Welcome to Real Baking with Rose, the personal blog of author Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Spend A Moment with Rose, in this video portrait by Ben Fink.

Check out my new creations


RSS AND MORE



Get the blog delivered by email. Enter your address:

Eat your books
Previous Book

Roses' Cookbooks

The Baking Bible

The Baking Bible

Buy from Amazon: USA | Canada | France | Germany | UK

Buy from Barnes & Noble
Buy from IndieBound

Next Book

Silicone Cake Pans

Dec 10, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

Allison Question:
Hello Rose,

I am a novice baker who's been turning out fabulous cakes thanks to your Cake Bible.

I have,however, had trouble locating magic strips for my cake pans, and was advised to try a silicon pan to achieve an even layer. What is your experience with silicon cake pans?

Thank you,

Rose Reply:
i am so entranced by silicone that i now represent (am spokesperson for) Lékué silicone of spain. the cake layer is not quite as high but it is more even and interestingly it has a more even, lighter, and i think much improved texture.

Read about my association with Lékué Silicone pans and bakeware from Spain.

Comments

I just made the Heavenly Coconut Seduction cake in a royal blue silicone loaf pan. Painted the inside with butter and dusted with flour. Had to increase time by 15 minutes, and lowered the temp slightly as the top was getting brown. The final 5 minutes, I only let the heat come from the bottom of the oven as the bottom of the cake was the last to get cooked.

Then I let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes. It unmolded beautifully - what a relief! The cake is so-ooo delicious and smells tempting, Rose - crunchy on the top, slightly on the sides and bottom, and tender and fine inside. Thank you! (I didn't make the cream topping though.)

REPLY

Hi Heather,
Besides the manufacturer's instructions for car of your silicone pans, we recommend washing the pans in soapy water with some vinegar and or in your dishwasher. In a worse case situation, although it can be too strong is to clean the pans with a soft scrub cleaner and then washed as above.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Heather Smith
Heather Smith
03/ 1/2013 10:43 AM

Just wondering how to treat the greasy feeling silicone pans ????

REPLY

Hi Hazel,
We ask what is its volume cup capacity?
10 cups is a fairly standard size for bundt pans, which you can then try adapting most bundt pan cake recipes as your baking times will likely increase as silicone is an insulator.
However, we only suggested using a silicone bundt pan for one recipe, the Chocolate Velvet Fudge Cake, in Rose's Heavenly Cakes The next book will not have any silicone bakeware specified for equipment except for one recipe for very small cakes.

REPLY

hazel emery
hazel emery
02/ 9/2012 01:00 PM

i have bought a silicone teddy bear cake mold
size 25-18-4cm for my grandsons 1st birthday but do,nt have a recipe
please can anyone help

thankyou

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from nat
11/18/2011 05:12 PM

Hi Nat,
For times or any variation to a recipe, you should always check with the author of the recipe.
From our testing and experience, we prefer and state in our recipes to use light aluminum, straight sided pans. Crisscrossing sheets of parchment across the bottom and up the sides, attached with shortening or baking spray, and then lightly coated with baking spray with flour will give you a clean release when unmolding.
If you prefer silicone, you may want to start with adding 10% to the shortest recommended baking time. Experimenting will give you the times.

REPLY

How long should you cook brownies in a silicone pan?????

REPLY

Some silicone is poor quality--thinner and may have an unpleasant smell when heated that it transfers to anything cooked in it.

REPLY


What makes a silocone mold pan so much better than the other's that are mentioned?


Stuart

REPLY

Maddy Swick
Maddy Swick
04/ 2/2011 09:41 AM

I use spray olive oil and then flour on my silcone pans and never have a problem. I shake off all the excess flour before using.

REPLY

how can i get my cake to come out clean . always sticks what a mess . Tks Jan

REPLY

can someone tell me where I can get a 8" silicone cake pan round.

