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Product Line: Rose Levy Bakeware

Oct 15, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

I'm pleased to announce my association with Harold Import Company. Harold Import is distributing my new line called Rose Levy Bakeware™.

Rose Levy Bakeware™ represents my vision for the ideal bakeware that has been brewing in my imagination for years. I'm proud to offer these new design concepts for you to enjoy in your home.

Rose's Perfect Pie Plate
Rose's Perfect Pie Plate is the first product to be developed and I am very proud of it. It has a deeply scalloped border which effortlessly creates a beautiful crimped crust. Also available is Rose's Sweetheart Crème Brulée. Recipes for my favorite pie crust and three variations of crème brulée are below.

If you are a member of the trade, please contact Harold Import. If you are a consumer, look for Rose Levy Bakeware™ at fine kitchen and gourmet food stores near you. It is also available on line at CyberPantry.com, Fantes.com, and LaPrimaShops.com

ROSE LEVY BERANBAUM'S PIE CRUST RECIPE
Adapted from the Pie and Pastry Bible, Scribner, 1998

Dear Fellow Pie Baker,
I've devoted my life to baking pies and other sweet treats. When baking pies, it always frustrated me that I could not find a pie plate that really worked for me, so I decided to make my own. One of my biggest problems was to make a nice decorative border that held up well during baking. And you can see, the border of this pie plate is fluted which provides a mold for you to press in the dough to make an effortless beautifully scalloped border. Another challenge has been achieving a crisp bottom crust. The dark rose shade of my porcelain pie plate draws in and absorbs the heat evenly to create a crisper crust.
This perfect pie plate will make a pie that you will be proud of and your family and friends will love.

Flaky & Tender Pie Crust for a Single Crust Pie
8 Tablespoons/4 ounces frozen unsalted butter, 1/2 inch cubes
1 1/3 cups/6.5 ounces bleached-all purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 baking powder (preferably Rumford)
3 ounce package chilled cream cheese, cut in 4
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
2 teaspoons cider vinegar

Flaky & Tender Pie Crust for a Double Crust Pie
12 Tablespoons/6 ounces frozen unsalted butter, 1/2 inch cubes
2 cups/10 ounces bleached-all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 baking powder (preferably Rumford)
1/2 cup/4.5 ounces chilled cream cheese, cut in 4
3 Tablespoons heavy cream
1 Tablespoon cider vinegar

Make the Dough
1) Process flour, salt, and baking powder for a few seconds to blend.
2) Add cream cheese and process for 30 seconds until coarse meal.
3) Pulse in frozen butter cubes until peanut size.
4) Add cream and vinegar and pulse until butter is the size of small peas.
5) Scrape dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Cover hands with plastic bags or use latex gloves and press dough with your knuckles and heels of your hands, until it holds together in one smooth flat disc. (Do only half the mixture at a time for a double crust pie).
6) Wrap dough, and refrigerate 45 minutes before rolling.

Roll the Dough
1) Use a pastry cloth and rolling pin sleeve, both rubbed with flour or flour both sides of the dough and roll between overlapping sheets of plastic wrap, to about 1/8 inch thick.

2) For a single crust pie cut out a 14 to 15 inch disc of dough. For a double crust pie cut out a 12 inch disc (keep the other half of the dough chilled until 10 minutes before rolling).

3) Reroll any scraps by overlapping them and rolling between pieces of plastic wrap. Freeze for future use.

Line the Pie Plate

1) Transfer the dough to the pie plate by dusting it lightly with flour and folding it in quarters. Unfold and ease it into the pie plate.

2) For a single crust pie, tuck under the excess dough and press it into the fluted edges of pan to extend a little past the edge as the dough will shrink in slightly during baking. For a double crust pie, using scissors or a sharp knife, trim the excess dough to be flush with the edge of the plate.

3) Cover it loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 1 up to 24 hours. (For a double crust pie, refrigerate it until ready to fill the pie.)

The Prebaked Single Crust Pie Shell

1) Preheat the oven to 425°F. at least 20 minutes before baking time

2) Line the pastry with a large coffee urn filter or parchment, pleating it as necessary so it fits into the pan and fill it with dried beans or peas. Bake 20 minutes and lift out the beans with the parchment. With a fork, prick the bottom and sides and bake about 5 minutes more or until the crust is pale golden. Check after 3 minutes and prick any bubbles that may have formed.

Remove the pie plate to a rack. For an extra crisp crust, while the crust is still hot, brush the bottom and sides with about 1 tablespoon of lightly beaten egg white. Allow it to cool complete before filling with the pie filling of your choice.

