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For a great tutorial, check out the Baking Bible Bake Along with ROSE'S ALPHA BAKERS. The link is on the left side of the blog. We will also be posting "OUT-BAKES" from the book, on this blog, including step-by step photos and other extras.

Freezing Pies

Dec 17, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

Linda Question:
Wanting to make raisin pies early for Christmas and not sure if they will freeze. Can you help as I hate to waste anything.

Rose Reply:
hope this reaches you in time but at least you’ll know for the future: you can freeze unbaked pies and add about 20 minutes to the baking time depending on how deep the filling is. it’s actually an advantage because the bottom crust starts baking before the filling thaws giving it a chance to get crisp and brown.

i wouldn’t freeze a baked pie because the dough loses much of its charm and all that remains is the filling and calories!

Comments

zlota stromberg
zlota stromberg
12/19/2014 11:11 PM

Forgot to tell you I already have the baking bible and as your other books this one is GREAT!! Love it:)

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zlota stromberg
zlota stromberg
12/19/2014 11:10 PM

Hi Rose!! sorry to bother you!! i want your advice if you can help me with this! I made a pear tart, I use your cookie dough and your almond creme recipe, the only thing I changed is I froze everything raw and did not poach the pear. Today i decided to throw it on the oven to try how it comes out from the freezer to the oven and to be sure I could freeze and make the tart in advance, I pre headed the ocen to 425 and put a baking sheet on the bottom of the oven for 20 minutes, after that I saw the borders were turning brown so i decided to move the tart with the baking sheet to the middle for another 40 minutes, until the pears were a little brown and the almond cream was puffed. When try it, it was perfect but soggy on the bottom. I just want your advice or suggestion, I thought next time I will keep it on the bottom of the oven for 35 minutes so it will have more time to get crispy, my doubt is if I have to leave the tart on the bottom for the whole baking time? or should I change it to the middle and lower the oven temp??
Please hope you can help me with this!!
Happy Hanukkah!! Thanks in advance!!

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Thank you, thank you, thank you!! Your posing has just saved me a ton of valuable time. Baking for Holidays is not so challenging when you can make now and bake later.

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Thankyou so very much, for the information. I did exactly what you told me to do, and my pies went to the freezer, looking like I had done them from scratch. Your information was the best, thankyou.
Merry Christmas to you, Rose, and your family.
Ps. This is a beautiful web-site.
Thankyou, Linda J.

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linda, i think you will have a problem attaching the top crust to a frozen bottom crust. you are asking if you can re-freeze these pies which would mean that after putting the meat into the frozen crust and topping with the fresh crust would freeze the pies and then let them thaw and then re-freeze them. that's a lot of thawing and refreezing which will compromise texture and flavor. i would thaw the frozen crust just enough to soften to border, add the meat, top with the new crust, freeze the whole thing, and then when you are ready to serve it bake it from the frozen without thawing.

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I want to make 6 tortiere pies for Christmas Eve. I have 6 frozen bottom shells, and I want to put my meat filling onto these shells (without thawing them,and I will cover them with my fresh 6 pie-crusts(that I have just made) to put on top of the filling.My question is: Can I re-freeze these 6 pies, and thaw them out at a later date , and bake them then? Could you please help me in this matter? Thanking you in advance, LindaJ.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ruth
06/10/2013 02:34 PM

Hi Ruth,
As Rose stated above, "i wouldn’t freeze a baked pie because the dough loses much of its charm and all that remains is the filling and calories!"
However, if you want to freeze the pie, we suggest removing it from the pan onto a piece of plastic wrap. Seal it tight and wrap it again with freezer weight aluminum foil. You can place it back in the pan for re-freezing.
Rose & Woody

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I just baked a strawberry/rhubarb pie for my husband. He only ate about half of it. He's gone in a truck all week, so he wants me to freeze it. Is there anything special I should do before freezing a half-eaten pie?

Thanks

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I have just made a meat pie, called Tourtierre, and wanted to freeze it for a celebration in a few weeks..

I made the crust (bottom only) froze it, lining pyrex pie plate with plastic, released it to reclaim the pie plate... made the filling, lined the pie plate with plastic, froze it & released the filling, to store them separate til assembly day... will form top crust (now frozen but not yet rolled out), on assembly day....

thanks for all the advice re: freezing & baking with pyrex... i guess the thing to do is to return frozen crust to pyrex for an overnite partial thaw, then fill with still frozen filling, & top with crust, & bake with some extra minutes to compensate for frozen filling? Does all that sound like the way to proceed?

many, many thanks!

susan

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maureen, re your question about the crumb topping, in my recipe in the pie and pastry bible i do indeed add the crumb topping part way through baking. (at 400˚F the crumb topping takes about 20 to 25 minutes.

baking 2 at a time will take a little longer--about 10 minutes depending on your oven and how well-insulated it is.

