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Why "Real" Baking

Oct 31, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

why i believe in real baking, i.e. baking from scratch as opposed to a mix

i suspect that the two main reasons people bake from a mix is 1) that they think it's faster and easier and 2) it's practically foolproof. there may even be some who grew up with the flavor of a mix and actually prefer it.

i grew up without a cake baking tradition, in fact, my grandmother used the oven only to store pots and pans. there was NEVER anything baked in that oven until I went to the university of vermont, took a course in basic food, and came home thanksgiving vacation with the intention of making my father's favorite--a cherry pie. it was a disaster of melting bubbling soap that I hadn't realized was stored in the broiler beneath. in short, i learned scratch cake baking on my own--from scratch.

it's o.k. to prefer cake mixes if you really do prefer them. my take on the mixes is that since they contain emulsifiers which give them what is known in the industry as tolerance, i.e., the ability to keep their texture despite additions of various extra ingredients, these emulsifiers result in an unpleasantly metallic after-taste. to my palate, the flavor of a cake baked from scratch is incomparably superior. and making a cake from scratch takes maybe 10 minutes more prep time than one from a mix. but as far as the foolproof aspect, let me tell you how to achieve that in a scratch cake.

there are only two important things to know:

1) use cake flour or bleached all-purpose flour. if you use a scale, the weight is the same. if you are using cup measures, and you have all-purpose bleached flour, for every cup of cake flour use 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons of all-purpose. if you want the cake to be as tender as one with cake flour, use 3/4 cup of all-purpose and 2 tablespoons of cornstarch. the all-purpose flour i use is gold medal, but if you happen to have a southern or regional brand the protein content may be as low as cake flour so you will not want to add the cornstarch as it may weaken the cake's structure and cause it to collapse.

the reason that it is essential to use bleached flour is that unbleached has particles that are smooth and round and the butter slips right through them and lands in a gummy layer at the bottom, causing the cake to fall in the center while cooling. the bleaching process, however, roughens these flour particles enabling them to hold the butter in even suspension.

if you measure the flour instead of weighing it, use a measuring cup with unbroken rim. place it on a counter and use a sifter or strainer to fill it with flour, allowing it to mound over the top. use a long metal spatula or knife to run it over the rim, thus removing any excess flour. never lift the cup or shake it during measuring as this packs more flour into the cup which would result in a denser drier cake.

that's all you need to know about flour for cakes and it's really quite simple.

2) have the butter softened but cool, i.e. it feels cool to the touch but when you press it with your finger it will flatten. this is a wide range of temperature, between 65 and 75 degrees. most kitchens are warmer than 75 degrees so to be on the safe side you can let the butter soften in a cooler room. if the butter is too cold or too warm the cake's texture (crumb) will not be even.

here is my favorite of all my yellow cake recipes. it's the right amount for a standard 9 inch by 2 1/2 inch springform pan but if you have only a 9 x 2 inch pan, just be sure to fill it only half full and bake the remaining batter as 2 cup cakes. (15 to 20 minutes)

if you still prefer your favorite mix, you have my full permission to use it, but not if the only reason is that you don't trust a "real" cake!

Comments

Hi Brooke,
You may also want to see America's Test Kitchen for gluten free recipes as they usually have a group of testers verifying that their recipes do work.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you for your reply!! I've been through many horrid gluten-free recipes so I thought I'd ask an expert.

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Hi Brooke,
Since gluten free is not our sole genre of baking, we do not have any substitute recipes for a gluten-free gingersnaps crust or for replacing bleached cake flour.
Fortunately, there are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize in gluten free specific baking. For most of these authors, gluten free is their way of life on a daily basis.
We also have reviewed and recommend Alice Medrich’s book “Flavor Flours” which is an excellent book for alternative flours to wheat flours, in which she researched recipes for taste and texture where the altenative flour gave a new dimension to the recipe versus just putting out a gluten free baking book. Her book was one of the 3 nominees for Best Baking book at the IACP awards in 2014. She has an oat flour gingersnap recipe in her book, a couple of tart crust recipes, and many cake recipes.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose,
Finally, I have a day I can see well enough to write you..,so here it goes....
I purchased your book Rose's Heavenly Cakes & there are so many wonderful recipes and amazing techniques to choose from! I was so excited when I saw your book!!! Due to my ms my diet has to be gluten free and I was wondering for your Swedish gingersnaps what you would recommend as a substitute? If I had a gluten free recipe I would make them from scratch so I could try my hand at your pure pumpkin cheesecake. It looks yummy!! Any cake flour gluten free suggestions or any other help would also be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Brooke

