Welcome to Real Baking with Rose, the personal blog of author Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Spend A Moment with Rose, in this video portrait by Ben Fink.

Check out my new creations


RSS AND MORE



Get the blog delivered by email. Enter your address:

Eat your books
Previous Book

Roses' Cookbooks

The Baking Bible

The Baking Bible

Buy from Amazon: USA | Canada | France | Germany | UK

Buy from Barnes & Noble
Buy from IndieBound

Next Book

Cool Rise for Bread

Dec 20, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

Question:
I would like to know if all bread recipes (with yeast) can be used as a cool rise? That is after they are shaped and formed can I put them in the refrig. over night ?

Rose Reply:
i’m racking my brain to think if there’s an exception and can’t come up with one. oh! quick breads that use chemical leavening instead of yeast need to be baked soon after mixing. but yeast breads all seem to benefit from a cool, slow, overnight rise.

Comments

Rose levy beranbaum
Rose levy beranbaum in reply to comment from Micki
11/26/2013 09:54 AM

Mickie, I would decrease the yeast a bit if holding in the fridge for two days. If you don't it should still be fine but with a little less height.

REPLY

I've seen some cool rise recipes (I'm specifically thinking about challah) that allow for as long as a two day rise in the fridge. If I make a standard batch of challah and allow it to rise in the fridge for two days, will it overproof?

REPLY

Hi Rose/Woody,

I would like to know in the "Beer Bread" recipe if I can substitute bread flour for either unbleached all-purpose or even cake flour?

David Chau

REPLY

David Chau
David Chau in reply to comment from woody
04/ 8/2011 09:38 AM

Thanks so much, Woody. You are the BEST!

REPLY

Hi David,
Once uncapped, the left over 3 ounces of beer will go flat within a day even if you try to refrigerate and store it in a sealed container. You might see how you like the taste of using the leftover beer and adding water to make up the 9 ounces that you need for the recipe to make another loaf. You can then freeze the extra loaf.
Another thought would be to use it for a savory recipe like a beer batter for fish.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

For the "Beer Bread" recipe. With the left-over beer, and since I don't drink, can I save it for future batch? And if yes, how long can I keep it for?

David Chau

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from David Chau
04/ 5/2011 07:56 AM

david, sounds like you let the dough rise too much so it couldn't rise sufficiently when in the oven. whole wheat doesn't have the extensibility of white wheat.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

In your "Basic White Loaf", I replaced the unbleached flour with unbleached whole wheat flour; and the first four loaves turned out beautifully. However, my next six loaves, though tasted good, the tops were flat. What did I do wrong?

The yeast is only two months old, and I always keep it in the freezer in its own dark jar. I followed every step exactly the same way as with the previous loaves.

David Chau

REPLY

I use this recipe:

COOL RISE SWEET DOUGH

5-6 c. flour
2 pkgs. yeast
1/2 c. sugar
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 c. butter
1 1/2 c. hot tap water
2 eggs
Cooking oil

Spoon flour into measuring cup and level. Combine 2 cups flour, undissolved yeast, sugar and salt in large bowl. Stir to blend, add butter. Add hot tap water.
Beat with electric mixer at medium speed for 2 minutes. Add eggs and 1 cup flour. Beat with mixer at high speed 1 minute.
Gradually stir in enough flour with wooden spoon to make soft dough. Turn out on floured board. Knead 5-10 minutes or until dough is smooth and elastic. Cover with plastic wrap then a towel. Let rest 20 minutes.
Divide and shape as desired. Place on greased baking sheets or in greased pans. Brush dough lightly with oil. Cover pans loosely with plastic wrap.
Refrigerate 2-24 hours. When ready to bake remove from refrigerator. Uncover, let stand 10 minutes. Bake at 375 for 20-30 minutes. Remove from pans immediately. Brush crust with butter. Cool on racks. Frost as desired.