The Double Crust Pie

This standard size 4 cup volume pie plate can accommodate anywhere from 3 1/2 to 8 cups of filling. The larger amount will mound above the sides of the plate and will require you to roll a larger piece of dough to cover it.

To determine the size of the upper crust: After filling the pie, take a tape measure and measure from one edge of the plate to the other. Then add 1 1/2 inches to have enough dough to tuck under the bottom crust. (You will need a disc 12 and 13 inches in diameter)

Lightly brush the bottom of the pie shell with water. Unfold the dough for the upper crust over the filling and tuck it under the bottom edge of the dough. Press it firmly into the fluted border of the plate to extend slightly paste the edge. Cut a steam vent or vents into the crust.

For the best shape and texture, cover the pie with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 1 hour up to 8 hours. (You can freeze the pie and bake it from the frozen state, but will need to bake at a lower 400°F. add an extra 30 to 45 minutes of baking time, depending on the amount of filling.)

When ready to bake the pie, protect the decorative border with a foil band cut from a
large circle of foil.

Preheat the oven to 425°F. at least 20 minutes before baking time. Set the oven rack at lowest level and place a baking stone or baking sheet on it before preheating. Place a large piece of greased foil on top to catch any juices

Most pies with 4 cups of filling take 30 to 40 minutes to bake. Pies with 8 cups of filling can take an hour or more. Be sure that the juices are bubbling thickly through the steam vent. An instant read thermometer will be 212°F.

Note: If the top of the pie starts to get too brown, either reduce the oven heat to 400°F., or tent it loosely with foil.


Sweetheart Classic Crème Brulée
Serves: 4

The Custard
1/2 a vanilla bean, split lengthwise
2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

The Brulée
2 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons light brown sugar, preferably Muscovado or superfine granulated sugar

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a fine strainer, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the vanilla bean and sugar and using your fingers, rub the seeds into the sugar. Remove and reserve the pods. (If not using the vanilla bean double the vanilla extract.) Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

2) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream, milk and vanilla pods to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture and vanilla pod, stirring constantly.

3) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into the strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract. At this point the mixture can be cooled and refrigerated for up to 24 hours or it can be poured into the molds.

4) Preheat the oven to 325°F. at least 20 minutes before baking.
Carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come about half way up the sides of the molds. Set the pan in the oven and bake for about 20 minutes until the crème shimmies like soft jelly when shaken and a knife inserted into the center comes out almost clean. (Temperature is 175 to 180°F.) Place the baking pan on a rack and allow to cool completely. The molds can be removed as soon as the water is cool enough to lift them out. Refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours.

5) Shortly before serving make the brulée. The ideal method of caramelizing the sugar topping is with a small torch as it doesn't heat the filling. Alternatively, preheat the broiler.
Press the sugar through a sieve allowing it to drop onto the cooled custards. Gently spread it to make an even surface.
If using a small propane torch, hold it a few inches above the sugar topping and wave it back and forth until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Serve at once or hold at room temperature up to 3 hours.
If using a broiler, set the sugar topped crème molds on a baking sheet and place 2 to 3 inches from the broiler. Watch carefully to avoid burning and broil for about 3 minutes or until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Chill for about 10 minutes.

Sweetheart Chocolate Crème Brulée
Serves: 4
The Custard
1-1/2 ounces of fine quality bittersweet chocolate (preferably 60% cocoa mass)
1/2 a vanilla bean, split lengthwise
2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

The Brulée
2 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons light brown sugar, preferably Muscovado or superfine granulated sugar

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a fine strainer, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) Chop or grate the chocolate and set it aside.

2) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the vanilla bean and sugar and using your fingers, rub the seeds into the sugar. Remove and reserve the pods. (If not using the vanilla bean double the vanilla extract.) Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

3) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream, milk and vanilla pods to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture and vanilla pod, stirring constantly.

4) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and add the grated chocolate. Stir constantly until melted, and then at once pour into the strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract and pour into the molds.

5) Preheat the oven to 325°F. at least 20 minutes before baking.
Carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come about half way up the sides of the molds. Set the pan in the oven and bake for about 20 minutes until the crème shimmies very slightly when shaken and a knife inserted into the center comes out almost clean. (Temperature is 175 to 180°F.) Place the baking pan on a rack and allow to cool completely. The molds can be removed as soon as the water is cool enough to lift them out. Do not refrigerate.

6) Shortly before serving make the brulée. The ideal method of caramelizing the sugar topping is with a small torch as it doesn't heat the filling. Alternatively, preheat the broiler.
Press the sugar through a sieve allowing it to drop onto the cooled custards. Gently spread it to make an even surface.
If using a small propane torch, hold it a few inches above the sugar topping and wave it back and forth until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Serve at once or hold at room temperature up to 3 hours.
If using a broiler, set the sugar topped crème molds on a baking sheet and place 2 to 3 inches from the broiler. Watch carefully to avoid burning and broil for about 3 minutes or until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Chill for about 10 minutes.