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Hi carol,
We always recommend, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
In general, our formulas fill a pan half full where many authors will fill a pan two-thirds full. For our butter and genoise layer cake formulas, our formulas are designed for two inch high pans. This guarantees a uniformly baked cake for even texture from side to side and bottom to top.
We do have formulas for different sized two inch high pans in "The Cake Bible" and an excellent red velvet recipe in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes"
Rose & Woody

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carol isaacson
carol isaacson
03/19/2015 05:22 PM

I am baking a two tiered wedding cake for my daughter's wedding- to go at the top of a cupcake stand. I'm using one 8 X 3" round pan and one 6 X 3" round pan. I've read different formulas for determining the right amount of batter for each pan. Can you please confirm the formula? The bottom tier is white cake and the top red velvet. Thank you! :)

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Wanda
10/31/2011 01:20 AM

hi Wanda,
Rose states using UNsalted butter as an ingredient because the amount of salt in salted butter can vary widely depending on the creamery. The salt needed for the recipe is included as its own ingredient. We recommend making any recipe as it is stated for the first time and you can then adjust or substitute to your preference.

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Hi Rose, I am just learning about baking cakes from scratch. I love a moist buttery cake. Is it okay to use salted butter instead of unsalted in recipes? I like the taste of the salted butter better. thanks Wanda

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from joanna
10/29/2011 01:04 AM

Hi Joanna,
As long as you accommodate for using it, which usually means lowering the temperature, you can use it. Rose does much of her baking in a small convection oven. We recommend start with the standard oven setting, until you are comfortable with its baking results, then adapt to the convection setting and also use an oven thermometer to make sure it is heating to the temperature you are setting.

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Thanks, Woody, will take your advice. I have decided to resist my night-owl tendencies, so instead of diving right into my new Cake Bible for the next couple of hours I will wait until morning to buy cake flour, and then dive in. Hard to do since I am so excited...:)
The picture of the cake with Classic Coffee Buttercream looks great, so perhaps I will do that one. Going to a family event so not sure what adults and kids alike will adore.
I appreciate your willingness to respond to (very) basic questions for a newbie, and will look forward to reporting back on my success. Last question is...I prefer baking with convection feature on our oven. DO you recommend against it?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from joanna
10/29/2011 12:17 AM

Hi Joanna,
We recommend that you always make the recipe as stated so you have a control cake from which to try substitutions. If the recipe offers both cake flour and bleached all-purpose flour, the cake flour will give better results. If you plan on using all-purpose UNbleached flour, we suggest you read the Power of Flour article to see the results of the three types of flour including additions. The Ingredients and Understanding sections in The Cake Bible will also give recommendations. When you do substitute, we suggest only change one ingredient or procedure. Our control cake is the All Occasion Yellow Downy Cake made with cake flour. Frostings are a matter of one's personal preference for adorning any particular cake. Enjoy your maiden voyage.
The All Occasion Downy was my first cake some 12 years ago.

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Help -- I am new to this group (and am excited!)...can I substitute (one time only, grocery store almost closing in California)all-purpose unbleached flour for cake flour called for in the recipe for Golden Butter Cream Cake and/or All Occassion Downy Yellow Butter Cake? If OK should I sift? Finally will it be OK to frost with Classic Buttercream, Classic Egg White CHocolate Buttercream, Light WHipped Ganache Filling or Quick Light WHipped Ganach???? This is my maiden voyage with my NEW Cake Bible ....so I need a quick "win". Thanks for any insights you are willing to impart.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
03/12/2011 06:48 PM

Hi David,
I forgot to mention that all-purpose unbleached can work in tube pans for butter cakes. All of our tests were done standard layer butter cakes.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
03/12/2011 06:43 PM

Hi David,
You can but you should read our series of blog articles on "the Power of Flour" as we tested cakes with yolks, whites, and whole eggs using cake, all-purpose bleached, all-purpose unbleached flours, and adding in cornstarch and potato starch. The leavening definitely needs to be adjusted for each type of flour. The unbleached flour will add a slight cornbread taste compared to the other flours.
Enjoy experimenting.