REPLY

priscilla murphy
priscilla murphy
04/29/2010 07:42 PM

Does anyone have a recipe for "Cream Bread"it it from my childhood. All of the old fashioned bakeries that made it are long gone. It was a cylindrical loaf of white bread, made in a crimp pan. When sliced, each slice was about the size of piece of small baloney.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

REPLY

Where does one purchase 'malt powder'? I am visiting Phoenix AZ. I am not able to find it in my home town in Canada. Thanks.

REPLY

I've been chilling pretty much all my yeast doughs for years because it seems so convenient to me. I mix it up, stash it in the fridge and then can take it out and shape whenever it works for me (although I've never left it for more than 2 days. I'm afraid the yeast will weaken. Is that correct? I'd like to know what the experts say.) The big question I have though, is whether chilling dough tends to produce chewy breads/rolls. I generally prefer lean breads with some chew, but that's the last thing I want with my cinnamon rolls and that's what I get. I use a sweet roll recipe (have tried a number of recipes) not a lean dough, yet they're not meltingly tender like I think they should be. I really like to chill rich sweet roll doughs because I can leave the dough fairly soft (higher hydration) yet it firms up when it’s cold and is a breeze to shape. Is that causing my 'chewiness'!? Where did I come up with the chilling dough/chewy bread theory? In a post on thefreshloaf.com. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3123/soft-moist-white-bread
I’d really love to tap into your expertise on this!
Thanks,
Gayla

REPLY

ann hodgman
ann hodgman
09/ 2/2008 10:07 PM

Thanks--I am SO there! After I finish the batch in my freezer, I mean.

REPLY

don't worry--questions are meant to be posted as comments.

i would try a higher protein flour such as the gold medal better for bread flour. it may change the interior a bit but will hold the layering better. it's probably most similar to what they use in france. do let us know the results!

REPLY

ann hodgman
ann hodgman
09/ 2/2008 09:14 PM

Sorry, didn't mean to post my question as a comment--but I can't find any instrux on this site for posting questions!

REPLY

ann hodgman
ann hodgman
09/ 2/2008 09:13 PM

I love the Bread Bible's croissant recipe. The only thing I would change: the croissants' exterior isn't quite as flaky as I'd like. Is there any way to tinker with the recipe or cooking method to produce a flakier exterior? (The interior is perfect.) I want the kind of croissant where you have to dust yourself off after taking a bite!

REPLY

i can't see why not!

REPLY

Cinda Harris
Cinda Harris
03/ 3/2008 09:17 AM

I had a cool-rise yeast bread recipe for 30 years and have lost it. The bread is an egg braid sweet bread, like a challah or brioche. The recipe made two large loaves. I only made it occassionally, so don't remember the process. Can I use a standard challah recipe using the cold method with the same results?

REPLY

no i don't use rasin puree and most of my breads have very little fat. why don't you post this on the forums as i bet some other ppl may have some experience with this!

REPLY

Sharon Halbrook
Sharon Halbrook
01/ 3/2008 07:17 PM

Rose: Looked in your blogs but didn't find one for this question Have you used raisin puree in any of your bread recipes? Im looking for a recipe for dark sweet bread using whole wheat and white flour and raisin puree for sweetner and freshness to bread also understand the puree takes place of some of the fat needed. Thank You Sharon

REPLY

I use a cool rise yeast bread recipe to makecalzones/cinnamon rolls for 7th and 8th grade Skills for Living students. It is the only way to prepare such a long recipe in 2 50 minutes class periods. It works great...almost fool proof. You can get the recipe from the Utah lesson plan website. Google cool rise yeast recipe.

REPLY

Wow thank you so much for your quick reply. Now I can put sticky buns in the refridge and bake themn fresh on chrismas morning

REPLY

POST A COMMENT

Name:  
Email:  
(won't be displayed, but it is used to display your picture, if you have a Gravatar)
Web address,
if any:
 
 

Comment

You may use HTML tags for style.

EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Sign up for Rose's newsletter, a once-a-month mouthwatering treat!

DATE ARCHIVE

Featured on finecooking.com