Sweetheart Coffee Crisp Brulée
Serves: 4

The Custard
2 Tablespoons finely ground coffee (from freshly roasted beans)
2 Tablespoons sugar, preferably Turbinado
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a strainer lined with cheesecloth, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the ground coffee and sugar. Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

2) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream and milk to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture stirring constantly.

3) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into the cheesecloth-lined strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract. At this point the mixture can be cooled and refrigerated for up to 24 hours or it can be poured into the molds.

Puff Pastry Crisp Brulée
Glossy caramel-glazed puff pastry hearts are an exquisite and innovative way to get a brulée topping without having to use a torch or a broiler. Store-bought frozen puff pastry makes it quick and easy!

A half package of frozen puff pastry sheets, thawed at room temperature for 30 minutes.
2 rounded Tablespoons superfine sugar

Dust the work surface with 1 rounded tablespoon of the superfine sugar. Set the puff pastry on top and dust the remaining sugar evenly on top.
Cover it with a piece of plastic wrap and with a rolling pin, roll lightly over it so that the sugar will adhere to the pastry.
Wrap the pastry in plastic wrap and chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F.

Set a piece of plastic wrap on the counter and place the pastry on top. Using the medium-size heart cutter, cut out 9 hearts. Set them about 1 inch apart on a baking sheet and bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown.

Lift each pastry heart onto a rack, and cool completely. Then, using a serrated knife, split each in half horizontally to form 18 hearts.

Use 8 of the beautiful top halves to garnish the 4 crèmes. Place 2 hearts on each. Serve the remaining pastry hearts on the side.

Tips:
♥ If using a vanilla bean, after making the crème, remove the vanilla pod and rinse and dry it thoroughly and bury it in sugar to make vanilla sugar.
♥ You can cover the custards before refrigerating them but be careful not to allow plastic wrap to disturb the 'skin' on the surface as it makes a crisper brulée.
♥ To make superfine sugar, simply process granulated sugar for a few minutes in a food processor.
♥ To Store: Although best eaten right after caramelizing the topping, the finished crème brulée can be refrigerated overnight and allowed to come to room temperature for about 30 minutes. In some refrigerators the caramel will retain its hard texture but in a high-humidity refrigerator it will liquefy.

Comments

Hi, you have some interesting products, but I was wondering, where are most of them made? It is very hard to find baking products made in usa, but is it safe to use baking products from most countrys overseas? Most of the baking products I have are fro restaurant supply places and mostvare made in china some are made in usa. I guess as long as they are made by a reputable country they shoukd be okay.

REPLY

HI Rose,
The manufacturer is not making the pie plate with the pie recipe on the face of the plate. The new ones come with a recipe booklet. You may want to check eBay.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Rose Wilkinson
Rose Wilkinson
12/20/2013 02:25 PM

Do you still sell rose's perfect pie plate with the recipe in the face of the plate? Rose's Perfect Pie Crust? Mine was a gift.... Someone chipped it recently and would love to find another.... Rose too...

REPLY

Rose Wilkinson
Rose Wilkinson
12/20/2013 02:24 PM

Do you still sell rose's perfect pie plate with the recipe in the face of the plate? Rose's Perfect Pie Crust? Mine was a gift.... Someone chipped it recently and would love to find another.... Rose too...

REPLY

Rose levy beranbaum
Rose levy beranbaum in reply to comment from Joyce R. Masso
02/ 9/2013 05:13 PM

Hi Joyce. Hope you enjoy the pie plates. My recipe for strawberry rhubarb pie is in the pastry bible. Basically I use fresh berries and don't cook them.

REPLY

Joyce R. Masso
Joyce R. Masso
02/ 9/2013 03:37 PM

I just received your 9" ceramic pieplate RL3 and the mini [ie pan set. You mentioned you had a favorite strawberry rhubarb pie. I have tried to find it on your web site but cannot. Is it possible to get it? I have my own but would like to try yours. Thanks Joyce Masso

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Nancy
12/20/2010 10:08 PM

nancy, there is no need to use a stone for baking cookies. the purpuse of stone is to transmit heat and to retain heat when opening the oven door so that the oven temperature doesn't drop. i would bake pies and bread in their pans directly on the stone. free form breads can be set on parchment and then on the stone or bottoms floured and set directly on the stone.

no preparation is needed for the stone, i leave mine in the oven at all times.

