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Rose's Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust

Oct 28, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

cold

volume

ounces

grams

frozen unsalted butter, 1/2 inch cubes

8 tablespoons

4 ounces

113 grams

pastry flour (or bleached all purpose flour*)

1-1/3 cups + 4 teaspoon (or 1-1/3 cups)

6.5 ounces

184 grams

sea salt

1/8 teaspoon

-

-

baking powder (preferably Rumford or another non-aluminum variety)

1/8 teaspoon

-

-

cream cheese, cut into 4 pieces and chilled

1-3 ounce package

3 ounces

85 grams

heavy cream

2 tablespoons

-

-

cider vinegar

2 teaspoons

-

-

Food Processor Method

1) Process flour, salt, and baking powder to blend.
2) Add cream cheese and process until coarse.
3) Add butter cubes and pulse until peanut size.
4) Add cream and vinegar and pulse until butter is the size of small peas.
5) Scrape dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Use latex gloves or cover hands with plastic bags and press dough until it holds together in one smooth flat disc.
6) Wrap, and refrigerate 45 minutes before rolling.

Notes: Baking powder containing aluminum has a bitter flavor. Most health food stores and many supermarkets carry the calcium variety.You can eliminate the baking powder and double the salt but the crust will be less tender.

*If not using pastry flour to achieve the same tenderness use 2/3 bleached all-purpose flour and 1/3 cake flour

Comments

I watched a video on your perfect flaky pie crust.....but forgot to write down how much flour to use. The other ingredients are: a pinch of salt....1 stick of cold butter and ice water. But...how much flour do I use. thank you!

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I watched a video on your perfect flaky pie crust.....but forgot to write down how much flour to use. The other ingredients are: a pinch of salt....1 stick of cold butter and ice water. But...how much flour do I use. thank you!

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In order to effectively spin comments, you need to be creative and unique. Convince the creator that even though the comment is overly generic, it's still content they want posted on their page.

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Thank you for your kind words. I experimented for weeks before I plunged into the task. I loved your recipe as it worked every time.
I love your books and the way you explain the chemistry behind the interaction of various ingredients.
Reading so many books on baking, I am convinced nobody packs as much relevant information in their books as you do. I wanted to tell you (without sounding too pretentious) that there are a lot of us who appreciate.

Oh yes I can make the crusts even in my sleep. But too bad my arms fell off after I rolled the 149th crust. :)

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Wow suse! What a testament to both of us. The pie crust is essentially the same as the one in the pastry bible in a recent printing. I changed the water to cream and for the 5 ounce/145 gram formula i use 2 tablespoons of cream and 2 teaspoons of cider vinegar instead of 1-1/2 teaspoons listed in the current printing.

I bet you could do this recipe in your sleep now"

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Hello Rose,

Happy Thanksgiving to you and everyone else. I just wanted to say that over the last 3 weeks I made around 140 Flaky cream cheese pie crusts from the recipe in the Pie&Pastry Bible. I also made your peach, pecan, cherry and the pumpkin cheese cake (made the gingersnap cookies too).

The crusts did not shrink. I was a pie newbie when I took this task on. I am glad I went with the expert to get through this. Thank you very much.

Is this recipe similar except that heavy cream replaces water?

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Patsy, thx for reporting. I like how u describe it "it is crumbs coming out of the food processor...."

Many people miss that important detail. If it is a dough ball coming out of the food processor, flaky pie crust will not be flaky anymore.

It is the pockets of unmelted butter that creates the pockets of air on flaky pie crust.

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Have done this crust twice for the Designer Open Face Apple pie and it was great both times. When it comes out of the food processor, the dough is crumbs, but working it in the plastic bag (great directions in Rose's Pie and Pastry Bible) the crust pull together and later after chilling rolls out like a dream. Got rave reviews on this pie and crust, can't wait to try this version with the cream instead of water!

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Rose's Favorite Flaky and Tender Pie Crust" recipe doesn't specify what brand of cream cheese. I assume she's referring to the standard Philadelphia Cream Cheese. I've attempted the dough with other local brands of cream cheese including some organic cream cheeses.

I think I've noticed an effect similar to adding to much water to a pie dough and wonder if it's possible that the water content of cream cheese may vary.

Can you verify that it's Philadelphia Cream Cheese that is the standard in the recipe?

Thanks

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Hi Rose and Woody!

Cream cheese isn't an option here.

Is there anything I can substitute for it?

