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Corrections: The Bread Bible

Feb 28, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose

The following is the complete list of errors and corrections from The Bread Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Use the comments below to report anything else you find.

In the CRANBERRY-BANANA-WALNUT QUICK BREAD, page 101, the correct baking temperature is 350 degrees F.

In the crisper flat bialy variation on page 165, Matthew suggests using 1 teaspoon of poppy seeds per bialy or a total of 2 tablespoons/18 grams.

In the PRETZEL BREAD on page 172, step #2..Empty the dough onto a counter and shape it into a ball. Let it sit covered for 1 hour (it will relax and spread out slightly). Divide it into 4 pieces, divide each piece into 3 (total 12 pieces--about 1.3 ounces/33 grams each) and roll each into a ball. Shape each ball into a tapered 4-inch little football,, 1-inch wide in the middle.

In the DUTCH BABY on page 182, Hand Method, after "slowly beat in" add the words milk before "the eggs."

In the ROSEMARY FOCACCIA SHEET on page 205, it may take longer than 20 minutes to form a ball. For the airiest texture and largest holes, allow the dough to double for the final rise and deeply dimple the dough with wet or oiled fingertips just before baking.

In the BUTTER-DIPPED DINNER ROLLS on page 249, the yield is correct as 12 rolls and the dough for each should weigh about 50 grams; page 254, if not using dry milk you can replace the water with 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons of milk.

In the Velvety Buckwheat Bread on page 308, replace the water with 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon/6.7 ounces/192 grams of the water and 3/4 cup/6.5 ounces/182 grams sour cream.

In the RYE BREAD recipe on page 326, on the flour mixture chart, the 2 1/4 cups bread flour weigh 12.3 ounces / 351 grams, and step #2: eliminate the words 'rye flour.' (Rye flour is used only in the sponge on page 325.)

In the PUMPERNICKEL BREAD recipe on page 333, the oven is preheated at 400°F but then should be lowered to 375°F.

In BRINNA'S PUGLIESE on page 347, the water should be 6 tablespoons (not teaspoons). In the GOLDEN SEMOLINA TORPEDO on page 366, step #2: ...whisk together ALL BUT 1/4 cup of the durum flour.

In PUGLIESE on page 363, step #5...until it has increased by about 1 1/2 times, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

In the PROSCIUTTO RING on page 371, the bread will weigh 1 1/2 pounds/690 grams and in the chart, the meat mixture should be 1 1/2 cups/6 ounces/170 grams.

in THE BEER BREAD on page 376, under the mixer method, it should read: if it is too sticky add in a little flour...

in THE TEN GRAIN TORPEDO on page 396, step #4...knead for 7 minutes. The dough will be dry.

in THE ALMOND FIG BREAD on page 412 There have been some questions about the weight of 75 grams for the coarsley chopped slivered or whole almonds. It is correct. The volume, however is a little under 1 cup. It will not hurt, however to use 1 cup.

in all the SOURDOUGH RECIPES: What I should have written was: If making bread the next day, or if starting to increase the starter the next day instead of if baking....the rational here is that if you, for example, have a weekly schedule of feeding the starter every Monday, but you don't want to start increasing the starter for bread baking until Tuesday so you can bake on Wednesday, you need to let it sit for 2 hours after feeding it and then refrigerate it until Tuesday when you start the increasing process. (All this is far easier to do than to put in to words!)

in the SOURDOUGH RYE on page 453, you will be increasing the starter by 4 times, from 25 grams to 100 grams.

In the SOURDOUGH RYE on page 454, Hand Method, use the same amount of starter as is on the chart above (1 1/2 cups).

In the SOURDOUGH PUMPERNICKEL on page 462 (Mixer Method and Hand Method) use the same amount of starter as is on the chart on page 461 (1 cup plus 2 tablespoons).
on page 463, step 7, oven temperature should be 400°F, and on page 464 step 8 lower it to 375°F. If using sesame seeds, add them after the glaze.