REPLY

I recently purchased a baking stone to bake pies and cookies. Does the stone need any preparation before baking cookies? The recipe for the cookies states ungreased pan, should the stone be greased and should it be hot before putting the cookies on it?
As you can tell I am completely in the dark when it comes to baking stones.
Thank you
Nancy

REPLY

Olawale Taiwo
Olawale Taiwo
10/22/2010 06:27 AM

Hello Rose,

How can one increase the sweetness of a cake. Is it necessary to add a sweetener?

sometimes I decrease the content of my sugar in cakes and substitute it with milk, because too much sugar mite make the cake foam. Is there another way to keep the sugar content high or better still the sweetness content.

REPLY

thanks so much, i have been inspired by you today. i hope to get Heavenly cakes as well.
u are truly a teacher of virtues.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Olawale Taiwo
10/20/2010 09:43 AM

you won't be confused when you get the book. it is very detailed and you will have many choices which are all "the best" because that's all i put in the book!

REPLY

Hello, rose

thanks for your prompt reply. I cant wait to lay my hands on the Cake Bible.

I am bit confused. which is the best buttercream recipe. I saw some with egg whites, some cream of tartar. I use cream of tartar for royal icings only.
What would you recommend. Also, am using margarine for buttercream, may be i will make it 70% margarine and 30% crisco shortening.

If I had a butter flavor to the cake recipe, i guess it will give the impression of a butter taste?

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
10/20/2010 07:25 AM

also, keep in mind that butter is only about 81% fat and crisco is 100%. a cup of butter weighs 227 grams and a cup of crisco weighs only 191 so if you're subbing crisco for butter use only about 0.8%. if the cake is too tender you could try adding a little extra liquid to compensate for the 1.5% water that would be in the butter

margarine shouldn't be a problem as it's formulated to have a similar fat to liquid content as butter but of course it lacks the flavor.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Olawale Taiwo
10/20/2010 07:13 AM

olawaiie, i think the texture will be great and the flavor lacking. you should probably add a little more vanilla to try to boost it.

REPLY

Olawale Taiwo
Olawale Taiwo
10/20/2010 05:41 AM

Hello Rose,

I just ordered for the Cake Book, I hope it has contents on using margarine instead of butter.

Here in Nigeria, the baking butter we have is Margarine it comes in 10kg buckets. My concern is, I want to mix margarine and crisco vegetable shortening together to get that moist textures and flavorful cake. What do you think the result will be, based on the cell structures of the cakes. Am thinking of using this techniques for all my cakes and some of your recipes. Do you think there is something I need to know.

Thanks for the reply.

Wale

REPLY

mia, so glad you are looking for rose's creme brulee set, they are great. i use mine's all the time to bake mini tarts, mini cakes, or as shallow ramekins.

i love the fact that the bottoms (undersides) are flat and unglazed, which is what i sought after for any ceramic pie plate as it conducts bottom heat much better. many ceramic pie plates nowadays have glazed bottoms, or little leg pegs, which makes contact with bottom heat slower.

happy baking. /H

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mia
07/27/2010 11:30 PM

Thank you mia for calling this to my attention. Although I'm on vacation and not on my computer I will try to update this posting from my iPad if possible. I have already contacted Harold imports and was informed that they are no longer being packaged with the cookie cutter, recipe booklet, or in the gift box.

I see that amazon has not updated this info on their description of the item.

The cookie cutter is not important but the recipes I offered with the ramekins are really worth having! Here they are now!

Sweetheart Classic Crème Brulée
Serves: 4

The Custard
1/2 a vanilla bean, split lengthwise
2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

The Brulée
2 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons light brown sugar, preferably Muscovado or superfine granulated sugar

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a fine strainer, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the vanilla bean and sugar and using your fingers, rub the seeds into the sugar. Remove and reserve the pods. (If not using the vanilla bean double the vanilla extract.) Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

2) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream, milk and vanilla pods to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture and vanilla pod, stirring constantly.

3) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into the strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract. At this point the mixture can be cooled and refrigerated for up to 24 hours or it can be poured into the molds.

4) Preheat the oven to 325°F. at least 20 minutes before baking.
Carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come about half way up the sides of the molds. Set the pan in the oven and bake for about 20 minutes until the crème shimmies like soft jelly when shaken and a knife inserted into the center comes out almost clean. (Temperature is 175 to 180°F.) Place the baking pan on a rack and allow to cool completely. The molds can be removed as soon as the water is cool enough to lift them out. Refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours.