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kelsey, i haven't experimented with mini pies from the frozen but i'm sure you'll need to add to the baking time time. my guess is 10 more minutes at 350˚F.

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Corning has told me that it's fine to but pyrex that is frozen with the pie into a hot oven as long as it's set on the oven rack. If set on a deck oven, hot stone, baking sheet, or any hot solid surface the shock could cause it to crack.

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Maureen, I have baked fruit pies in pyrex straight from the freezer- the trick I use is to dip the bottom of the pie plate into a bowl of hot tap water just long enough to take the chill off, about 30 seconds. Then dry and bake. It has worked for me several times without cracking my pyrex pie pan.

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Couple of questions.
My frozen apple pies are frozen in pyrex pie dishes. If I put them on a cookie sheet (as some receipes suggest), will that cause a problem with the glass?

I intend to put crumb topping on these (no top crusts). Should I wait till the pie is half done to do this?
and
If I bake 2 at a time, will I need to increse the baking time? Wall oven.

Thank you.

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Sorry to be so dense, pregnancy brain is kicking in…So 10 minutes at 450 then 50 minutes at 350? I don’t bake much and I don’t want to mess up too many.

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i would follow these same instructions and bake from the frozen as i suggested above.

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I have made some miniature mock cherry pies(my grandmother's recipe) that I froze. I'm wanting to give them as Christmas presents and need to figure out if I should thaw before baking or not. My main concern is the recipe calls to bake for the first 10 minutes at 450 then the remaining 30 minutes at 350 and I don't know how I should change that if I bake them from frozen. Any advice?

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These comments are wonderful - I am planning on using your raisin pie filling in an open premaid graham cracker pie shell, and
top with whipping cream and cracker sprinkles..is that okay -

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I need to freeze a baked pecan pie for my daughter who just had a baby. I am baking two pies now in the oven. We will eat one while I am here, but want to freeze the other one for them to eat later after I go home. My Pecan pies are loaded with pecans and its her favorite.

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Why didn't I think of that?? That's a great idea :D Thank you so much!!!

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i would line the tins with plastic wrap and then lift out the pies when frozen. when ready to bake unwrap and pop them back in!

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Rona Rosenboom
Rona Rosenboom
07/18/2010 07:34 PM

I need to make about 75 mini cherry pies (in muffin tins)for a sale that is a couple of weeks from now. I need to make them in advance and freeze them unbaked, but don't want to put the all those muffin tins in the freezer, due to freezer space. You say the crust is better if you freeze cherry pie UNbaked... so, any suggestions on how to handle this? I don't think I could get them out of the muffin tin after shaping them and filling them in order to freeze them unbaked. Hope this makes sense. Thanks!

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I have been baking for many years and have made I would imagine hundreds of pies of all kinds. I have frozen countless baked pies with no problem with the crust as far as it becoming like cardboard. The only fat I use in my crust is unsalted butter. I do not use Crisco or anything product like it or lard. Just butter. I defrost in the refrigerator not on the counter. This slow defrost is important. The crust remains very good and you can certainly heat up slices in the oven. I would not use a microwave to heat slices as the crust will become like cardboard.
Regarding the lattice sinking I've never had that problem because I am not baking a frozen pie which I suspect is the problem. Go ahead and bake your pies and then freeze. Be sure that they are completely cool before freezing. I wrap the baking pies in plastic wrap from below and from the top. In other words, cross two sheets of plastic wrap on your counter and then set the baked pie (obviously in the dish) on the wrap and come up and over the pie with the plastic wrap. Then do the same from the top. This double wrap keeps the pie from drying out from freezer burn. It works great. Keep it wrapped while thawing in the refrigerator.
I do not use oil sprays on my pie plates before putting in the crust. I do lightly butter the pie plate, however, my crust is loaded with butter and I have never had a problem with sticking.

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another option if you want to freeze the pie is the do it without the lattice and make cut outs such as leaf shapes and freeze them too. then you can bake them separately and place them on the pie after baking as in the designer cherry pie.

this is the down-side of butter crusts--they soften more quickly but they're worth it for the flavor!