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Hi Rose,

Can I use unbleached all-purpose flour for recipes that ask for bleached all-purpose flour in your Rose's Heavenly Cake Bible?

David Chau

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Well, That explains it. I dislike it too. I am going to mix the fondant with white chocolate. Use the lemon curd from Woody's cake with pound cake and use white choc. ganach under the fondant. Wish I would have looked at Woody's cake first. It's too late. Thanks Rose for everything you do. Love Everything about you. Roseanna

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i'm so sorry roseanna--i haven't used rolled fondant for a long time. i was remembering how the shortening buttercream was necessary if doing a thin layer of fondant but such is my dislike of the flavor for each recipe in the cake bible using fondant i recommended using the thinnest possible layer of the delicious buttercream used to fill the cake and then make a thick enough fondant and it certainly resulted in alabster smooth top and sides!

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Rose, Thanks. I have looked all through The Cake Bible and can't seem to find it. I think Sarah of Baking911 may have adapted it and I can look there. My Bible is pretty mych worn thin and fallen apart. My second is on the way.

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it's in the cake bible and uses white vegetable shortening. butter would not produce a perfectly smooth fondant over it.

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I hope this is the right place to post a query re fondant. I know Rose recommends a certain Butercream under fondant in the Cake Bible. For the life of me I can't find it! Can anyone help? Thanks

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Trena Justice-Cruz
Trena Justice-Cruz
07/ 5/2009 03:13 PM

I am trying to purchase Swans Cake Flour in bulk. Can someone direct me to the website. Thanks

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you know matthew, i've heard that the one good mix made by jiff is cornbread!i've been meaning to try it. but i know what you mean about cake mixes--very hard to go back after tasting the buttery purity of scratch. thanks!!!

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Once you go Rose, you never go back! I'm making the kugelhopf today, which calls for a cup of cakes crumbs. I really should have know better, but I thought I would make it "easy" and cheap on myself, and I bought a box of Jiffy yellow cake mix. I figured it would be okay, and masked by the other ingredients in the schmear.

I haven't made or tasted a cake mix in years, and I guess this one is pretty much the bottom of the barrel for mixes anyway. I took one bite of the finished cupcake, and, I'm embarrassed to say that I literally spit it out. It was the most horrible, chemically tasting, yet otherwise flavorless baked item I think I have ever tasted.

I have a batch of Rose's yellow cake cupcakes in the oven now--which is what I should have done in the first place! It really was just about as easy as putting together that awful mix, and I can actually enjoy any leftovers!

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Where can i find swans down cake flour in bulk form with reasonable shipping?

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I'M with you Hector. I printed it out and taped to my reefer door. Thanks

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Thanks for that, Hector. I have been aware of all these additives for a long time and it is one of the reasons I like to bake my own cakes apart from the cost of buying anything as good! I now bake all my bread as well and although it might not stay 'fresh' as long as the commercial brands at least I know what it consists of!

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When my brother and his family were staying with me during Thanksgiving 2007, we got into a HUGE fight because I threw away a pie he had bought and sat in my fridge for 1 week. It was his family daily snack.

Little we knew at that time, that his son (my 4 year old nephew) had Asperger's Autism Disease. We my nephew diagnosed in Spring 2008. My nephew now attends 10 therapy sessions a week (yes, per week).

My nephew gets worse whenever high levels of toxins are detected in his blood and perhaps from digestive system imbalance; toxins that normal people digest and discard naturally. I BELIEVE and BEG for parents to read food labels.

THE YELLOW KITCHEN never uses the stuff that is highlighted in yellow below.

I took this picture from a Strawberry Cream pie from a well known local bakery. It won't be good business ethics for me to mention the name of the bakery, just read the labels when you buy pie anywhere.

There is NO need to use food ingredients that are not naturally occurring. Do you think our bodies know how to digest things that are unnatural?

/H

THE "real" YELLOW KITCHEN.

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/ThisIsWhatYouGetForYourMoney.htm

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I wonder if your oven temperature is running on the low side. I was having a problem with things taking too long to bake and that turned out to be the reason.