5) Shortly before serving make the brulée. The ideal method of caramelizing the sugar topping is with a small torch as it doesn’t heat the filling. Alternatively, preheat the broiler.
Press the sugar through a sieve allowing it to drop onto the cooled custards. Gently spread it to make an even surface.
If using a small propane torch, hold it a few inches above the sugar topping and wave it back and forth until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Serve at once or hold at room temperature up to 3 hours.
If using a broiler, set the sugar topped crème molds on a baking sheet and place 2 to 3 inches from the broiler. Watch carefully to avoid burning and broil for about 3 minutes or until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Chill for about 10 minutes.

Sweetheart Chocolate Crème Brulée
Serves: 4
The Custard
1-1/2 ounces of fine quality bittersweet chocolate (preferably 60% cocoa mass)
1/2 a vanilla bean, split lengthwise
2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

The Brulée
2 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons light brown sugar, preferably Muscovado or superfine granulated sugar

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a fine strainer, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) Chop or grate the chocolate and set it aside.

2) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the vanilla bean and sugar and using your fingers, rub the seeds into the sugar. Remove and reserve the pods. (If not using the vanilla bean double the vanilla extract.) Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

3) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream, milk and vanilla pods to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture and vanilla pod, stirring constantly.

4) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and add the grated chocolate. Stir constantly until melted, and then at once pour into the strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract and pour into the molds.

5) Preheat the oven to 325°F. at least 20 minutes before baking.
Carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come about half way up the sides of the molds. Set the pan in the oven and bake for about 20 minutes until the crème shimmies very slightly when shaken and a knife inserted into the center comes out almost clean. (Temperature is 175 to 180°F.) Place the baking pan on a rack and allow to cool completely. The molds can be removed as soon as the water is cool enough to lift them out. Do not refrigerate.

6) Shortly before serving make the brulée. The ideal method of caramelizing the sugar topping is with a small torch as it doesn’t heat the filling. Alternatively, preheat the broiler.
Press the sugar through a sieve allowing it to drop onto the cooled custards. Gently spread it to make an even surface.
If using a small propane torch, hold it a few inches above the sugar topping and wave it back and forth until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Serve at once or hold at room temperature up to 3 hours.
If using a broiler, set the sugar topped crème molds on a baking sheet and place 2 to 3 inches from the broiler. Watch carefully to avoid burning and broil for about 3 minutes or until the sugar is melted, bubbling, and deep brown. Chill for about 10 minutes.

Sweetheart Coffee Crisp Brulée
Serves: 4

The Custard
2 Tablespoons finely ground coffee (from freshly roasted beans)
2 Tablespoons sugar, preferably Turbinado
3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Equipment: 4 heart-shaped ceramic crème brulée molds set in a small baking pan; a strainer lined with cheesecloth, set over a large measuring cup or bowl

1) In a heavy non-reactive saucepan, place the ground coffee and sugar. Stir the yolks into the sugar until well blended, using a wooden spoon.

2) In another small saucepan (or heatproof glass measure if using a microwave on high power) heat the cream and milk to the boiling point. Stir a few tablespoons into the yolk mixture; then gradually add the remaining cream mixture stirring constantly.

3) Heat the mixture to just before the boiling point (180°F.). Steam will begin to appear and the mixture will be slightly thicker than heavy cream. It will leave a well-defined track when a finger is run across the back of a spoon. Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into the cheesecloth-lined strainer, scrapping up the thickened cream that settles on the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vanilla extract. At this point the mixture can be cooled and refrigerated for up to 24 hours or it can be poured into the molds.

Puff Pastry Crisp Brulée
Glossy caramel-glazed puff pastry hearts are an exquisite and innovative way to get a brulée topping without having to use a torch or a broiler. Store-bought frozen puff pastry makes it quick and easy!

A half package of frozen puff pastry sheets, thawed at room temperature for 30 minutes.
2 rounded Tablespoons superfine sugar

Dust the work surface with 1 rounded tablespoon of the superfine sugar. Set the puff pastry on top and dust the remaining sugar evenly on top.
Cover it with a piece of plastic wrap and with a rolling pin, roll lightly over it so that the sugar will adhere to the pastry.
Wrap the pastry in plastic wrap and chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F.

Set a piece of plastic wrap on the counter and place the pastry on top. Using the medium-size heart cutter, cut out 9 hearts. Set them about 1 inch apart on a baking sheet and bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown.

Lift each pastry heart onto a rack, and cool completely. Then, using a serrated knife, split each in half horizontally to form 18 hearts.

Use 8 of the beautiful top halves to garnish the 4 crèmes. Place 2 hearts on each. Serve the remaining pastry hearts on the side.