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Matthew, I did use sour cherries, but I don't know the variety as they were from my sis-in-law's garden. I've had the same problem with other cherries I've used that are sour as well. I will take up Rose's suggestion and only bake from the non-frozen state and see if it helps. I just love the flexibility of freezing pies, though.

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Sherrie, did you use sour cherries?

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sherrie, i can't see how you could suspend a lattice crust above the filling. this is probably due to the nature of a lattice crust. i don't believe i've ever baked one from the frozen so it may not be a good choice of top crust if one is intending to freeze the pie.

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Over the holidays, I baked 2 lattice crust pies from frozen and in both cases the lattice was submerged in the filling, thus preventing some of the lattice from cooking properly. This has happened before, but only now have I decided to investigate. I used your cherry pie recipe and cream cheese crust. I weighed and also measured the cherries by volume and it was consistent with your recipe, so I doubt I have too much filling, although the cherries are very, very juicy. How should the lattice go on the pie? Resting on the filling or suspended above it? I usually allow it to rest lightly on the filling below, could this be the problem?

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samantha, i would add the egg wash and sugar just before baking but i think it would work almost as well to add it before freezing.

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travelyn, it's fine to add the still frozen pie to the pyrex dish and then to bake it.

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Hi Rose,
I am baking apple-cranberry pocket pies for thanksgiving. Can I prepare them and freeze them? if yes,do I egg wash and put sugar on before or after I freeze? Thank you,
Samantha

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When you bake a frozen pie, can you take it from the freezer and bake in a pyrex pie dish? Or do you have to defrost it first.

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Most fresh fruit pies freeze well unbaked and they bake well straight from the freezer, but it can depend how much liquid is on the fruit, so I would try it first or use one of Pie and Pastry Bible that has been tested to be frozen!

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burcak deniz
burcak deniz
08/13/2009 03:03 PM

Hi.I have a peach pie recipe where I cook the peaches with sugar and use it as a filling. The tart covers all the filling and it also has baking powder in it.Is it ok to freeze a recipe which has baking powder in it and should I put it in the oven as soon as it gets out of the freezer.Thank you very much.

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I agree about the rhubarb, I made that tart a few weeks ago--delicious!

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i would let it stand for 10 minutes at room temp and then brush and sprinkle before going into the oven. it shouldn't be taken out during the first 20 minutes of baking. the rhubarb sure is beautiful this year--i'm making the strawberry rhubarb tart this weekend!

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Tamara Krievins
Tamara Krievins
05/28/2009 07:29 AM

I'm going to bake my rhubarb pie from the frozen state this weekend. I understand that the top crust gets slashed just before going into the oven, but when should the pie be brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar? At the frozen state, just before going into the oven, or after the pie's been in the oven for a bit?

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I've made it many times the regular way, so it'll be interesting to try it semi-frozen. Thanks for the tip.

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it's especially delicious frozen--great texture, a little less sweet--and cuts beautifully. maybe thawed a tiny bit--10 min? do let us know how you like it!

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Oh, that's excellent! I will switch the sugar crust and do it all ahead. Love that! Thanks.

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if you freeze just the crust it will only take 3 to 5 extra minutes baking from the frozen. but here's another suggestion: use the sugar crust (pâte sucrée) and you can prebake the whole thing and serve it either defrosted or even frozen!

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I was hoping to make the Chocolate Pecan Pie this weekend and freeze it. I see the comments discouraging that. My question is whether freeze the unbaked flaky cream cheese crust. Also, how much longer will it take to bake the crust from frozen? Thanks.

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once pies are baked they no longer freeze well. the crust becomes cardboardy.

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my mom wants to know if you can freeze already baked berry pies??

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Ginny Cantlin
Ginny Cantlin
09/15/2008 12:23 PM

Would like to know if people have success in freezing cooked berry or fruit pies with double crust?

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Thanks Rose! Warm pies always taste better anyhow. Hope it works!

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you should probably reheat them before serving--i personally find that freezing baked pies compromises the crust so reheating may help to bring it back to life. say 10 minutes at 350F preheated oven if they are at room temperature, 15 min. if refrigerated.

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OK, we're going camping for Memorial weekend, and I like to prepare a lot of things ahead of time. Today, I baked two rhubarb pies (single crust). My plan was to freeze them and pack them in a cooler when we leave on Thursday. My plan was to thaw them next Saturday morning for dinner that night; think they'll be ok?

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if it's still unbaked here's my advice: bake it from the frozen at the usual temperature but add about 20-30 minutes to the baking time. bake until bubbling so the cornstarch activates fully to thicken the filling.