In the SOURDOUGH WHEAT BREAD SEEDS on page 468, after the first paragraph add: "Cover tightly and allow it to sit at room temperature 8 to 12 hours. It will have puffed slightly. Proceed to step 2.
At step 2 add the words "That night..."
At step 4 on the following page add the words "The next morning"

in the PANETTONE on page 513, use only 1/4 teaspoon of fiori di Sicilia (the 1/2 teaspoon listed in the earlier printings is just a bit too intense)

In the CHALLAH on page 517, when making the sponge add the yeast listed in the ingredients.
In all breads, when making a starter that you plan to have sit for more than 4 hours, refrigerate it after the first hour at room temperature.

CANADIAN FLOUR: Canadian unbleached all-purpose and Canadian bread flour perform well in my yeast bread recipes. For quick breads using butter, however, it is necessary to use bleached all purpose flour or the center of the bread will fall and have a gloppy texture on cooling. For more information or specific questions regarding Canadian flour/brands and baking, you can contact editors@betterbaking.com

In the Ingredient Section for Weights on page 572, the listing for dry milk refers to King Arthur's special dry milk at 10 grams per 1 tablespoon. Instant dry milk is only 4 grams per tablespoon. If using instant dry milk instead of King Arthur's use double the volume.

Comments

Hi Rose,

The Cheddar Loaf in The Bread Bible says that 1-3/4 cups sharp cheddar is the equivalent of 4oz/113g by weight. So a cup is about 64 grams which means that it's a very lightweight cheese. Isn't 113 grams of cheddar closer to 1 cup or 1-1/4 cups? Also, by volume the amount of cheese is almost as much as the amount of flour, making it a very cheesy bread. I haven't made this bread yet and would follow the weight measure anyways, but wonder if the volume amount is an error.

Thanks

REPLY

Frank Metzger
Frank Metzger
04/16/2014 09:03 PM

Dear Rose,

I made the sourdough Rye. It turned out splendidly - best rye bread
since Bodenstein's bakery in Washington Heights, circa 1943! Really!!

BUT Why did you change the whole baking routine and not 'allow' the use of the Cloche? I made it that way. Its simple and foolproof and came out perfectly.

450 degrees for 15 minutes ; 400 degrees for 25 minutes and remainder out of the Cloche until a burnished dark golden brown.

It would be interesting from a learning point of view to find out why you made those changes.

Oh - I mixed it all in a big Cuisinart. That works well too as long as you use ice water.

Thanks for so many wonderful recipes! Frank

REPLY

Hi Elaine:

I have had the same problem repeatedly. BTW: My lidded pan is light colored and from King Arthur.

I finally figured out not to put the pan on the lowest rack as it burns the bread. I use the one above it. Also, after the 30 minutes, I bake for 10-15 minutes for color and then tent w/foil. I also don't go the full hour as it just darkens the bread too much. An internal temp for this recipe would be so very helpful.

PS: Added chopped fresh sage, thyme and celery leaves to these loaves today - Stuffing bread - YUM! :)

PPS: Rose thank you so much for your wonderful books that have helped make me the confident baker I am today. You are a gem! :)

REPLY

I've tried the baguette recipe twice now with unsuccessful results. The poolish never triples. The most I can get out of it is 1 cup. Still, though, I plodded forward with what I had, and the dough seemed to turn out nicely, doubled in size. My other problem is when dividing it in half to preshape, there's not much dough and each half is pretty thin. It's currently in the refrigerated proof, but I'm holding out much hope for this batch, either. I guess my real question is, if the poolish doesn't triple, will that affect the volume of the dough and the size of the baguettes in the end?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Elaine
01/17/2013 04:48 PM

Hi Elaine,
We have not added any corrections to this recipe as it has worked for us and for many others. The culprit could be either your oven or Pullman pan.
Ovens not heating to the temperature indicated by the oven's temperature setting is one of the three main factors for a cake recipe to fail along with incorrect measuring and over beating the batter. We suggest that you confirm that your oven is heating to the temperature you are setting by confirming with an accurate oven thermometer.
If your Pullman pan is darker, it will bake the bread in a shorter amount of time. We generally say one should lower the oven temperature by 25F if using darker pans.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

I've followed the pain de mie recipe to the T and each of the three times, I have ended up with black bread - not a dark brown as the recipe indicates.