Happy baking!

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gail kernius
gail kernius
02/11/2008 11:41 AM

I love the Cake Bible and am asking for it as a Valentine gift (he gets to eat the cakes). Having said that, I made the brownie recipe found here on the website and found the recipe didn't bake in the 9x9x2 pan for 30-31 minutes except around the edges.
Is it possible that the pan size is too small? Thanks Gail

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gail kernius
gail kernius
02/11/2008 11:40 AM

I love the Cake Bible and am asking for it as a Valentine gift (he gets to eat the cakes). Having said that, I made the brownie recipe found here on the website and found the recipe didn't bake in the 9x9x2 pan for 30-31 minutes except around the edges.
Is it possible that the pan size is too small? Thanks Gail

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Annette - sounds like you need to use cake strips to insulate the sides of your baking pans. There are several types available. Do a search for "cake strips" and you'll get a lot of hits on the subject.

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I started decorating cakes as a hobby, but over the past couple of years it has turned into a side business. I have several yellow cake recipes; the first cake tastes great, but is not as moist as i would like it to be. What can I do about that, the second recipe has great texture and is moist but when it comes out of the oven, the part of the cake closest to the side is discolored and brown.

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I recently bought a Viking range...figured if I bought an oven that cost that much...all my problems would be over. My cakes were a disaster. I put in a thermometer and I was about 75 degrees too cool. There were two gas jets under the floor of the oven...only one was lighting. It was a simple adjustment...but it also sounds to me like there is a problem with your oven temperature. Good luck!

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Toni, have you tried checking your oven temp. using an oven thermometer? If you are using the same recipe, same brand of ingredients, weighing / measuring accurately etc., then it must be your oven temp.

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I have a jenn-air double oven stove. Everytime i bake a pound cake it falls. My cooking time is always set according to the recipe. I have never had this problem until i purchase this oven.

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the more you raise the baking powder the more it will fall bc you're weakening the structure!

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I'm having a little struggle with adjusting the Almond Paste Cake recipe found in the book 'The Well Decorated Cake'. Works great for cake diameters 7 inches to 13 inches. But cakes with smaller diameters (4 to 5 inches) fall. I tried increasing the baking powder to 3 3/4 t, per the butter cake baking powder table in 'The Cake Bible', but the smaller cakes still fell. Any ideas??

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Marcus:
Good for you...and enjoy your baking journey. I'd like to put in my two cents: You'll notice in the cake bible that all the ingredients are given both volumetrically and by weight. I really recommend that you buy a digital kitchen scale and weigh your flour (or all the ingredients for that matter)...it is really tough to accurately measure flour in cups and your cakes will be MUCH better if you measure accurately. I bought one recently for about $40.00...not too bad...and I use it all the time.

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Marcus - you should check a copy of The Cake Bible out of the library and give any one of the butter cakes a try. Be sure to start with room temperature ingredients, use the correct size pans called for in the recipe, and don't forget to check out the "understanding" and "pointers for success" that accompany most recipes. And please don't hesitate to ask questions - there are many people on this blog (and the new forum) that are happy to help!

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I'm one of the few guys who are not chef's or cooks, who enjoys baking. I've almost always used box cakes, now I want to broaden my horizons and move up to scratch cakes. I have been experimenting for about 4-5 months, but my cakes are still not quite the quality of where I would like for them to be. I've seen lots of scratch recipes. My question is, can you give me a basic simple can't miss scratch recipe that I can start with? Give me some things that I should avoid when cooking from scratch and then I can use my own creativity from their after.

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thanks tammy. you're right--no one ever addresses storing cocoa butter but in fact it is much like storing chocolate. it can stay at cool room temperature, low humidity, but if you're planning to keep it for several years, it's best to refrigerate it or freeze it--airtight to avoid moisture. using a vacuum device is idea.

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Tammy Bartley
Tammy Bartley
11/11/2007 07:50 PM

Can anyone tell me how to store Cocoa Butter? When it was delivered to my house yesterday, it was packed in an ice-chest with a lot of ice packs around it. Do I need to refrigerate it? btw..I bought TCB a couple of months ago and I can't stop baking! I love TCB!(and so does my Sunday school class... they tell me to keep on practicing...because they love Rose's cakes and the Mousseline buttercreams. It's a win-win relationship...I get to bake, they get to eat) I'm also getting braver with my baking thanks to Rose... I made my first Genoise yesterday.... all I can say is YUM! Thanks Rose!

