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Size of Bundt Pans

Dec 18, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose

Sue Question:
I have a question. My recipe calls for a 12 cup bundt pan. I have not been able to locate one. In addition the size is not given in cups, they are given in inches, so I bought one that says 9-1/2 inches. How does 12 cups equate to 9-1/2 inches? Will my recipe turn out using this size pan?

Rose Reply:
for the future, the best way to know pan size is to use a liquid measure to pour water into it. if it’s a two-piece pan line it first with a plastic bag such as a garbage bag.

i can tell you that by june, nordicware will be reissuing the famous 12 cup bundt pan. your 9-1/2 inch pan is almost certainly 10 cup capacity.

a good rule of thumb is to fill it no more than two-thirds full. but i sometimes fill it as much as 1-1/2 inch from the top and then it domes above the center tube while baking.

you will have extra batter using the smaller pan so use it to bake cupcakes.

Comments

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Gayle
09/15/2014 10:10 PM

Hi Gayle,
We suggest that you contact Nordicware for the information that you seek.
Rose & woody

REPLY

I am wanting to make a 6",8" and 10" bundt cakes for my wedding cakes! What size of bundt cakes do I need to buy because they all are by cups and I can't figure it out! :)

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Annie
07/18/2014 10:32 PM

Hi Annie,
On Nordicware's website, Nordicware still has their 12 cup classic shaped aluminum pan. They also have the cast aluminum Anniversary Pan version, which is designed for batters from 10 to 15 cups. We used this pan in our upcoming "The Baking Bible" for making a delicious babka bread. Most of Nordicware's pans are 10 cup capacity, because many of today's layer cakes are made in 9 by 2 inch round pans which hold 8-2/3 cups. The smaller size bundt pans eliminates the need to convert the recipes except for the leavening.
To solve your sticking problem, we recommend that you use Baker's Joy spray which is a combination of oil, flour, and lecithin. Spray it on and lightly brush off any excess. Otherwise, brush on shortening, lightly coat it with flour--preferably Wondra, and tap out the excess flour.
We will be posting an article on how to prepare a bunt own on August 9th.
You can also call Nordicware for more information.
Rose & Woody

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Mary Lynn Chlada
Mary Lynn Chlada in reply to comment from Annie
07/ 9/2014 10:02 PM

Hi Annie,
I remember having a Hugh Bundt pan. It made a double box cake. The pan was as you said, lower and very round.
I have tried to find another one for at least 10 years. If you have any luck finding one let me know and I'll d the same.

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Hi, I threw out my original Nordic Ware bundt pan from 1973 and now I am kicking myself. I hate the new one I got - cakes stick all the time no matter what I do and it is too small.
I am now on a hunt for the 12 cup. I found it BUT I think I remember my old pan being wider and shallower. I really don't want a high cake, just bigger.
Am I mistaken? Does anyone still have the old cake pan? I know I have to resign myself to this size!
Many thanks,
Annie

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from phyllis
03/31/2014 10:36 PM

Hi Phyllis,
Except for a few recipes in "The Cake Bible", we specify the cup capacity of the bunt pan in our recipes. If the recipe is not filling the pan per Rose's recommended measurements stated above, you can generally can increase the recipe's ingredients to meet filling the pan to the proper height.
Most of our bundt cake recipes are for 10-cup capacity bundt pans. You can make the recipes in your larger pan, but the cakes may be slightly shorter from the sides reflecting in heat, unless you increase the batter.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Cristina
03/31/2014 10:26 PM

Hi Christina,
I recently moved and have a similar problem my oven and the apartment management is not looking to repair it. I only bake recipes like brownies or butter/oil cakes where I can open the oven door to check to verify that the baking item is done without risking that the item will fall, like a génoise cake.
Hopefully, you can have your's repaired or replaced, and not have to limit your baking.
Virtually, every oven I have had has required me to make a chart of where to set the oven temperature versus what the oven's temperature dial indicates.
Woody

REPLY

problem I hope you can help - I have now bought the Original Nordicware bundt pan - it is 12 cup capacity, and 10 inches across... I made the cake precisely but it did not fill the pan well enought so when finished, it is rather low. I am always confused about bundt pan sizes. And should I have bought the new Platinum series, or the Anniversary Bundt pan? I am confused as to which to have bought. Thanks

REPLY

Rose and Woody,
Another possible oven problem:
Was using an oven thermometer, and putting the batter in the oven when the desired temperature was indicated, but cakes were taking much longer than the recipe specified to get done. Brownies were a little "rare."
The stove repairman explained that it was a problem with a valve that regulates and maintains the oven temperature.