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I have a Cherry pie that is unbaked and frozen I made last spring '07. How long should I bake it for and what temps.?
Thanks

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Thanks for the reply, Rose. That is probably the safest bet.

I was trying to avoid this because my fear is that thawing it will increase the likelihood for a soggy bottom crust.

What effects can I expect if I thaw the pie rather first?

(I am willing to be a guinea pig and report back, of course)

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i checked the chantal website and they say the warantee is voided if subjected to extreme temperature changes. Probably the best thing to do is to let it thaw overnight in the frig and then bake it chilled but not frozen.

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Unfortunately, I froze the pie without the plastic wrap underneath. What to do?!

I am trying to find out from Chantal whether it can go from freezer to oven, but I am betting that they'll recommend I don't do it.

Would starting it in a cold oven help? I am also thinking of running warm water on the underside of the dish to try to unstick the pie. Any tips of what to do here?

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i don't recommend freezing baked pies or baked pie crusts. i would freeze the unbaked pie crust and prebake it frozen as it holds it's shape best.

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No, I am afraid I have not heard back...

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Hi, I enjoyed reading about you and your family. Did you get an answer about freezing pecan pies?

Thanks

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Hello Rose, I hope you get this soon. I currently have my butter and flour mixture freezing for the crust...

I know it is fine to freeze pecan pies. My question is should I prebake the crust, add the filling, freeze solid, and then bake? Or should the crust be completely unbaked before freezing?

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Can I freeze unbaked pound cakes?

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Can I freeze unbaked pound cakes?

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Can I freeze unbaked pound cakes?

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it really depends on your freezer--how low the temperature etc. but in most any freezer it can last at last one month. i have a sub zero and a kitchen aid and find a frozen fruit pie is fine for at least 6 months.

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Jean Morando
Jean Morando
09/13/2007 05:40 PM

I have baked a blackberry pie and it is now in my freezer. What I need to know is how long can it stay there?

Thank you for your time.

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darlene snyder
darlene snyder
06/23/2007 04:06 PM

How do you freeze a blueberry pie?

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if they're not my recipe i can't tell you for sure but i'd use the same oven temp. as unfrozen but add 15-20 min. or until bubbling.

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I have frozen blueberry pies. How long and at what temp. should they bake on? Thank you "berry" much!

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i wouldn't freeze the pumpkin pie as i don't think a custard based pie would freeze well though i could be wrong.

you can still use the egg white wash and certainy macerate and reduce the juice. but don't bake on the floor of the oven--a baking stone should be fine on the lower shelf as the extra baking time from the frozen will be enough to bake the crust.

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I just bought your book and am very exciting to start baking. This year for the holidays I want to freeze the pies ahead. I want to make the Apple Crumb, Cherry, and Pumpkin pies. I do have some questions for you:

If I plan to freeze:
(I plan to freeze in pie dish with plastic on bottom and top and pop out of dish and put in freezer zip lock bags)
-Do I still prebake the crust?
-Use egg white wash to seal in crust?
-macerate juices?
When baking:
-Use oven temp of 425 Prebake and leave at 425 the whole time?
-I plan on using Chantal ceramic dish --do you suggest cooking on bottom floor of oven for a frozen pie for the first 20 minutes? or is baking stone on lowest level better for frozen pie?

Do you have any other freezing and baking with frozen pie tips to add?
Thanks!

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sounds like a lot of wonderful pies to come!

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Thanks so much for the freezing pie suggestions. I have overpicked (is that possible?) the wonderful apples grown locally and was trying to plan ahead for the busy holiday season coming up.

Thanks again. Cynthia

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Thanks, the thoughts on the rolls are very concise and helpful.

So here's another dilema. I was so very proud of myself because I just froze my first ever pie crust. I remembered Rose's instructions, and was happily imagining some Sunday morning with unexpected guests. No problem, I'd have a frozen, formed pie shell ready to go for a nice breakfast quiche.

The only glitch is...I forgot to line my Pyrex pie plate w/ plastic wrap! Now, what to do? Can I just keep it frozen in the Pyrex, and when I need to use it, let it defrost a bit in the fridge before putting in the oven? I still would't put it on the tiles, but I'm interested to hear what you suggest.

Thanks for everything!

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thanks theresa--very helpful. i'd only add that from my experience an oil spray gives the best release. if using butter, i use clarified as the milk solids in melted butter are what carmelize and can cause sticking.