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Hi Shuang - I'm from M'sia and all the above-mentioned flours found here are bleached. Unbleached flours can only be found in organic shops or corners in specialty supermarkets.

Plain is all-purpose, cake flour is superfine (low-protein) without baking powder, and bread flour is high-protein flour. Unfortunately actual protein contents are not given. I've used the local cake flour for cakes with success though. Hope this helps.

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Hi Abbu - my half sheet pans (13x18 inches) will hold 24 cupcakes. So a full sheet pan should hold about 48 cupcakes. I hope that helps.

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how many cupcakes would I need to make to serve as many as one sheet cake?

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there has been a great deal of discussion on the blog regarding flour. just do a search and you will find it. hopefully someone from singapore will respond (if they haven't already posted and i think they have) to tell you their experience with the available flour.

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Here in Singapore, the flour is only labeled as "plain flour", "bread flour", "cake flour", etc. They don't say bleached or unbleached or give a protein content. I wonder what I should use to produce a proper cake. Can I just use plain flour, and sift it myself to get the volume called for? Thanks.

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agreed! i've always loved raspberry vinegar so this sounds even better.

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Wanda - Sounds great (kind of like spinache/strawberry salad). I have strawberry puree in the fridge - I think I'll give it a try.

Please post the butter cake spread sheet if/when you come up with it - lots of us would be greatful :)

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Wanda LaLoggia
Wanda LaLoggia
06/17/2007 12:11 PM

Rose, Your Raspberry Puree is great; but I've discovered a new application. Try it drizzled over a salad of baby spinach leaves with parmeasean cheese and a few dried cranberries. I know it sounds weird, but the taste is absolutely amazing!

Hecter, I love the spreadsheet. I'm going to try something similar for the buttercake recipes, unless you've already created one I could 'borrow'?

Thanks.

Wanda

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the recipe is in the cake bible.it's available for purchase in all book stores and also is in most libraries.

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I'd love to have the recipe for the Golden Butter Cream Cake. Can you post it??

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sounds like your oven is baking REALLY low and slow. cakes don't fall if they are baking at the right temperature or even at too high a temperature. either have a professional calibrate your oven or try a cake in someone elses just to prove to yourself that's what's happening.

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Rosie Lewis
Rosie Lewis
03/ 9/2007 02:41 PM

I need to know why my cakes always fall in the oven? Ive tried raising the temp. 5 or 10 degrees. It doesnt matter what kind of cake I bake. I just made an angel food(box)pineapple & it fell.The recipe has a mix,a can of p.apple & a teaspoon of vanilla. I rarely use a mix. Mine are all from scratch. & they all fall. It must be my oven but what??? HELP

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Rosie Lewis
Rosie Lewis
03/ 9/2007 02:36 PM

I need to know why my cakes

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well that's GREAT news--the roses are the most difficult achievement. whew!
now that's odd about the smaller cakes bc normally they would need more leavening not less. maybe they need to bake a little longer.
i like to use 3/4 cup sifted bleached all purpose and 2 tablespoons cornstarch for 1 cup of cake flour. but as you know, substitutions are never quite the same. try to find cake flour or order it from king arthur just one time as a cross check.

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Wanda LaLoggia
Wanda LaLoggia
03/ 7/2007 09:19 PM

Rose, I'm having a hard time finding cake flour. I use bleached all purpose flour (sifted and weighed) instead, do I need to make any other adjustments? i.e. adding cornstarch? My cakes taste good, but for the smaller layers, they fall in the middle about 5 minutes after I take them out of the oven. The larger cakes, 8" or larger are ok. The next time I make a smaller cake, I'm going to reduce the baking powder by 1/4 tsp, unless you have another suggestion? Thanks as always.

BTW, I tried the Chocolate Roses again and this time they came out beautifully. I think I kneaded the chocolate too long before trying to form into roses.

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i've found that when stored airtight so in a non-humid environment it can keep even for several years.

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Does Swans Down Cake flour have a shelf life?