REPLY

Hi Winter Rose,
We think your problem is your friend's oven, since we are assuming you were using the same ingredients and knew that the leavenings were fresh.
In all of her books, Rose discusses that a major problem with a baked recipe failing or producing poorer results than stated is the oven not heating at the same temperature as the temperature setting. We have a couple of suggestions for checking your oven's temperature. We have listed a couple of thermometers designed for ovens on page 474 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and a section on ovens on the next two pages.
Another test, is to make the All Occasion Downy Yellow Cake in The Cake Bible or Rose's Favorite Yellow Butter Cake posted on this blog. If you have good results with these within the time frames given then your oven is heating properly.
You may also experiment with positioning the cake pan in different places on your oven's rack. My oven's right side is slightly hotter than the left side. My two previous ovens were off from 10 to 20 degrees. If your oven does not have a calibration feature, you may want to make up a chart for where to set the oven's temperature.
Ovens not heating to the temperature indicated by the oven's temperature setting is one of the three main factors for a cake recipe to fail along with incorrect measuring and over beating the batter. We have had the same problem in using someone else's or business's oven when doing demonstrations and teaching classes.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Winter Rose
Winter Rose
05/22/2013 01:34 AM

I have baked two Grand Marnier cakes in the past and they turned out great. Today I tried to bake another one following the exact same recipe and for some reason there was a ring of collapse around the center of the cake. The only difference is that I baked it in my friends oven both times before. But her's was gas like mine and even older than mine! The recipe calls for a 350 degree oven. Any ideas as to why this is happening?

REPLY

Hi Tasanee,
In Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we gave 12 to 14 servings for a 10 cup bundt pan.
This works out to around 3/4 of cup of cake per serving. Adornments, type of cake, and the event may change what the servings per size of bundt cake will be.
Rose & Woody


REPLY

Tasanee Jordan
Tasanee Jordan
03/ 6/2013 03:34 PM

I would like to know how can I figure out how much a bundt pan will serve. A 6 cup bundt pan will serve how many? A 9 cup pundt pan will serve how many? A 12 cup bundt pan will serve how many? Is a bundtlet a single serving?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from jo
02/ 3/2013 07:46 PM

Hi Jo,
We are surprised that the cup capacity was not marked on the packaging. We would suggest you just measure in cups of water until you fill to the rim to calculate its cup capacity.
We do this when we buy new pans just to confirm.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

i just bought a fluted tube pan 9 3/4 x 3 3/8, how many cups is that

REPLY

Hi Nancy,
We ask if you are making a recipe from one of Rose's books?
We generally do not recommend silicone pans for baking bundt except for chocolate cakes. A major problem with silicone pans is that the quality and thickness of silicone can vary widely amongst brands which can effect baking time, cooling time, and unmolding. If you have a copy of Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we have a recipe for a Chocolate Velvet Fudge Cake on page 117, which we state to let the cake cool 1 hour or completely cool before unmolding, and write about silicone pans on page 466.
We do like using silicone pans for: covering a springform pan for baking cheesecakes in a waterbath, cupcakes, financiers, and madeleines. Rose also has a cake strip, Rose's Cake Strip, which is made out of silicone.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Nancy Mullin
Nancy Mullin
01/15/2013 05:19 PM

I just tried a silicone bundt pan. I have a gas oven (thermo checked the temp!) Recipe called for 45 min @ 350--it took at least another 20 for the pick to come out clean. It did not stick to the pan, just fell apart when I inverted it to cool (waited ab 15 min). It's tasty, moist and tender, not dry, but this will NOT do!! What did I do wrong...or should I go back to my metal pans? PLEASE HELP

REPLY

Thanks :-)

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from LAN
11/16/2012 09:19 AM

Dark pans or pan linings absorb the heat faster. If your recipe specifies 350F/175C, use 325F/160C.