REPLY

I would love to know the cost of a 8" round cake pan silicone.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from venga, Sham
11/29/2010 09:37 AM

venga, put silicone in the search box on this blog and you'll see all i've written about it. to answer your question: yes both microwave and conventional oven just not under a broiler or on a cooktop, i.e. no direct heat.

REPLY

venga, Sham
venga, Sham
11/29/2010 08:03 AM

I would like to know what is the purpose of using a silicone baking pan? Can you use a silicone bake pan in a microwave oven. How about a conventional oven?

Thnx

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from KIM
11/28/2010 05:00 PM

kim, you don't need my permission to change an ingredient to suit your taste if it is the same type of ingredient, i.e. you can't substitute pears for bananas but one extract for another is simply a matter of personal preference.

REPLY


Rose, in your heavenly cakes book, there's a recipe for marable velvet cake. Can I change the 2 teas. pure vanilla extract to 2 teas.pure peppermint extract?

REPLY


Anonymous in reply to comment from ES
11/28/2010 03:30 PM

409 or Fantastic takes grease and stains right off, then wash with regular dish soap. I use sponge on the abrasive side. Does not harm bakeware at all.

REPLY

Sarah Goldenberg
Sarah Goldenberg
04/20/2010 09:59 AM

Dear Rose -I live in Israel, and I recenbly found a silicone pan shaped like a star of David. I used it for the first time this week to bake a cake for Israel Independence Day. I am glad that I used an old and tried recipe, so I could monitor it closely. I used a a cake rack under the pan, and instead of a pan, and it worked out very well. I will try to lower the temperature next time - but I am very happy with the silicone pan. I plan to buy several for friends and children so that they can have the fun too. I also bought a rose shaped pan, but i have not yet had the neerve to use it. I need a good recipe that does not use either butter or other dairy products.

REPLY

Sarah Goldenberg
Sarah Goldenberg
04/20/2010 09:58 AM

Dear Rose -I live in Israel, and I recenbly found a silicone pan shaped like a star of David. I used it for the first time this week to bake a cake for Israel Independence Day. I am glad that I used an old and tried recipe, so I could monitor it closely. I used a a cake rack under the pan, and instead of a pan, and it worked out very well. I will try to lower the temperature next time - but I am very happy with the silicone pan. I plan to buy several for friends and children so that they can have the fun too. I also bought a rose shaped pan, but i have not yet had the neerve to use it. I need a good recipe that does not use either butter or other dairy products.

REPLY

Glenda Pettifer
Glenda Pettifer
12/31/2009 12:30 PM

Rec'd a set of "Arts" silicone bakeware for Xmas. Tried the loaf pan with a frozen loaf of bread...came out perfect. Just tried the bundt pan with angel food cake & it cooked in less time (about 10 min. less) & came out of the mold leaving crust on the pan, same as it would have using an aluminum pan. So far, pretty happy. Was concerned with all the negative comments posted. My only complaint is the lack of instructions. Glenda

REPLY

I just happened to stumble onto this site while looking for another style silicone bundt type pan. I just finished baking 3 cakes in my Pampered Chef pan that I got some time ago. I WAS IMPRESSED! I dropped the temp 25 degrees as suggested, put it in the oven by itself, (I guess it is firmer than others), cooled for 10 minutes in the pan and the cakes came out beautifully. I hate to push brands, but after reading the comments on your blog, I thought your readers might be interested.

REPLY

nici, it's not a silicone liner, it's a silicone pan. brands are constantly changing but it should be easy to find a 9 inch or slightly larger pan like the one i used.

REPLY

Nici Badgley
Nici Badgley
11/19/2009 06:47 PM

Dear Rose, I watched a youtube video of you explaining pans for baking a cheesecake using the water bath method. You showed a springform pan with a silicone liner on the outside. I was wondering what style and brand this silicone liner was because I cannot find one anywhere. If you know where I can purchase the same one it would be so helpful for my beautiful cheesecakes. Thank you kindly.
Nici

REPLY

Dear Sirs,

This is Sandy Gong,from Daffodil Industrial Co.,LTD.We are factory of manufacturing silicone cake mold.There are so many styles.Pls contact me if you are inerested in our products.I will send you pitures.