Have a Joyful Day :~D
Charlie

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Thank you Woody, then I will keep the food processor for pie crusts and other things but keep the stand mixer as well.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Krissy
12/12/2012 03:58 PM

Hi Krissy,
Rose has perfected this pie crust recipe to made in a food processor although most pie crust recipes can be made by hand mixing. We always recommend making a recipe to the author's instructions for equipment and ingredients. You can use the stand mixer and instructions for it's application is in The Pie & Pastry Bible. Enjoy your Kitchenaide as it has so many uses for baking and mixing.
Rose & Woody

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Actually I just realized for the stand mixer the only feature I have is the wire whip, flat beater, and dough hook, so all those could probably be used for mixing pie dough or cake (the other features are very pricey and my family gave me a hand pasta maker) so for mixing pie dough, would it be best to use that stand mixer, with those features, or is the food processor better? Is it worth having a food processor if I have the stand mixer with those three features?

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Hi, I had a quetion about what to use for the pie crust. I have found that I like mixing pie crusts with the food processor and have head great results. My fiance purchased a food processor for out apartment but recently my mom offered me her kitchen aide stand mixer, which I initially wanted just for the pasta and ravioli maker. However, I realized that it came with a feature for mixing cookies and dough, so was wondering,for pie crust is it better to use a stand mixer or a food processor or is that just a personal preferance. Also, is it beneficial, if I like to bake and cook a lot (and blend a lot of fruits and veggies and nuts for healthy recipes) to have both the kitchen aide stand mixer and a food processor or are both used interchangagly?

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ian, try using a pyrex pan so you can see how much the crust is darkening. start low in the oven and after about 20 minutes if it looks golden brown raise it to a higher shelf.

to prevent shrinkage, when rolling the dough and before cutting it to size lift it and let it shrink in. also be sure to chill it for a minimum of 1 hour before baking.

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Hi Rose so i made your beautiful Open Face Designer Apple Pie,i followed the new version of the pie crust and the pie came out grate all my friends loved it ,now i have to bake two more for a thanksgiving dinner party ,the only problem i had was with the crust, after i baked it in the oven it shrank a little to the bottom i wasn't sure if it was because i used pie weights instead of beans or because i cut the crust flush with the pie plate and didn't leave enough hanging over the edge.

Also i wasn't sure if i should bake it in the center of the oven or bottom,when i baked it at the bottom it got a little burnt wasn't sure it was because of the placement of the shelf or if i should reduce the baking time,even with the burnt crust my friends finished it in a day lol it was an amazing pie

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Cyndy Knighton
Cyndy Knighton
11/15/2012 03:33 PM

I just got a copy of the PPB a few weeks ago. The only pie crust recipe I've tried so far is the one with cheddar cheese. I used the Mexican blend of shredded cheese from Costco instead of the cheddar, which worked out really well. The crust was used in making pocket chicken pot pies (6" diameter rounds). That experiment has got me so enthused to try different fats than butter & shortening and I started wondering about cream cheese. And then here's this recipe!

My question now is, has anyone tried other fats or cheeses than the cream cheese discussed here? I'm specifically thinking of a soft chevre as I'd like to try making more pocket/individual dessert pies with chevre on the bottom and blueberry or apple on the top (because I adore those flavor combinations)

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thank you so much rose def looking forward to making it

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i should have explained--the one on the blog with the heavy cream.

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Sorry Rose just saw that the book was published on 1998 so il use the above recipe for the crust,as for the pie itself is there any changes i should know about or is it OK to go ahead and follow the recipe from the book.

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Sorry Rose as i just got the book and still new to it all,when you say new do you mean the one in the book or online?

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ian, follow the new recipe---it's more tender and delicious. and best of luck!

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Hi Rose,

I'm new to the pie baking world, and really wanted to learn more so i bought your PIE AND PASTRY BIBLE and its great.I'm gonna attempt to make your beautiful open face designer apple pie this weekend, wish me luck,anyhow all that aside i was looking at the cream cheese pie crust recipe recommended for the pie and noticed you said to use 11/2 tsp of water and 11/2 tsp cider vinegar, and saw that in the above recipe that you used heavy cream and a slightly different measurement,im not sure which one should i follow or if the changes will make a difference in the outcome of my pie

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I've got a tip: take a plastic trash liner, dump in a bunch of cold water and some ice, them put it on your counter to cool it before you roll out your dough. Chills down granite in a matter of 10 minutes.