Have there been any corrections to the baking time or temperature?

REPLY

rose Levy Beranbaum
rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Bess Hudson
11/13/2012 07:17 PM

bess, ii always use non-diastatic malt powder. please see page 552 for an explanation as to the difference between diastatic and non-diastatic.

REPLY

Hello Rose!

I love your book and have been making many recipes. I'm currently trying to perfect the bagel recipe and wondered if you are using diastatic or non-diastatic malt powder? I've never used either and I'm clueless as to which does what.

REPLY

Sounds like a great plan- you might also be able to convince a local bakery to give you a little starter.

Aside from the standard advice on starting sourdough cultures, the only tips I have are for the initial mix on day one: sift some of the bran out of organic whole wheat flour (commercially milled, so it will be in larger flakes and sift out easily) and use them for part of the flour mix. The rest of my flour mix was whole grain rye.

Good luck!

REPLY

Julie- Thank you for your generous offer- what a great community this is. I live in Columbus, Ohio so unfortunately it's probably not practical. I was thinking about this some more and I may have a 'starter contact' at work. I was also thinking of taking some vacation time to give myself ample time to get a new starter going (that's a good reason to take time off work, right?!). Thanks again- I'll keep you posted.

REPLY

Thanks, Rose- I also have a couple of starter "cousins" here in town :) Always happy to share.

REPLY

rose Levy Beranbaum
rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Julie
08/29/2012 09:28 AM

julie, that is so lovely of you to offer some of your starter. there is little more satisfying than sharing a starter. a few people have mine and it's comforting to know that if something should happen to mine (after 10 years) it's cousin is still alive and well in MN!

REPLY

Michael, if you're in the Northeast, I may be able to give you some of my starter, it is going strong this time of year.

REPLY

rose Levy Beranbaum
rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Michael K
08/27/2012 10:06 PM

michael, i haven't gone back to lalvain since i've made my own starter. it's such a thrill when it goes iive so to speak. it does take a bit of patience so don't give up!

REPLY

Thanks Rose. Well, it looks like it's time to tackle making my own starter (deep, nervous sigh)! I'll read the Sourdough chapter before I get started to make sure I get off on the right foot. Thanks again for everything (especially for the killer recipe for the delicious sticky hot fudge sauce which I am shamelessly eating by the spoonful as I write this!)

REPLY

rose Levy Beranbaum
rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Michael K
08/26/2012 10:21 PM

michael, it's very disappointing to find out that KA is no longer carrying this excellent product. the only way to make this bread now is to make the classic sour dough french county boule version on page 250. of course you'll need to make a starter unless you purchase one.

REPLY

Hello. I have been following this site for several years and am an avid fan. I have a question about the French Country Sourdough Boule in the Bread Bible. I want to make this for a dinner in a few weeks, but have been unable to find the Lalvain Pain De Campagne starter anywhere online. I've checked King Arthur and they have a sourdough starter, but it's not called Lalvain Pain De Campagne. Any suggestions?
Rose- I have all your cookbooks and have made many, many of your recipes over the years. Your recipes, writing, and advice have enriched my life tremendously. Thank you so very much.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ruth Tourjee
01/21/2012 03:17 PM

don't worry ruth. i was a blond until i mutated to, as nancy wrote recently in her article for ny woman, toffee color.

this was a good thing for everyone to read so that they understand my style of writing a recipe. it will be helpful!

REPLY

Oh, boy---can I use the excuse that I'm a blond? I did the same thing with the rye bread recipe last week, and it's so dry this time of year that the recipes need LESS flour, not more. I did read the whole recipe through before I started, but I guess I skipped over that sentence. No harm done--I decided to err on the side of caution and used 312g in the mix. Thanks for replying so quickly!

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ruth Tourjee
01/21/2012 03:03 PM

ruth, it's important to read through the whole recipe. when i write add the flour X grams you add all the flour. when i write add X amount OF the flour that means that the rest of the flour may be added later as is the case here. at the end of the page (155) i write: "If desired add the remaining flour...."

