead recipes. The corn muffins was the first recipe to be styled and photographed. To aid Erin and Matthew in composition ideas, Matthew made prints from our step-by-step final step photos for all of us to reference.

6.jpg

Following the corn muffins, was our latest addition to the book, the Japanese Milk Bread, which I had made the day before. We also had several recipe shots to include me in the shot as well as possible front and back covers tries.

8.jpg

The scheduling worked smoothly. Woody and Katie managed to make styling perfect recipes on their first tries. My editor, Stephanie, came on the second day and was so pleased with the beauty shots, she felt free to leave us to our own devices for the rest of the shoot and loved the results!

Several things differed from our last experience in relatively remote upstate New York, for The Baking Bible shoot. In addition to the team being able to take home baked goodies each night, any remaining ones went over to The Prop Workshop showroom for their staff and customers. And if we needed something which we hadn't thought to bring, it was easily acquired within a few block's reach. As chief stylist, Erin didn't have time to make her fabulous lunches, but she came through with great take out choices, plus we enjoyed dinners with friends at some of Manhattan's finest restaurants.

Our final day included Matthew's daughter Nora, coming to the studio for her school's "invite your child to work day." Along with taking possible portrait shots of me, Nora was happy to be the photographer for our team RoseWood and company shot.

Rose_Portrait_0298.jpg

During the rare 'down times' while Matthew and Pedro were waiting for the next competed recipe to photograph, Matthew and I were able to edit down the possible selects from which to choose the final photos to portray our recipes. Matthew gave us prints of the best, which now don several of my baking library's shelves.

June LeBell--The Loss of a Treasured Friend

May 01, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Special Stories 2017

FullSizeRender.jpg

JUNE & ROSY--(not named after me)

June died yesterday with the same grace with which she lived. Her last words to her many friends, fans, and family were to comfort all of us: I am calm and at peace. Her last words sent to me were: I cherish our friendship. Music, food and just plain love. Thank you my friend.

June died the day after her birthday and the day before her 8th wedding anniversary to Ed Alley. I'll always remember the day I was on a help line for my computer, waiting for a response from the slow typist on the other end, when I chanced to see an email from June saying: Big News! Then, with great joy, I saw the rest: I got married! This was June's first marriage and she had waited almost a lifetime to find the love of her life. I was so happy for her I 'screamed' onto the computer: June LeBell is married! The tech on the other end responded with: That's wonderful! To this day I'm not sure if he even knew who she was but very likely he did, based on his response and also on June's 'visibility.' June was the first female announcer on WQXR--a career which spanned almost 30 years. Her exquisite voice, knowledge of music, and sense of humor delighted millions of listeners. I'm surprised that there is no obit in The New York Times (WQXR was the radio station of The New York Times.) Maybe it will come. (It did--3-2-17!)

Here is the introduction to her first and only book, The Kitchen Classics. June had asked me to write the intro to the dessert chapter, saying that Julia Child was writing the intro to the savory one. But when Julia heard I was writing the one for the dessert chapter she said: "Rose knows you so much better; let her do the whole thing." Thank you Julia! Until I wrote it I had no idea how very much I had to say--how deep was my music background, and my friendship with June.

Continue reading "June LeBell--The Loss of a Treasured Friend" »

Shortbread for Mother's Day

Apr 29, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Recipes

IMG_6832.jpg

Many years ago, I fell in love with shortbread cookies and decided to sell them. My stepdaughter Beth, who has great artistic talent, and is now an architect, made this sign which I put up in the basement of our apartment house. I only ever got one order. I brought a sample to Georgia DeLucca of Dean & Delucca and his verdict was: "Did you ever try Danish Lurpack butter? It needs salt." I strongly disagreed. Loving salt though I do, this one cookie, which has only butter, sugar, and flour, is the soul of purity and needs nothing more. (I did manage to suspend disbelief and tried the Lurpack butter, but even one grain of salt stood out in an unpleasant way.

Thus ended my career as a cookie baking saleswoman and I went on to write The Cake Bible, and then Rose's Christmas Cookies, in which this recipe resides.

I tried many different types of flours and sugars including part rice flour, which adds crispness, but bleached all-purpose flour is my favorite for this cookie.

Scottish Shortbread Cookies

Makes: 4 dozen 1-1/2 inch cookies

Equipment: cookie sheets, no preparation needed

unsalted butter: 284 grams/10 ounces
powdered sugar: 28 grams/1/4 cup lightly spooned into cup and leveled off
granulated sugar: 50 grams: 1/4 cup
bleached all-purpose flour: 362 grams/3 cups, lightly spooned into cup and leveled off

Cut the butter into 1/2 to 1 inch cubes. Wrap it, and refrigerate.

In a food processor, process the sugars for about 1 minute until the sugar is very fine. Add the butter and pulse until the sugar disappears. Add the flour and pulse until there are a lot of moist, crumbly little pieces and no dry flour particles remain.

Empty the mixture into a plastic bag and press it together. Remove the dough and knead it lightly until it holds together.

Set 2 oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Preheat the oven to 275°F/135°C.

Measure 2 level teaspoons or 1 scant tablespoon of the dough and knead each piece by flattening it between your palms and then rolling it into a 1 inch ball.

Place each ball on the cookie sheets, flattening it with a cookie press, fork, or the bottom a tumbler, lightly moistened with water. Work with one ball at a time, right after rolling it, so that it does not crack around the edges. Leave about 1 inch between the flattened cookies.

Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until pale golden (do not brown). For even baking, rotate the cookie sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through the baking period.
Use a small angled metal spatula or pancake turner to transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool completely.

Rose's Chocolate Baking Essentials on Craftsy

EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Sign up for Rose's newsletter, a once-a-month mouthwatering treat!

DATE ARCHIVE

Featured on finecooking.com