I've found a touch more moisture (2.5T cream, say) makes the dough easier to handle.

And if you don't have a pastry cloth, rolling between sheets of plastic wrap works well. Cool it in the fridge for a few before peeling off the plastic. And, put your finished item on parchment paper for baking. Only way an amateur can handle it . . .

Delicious and worth the trouble.

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Fabulous idea, Hector! I'll lop those babies in half for my forthcoming crusts!

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prior freezing, weigh it and freeze it in portions according to what you most will do with it. that way you don't have to thaw the whole block and use only part of it. for example, for cheesecake, i freeze blocks of 454 gr, actually of only 227 gr since now i prefer to bake just a half recipe.

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Thank you so much, Hector! I just got the PPB, and I'm very excited to make my first pie. I'll be stocking up on Philly this weekend, then, for the freezer! Big Land o'Lakes sale last weekend! Woo hoo!!

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Hi Ann, I do and works.

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Hi, Rose & All!

My groc is having a big sale on Philly cream cheese, and I was wondering if you can make this crust with cream cheese that has been frozen.

I've used frozen cream cheese for other purposes, but I wasn't sure if, somehow, having frozen & thawed the cream cheese would prevent the crust from "coming together."

I know I can freeze the dough/crust, but I wasn't sure if I could make the crust with cream cheese that had been frozen.

Many thanks!

--ak

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The Bible versus the Large Bang

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Anne, if crispness is the concern, I love to blind bake this great pie crust and brush it with lightly beaten egg whites as soon as it comes off the oven. The egg whites will cook with the heat and create an impermeable coat.

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I'd like to bake Rose's pie crust for Thanksgiving. Are there any things I need to do to keep a sweet potato pie with the butter crust fresh for 4 days? Thanks in advance. Never posted before but read everything!

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ann, this makes enough for a deep dish 9 inch pan or a 10-inch pie. for a double crust multiply it by 1-1/2. for a regular 9-inch pie plate make the whole recipe or make 3/4 of the recipe.

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Does this recipe make a single or double pie crust?

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Thanks! I thought the cream + acid in creme fraiche would make a viable substitution. Plus, I have it in the fridge but no vinegar. If it works, I'll let you know.

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amy, i've never done it but i'm quite sure if you replace the heavy cream and the vinegar with equal amount of crème fraîche it will be fine. i would use bleached all purpose flour, not pastry flour to make sure it holds together well.

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Can I replace the 2 tablespoons of heavy cream and 2 teaspoons of vinegar with creme fraiche? How much creme fraiche should I use to completely replace the two ingredients? Thanks!

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Thank you very much!

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it does, perfectly, and for years according to my experience. wrap well airtight please. i freeze the unbaked dough.

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I would like to know if Rose's pie crust holds up well in the freezer?

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Cynthia, I would buy, borrow, or steal a copy of Pie and Pastry Bible and read on!

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Don't use this version of the recipe! I followed it as best I could (guessing I needed to double it for a top and bottom layer pie, guessing because it doesn't say) and it is wonderful. But when I followed the link in one of the comments to the Washington Post article I found entirely different amounts, a description that tells me THAT recipe makes enough for a top and bottom crust, and much better instructions, including freezing the dry ingredients too (which I missed in this version). It would be great if there was a link on Rose's site to a well documented version of the recipe, rather than having us google and get this and other versions. It is a fabulous recipe! Thank you, Rose!

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes/2008/07/16/flaky-cream-cheese-pie-crust/

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Good thinking!

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I just started prepping this recipe and accidentally mixed 1/8 t baking SODA with the flour and salt. I don't want to waste the Wondra (plus no stores are open to buy more at this time), so what should I do? Add a pinch of cream of tartar?

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Oh dear, are you looking for a new range or built in oven or a countertop model? If countertop, be sure you can fit a la cloche if you like artisanal free form beds, the la cloche in a convection oven works well. I like the cadco 1/4 or 1/2 size. The sharp or panasonic full size microwave convection ovens are also good because the turntable is so great for layer cakes. The newer smaller models about 0.9 cu ft are something to look for, specially I you won't be baking anything larger than a 10" cake.

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My oven is old and can't keep its temperature and I am looking for a new electric convection oven. There are so many to choose from. Is there really a big difference which one I choose? I have looked at consumer reports, but I was interested in which oven home cooks who like to bake bread and cakes find work well. Thanks so much!