REPLY

Ruth Tourjee
Ruth Tourjee
01/21/2012 01:48 PM

In the bagel recipe, pp.154 & 155, there is a discrepancy in the amount of flour to use in the full recipe. The text of the recipe (in step 2) says "whisk together 2 cups (11 oz/312g) of the flour....".

In the chart of ingredients, it says that you use 364g or 12.75 oz. of flour for the full recipe.

I didn't see this discussed in the list of errors on this website. Maybe I'm reading something wrong?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kevin
12/20/2011 01:15 PM

Hi Kevin,
Thank you for your comment. We added a new entry for the Ingredients Section showing the revisions for King Arthur's and instant dry milk measurements.

REPLY

Rose,

Thank you so much for the reply. It makes sense. I do measure by weight and went with the ounces listed. Everything turned out just fine. I was more curious than anything.

Kevin

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Kevin
12/20/2011 11:45 AM

kevin, i used king arthur special dry milk which is heavier in weight than other dry milk powders. the king arthur dry milk powder weighs between 40 and 44 grams for 1/4 cup. if using other dry milk powders either go by weight or use double the volume.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

Just tried the Pullman/Pan de Mie on p. 256 and ran into something curious. The recipe calls for 1/4c Dry milk, but then list the weight as 1.5 oz or 44 grams. I do measure by weight, but 1.5 oz was a lot more than a quarter cup--more like 3/4 cup. I know it can vary a lot in the size of the granules, but a difference like this seems unlikely. Can you advise which is correct?

Thanks, Kevin

REPLY

Hi Rose Ann,
Rose always suggests to confirm that your oven is baking at the correct temperature. Have you confirmed your oven's temperatures are correct?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
11/17/2011 12:17 AM

Hi David,
The water difference is insignificant.

REPLY

Rose Ann Cleland
Rose Ann Cleland
11/16/2011 04:03 PM

Dear Rose,

I love your Bread Bible book. I am a nocive bread baker but feel enthusiastic about trying more receipes in your book! I tried the Jewish Rye Bread. My husband loved it! One comment, the bread was cooked in the first 15 minutes (I use a pizza stone). I inserted the thermometer and it was done! I did, however continue to bake the additional time you suggested and after 10 minutes I smelled the bread burning!! Did I do something wrong?

REPLY

Hi Rose,

In your "Cheddar Loaf" on page 283 under "UNDERSTANDING". It stated that because of the fat content in the cheese, the water has been reduced to compensate.

If you were to divide the water in half from "The Basic White Loaf" recipe, you would get only 202.5 grams not 206 grams. Would the 3.5 grams of water make a difference for the end result?

David

REPLY

I had the same problem. The lowest rack setting in my gas oven was right on the bottom of the oven so I raised it to the next one and lowered the temp to 400. Baked it for 30 mins covered and then another 15 mins uncovered and it was perfect.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
08/16/2011 10:51 PM

i checked my first draft of the manuscript and i see what happened during editing! Here's the way it should be written:

Empty the dough onto a counter and shape it into a ball. Let it sit covered for 1 hour (it will relax and spread out slightly). Divide the dough into 4 pieces and divide each piece into 3 (total 12 pieces--about 1.3 ounces/33 grams each) and roll each into a ball. Shape each ball into a tapered 4-inch little football, 1-inch wide in the middle.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Pat O'Day
08/16/2011 10:39 PM

pat, i haven't made these for several years but i'm certain that when you shape the prezels each one should be 4" long and 1" wide in the very middle. that is the important measurement.

REPLY

Hi Rose,
Love your book and I am trying many of the recipes. With the Prezel bread is the direction to make 3 1/2 in. wide by 2 1/2 in. high right? All the weights work. I'm getting 12 -- 1 1/2 X 1/2 in.