Best regards.
Yours
Sandy
Best Regards!

Sandy Gong

Daffodil Industrial Co.,Ltd
Tel:86-757-25385389
Fax:86-757-25385222
Email: sales15@dsilicone.com
MSN: gongxiaoqin560@hotmail.com
AAD:Nanpu Industrial Estate Jun'an Town
Shunde Foshan Guangdong,528329,China

REPLY

when my tupperware gets sticky like that I use TSP to give them a good cleaning.... then washing them very well after to remove any left over TSP

Might work on this too.

My method is put a little TSP on counter get a wet cloth and then scrub the item it takes time but it is worth it... my tupperware is 40 years old and just like new.

REPLY

I finally got my silicon bakeware to work for me. I sprayed them with non-stick cooking spray before I poured the batter in them. I put the pans on wire racks and not baking sheets before putting in the oven. I lowered my oven temperature 25 degrees than suggested in the recipe or cake box but added 10 to 15 mins to the baking time, checking every 5 mins during the last 15 mins to see if they were cooked through. I cooled completely in the pans before trying to release the cake or brownies. If I have the time I let them cool overnight. I loosen the cake/brownies from the side of the pan and then invert. I then work, manipulate the flexibility of the pan to get the release but they do come out.

REPLY

I have two silicone loaf pans. When I take them out to use, they are relly sticky and seem to have a film on them. When I try to wash them in hot soapy water, it still doesn't come off. What is it and how can I get it off of my pans?

REPLY

I want to know what to do with sticking cakes in silicone cake pan. the question on internet was not answered. i have tried every thing but they still stick. can someone please help me?

REPLY

Re the heart shaped silicone muffin tins from Target, I have the red ones...they bake beautifully but are very sticky after baking. I've tried Soft Scrub, Goo Gone, Ajax, liquid detergent, nothing works. It is disgusting to handle. How do you clean them?

Thank you.

REPLY

Ann Hodgman
Ann Hodgman
01/31/2009 10:17 PM

I've had so little success with the silicone bakeware I've tried--under such variable conditions--that I've given up on it. I haven't tried Lekue, though. Why is it better than the others?

REPLY

I have an entire set of silicon cake pans that I have a problem with. When I try to release the cakes or brownies from the pans part of them stick to the bottom of the pans. It totally ruins the effect. I thought I wasn't letting them cool long enough so I left them in overnight and they still stick. I thought the whole purpose of using the silicon bakeware was the non stick properties. I read that you shouldn't use the nonstick baking sprays on them, I not sure why not. I don't want to have to use parchmant paper, besides the bundt pan isn't conducive to that process anyway. Do anyone have a solution or what I am doing wrong?

REPLY

Hello,

I am looking for a Crescent Moon shaped cake pan. I know that a few different sillicone bakeware companies make them in personal cake size. I was just wondering if anyone knows where I can buy a larger one or if they are even made? I am looking to buy one before June of this year for my sisters 20th birthday. Thank you all in advance.

REPLY

ann hodgman
ann hodgman
09/ 3/2008 12:19 PM

So, so agree about silicone pans. There are many things they don't work for. They don't even unmold cakes all that well!

REPLY

i use baker's joy which contains flour. unless making a cake mix (and i'm sure you are not!) in order to use a silicone bundt pan successfully you need to set it on a rack and then set the rack on a pan. the cake must cool in the pan completely before unmolding. this works well for a chocolate cake yielding an extra moist and fudgy cake but i find yellow cakes bake very unevenly.

REPLY

Do you put oil on the silicon bundt pan before putting batter in?

