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Dry Cookies

Dec 22, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

BARBARA QUESTION


Feedback: i HAVE A COOKIE THAT BECOMES QQUITE DRY AFTERBAKING AND i WONDERED IF THERE IS ANYTHING I CAN DO TO PREVENT THIS/

ROSE REPLY

cookies usually become dry due to overbaking as they continue baking after removal from the oven. better to underbake as you can always return them to the oven but you can't UNbake! bake the cookies until starting to brown at the edges and set but still soft when pressed in the center. leave them on the cookie sheets just until they are firm enough to remove and then transfer them to racks.
a few spoonfulls of molasses, honey, or corn syrup will also help to keep cookies soft.

Comments

Hi Vicky,
We always recommend that you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
You can also post a picture on the Forums section for others in the international baking community to give their comments.
We will either apply our glazes at room temperature or chilled depending on the glaze and the surface for the glaze. For the best sheen for a chocolate glaze, we usually do this with the surface (buttercream or ganache) at room temperature.
We suggest refrigerating the cake, let it warm up to room temperature the day of the event, apply the drip either at home or on site.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi! My name is Vicky. I'm making a 2 tier buttercream drip cake for a friend's engagement party next week. I'm concerned about transportation. Would it be better to refrigerate the 2 cakes and assemble at the venue? The drip is made from white chocolate ganache. I'm worried that if I leave the cake out at the venue, the mixture from inside the cake will sweat and ruin the drip and the cake. Thanks in advance for your assistance.

REPLY

Hi joanne,
We always recommend that you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
Since we do not use margarine in any of our recipes, our suggestions when a cookie comes out dry after baking are:
1. increase the fat content
2. decrease the flour
3. try undertaking and/or moving them to a wire rack as soon as they can be moved
4. a possible change in one of the ingredients
(This is especially a factor when using eggs. The yolk to white ratio has radically changed over the last few years. Yolks are virtually always smaller.)
5. a possible change in one's technique for making a recipe
(we have done it ourselves where we have made a recipe so many times that we have made a "shortcut" that affects the results.)
If you try any of our suggestions, we recommend only doing one at a time.
We are also assuming that you have always had this problem with this recipe.
You can also post on the Forums section for others in the international baking community to give their comments.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

joanne depoley
joanne depoley
10/27/2016 09:05 AM

My cookies require margarine instead of butter and notice that my cookies come out dry and would like to find out how to prevent dry texture. Thank you.

REPLY

marina, sounds like too much flour or that they aren't underbaked enough to stay soft the next day. the reason those cookie stands have been so popular is that these cookies are at their best still warm from the oven!

REPLY

Why would chocolate chip cookies be dry, the day after you bake them? They were made with butter, left to bake a little on the cookie sheet, stored in Tupperware.

REPLY

Why do my chocolate chip cookies become dry after baking? They are baked with butter, & underbaked.

REPLY

my sugar cookies are coming out too fluffy--i would like them 2 be soft and chewy--what should i do ?

REPLY

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