REPLY

I bought some bundt pans some years ago, they have black nonstick coating

I've noticed the ones that are available now are called 'Platinum' and they are silver colour all over

Does anyone know what's the difference between the black and silver coating?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Marcia
10/13/2012 08:10 PM

Hi Marcia,
If you are referring to the portion of the bundt cake that domes above above the rim of the pan and lowers after cooling is normal as with most cake recipes. Even for producing a layer cake where you want a flat top, the cake has to dome slightly and flatten out on cooling.
We call the "ridge" the "apron" for the distance between the serving plate and where the now bottom of the cake rises to the widest section of the sides of the cake after you have inverted the cake, cooled it, and moved it to the serving plate. During testing a recipe, we will take this measurement with the hope of reducing it to where the cake looks like it is sitting completely flat on the serving plate. In some recipes this can not be achieved without seriously compromising the recipe's texture. In one of the recipes for the new book, we actually worked on making a noticeable "apron" for the cake's appearance.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Please tell me why is my bundt cake coming out with a "ridge or skirt" line and then falling after it cools?

REPLY

Hi Grandpa Andy,
We believe your pound cake is falling due to not enough structure from the ingredients. We recommend to lower the leavening slightly or change flours. If using cake flour go to bleached all purpose. Another factor, could be too much batter if the batter is within a half inch from the rim.
Does the recipe state a bundt pan for equipment, which usually will also state how many cups?

REPLY

Grandpa Andy
Grandpa Andy
08/14/2011 10:59 PM

When I bake a pound cake in either the Nordic Ware Rose or the cathedral bundt pans they fall during the last 10 min.

REPLY

My rum cake kept falling--REALLY ANNOYING-- (I used a bundt pan 12-cup)so I lowered my temp and cooked a little longer until done.....It came out beautiful and did not fall....Original recipe said 375 I dropped it to 325....I also did not use as much liquid...My recipe said to prepare pudding with milk and leave at room temp...this did not work...I added just the dry pudding before baking...It was just as good...lots of oooohs & ahhhhhhs............GOOD LUCK TO ALL

REPLY

Sandy, if your cake if falling, it probably doesn't have enought structure in its recipe, or it is underbaked, either by time or temp. Without more information it is difficult to say why your cake falls. What recipe are you using?

Since your pan is probably non-stick, I'm not sure if inverting it would make a big difference. Are you unmolding it after a ten minute cooling period?

REPLY

WHY DOES MY RUM CAKE MADE IN A BUNDT PAN FALL EVERY TIME AFTER I TAKE IT OUT OF THE OVEN. SHOULD I INVERT THE PAN AFTER THE OVEN. WOULD IT PREVENT THE FALL......

REPLY

sandy andre
sandy andre
06/21/2009 07:40 PM

If I don't have a bundt pan for a receipe I will use an fluted pan. It works everytime. It just isn't as pretty.

Here is my problem. I have a receipe for rum cake in a bundt pan. It comes out beautiful everytime. But after it cools it falls about 50%.. I think I use to invert the pan after the oven.

REPLY

I made a bundt cake in the new silicone pan and then in a regular bundt pan and both times they fell before even taking them out of the oven. I have no idea what happened as I have made the recipe before! HELP!

REPLY

batter is too strong. try increasing the leavening.

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I am a new baker and I just make simple french vanilla, chocolate, and marble cakes with a fluted bundt pan, I just moved up from circular pans. The center always rise's higher then the sides, so they sit off the bottom of the plate when they are all done and I use frosting to cover the gaps, what causes this?

REPLY

If there is no pan size how do you know if it is a ten-cup vs. a larger cup recipe? Do you add the ingredients 3c flour + 3 c sugar etc. Occasionally I find recipes stating only "tube pan" whic is confusing.

Also I have 1-1/2 size pans and would like to use for Christmas gifts. How much of my pound cake recipe to put in each (my recipe is so good).

REPLY

I believe Babs is right. You have to be sure the volume of the pan you want to use is sufficient for the recipe though... these pans come in every size immaginable.