REPLY

i was told by lékué that after extensive use the pores of the silicone will exude a bit of oil from the batter baked in them and the thing to do is to put them in a moderate oven for about 30 minutes to "cleanse" them.

REPLY

Judith Anderson
Judith Anderson
08/16/2008 09:18 PM

I notice that every time I take my silicone bundt pan out of the closet, even after I have meticulously washed it after baking, it has a sticky grease film on the outside. Scrubbing it with dish detergent temporarily removes the grease, but it oozes out again in the cabinet. I wasn't aware that silicone baking pans were absorpbant. Is there any way to avoid this problem?

REPLY

Strange..Wouldn't you think this would be a copyrighted (by NordicWare) design?

REPLY

Linda, Hamilton Beach makes one.

REPLY

I picked up a silicone bundt-type cake pan at a garage sale. It's blue, and in the same design as NordicWare's Cathedral pan. No maker's ID on it. Does anyone know who might have made it? I don't see any silicone on NordicWare's website.

REPLY

Thanks for the help on the heart shaped silicone pan from Target!! I was on here looking like crazy and Leann had the exact same question I had. Mines in the oven as I type this. Baking it at 350. Wasn't really sure how much of the box mix to use though. It seemed way too full when I poured the whole mix in but hopefully i works. I also put a baking sheet under it.
Thanks Rose for the reassurance! I'll post again when I see the results!
Thanks
Jamie

REPLY

Thanks for the help on the heart shaped silicone pan from Target!! I was on here looking like crazy and Leann had the exact same question I had. Mines in the oven as I type this. Baking it at 350. Wasn't really sure how much of the box mix to use though. It seemed way too full when I poured the whole mix in but hopefully i works. I also put a baking sheet under it.
Thanks Rose for the reassurance! I'll post again when I see the results!
Thanks
Jamie

REPLY

yes but a stainless steel rack is even better for air circulation.

REPLY

Do i need to put a pan underneath the silicone muffin pan for baking? It is so floppy, I can't imagine getting it into the oven without something rigid underneath.

REPLY

Phyllis:
I don't know where you live, but I recently saw loose bottom 9" pans at Bed Bath and Beyond...and I think they are a national chain...but you may not be in the US! I am still amazed how the internet brings people so close together from so far away

REPLY

parrish aka magic line in l.a. (they have an 800 #) sweet celebrations in MN also carries them.

REPLY

Phyllis Magida
Phyllis Magida
01/28/2008 08:47 AM

Dear Ms. Berenbaum,
I can't find either 8 or 9-inch round cake pans with loose bottoms.

Do you know of a company that makes them? I called both sources in your Cake Bible book but they either don't make them any more or are out of business.

All best to you,
Phyllis Magida

REPLY

silicone rose! a disaster!!!

REPLY

i must congratulate you on your courage and imagination! i actually prefer silicone muffin pans because the cupcakes or muffins end up having a better shape but as you pointed out, not if they have a middle row.

REPLY

The comments about the silicone bakeware have been enlightening and certainly helpful, especially regarding the bundt cake pan, which I purchased but have so far not put to use. I did, however, purchase a silicone muffin pan last year, each cup sized at 31/2 x 11/4 inches. The first time I used it, the muffins came out lopsided. The second time they did the same. I have an electric range and I followed all the instructions, but couldn't figure out why the muffins were coming out lopsided. Finally, I took a drastic step which some would consider a little crazy, considering what I paid for the pans, but I took my kitchen scissors and cut each pan right up through the middle, leaving 3 cups per piece. I placed these on the baking sheet, spaced a little apart, and lo and behold, no more lopsided muffins. A somewhat drastic step for sure, but one that has paid off in the end.