REPLY

Hi Ashley,
step 3. Shaping the dough and letting it rise: you are placing the dough on a baking sheet
step 4. Preheat the oven: you are putting a baking stone or another baking sheet to heat up with the oven
step 5. Slash and bake the bread: you are putting the baking sheet with the risen dough on top of the baking stone or sheet

These steps are used in many recipes in the book.
Enjoy making the beer bread. It was the first bread I made, although I did mine as a loaf.

REPLY

Hi Rose! I just received your book as a gift (with an agenda, I'm sure, as my boyfriend is now anxious to see what I'll make next!) and I have a question on the Beer Bread on page 377; under step 5, SLASH & BAKE THE BREAD, the paragraph states "mist the dough with water and quickly but gently set the baking sheet on the hot stone or hot baking sheet". Should this be "set the DOUGH on the hot stone.."? or do I put the bread on a sheet, then on the stone?
Thanks, in advance, for your clarification.
Ashley
Moab, UT

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Yanting
04/21/2011 04:16 PM

if the dough is not the consistency i describe after mixing that is the time to adjust it. some doughs i say should be very tacky or sticky as they will absorb the moisture during rising. but the instructions are all indicated in the recipe.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I'm trying out the cheddar loaf from your Bread Bible, but I started to realize that the dough is a bit too dry after I left it for the first rising. And this became even more apparent at the later stages. Would like to check with you on this, if I were to add more water to a dough that is too dry, at what stage should I add it at the latest?

Thanks!

Yanting

REPLY

I am making dinner rolls and I am a little confused about how to shape the rolls and if it is ok to shape them into crescents or other shapes. In addition I just want to clarify that I need to let this dough rise 3 times....2 times before I shape it and 1 time after? Thanks.

REPLY

patrick schaetzle
patrick schaetzle
03/ 9/2011 05:51 PM

I'm a recent transplant from New Jersey to Denver Co. I've always made my own pizza dough but can't replicate that NY styled crust that I grew up with. I use high gluten flour,a baking stone and an oven that can reach 555. I've adjusted the yeast levels, done a warm proof, a cold proof, added additional water and i still can't get that wonderful airy crust New York is known for. wondering if you can guide me through this problem. Thank you in advance.
Pat

REPLY

Hi Rose,

Completed two recipes from the "Bread Bible": Cinnamon Crumb Surprise, and Basic White Bread. Everyone loved them. Thanks, Rose.

David Chau

REPLY

Lorie--have you followed through to where you add the onions later? They will add some moisture to the dough (this is included as part of the hydration), so it will probably seem stiffer than some of the other breads at first. If it was very stiff then you probably had an error measuring as Rose mentions. I made this recipe as written and didn't encounter any problems, but it has been a few years since I made it so I don't remember the specific dough consistency at each step.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Lorie
03/ 9/2011 03:52 PM

lorrie, did the bread weigh as indicated? if not you may have made a mistake when weighing the ingredients. that's always a good cross check. and of course, the reason i give the desired consistency of the finished dough is that if one does make a mistake one can adjust it by adding more water or flour.

REPLY

Help,trying to make walnut onion bread on pg. 421 and I'm doing something wrong. It is not sticky at all when I first mix the ingredients. I've made several of this books breads and never had this problem. The bread is really stiff. Are the liquid ingredients measurements right? HELP this bread sounds so good.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

Received my Bread Bible today, February 25. Can't wait to start rolling and kneading.

David

REPLY

Hello Sifu Rose,

I just placed an order through Amazon in Canada for your Bread Bible. Won't receive it for another four weeks. In the mean time, thank you again and again for all your wonderful recipes.

Love you much,

David Chau

REPLY

Yes Alyssa, as Rose said, I also did a total of six pulls. What I would add is that these little rolls are for the "craft person" as Rose says in her description, in that they do take practice to get the right appearance. I made these a few times before they looked good to me, although the rolls always taste good no matter how they look. I found you will need some practice with the amount of flour needed in shaping--too much, and they won't stay folded over, too little and they stick together and won't open while baking.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Alyssa Koo
12/29/2010 10:15 AM

alyssa, not a silly question at all! i know just how you feel about yet another cookbook. i've been trying to convince my husband that books are great insulation! i'm now thinking of getting rid of all the novels i'll never reread in favor of having a place for my cookbooks.

i haven't made the sacaduros for several years but i do remember that i did a total of 6 pulls and that the final two, taking tiny pinches, were the most difficult. it might be fine to leave the final two out but you might want to wait for matthew boyer to reply as his look absolutely beautiful in the photo he did of all the recipes in the book. my bet is that he did the 6 pulls.