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i heard eli zabar's carries them.

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Jennie Molinas
Jennie Molinas
03/ 2/2007 03:32 PM

Are there any other stores in NYC, other than the Garden of Eden, that carry your Heavenly Cake Mixes? Thanks, Jennie Molinas

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night before is too hair raising should something go wrong. wrap it well and refrigerate it.

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Aminta Banks
Aminta Banks
02/27/2007 12:11 PM

I have to do an aniversary cake and want to know when do I start baking the cake the night before or can I do it earlier in the week and refrigerate until I need to frost? The cake is going to be 18,14,10 and 6.

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rumford is calcium based not sodium based and so has a better flavor.

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Jennie Molinas
Jennie Molinas
02/19/2007 10:45 PM

Why do you prefer Rumford brand of baking powder? How is this different from other brands?

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I'm baking a chocolate cake and I was wondering what kind of syrup I should glaze over the top to make it extra moist. Thanks.

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i find the sourcream cake more dense and buttery.
you're right about the syrups--they help keep the center moister by preventing evapporation but don't actcually penetrate to the center unless it's a genoise or biscuit.

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Hello Rose. The Cake Bible has become just that for me in the kitchen. Thank you for such a well written comrehensive baking resource.

Will you guide me through a couple of issues dealing with pan sizes and the use of sugar syrups?

First, I am looking for a dense, buttery cake suitable to a sheet pan as well as for cupcakes, both regular and jumbo size. The All Occasion Downy Cake is delicious but a bit too light. I loved the denser buttery taste of the Golden Butter Cream Cake but don't know how to convert the recipe to the above lised pan sizes.

Second, will you offer some advice on the proper technique for use of sugar syrups? The cakes are quite moist and delicious right after baking, but seem to stale and lose moistness by the following day, even when wrapped airtight. Do bakeries bake and decorate every cake daily to prevent this? For me, I would love to use a sugar syrup to help moisture retention. I have tried brushing the top of the cake, poking holes with a skewer and brushing, using a syringe for soaking but the result is always the same; the 1/4" top of the cake is saturated and the rest is bone dry, even after waiting 24 hours for it to "seep in." Is it versatile enough to use on any butter cake, or do you recommend one in particular? Second, what is the proper technique for using one? i.e. temperature of the syrup versus the cake, proper amount of syrup for cupcakes versus sheet cakes, and any other factors you think pertinent.

Thank you again for your time and consideration. I hope to hear from you soon.
Nicole

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when i revised the book for mcmillan (UK) i discovered that harrods carries american cake flour. not sure if it still does. the book is no longer in print but check books for cooks and out of print book stores for a copy of the revised UK version as i did different combinations of plain flour and self raising and it worked well for almost all the cakes. there is no rule of thumb but i can tell you that plain flour will work for sponge cakes, génoise, etc. and any cake that uses butter in a solid (unmelted form) requires bleached cake flour (and the right amount of leavening--not self-raising).

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Hello Again!

I was wondering if you knew of any flour here in the UK that would approximate US cake flour. I can't seem to find any, except in bulk form...which i don't have the storage room for! Otherwise, what could i use?

Thanks
Ruth

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I have good news for you. I always bring home flour when I travel to different countries and the only flour that has worked happens to be the Italian 00 flour. I suspect that by refined they must mean bleached.the 0 may work also but I haven't tried it.

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Hi Rose,

I don't know if the flour in Italy (0 or 00) is bleached or unbleached, but I can find flour that is around 7,5g protein per 100g. Does that "protect" me in any case, regardless of the bleached/non-bleached factor? Here (in Italy) they say 00 is more refined, 0 is less refined, and and whole wheat is even less refined. But is it bleached?

Thanks for any insight!
3LC

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Alison: when solid butter as opposed to melted butter is used in a layer cake it needs the roughened surface produced by the bleaching of the flour to hold it in suspension. when unbleached flour is used in this type of cake it rises normally and right at the end of baking sinks right in the middle. this is caused by the butter dropping out of suspension.

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Alison Carosone
Alison Carosone
11/16/2005 07:42 PM

I have always read that unbleached all purpose flour should be used over bleached all purpose flour. Why is this? And why do you prefer bleached for cake making?

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