REPLY

Thanks Matthew
I did look after reading your reply and I found an 11 inch fluted quiche pan that is 1 inch deep. I'm not sure how much of the outside dimension of 11 inch is taken up with the fluted edge.
I would use this as a waterproof sleeve to go over my springform pan of 10 1/2 inches, so as long as it would provide a water protector it would work well. I then put this into a 12 x 2 in. metal cake pan that holds the water.
I would prefer to have the sleeve a bit deeper than 1 inch, but I might be able to make due and carefully watch the water bath depth. I really don't like using foil as occasionally the foil will leak, allowing water to seep into the springform and cake.Not good!!
If you know of a deeper round, let me know.
Thanks

REPLY

Barb,
I just did a quick search and saw several at 10 or 11 inches, but you're right 10.5 seems harder to find. You might be able to stretch the 10 inch pan--how tall were you looking for?

REPLY

Hi Rose
I got quite excited when you began to talk about cheesecakes in water baths.
I bake cheesecakes for my son's restaurant so I make quite a few. My problem is that I use 10 1/2 in pans and I also don't like foil for a water bath cover. I have hunted for a round silicone pan wide enough to use as the spring form cover. I cannot find one large enough. I believe there would be a market for these if they were reasonably priced. I find that others in forums feel the same way about foil. Do you know if this size exists?
Thanks

REPLY

I was given a silicone bundt pan as a gift...tried it once and it was a disaster!

REPLY

as i mentioned above, the bundt type silicone pan can be a problem but the smaller pans such as the heart, muffin pans, financier pans, madeleine are all terrific.

leann, i can't attest to cheap silicone but i can tell you that the lékué heart shape pan worked perfectly using the same oven temperature as usual--350F. it may take a few extra minutes to bake. you do need to put these pans on a baking sheet bc they are so flexible but they won't melt in the oven. and as i said above, putting them on a rack before putting them on the baking sheet gives the best circulation of air, especially for pans such as muffin pans that have a center row.

REPLY

Gloriamarie
Gloriamarie
01/ 1/2008 01:21 PM

I've tried the suggestions for baking in silicone bundt pans and they do not work. The cakes burn, no matter what kind I use.

I've lowered the oven temp, tried cooking at the original temp but for shorter period. Still burns.

I've had it with silicone baking pans.

REPLY

I just got a inexpensive silicone/plastic flexible heart shaped pan (from Valentine decorations) at Target. I have no idea how to use it. No recipe or mix tells you what temp or time to bake a cake when it's in a silicone pan. Just metal, dark, etc. Also, do i put the silicone pan on a cookie sheet to keep it flat or straight on the rack like a regular cake pan? I'm so afraid of it melting all over the oven. This pan didn't come with any kind of instructions.

REPLY

i have had the same experience.
the only cake i have baked successfully in a silicone bundt pan is a chocolate cake and only by using the method below. yellow or white cake batters do just as you described except if using a cake mix. but a chocolate cake baked in a silicone bundt pan is velvety and moist. i'm even putting it in my new book it's so good.
but the only way to get even baking for this cake in this pan is to set the silicone bundt pan on a rack and then set the rack on a sheet pan or rigid cookie sheet. putting it on the rack allows the air to circulate and get to the bottom of the pan. having it on the rigid pan allows you to remove it from the oven without flexing the pan which would crack the cake as a cake when hot is most fragile and the silicone is flexible. you must allow it to cool completely or until barely warm before unmolding.

REPLY

Sister Gloriamarie Amalfitano
Sister Gloriamarie Amalfitano
11/ 4/2007 06:35 PM

I have a problem with silicone bundt pans. I have read Rose's booklet and it doesn't address my question.

I purchased 2 Wilton silicone bundt pans at Bed Bath and Beyond. They are blue.

I have made 4 cakes using them and each cake came out somewhat burnt on the flutie bits and down the outsides.

I have checked oven temperature. I have tried cooking at a lower temperature. But by the time the toothpick comes out clean and I unload the pan, the cakes are sorta burnt. I've read the directions that came with the pans so often I practically have them memorized.