REPLY

Rose: I just got your bread bible. It's taken me this long because I have a million (!) cookbooks, and at least 1/3 of those are baking books, of which at least 1/4 of those are about bread, so I tried not to get yet another bread cookbook. I could resist no longer, however, because I love your "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" so much. I decided if that cookbook was so amazing, the bread bible must be also. And it is! Thank you!

I've already made several of the recipes from the Bread Bible and love them. I also appreciate how detailed your instructions are, including the section describing the essential steps for making (yeast) breads. In particular, I love that you have confirmed what I've always suspected -- for any yeast loaf, the final (shaped) rise can occur overnight in the refrigerator. (Since I tend to start baking late in the day, this is perfect to allow me to have fresh bread the next morning.)

I have a silly question about the Sacaduros recipe. On page 316 (first edition), step 4, you describe the process of pulling opposite ends of the dough and folding them over, then pulling two other sides of the dough and folding them over. Halfway through the paragraph, you say to "Repeat the process one more time, for a total of 6 pulls (three times) . . . " Then, in the illustrations on pages 317-318, it shows the pulling occuring four times (illustration steps 2, 4, 7, and 9).

My confusion is about how many times we should pull the opposite ends of the dough and fold them over, as the instructions seem inconsistent. On the one hand, "Repeat one more time" implies that the pulling occurs twice, and then the entire process is repeated once, for a total of 4 pulls. This is consistent with the illustration steps. In contrast, "for a total of 6 pulls (three times)" implies that the process of pulling on each end and then pulling the other sides is repeated TWICE, for a total of 6 pulls.

Thanks for your help! I'm so excited about trying another recipe.

REPLY

Danny, thanks for the chuckle. The BECAME typo bothered you, but not the INTERGRATED?

REPLY

I would read the note about using less starter in the summer. Also, it sounds like you aren't getting enough oven spring--maybe you are letting the breads rise slightly too much and/or not generating enough steam when baking? Also, it could be an issue with shaping if you aren't getting the proper height. Sometimes it just takes a bit more practice to work out these "appearance" issues.

REPLY

Bread Bible novice
Bread Bible novice
07/16/2010 08:33 AM

I NEED HELP! I bought The Bread Bible in the hopes that it can help me with my insecurities with bread making particularly with the free form kind. Although the breads thus far that I have bravely ventured to make have tasted fabulously enjoyable, I have not had success in achieving the proper height. That was the case with the Tuscan Low-Salt Bread I made in the Spring. The Tyrolean Ten-Grain Torpedo I made didn't compare in size to the pictured version, eventhough it seems to have risen better than the Tuscan.
This Summer - I finally ventured into making my first sourdough bread yesterday, after seemingly successful at making the stiff sourdough starter in The Bread Bible. I chose the Sourdough Rye. After being refrigerated, I let the starter sit at room temp for 1 hr before mixing in the dough (per intructions). I made 2 doughs by the way. I followed the process to a T except in step 4 I let the doughs rise in the oven (so our dog wouldn't get to it). I think the temp in the oven was more than 80) but both doughs seem to be ok and rising after each 2 business letter turns. Not until I was about to shape it for the final rise that I notice that the doughs have become stickier. I was still able to shape the first one into a ball, but the second one was sticking all over the place - my hands, dough scraper, lightly floured counter - that I just scraped it onto a pan (I only have dark ones). I didn't know what else to do (any suggestions?). Both breads still turned out crusty and tasty after baking. BUT neither one rose to the right size or height indicated in the book. One was about 9"x1 1/2" while the other about 8"x2". For the sourdough, I used recently bought Pillsbury Bread Flour and Rye Flour from WholeFoods. What did I do wrong? Any advice? PLEASE HELP ME!!