Tips:
♥ If using a vanilla bean, after making the crème, remove the vanilla pod and rinse and dry it thoroughly and bury it in sugar to make vanilla sugar.
♥ You can cover the custards before refrigerating them but be careful not to allow plastic wrap to disturb the ‘skin’ on the surface as it makes a crisper brulée.
♥ To make superfine sugar, simply process granulated sugar for a few minutes in a food processor.
♥ To Store: Although best eaten right after caramelizing the topping, the finished crème brulée can be refrigerated overnight and allowed to come to room temperature for about 30 minutes. In some refrigerators the caramel will retain its hard texture but in a high-humidity refrigerator it will liquefy.

REPLY

Hi,

Im Mia ,from India!
I love ur whole range of products and was thrilled to have shopyourworld.com In India a bit back , coz they make ordering from Amazon a dream!
So thru shopyourworld.com i ordered my first set of Creme brulee sweet heart molds with CC cutter and recipe booklet , well one came broken and without the recipe booklet and cookie cutter.
[thru amazon @ hic]
i pay almost the amount of the product or more for shipping , but thanxx to the shopyourworld gaurentee they ordered for another set ,and to my utter dissappointment this too came with out a cookie cutter and booklet ,i was so looking foward too!

And it came better packed then the first time but not in a gift packed box!

I a very suprised that HIC that sells thru amazon can dissappoint so so muc!

I order thru shopyourworld.com from amazon , coz they do look after all the customs and have excellent service too.'

Now the seller @ amazon wants us to send the creme brulee molds back to send the Cookie cutter and recipe booklet, can u beat that?
send it back from India to the US?
and if they dont pack it well , we'll have breakages again and will have to re order and twice over they have not gift packed nor send the CC nor recipe booklet.

I so want to order a few more cute , really fantastic items from ur product line , like the pie plate but i now wonder , if they will do the same with that too?

i am writing assured that u will take this up and solve this matter !

thanking u , 'warmest regards,
Mia S Rose.

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The financier mold is called "mini cake pan", and is for sale on Amazon.

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elaine clarke
elaine clarke
01/12/2010 01:06 PM

I am having difficulty locating an outlet for the Lekue Financier molds. Harold Imports is wholesale and I am one person. Do you know where I can buy the financier molds?

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Thanks, I ordered it. They seem to be on short supply, so if anyone wants one, you should probably go ahead and order it. I searched today, and the only result is 1 in stock for sale on amazon.

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I just wanted to double check before ordering--is the Lekue Mirage 9-inch La Bomba 6 cup capacity? and appropriate for Zach's La Bomba and perhaps the charlottes in the cake bible? I assume it is as it must have been part of the inspiration for the name of Zach's dessert, but I can't find any information about its capacity.

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thanks catalina--that's wonderful to know. i bet some of the germ still is in it which should add an interesting flavor!

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In response to the comment by Rose that whole grain flour will not behave like cake flour or a.p. flour: I have been baking with whole wheat flour almost 40 years. I have found that if I first sift the flour to remove the bran (saving the bran for the next loaf of home baked bread), it lightens the texture considerably. It still does not produce as light a cake as one made with cake flour, but it isn't bad. Some of my friends have been surprised to learn that my cakes are 100% whole wheat. Rose, your recipes adapt beautifully.

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i just want to add that there is no way a whole grain flour will behave like a cake flour or all purpose flour. the bran is like little knives cutting through the gluten so you will lose volume. but do try it--you may like the results. personally i don't so if you're curious do a side-by-side comparison.

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hopesews, if you are asking whether home ground wheat flour can be used as a substitute for heat-treated or bleached flour, I think the answer is probably no. Search the blog for "Kate Flour" for more on this.

If you are asking whether you can heat treat home ground flour, I think that would probably work.

In addition to heat treating, you would need to cut the flour with cornstarch to reduce the protein content (13% is very high for cake flour, which more like 8%).

You would also need to consider whether you can achieve a fine enough grind at home to come close to cake flour.

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I got a quick response from Wheat Montana. The content of their soft wheat is 13%.

Sorry, but I'm not sure where to ask this question. Should I do it in the forum, bread? I'm a newbie at this site. Thanks.

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Thank you, Rose & Hector for answering. I will take your advise and wait to see what Woody comes up with. I think I'll send off a message to the website where I bought it informing them of the problem. I bought a whole lot of Mirage pans, so they shouldn't have a problem with this return if the tests show that you can't make cheesecake in them. I very seldom make cakes, though after reading through this blog, I am tempted. I realize I need to purchase your books, Rose!! I do a lot of bread & hubby loves cookies.

Another ?. Has anyone tested home ground flour to see if it works as "Kate flour"? I have been grinding my own for years. Just wondering if someone has tried with soft (pastry) wheat. I'm not sure of the protien content, but it is Montana Wheat. I'll have to search to find out.
Thanks again for answering. And Woody, thank you for tackling this for me.