I end up feeding them to the birds because I feel I can't use them. I am making them to sell at Gourmet Pantry at my church's Christmas fair and i just can't see selling slightly burnt cakes.

Is there something special about baking with these pans I don't know?

Thank you for your help,
Sister Gloriamarie

REPLY

our main products: silicone mould, silicone cake mould,silicoen cake pan,silicone kitchware,silicone glove,silicone case,silicone keypad etc

If you need the items, pls let us know,we will try our best to meet your need !

Our e-mail addrress: huiliancentury@yahoo.com.cn
Our company website: huilianmoju.en.alibaba.com
MSN: huiliansaler@hotmail.com
Tel: 86-0755-81752173
Fax: 86-0755-28094615
We are looking forward to hearing from you soon.

REPLY

We are a professional manufacturer of precise mould and product.We have two professional manufactories:1.connector mold manufactory;2.silicon mould manufactory.We have ever created precise connector mold and silicon mould for the customers of Japan,Taiwan,Europe and American etc.Including the plastic and silicone product,auto connector,precise mold parts,camera, mobile phone,various communications,digital products etc.
We have advanced equipments and many experienced technical personnel,and we can provide all kinds of precise connector and silicone mould for the customers.The products spread all over the fields and extensively use in every corporation all over the world.
We integrate development,design and manufacturing capabilities,especially specializing in manufacturing advanced mould of Europe,America,Japan . We can manufacture various kinds of silicone products according to customers' repuests or samples.

If any of our products are of interest to you, please let us know. We will be happy to give you a quotation upon receipt of your detailed requirements.

Our e-mail addrress: huiliancentury@yahoo.com.cn
Our company website: huilianmoju.en.alibaba.com
MSN: huiliansaler@hotmail.com
Tel: 86-0755-81752173
Fax: 86-0755-28094615
We are looking forward to hearing from you soon.

With Warm Regards
Sincerely,
Songjun Ye
Sales Manager

REPLY

yes--it takes a little longer in silicone.

REPLY

We seem to notice a difference in cooking times when using a silicone bundt pan. Have you notice that you have to adjust the cooking time?

REPLY

Tisha - you can find a description of Fat Daddio's cake pans if you do a simple google search. I don't have any, but they are supposed to be exactly like standard aluminum pans, plus the manufacturer claims they are completely dishwasher safe.

REPLY

never heard of it.

REPLY

Tisha Andrews
Tisha Andrews
06/ 6/2007 10:40 PM

I've recently heard some profesional cake bakers and sugar artists get excited about a new anodized aluminum cake pan made by Fat Daddio's? Can you tell me anyting about the pans or the company?
Andrea

REPLY

Michele - silicone does have kind of a "greasy" feeling to it. I don't have any silicone cake pans, but I have the silicone baking mats and they always feel a bit greasy. I've tried using a dry paper towel on them, which seems to work a little, but I can never completely eliminate it. (I've also noticed the greasiness is worse when it's very warm).

As for the stickiness you described - if it's from baked on cooking oil, try scrubbing it with a baking soda paste. That's what I use on all my cookware and bakeware - it works very well.

REPLY

Michele Q. Kuznitz
Michele Q. Kuznitz
05/20/2007 01:33 PM

does anyone know how to clean silicone baking pans so that all the grease and stickiness is removed from them after each use?

REPLY

please look at the booklet i did on silicone and various threads discussing its properties and what it works well for and what it doesn't. it will not work to place the hot water as you suggested--the pan needs to be in the water bath for cheesecake.

REPLY

Thank you Patrincia and Rose.

I'm puzzled as to how silicon works. If it can be made into heat-proof gloves, how does it work in baking ?

If its purpose is to equalize the temp and prevent drying, will a different method like placing a large bowl or pan of hot water in a separate rack under or above the cheesecake pan work?