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I'm not absolutely positive, but I believe the word "bundt" may be copyrighted by Nordic Ware, and that's why other manufacturers call them fluted tube pans.

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Hi- I have a recipe that calls for a bundt pan, but I am having a hard time figuring out what the difference between a bundt pan and fluted tube pan is. All I seem to find in the stores here are the fluted tube pan. They seem to look about the same. Am I right?

REPLY

good news--noricware is no longer making the pans with dark linings so you won't have to drop the temperature!

REPLY

Silvia, I have quite a few of the Kaiser bundt style pans. They make beautiful cakes. The pans come with a little instruction booklet and explain how to grease the pan. They tell you to grease the pan with butter. This is what I have done, and the cakes always come out of the pans easily with the gorgeous designs intact. I prefer these now to Nordicware.

Speaking of Nordicware, I spray these pans with Baker's Joy, and never have any trouble. Just drop the temperature about 25 degrees when you bake with them, and watch it after about 35-45 minutes or so. You might have to cover the top with foil to keep the top from browning too much.

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Hi Silvia - I have two different Kaiser bundt pans. One is more traditional design and releases fine, but the other has more nooks and crannies... it was given to me by a friend who had problems with it. I haven't used it yet, so I don't know if I'll have the same problem. Wish I could be more helpful.

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Has anybody tried the Kaiser bundt pans?
I am thinking about ordering a couple of them (small ones), becuase the designs are lovely...and i'm a pan-lover! But, I have had some problems with nordicware cast aluminium pans before, and would like to know if the kaiser ones are easier or more difficult to use.

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i really can't imagine why manufacturers would do such a thing--the whole point of a tube pan is to be able to hang the cake upside down and not have it fall out!!! but there is another great use for non-stick tube pans--monkey bread! check out the bread bible--there's a great photo of it. sticky with caramel it unmolds beautifully in this type of pan.

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Hi Rose,
First of all I want to say I love your books and I'm so glad you have a blog now!! Anyway, I was recently given a tube pan that's nonstick, with the little legs no less. I baked a chiffon cake and when I tried to turn it upside down to cool it, the whole cake fell out. I didn't grease the pan but I guess the nonstick surface worked too well. My cake turned out dense because I wasn't able to cool it properly. My question is, should I just get rid of this non stick tube pan and buy a regular tube pan or is there any way that I can still use the tube pan for chiffon cakes and angel food cakes? Thanks for your help!!

REPLY

Renea - Assuming your oven temp is correct, I suggest you try one of Rose's pound cake recipes from the cake bible - there are a couple that can be baked in a fluted tube pan, which is similar to your angel food cake pan (you might even like Rose's recipes better!). Otherwise, I suggest trying your recipe with the pan that it suggests - reputible recipes are well tested and direct you to use equipment that will produce the best results.

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I have a poundcake recipe that calls for a 12 cup bundt pan. I purchased what I thought was a bundt pan but turned out to be a heavy aluminum angel food pan. Because this pan gets hotter than the regular pan, my cake is always beautifully brown and tests done. Once I take it out of the oven, it falls. When I cut it, there's about an inch of cake at the bottom of the pan that isn't done. I've adjusted the temperature and baking times and it always falls. Any suggestions? If necessary, I will email you the recipe.

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the short answer is: not well
for further details please do a search for silicone bundt pans in the search ox just to your left.

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What about the silicone bundt cake pans? Do they really work? Are there any advantages?

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yes as long as the volume of the two pans is the same as the bundt pan.

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Is is OK to make a cake calling for a bundt pan in 2 round cake pans instead?

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cake in bundt pans usually take 50 to 60 minutes to bake.

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How is bake time calculated when using a bundt pan compared to a layer cake?

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thanks babs! nordicware is also reissuing their classic 12 cup bundt.

i'm not terribly fond of making this large a bundt type cake because the outside crust gets so very dark by the time the inside of the cake is baked fully. i think 10 cup is as large as i want to get and in fact my favorite is the 6-6 1/2 cup bundt type pans aka fluted tube pans.

REPLY

Kaiser makes 12-cup "bundt" pans in at least four different designs. Go to www.kaiserbakeware.com

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