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At the time Julia's recipe was published, pastry flour probably wasn't as available as it is today. She obviously would have been able to get a hold of it, but home bakers probably couldn't - I'll bet they designed the recipe around the availability of ingredients most home bakers could get at the time.

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Maureen, yes, plus now you can watch it on youtube. Rose goes in extent how to achieve a flaky and tender pie crust. It isn't just a matter of what ingredients go in, but also about preventing the butter from getting warm or soft, zero to minimal kneading which also means running the food processor for only seconds and only till the mix appears crumbly and prior to forming a dough ball. I use gold medal bleached all purpose flour or a mix with wondra flour.

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Quick question. I have an order that calls for pate brisee. I used to use Julia Child's recipe, which calls for shortening. She said American all purpose flour made all butter crusts tough. If I use Rose's recipe from P&PB -- pastry flour and all butter -- will I be delivering on my promise to make pate brisee?

Thank you!

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I have baked with both gas and electric ovens and don't really have a preference.

Our fairly-new stove has an electric oven with convection option. We use the convection for some types of bread and for roasting chickens and turkeys. It makes for a very brown crust which is good for some things and not for others.

Do you do a lot of broiling? We had an old gas oven where you had to broil by pulling out the drawer below the oven. It was a pain to use. I like electric broiling better but the truth is, I hardly ever broil things anyway.

So, my advice is to think about what sort of baking you do, and what you might want. We do love having an oven where you can use it as conventional or convection.

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welcome to the blog! my preference is a gas oven because gas is less expensive than electricity. however, you need exhaust to outdoors ventilation.

electric is usually more even baking.

a must to have convection on either above, but plus if you can turn convection off as needed. not all things bake better with convection.

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Hi,

I have never posted before but I have enjoyed reading your posts. Y'all sound like you so enjoy baking and so do I.

Is there anyone out there that could tell me which is better for baked goods, a gas oven, electric oven or a convection oven. I am planning to buy a new stove and would like to get whichever is best for baking.

Thanks for any help you might offer.

Marylouise

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Dan, thanks for sharing these news!

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thank you for this great new year's gift-- I had no idea!

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Just felt everyone should know that Rose's flaky cream cheese pie crust was the most viewed recipe on Washington Post this year. Her Perfect Peach Pie was second. Woohoo Rose!
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/30/AR2008123000611.html?sub=AR

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Angus, I usually blind-bake on the bottom rack with a round pizza stone on the rack. (Put the stone in before you preheat the oven.) It seems to work well enough. I don't know if the bottom of the oven would work better or not.

I find that if you are partially blind-baking the crust and then baking again when you add the filling, it is a very good idea to cover the crust with foil or a pie shield. It will get too brown otherwise.

I haven't made a pie with an unbaked filling so I can't say what you should do in that case.

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1. Is it better to blind bake on the base of an oven, or on the lowest shelf?
2. Should a pie shield be used when baking blind?

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I made two of the Peach Galettes yesterday and was so happy with the results. Right now I have a white sheet cake baking. I am using a recipe from the "Confetti cake book". I made a sheet cake yesterday and plan on filling both cakes with homemade strawberry butter-cream and then carving cakes to look like a book for a Baptism tomorrow at church. I also will be making a plum tart and chicken and noodles. I just love your recipes and you make it so easy to turn out delicious food. Thanks so much.

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I had a (probably insignificant to everyone else! but) major revelation to me today when I read p. 18 of Rose's Pie and Pastry Bible. Ever since I first attempted to blind-bake a pie crust, I've been baffled by how to avoid the parchment sinking into the pastry around the edges during pre-baking. And there, in a small, line drawing on p. 18, was my answer. Until now, I've always cut a circle of parchment the exact size of the base of the pie dish and placed that onto my pastry before weighting it with dried peas. No wonder I always end up having to dig out the lining from under the base rim of the crust when the pastry has risen and browned! Instead, the diagram on p. 18 shows very clearly how to pleat the parchment lining so that it rises up the sides, even above the containing pie crust walls. Tomorrow, we're having bangers and mash. The day after, I'm planning to make a homity pie with the potato leftovers ... inc. blind-baking. I'll let you know how it goes!

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OR you can buy a set of letter cutters and cut out the letters from the leftover dough! (my father, by the way, said i should skip the candle.)
BIG NEWS for pie lovers: the cherry pie reheated PERFECTLY even two days later: i cut two pieces and then set them on non-stick foil though regular probably would be fine. i snuggled the foil around them to support them and keep the cherry filling from drying and baked them in a preheated 400F oven for 10 minutes. despite the humidity the recrisped--even the lattice!