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Hi, just a couple thoughts for Laura! I've been making my holiday rolls in advance for years. The rolls I make are soft white dinner rolls. I bake them at a low temperature, 275 Fahrenheit, for 10-15 minutes, just until they are set, but before they brown. (If they start to brown a little before you catch them, though, no big deal.) I use shiny muffin tins, and grease them well with butter. I have found that oil does not release as well. This helps them to come out easily and retain their perfect "skin," and the butter adds a nice flavor. If they do stick a little and get a few knife marks from your efforts to remove them, again, it's not a big deal -- they will still taste great. After taking the pans from the oven, I only let them cool for a few minutes before removing the rolls from the pan to cooling racks. I then put the racks with accompanying rolls, uncovered, right in the freezer to firm up for 30-60 minutes before removing the rolls, wrapping them in groups of 6 or 12, and then putting the wrapped rolls in a freezer bag in the freezer until needed. When you are ready to use them, they only take about an hour to defrost, but it doesn't hurt to take them out before then -- I usually take them out the morning of the "event" and they sit around wrapped until I need them. Then, as Rose says, you can just brown them at 350 or so for 5-10 minutes. If you don't have room for them in your ice chest with the pies, they probably wouldn't suffer too much if you had to defrost them the day before you use them. The browning should freshen them up. Hope this is helpful ... Rose, of course, feel free to edit or add!!!

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Great, thanks! That's a handy trick in general. I'll be sure to report back on how everything works. In the meantime, practice makes perfect so I'll work on those summer berry pies!

Thanks for all your attentive assistance.

Laura

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nope! i was wrong. the manufacturer does not recommend it to go from freezer to oven but here's how you can get around this restriction--i do it all the time! line the pie plate with a big piece of plastic wrap before placing in the dough. add the filling and topping if using and cover with another piece of plastic wrap. freeze it until solid at which point you can lift it right out of the pie plate and store it in a freezer weight storage bag. that way you have use of the pie plate for other things. when ready to bake, simply remove the plastic wrap from top and bottom and set it in the pie plate. in your situation where you want to freeze the pie and then bring it frozen in a food chest, if you have a lot of ice and it stays frozen i'd wrap it in bubble wrap and set it in the pie plate as soon as i get to the location where i'm going to bake it. if it's going to start defrosting youll need to set it in the pie plate before traveling with it.

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i'm 99.9% sure you can go from freezer to oven with my pie plate. it was one of my criterion. i'm checking with the manufacturer and will give you the final answer soon. luckily thanksgiving is a way away!

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Laura Jones
Laura Jones
05/18/2006 09:53 AM

Fantastic, thanks! Great idea about the oven themometer, I might have forgotten that!

One last question: Are your new pie pans safe to go from freezer to oven, or are metal best?

Many thanks, I'll be sure to do some test runs in advance! Yum!

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i love your advance planning. clearly you are dedicated to eating well!

i like your idea of freezing the unbaked apple pie as it will stay well in the cooler and even if still frozen--all the better as the bottom crust has the chance to get a head start crisping before the apples start softening. don't forget though that the apple pie will take a long time to cool enough to cut nice slices. maybe after all you should bake it wed. am. that way you won't have to worry about chancy ovens for both pies.

but good idea re handling the pumpkin pie the way you suggested.

the cranberry pie would also be terrific. pecan pie is excellent made ahead and everyone loves it.

the rolls are best underbaked slightly (til pale golden) and then finished for about 5 minutes in a 350 oven. you might want to try a batch ahead just to see how you like them best. they freeze very well too.

sounds like a wonderful thanksgiving in the offing!!!

be sure to bring an oven thermometer as you never know what unfamiliar ovens will offer.

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Laura Jones
Laura Jones
05/15/2006 11:24 AM

My family is planning to travel to a cabin in the mountains this Thanksgiving, and I am trying to plan to have as much food made ahead as possible. We will need to travel 2 hours by car Wednesday night.

What pies would fare well during travel, and how would you prepare them in advance? (I own the Pie Bible)

I was thinking of assembling an unbaked apple pie and freezing, then packing in a cooler for the ride. I was also thinking of pre baking a pie crust for a pumpkin pie, having the filling ready and chilled, and assembling and baking at the house.

As an alternative, I could try to bake both pies the AM of the Wednesday before, and travel with them cooked.

Also, any thoughts on advance prep of rolls? Should they be cooked in advance, or should the dough be frozen and cooked there?

Thank you for any help! I'm writing early in the hopes you will have the time to respond!

Laura Jones

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