REPLY

there are many ways in which to measure volume of flour (i list mine in the book) and each yields different weights. this is one of the many reasons why i prefer weighing.

REPLY

Rose, I recently bought a copy of The Bread Bible and have been making Levy's Jewish Rye. I love it as do my friends, but I have a question: On p 326, in the table where you discuss the dough ingredients, you note that 2 1/4 c of bread flour = 12.5 oz (later corrected to 12.3 oz) = 351 grams. I must be doing something wrong in how I measure the flour. In volume measure (cups), I gently spoon and sprinkle the flour into the cup. But then when I weigh it out on a scale, I get only about 310 - 315 grams, almost 50 grams light. Should I forget the cup measure and go by the gram weight? Thanks. I am anxiously looking forward to starting on the sourdough breads next.

REPLY

Hi there,

I found a typo in your errata -- you probably didn't mean to say "tool sticky":

"in THE BEER BREAD on page 376, under the mixer method, it should read: if it is tool sticky add in a little flour..."

REPLY

Gale,

Sounds like it's an issue with the temperature of the space where you're letting the bread rise or perhaps an issue with the yeast you're using or the temperature of the added water? Have you double checked those things? Depending on your environment you might have to let it rise a little longer.

Zach

REPLY

Speaking of The Bread Bible, I'm up in Vail this week, visiting my brother and sister-in-law, last night we made their favorite bread (and one of mine) from The Bread Bible the Proscuitto Ring. The altitude is 7,500 ft here and the ring did great. We had only two small pieces left. This time we made the recipe from the book; the last two times we made it with the addition of the soprassado and the pepperoni and lard - both versions excellent. The ring took a little longer to rise here but again the results excellent. This is a bread where there are rarely any leftovers.

Zach

REPLY

I love the Mantovana Olive Oil Bread and have made it a number of times. However, I can't get the bread to rise to 3 1/2". The best I can do is 2". I do use a scale to weigh the ingredients. I tried adding a bit more flour and I also tried adding some vital wheat gluten. Neither seemed to help. What could I be doing wrong?

REPLY

yayyy!! always a great and magical moment.

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Thank you! I got my ball! It did need a little more time and tiny bit of flour.

REPLY

kimberly, there are other factors involved. it should take longer that 30 minutes and if it does either you are using a lower protein flour or you measured instead of weighing and have less flour than needed in which case you should add some more by the tablespoon.

REPLY

ROSEMARY FOCACCIA
I am going on 35 minutes and the dough is still soupy. How much longer than 20 minutes? Thanks.

In the ROSEMARY FOCACCIA SHEET on page 205, it may take longer than 20 minutes to form a ball. For the airiest texture and largest holes, allow the dough to double for the final rise and deeply dimple the dough with wet or oiled fingertips just before baking.

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Scooter, this is merely a mathematical issue and i believe there are programs on the internet that do conversions. alternatively you could call a local college math dept. and i'm sure a student would be happy to do this for you for a nominal fee.

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Hi, Rose.
Is there a place on your website which offers info on increasing the size of ingredients? Trying to make the pizza dough and the recipe is for one 7-inch pizza. Trying to follow the exact amounts and am having trouble just doubling/tripling, etc.
I am a newbie in the kitchen .. in the womb still.
Thanks so much.

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ed, it's correct. it has to be your oven.

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RE: Pullman Loaf Sandwich Bread, pg. 256

I baked the Pullman Loaf at the prescribed temp of 425 for half (30 min.)of the baking time and the bread was already burnt. I would like to know if the temp and/or time is incorrect. If so, what is the correct temp and baking time?

Thank you.

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Hi Karen,

I think you are referring to a sponge, which is different from starter, but it does depend on how much yeast is used and what the room temperature is--so, yes, it would vary by recipe.

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Hello,

In reading the corrections to the Bread Bible, I noticed that you recommend putting a starter in the fridge after the first of four or more hours. In other books I have, the instructions are to leave the starter at room temperature, sometimes for 12 or more hours. Is that not a proper, or healthy practice - or does it depend upon the particular recipe? Thank you.
Karen

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My mistake, it's right there in the beginning of the recipe.