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the only way in which i use this silicone springform is to mold cakes such as the black forest cake that is in the frig right now at my father's request (who can refuse a dad for his 95th birthday). when i tried using this pan for cheesecake i found it took significantly more time, mostly because of the ceramic bottom. i did not, however, have the bottom drop out. the only reason i could imagine is the weight of the cheesecake and the propensity of silicone to expand during heating.
i have forwarded your posting to harold imports, the distributor of this pan, and personally, i recommend that if you aren't planning to use this pan for molding cakes that you return it to the place where you purchased it. it may be a defective one. meantime woody is planning to run a few tests using the pan so you may want to wait.

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oh dear, i have seen the lekue springform pans. it is a neat idea but somehow impractical and a unitasker. i find them a bit cumbersome to wash and maintain. now i prefer to use removable bottom metal pans lined with a silicone pan.

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I just bought Lekue springform pan and just made a Cheesecake. When I went to lift it out of the oven the silicone side came off! What happened? I can't find any info in searching on the web what caused the side to release with the pin still in. Any ideas? I really like the pan idea, but am perplexed as to the problem. Thanks.

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Kit, try search on the blog with the keywords jb prince balloon whisk, it is great to have for angel food and also for biscuit, genoie and chiffon.

also search for rose video, you ca watch Rose using her slotted skimmer on chiffon and on angel food.

the size and construction of either the whisk or the skimmer are important.

good luck.

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Please can someone help me find the "Angel Food Cake Folder" that Rose talks about in The Cake Bible. Pg 458. I have looked everywhere and it seems it is quite extinct. I could use the balloon whisk but I much rather use the other.

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www.lekueusa.com the site lists distributors!

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I saw in the Boston Herald, on Wednesday, December 12, an small article about the Lekue Silicone Financier Pan that you recommended. The paper said it can be found at amazon.com. I can not find it there at all. A google search turned up nothing, also. Do you know where I can find this pan???

Thank you for your help.

Sheila Thurman

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there is a possibility that king arthur will be carrying the cake strip. i'll be doing a posting soon with as much info. as i can get.

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Karen Levin
Karen Levin
11/11/2007 04:06 PM

Dear Rose,

I would like to know which stores may be carrying your products here in Canada? The business sites you listed do not ship to Canada. Will the Baker's Catalogue be carrying your line (they do ship to Canada).

I love this site, which I just found today. I have your books as well. Thank you.

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non-heavy duty aluminum foil works perfect for me, shinny side out (or dull side out if lightly greased).

heavy duty aluminum foil is too hard to peel off.

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p.s. great idea: use the non stick aluminum foil!

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brands have changed in 20 years but look for one that is a thin flexible sheet--i've seen them in beige and in white. the main thing is you don't want a stiff woven variety.

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Hi Rose,
I'd like to attempt making the caramel golden cage for the golden cage Zauber Torte from pg 172 in the Cake Bible. To make the golden cage, a non-stick liner is called for to cover a Kugelhupf pan (pg 313). Is there a non-stick liner you reccommend for this purpose?
Thanks!

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Thanks, Rose. Somehow, after it fell so much, I just knew that 350 would have been better for the cake - even tho it was light and airy. Glad to be reassured. You are such a patient and wonderful teacher. joan

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this is a very good question because theoretically a dark pan bakes faster and oven temp should be lowered 25 degrees but i've been using 350F for my chicago metallic pans and it works just fine! bottom line, if cakes are doming in a dark pan use the lower temp. if falling in the center higher temp.

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Dear Rose - Today I used my new Chicago Metallic 9x2 pans for the first time to make the Golden Butter Cream Cake. I set the oven for 325 as the pan instructions said. The cake rose to the top of the pan, almost began to leave the sides of the pan and I left it in a little longer even though I knew what you had said about that.. The cake, upon retrieving from the oven, fell to about what you had indicated, the sides came in a lot.
I still worried that it was underdone, but when we ate it, it was very lght and tender. I wanted to make the chocolate cream ganache, which came out perfectly, but I had to laugh when I ate it, knowing that you would be saying, "I told you so." It, indeed, was too much for this light and airy cake, even as delicious as the ganache was. Next time I will use Royal Honey Buttercream!
Q: Do you think it is wise to go by the instructions of Chicago Metallic, 25 degrees less than recipe, in this case 325, or just use 350? My oven is calibrated, even if it is an old electric, 20 years old. Thanks! joan

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thank you for sending this great photo. returning from vacation tomorrow--the nasft fancy food show at jacob javits is starting and my new product which you will adore is launching there. it probably won't be available for purchase til the fall but i'll see if i can get permission to post the photo next week! meantime stay tuned for an important posting that i'm about to do on cherry jam.