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Bill, you can roll a thin snake of leftover dough and "write" happy birthday on the crust before baking.

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Rose:
I just love love love this pie crust. My best friend is having her 49th birthday party on Sunday. This is a gal who LOVES pie, and is ho hum about cake. (She admits that the cakes I make from your recipies are the best she's had, but she still much prefers pie). So I'm going to bake a Birthday Pie for the party...why not? You can stick a candle in it...and still sing the song! She loves apple pie, it is her favorite dessert. So I will be baking your apple pie for her party, I will pipe Happy Birthday Denise on top, and will be making the vanilla icecream recipe you have in the cake bible to go with it. It is soooo delicious. I've made it twice before and it disappears as fast as I can make it (Mostly into my mouth). thanks again for your marvelous recipies.

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to prevent drying and other odors and butter and chocolate are excellent absorbers and you don't want them to taste like garlic!

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Quick question, what is the purpose of covering with plastic wrap? Is it just to prevent the dough from drying out? Or is it to increase the temperature of the dough?

When I roll pizza dough, I do the same when it becomes strechy, to relax it. Latelly, I haven't been covering it with plastic wrap, specially during the humid days.

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foil doesn't allow the pastry to breathe which is why i recommend parchment. also peas and beans smell dreadful when baking. rice on the other hand absorbs a little of the butter from the crust (through the parchment, browns lightly, and is perfect for pilaf!

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and if the sides are still shrinking and falling try this: (always covered with plastic wrap when resting/chilling) frig 1 hour, freezer 30 minutes. but the suggestions below are also very valid--don't stretch the dough--ease it in. don't over work the dough so it's too stretchy, etc etc.

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Thanks so much Hector - keep them coming.

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Erika:

1- never stretch/pull when rolling, the dough will stretch back when baking.

2- rest the dough before and after rolling, so it relaxes.

3- always blind bake with a coffee filter plus rice.

Here is how Rose makes the dough:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4847696856338055321&hl=en

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Yes, 10-15 minutes it not nearly enough resting time.

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The subject of pre-baking was recently discussed somewhere on the blog... Rose suggests blind baking with the use of a paper coffee filter filled with uncooked rice (the toasted rice can be cooked as usual afterwards - Rose says it has a lovely flavor).

Erika - when rolling, are you fighting to keep the dough from shrinking as you roll it out? If so, you need to let it rest longer. Be sure to push the dough down into the corners of the pie/tart pan too, and I like to leave a bit of extra crust around the top edge of the pan.

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Do you use baking beans? I usually line with foil and fill the cavity with dried peas/beans to add weight and to hold the foil in place, i don't have a problem with falling sides.

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I have tried blind baking several times and always end up with the same problem - The sides end up shrinking down. What am I doing wrong ? I always roll, prick and then let sit in the fridge for 10-15 minutes. Remove, line with foil and bake.

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YES, I realized that folding the sides under, making it double thickness, makes the best looking pie/tart edges.

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brenda, next time use the pie shield right from the beginning. also be sure to have a double thickness of dough on the rim, i.e. fold it under and press it down. if too thin it will bake too much faster than the rest of the pie. i think you'll be much happer with it this way.

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I forgot to leave my name about the blog with the hard rim. Please help if you can.

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I made this pie crust twice and both times my crust came out hard. The rest of the pie was fine, it was just the crust (the rim of the pie). So I do not understand why it wasn't the whole crust. As it started to get brown, I used a pie shield so it wouldn't over-brown, and I followed the directions exactly as stated. Please tell me why I could of had a hard rim!! The first time I made it I didn't brush with milk and sugar but the second time I did but the results were the same both times!! I am a little confused to what happened.

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Oh wait a minute... by "rolled", do you mean rolled-out flat???

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I would thaw the rolled crust in the fridge first, otherwise it will be too firm to unroll.

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When you freeze an unbaked pie crust, rolled, do you thaw it first in the refrigerator before blind-baking it? And for recipes not calling blind-baking, do you thaw the frozen crust first before filling it?

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Blanche,
Your post intrigued me because I had never heard of hot water pie crust. I looked up and read through a recipe. I think this would fall under a separate type of pastry other than traditional pie crust--like fillo, strudel, and Pâte à Choux are other categories.