REPLY

thank you so much patrincia. juliana if you want to use the double layer of heavy duty foil instead, just put some cream of tartar in the water and it will prevent staining the pans.
the water in the water bath serves to equalize the temperature and provide moisture to prevent drying.

REPLY

Juliana - Yes, Rose did mention baking cheesecakes in silicone pans:

"i love removable bottom pans for cakes that i'd rather not invert such as a coffee crumb or streusel cake. they're great for a cheesecake as well as long as you are sure to use a double layer of heavy duty foil to wrap around them to keep out the water. another great trick i'm using is to set the pan in a slightly larger silicone pan before putting it in the water bath!!!"

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I've tried to search your blog topics for information regarding silicon cake pans and cheesecakes but I can't seem to remember where I last saw one particular posting. Did you reply to a question similar to mine below?

I like to bake cheesecakes with a loose-bottomed cake pan but I don't like to wrap it with foil before putting it into the waterbath because somehow, the foil oxidizes during baking and leaves a stain on the outside of the pan as well as on the pan used for the waterbath. Also, sometimes the foil tears and the water runs into the loose-bottomed pan during baking, which makes the cheesecake soggy and coated with aluminium.

Did you mention somewhere (or did I read it in some other website?) that I can put the loose-bottomed pan in a bigger pan that is made of silicon and then put the silicon pan in the waterbath?

If this is possible, will the water heat be conducted through the silicon to the metal pan? I mean, what is the purpose of the waterbath? Is it just to provide steam for the baking (like in baking french loaves) or is it meant to lower the temp of the metal pan?
If the purpose is to lower the temp of the metal pan, then won't silicon act as an insulator to the water and the metal pan? Afterall, silicon is also used to make heat-proof gloves.

Thanks.

REPLY

Kitchen Conservatory carries Magic Cake strips. They are in St. Louis, MO or you can order online at www.kitchenconservatory.com

REPLY

i've never had white crystals form with lékué silicone bakeware which is 100% pure platinum silicone but i have had some whitish streaking. i simply put it in the dishwasher and it disappeared. if the silicone has been used a great deal the "pores" absorb some of the fat from what is put in it. to release this, all you have to do is put it in a 350 dgree oven for about 10 minutes or until you see some oil that rises to the surface. then wash it and you're good to go.
re cake strips instead of bain marie--believe me i tried it and it's NOT the same. better than nothing but not much!

REPLY

Lynn in Tucson
Lynn in Tucson
03/17/2007 01:14 PM

I've had silicone bakewear "bloom" with white crystals when left in the cupboard for a few weeks (put away clean, I swear!). It happened twice, so I tossed the bundt pan. Has anyone else experienced this?
Also, I thought I'd read that the magic strips could be used in place of a bain marie (for a flourless chocolate cake, for example). Is this true?

REPLY

I remember seeing magic baking strips for sale by the yard so that you can cut them to the lengths that you want. But I can not find those now. Does anyone know where I can purchase them?

REPLY

magic cake strips are wonderful when using metal pans but entirely unnecessary when using silicone pans.

REPLY

Beverly Wilhite
Beverly Wilhite
01/ 8/2006 09:03 AM

Re:Magic Strips (Allison)You can order those strips from "Sweet Celebrations" or "King Arthur Flour" the strips are a god-send for us rookies.:)BW

REPLY

tilting would be caused from either a strong blowing convection fan or a shelf that is not level. some people want domed cupcakes and other want flat ones. if you want flat ones you need to increase the leavening in the recipe.

REPLY

Why then, am I the only one who can't make them work for me? I bake the loveliest cupcakes and they always tilt from the heat when I use silicone. How can I keep them flat?

REPLY

POST A COMMENT

Name:  
Email:  
(won't be displayed, but it is used to display your picture, if you have a Gravatar)
Web address,
if any:
 
 

Comment

You may use HTML tags for style.

EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Sign up for Rose's newsletter, a once-a-month mouthwatering treat!

DATE ARCHIVE

Featured on finecooking.com