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it has something to do with the way in which silicone conducts more slowly. raising the oven temp. would not change this. but as i said, side by side the cake baked in silicone has a more delicious flavor and more even texture. really surprised me!

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Rose - why do cakes not bake as high in silicone pans... is it because they can't climb up the slippery pan sides very well?

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I use my Ruffoni copper fondue pot with the ceramic insert to temper chocolate, with the boiling water bath and chafing fuel. It works amazingly great.

The Lekue oven mitts are irresistible though.

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p.s. i may have mentioned this already on the blog so do a search but i love to use the slightly larger than 9 inch silicone pan instead of foil to keep water from seeping into a springform pan.
be sure to get the la bomba--it's ideal for melting chocolate-my fav. piece of silicone. also the popover pans are fantastic--i prefer the individual ones--and the mini cake pan that comes in a rectangle with 9 depressions--perfect for financiers and brownies. of course the glove pot holders and the spatulas are indispensible.

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no! the pan is not 9 inches--it is larger and since cakes don't bake quite as high in silicone pans you will get a significant decrease in volume. although i love the flavor and texture of a butter layer cake baked in a silicone pan my cakes and most others are designed for a true 9 x 2 pan therefore you would need to increase the batter and fill the pans between 1/2 and 2/3 full.

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put the word "thermometer" in the search box and you will get a huge amount of information i've already input on the blog!

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Rose, do you have any recommendations for a _really_ good candy thermometer? I've tried everything I've seen in the consumer market and haven't found anything I'm happy with. The little glass bulbs are hard to read. I have a Taylor that's on a stand, but if you're making a small amount of something (like your Sticky Bun caramel topping), it sits too high in the pan to measure accurately. Taylor's instant reads fluctuate a great deal. I've had a variey of thermometers and can't get any 2 to read the same at any point in time.

So I thought I'd ask if you knew of something that was reliable.

Thank you!

Beth

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all restaurant supply places have them. you could try googling to mail order or look in the yellow pages for restaurant supply places in your town.

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Where can I get dough containers? The site mentioned in your book does not work. Thanks Allen

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they are exactly the same except for the color.
by the way, the fluted tube pan makes the most velvety and moist chocolate cake but you need to bake it set on a rack on a sheet pan and allow it to cool completely still on the rack and sheet pan before unmolding it. i don't recommend this cake for yellow cakes however as the browning is uneven.

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Rose, I noticed on the web that the lékué silicone pans seem to come in two shades, red (professional line?) and blue. Are both lines made out of the same silicone material?

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mark,flexipan is not 100% silicone but also has fiberglass woven into it.
lékué is 100% silicone and in addition it is platinum silicone and has no odor.

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I was interested to read your comments on baking in silicone pans. I purchased a French-made Flexipan, and have baked several chocolate cakes in it. Each time, I can detect an unpleasant chemical taste in the final product.Is it just me who notices this? Would your silicone pans be different?

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I Have found the best place to find and buy wilton bakeware is at Bakewaredistributor. They have good prices and they can be found At

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Susan Field
Susan Field
08/16/2006 08:41 AM

I was making the ethereal pear charlotte from The Cake Bible and came to the part of the recipe where you have to cut the biscuit roulade into 2.5 inch strips. Rather than using a conventional ruler, I got out my quilting ruler and rotary cutter (like a pizza wheel, but the blade is a razor blade). The ruler is transparent, with markings every .25 inch, and it allows you to cut perfect strips of any width you like. I couldn't cut all the way through the biscuit because my rotary cutter didn't reach all the way through, but Olfa does make a jumbo cutter that would probably have done it. This is what I'm talking about: Rotary cutter: http://www.olfa.com/Products.asp?C=3&P=71
Ruler: http://www.save-on-crafts.com/om4x14rul899.html
You can also buy a rubber (well, sort of) mat that will stop you from blunting your blade or carving bits out of your countertop. There are many websites that give instructions on use, and all of them urgently recommend caution. These suckers are sharp, and you can take a finger end off without even trying. They will also carve bits out of your countertop if you're not careful. You can get them at craft stores like Rag Shop or pretty much any sewing store.

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i have not had much success making chiffon cakes in silicione tube pans. you do need to suspend it upside down but the flexibility of the tube thrusts it upward deforming the shape slightly and it does not unmold well.

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In baking a chiffon cake in a silicon tube pan, do you suspend the pan upside down on the neck of a bottle to cool, as you do with metal pans?

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