I am not well enough versed in pastry taxonomy, but perhaps someone knows a name for this genre. This is the type of pastry where the fat is added in liquid form. I know my great-grandmother used to make pie crusts using oil. My only experience with this type of pastry is cooking Indian foods--samosa pastry uses a similar technique.

From the reviews I read, most people praise its tenderness. This would make sense because tenderness in regular pie dough results, in part, from the absorption of some of the fat in the flour to keep it from forming gluten with water. Reviewers also claim that it is flaky; not having tried this recipe, I can't say for sure, but I can't imagine that it could be as flaky as a regular crust made with big streaks of butter.

I know that the oil based pastries I mentioned do have some flakiness, but it doesn't seem to be on the same level as traditional pie crust. I'm not sure I understand exactly how oil based pastries become flaky. I assume the mechanism must be similar to how pie crust becomes flaky (layers of fat). Since there aren't any large pieces of fat or visible layers, this must happen on a very small scale--perhaps, resulting in the equally reduced flakiness.

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blanche james
blanche james
09/11/2007 08:16 PM

Every recipe I see for a flaky pie crust says to use ice water. I found " an easy foolproof method" for a pie crust using HOT WATER! If all recipes specify ICE water, how does using HOT water work?

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Shuang - pie crust will absorb moisture from the fridge. Best to eat your pie quickly.

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I tried the pie crust, and it came out very nice. However, after putting the filling in and leaving it in the fridge for a few hours, the crust is no longer flaky and crisp. It had gotten gummy! What did I do wrong? What can I do to avoid that next time?

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constance--this is wonderful and for now you'll have to content yourself with the written recipe as pbs is "independent" which means each station can air when it choses. you could call and brow beat your local pbs station--if enough people showed interest it could work. they are SUPPOSED to be responsive to their audience!
with all the details in the recipes plus this blog you won't go wrong!

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Hi Rose,

Constance again, I would like to know if your show, "Baking Magic", will be returning to PBS ch. 13, if so, when will the show air?

Every time I make a cake or pie from your books the people go crazy.

The first time I made the egg white butter cream was without the chocolate. When I tell you I almost screamed soo loud! I called my friend and told her "I found it, I found it!!!!" We have been looking for "real buttercream" for years.
When you go to bakeries you get something they call "buttercream" and after it's gone, you still have some kind of greasy film in your mouth. But Rose I must say THANK YOU, THANK YOU!! From everyone I know, they love your buttercreams and cakes!!!

Once again much Luv,
Constance

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thank you for your beautiful inspiring note. it means a lot to me.

re the sea salt, the only reason i specify it is i don't want to add iodized salt, especially to a pie crust where you could really taste it. but i'll bet anything that no one could ever detect the difference in a pie crust between sea salt and uniodized table salt!

love back!and i hope you are having the rewarding career you deserve.

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Hello Rose,

I have two questions:

1)Is there a substitute for the sea salt for this pie crust (the cream cheese crust is my favorate too, it's wonderful with your pecan pie)?

2)Will you be returning to PBS ch. 13 soon? I was soooo excited when I saw you on television! I really miss your show.

PS I have all of your books but after buying 'The Cake Bible', in 1997 I went to NYRS in 1998 and have my cert. in Pastry Arts. I would just like to add a hardy thank you and a great big hug for changing the course of my life.

Much love,
Constance

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baking low in the oven is the best way to get a crisper bottom crust but unfortunately the heat eminating from the bottom will soften the border before it has a chance to set. for this reason i use a less raised border such as the checkerboard which fares well even low in the oven.
other solutions are:
the pie plate i designed that protects the scalloped border
putting the foil ring on right at the beginning will help

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Hi Rose,

I made a pie crust from your Basic Pastry recipe in the PIe and Pastry Bible. I did not cook the pie on the bottom of the oven, but I cooked it on the lowest rack. I noticed after 10 minutes that the edges were getting melty. The pie had just come from being in the freezer for 1 hour and the edges had a raised fluting. I let the dough rest overnight in the fridge before rolling out. Just wondering what I did wrong.
Thanks, Monica

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thank you elizabeth! yes--do bake on the floor of the oven for the first 20 min. i think you'll be very happy with this technique.

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I found your Rose's Pie Plate in a shop today and bought it! I won't be able to use it for a couple of weeks because of other projects in the works but when I do, would it still be best to bake the crust on the oven floor for the first 20 minutes or will this pie plate eliminate the need for that? By the way, it's a beautiful pie plate.
Elizabeth H

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