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Hi Rose,

on page 246 for the mixer method for the Basic Soft White Sandwich Loaf the butter is omitted in this section, but it says to add the salt and butter in the Hand Method.

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Jim, Use 4 grams lemon zest as Rose instructs. I think your dilemma is a great illustration of why, in baking, measuring ingredients by weight is the way to go.

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If I remember correctly, the recipe says loosely packed, but this is something you can easily adjust to your own taste--or even omit for that matter. I personally like it lemony. You should use fresh zest, and wash the lemons with soap and water beforehand. You could also use a very small amount of lemon oil.

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I doubled the recipe for the blueberry muffins on page 118, and used a pan for six big muffins. I used a Microplane grater to get 4 teaspoons of lemon zest from freshly washed organic lemons. The zest was wet, and I did pack it into the teaspoons when measuring. I was told the muffins were too lemony by a couple different people. Am I supposed to use dried lemon zest, or not pack the zest in tightly? I noticed there's lemon zest on sale that's really a lemon zest / sugar mix; should I have used that? Also - anyone know a good source for lemon zest, or how to remove pesticides and wax from nonorganic lemons? Thanks!

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You've got the wrong Bread Bible author Michelle. This must be in the one by Beth Hensperger.

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Concerning the recipe for "Semolina Sesame Seed Twist" step 5 is very confusing. You are directed to divide dough in two. Roll portion 1 into a yard long log then twist entire log. what does that mean? Twist it upon itself? Then you are directed to Twist the second portion and attach the two, looping around each other. finally it says to repeat with the remaining portion!!!What? We were told to make 2 portions which we already used up! Was it meant to be two divided in two? Was it to be quartered not halved?

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Oh, one more thing (sorry). The dough percentages listed on p. 95 range from 95% to 132% for water. So is this a typo as well, or does the 75% fall below this range? (I'm sure the muffins are delicious, but, well, I'm a bit obsessed with numbers.) Thanks.

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Rose,

I'm looking at your blueberry muffins, and the dough percentage on p. 120 states the water ratio at 95% of the flour weight. However, I plugged the ingredients into a spreadsheet, using your weights and the fat/water contents from the back of the book, and it calculates only 75% water. The fat ratio is spot-on, and I'm using the same formula for both the water and fat calculations (with different numbers, of course). Is this a typo, or am I missing something? I'd be happy to send you my spreadsheet if you'd like. Thanks.

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that's a new one! thanks danny. i'm not posting it as it won't affect the recipe but i will send it in to the publisher hoping they will correct it as it does indeed affect my sensibilities!

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Danny Woods
Danny Woods
07/ 4/2009 02:13 AM

Hi there
I found a grammatical error on page 63, in the '4.DIVIDING AND RESHAPING THE DOUGH' section. In the second paragraph, last sentence, it reads 'During shaping, it will BECAME fully intergrated'. Here it should read, BECOME, instead of "BECAME".
Just thought I'd post it up here.
Dan
PS: I'm really enjoying the book.

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kent, so glad you sent that link. my fav. part is when peter writes; Finally, I'm not sure about the advice to use high gluten bread flours. The flour they use is Europe is weaker than American flour. I prefer using an unbleached all-purpose flour and then taking the time to develop the gluten properly though mixing, folds, preferments and time. I find the stronger flours make the bread tough, not light and crispy.

i would call the dough in the photo very sticky. slightly sticky is when it wants to cling to your fingers but you can get it off easily--sticky is when you can't touch it--even lightly--without it clinging and very sticky is when it's hard as h to get off your fingers! but you can determine just how wet you like your dough for the specific bread in question for example, my raisin pecan i like to be more open grained and soft whereas my husband likes it denser which means i have to make it less sticky with extra flour when i want to please him more than myself. the great thing is YOU are the master of your bread--no one else! recipes are just guidelines.

yes--your high glulten flour was certainly the culprit. it's hard playing sherlock holmes when one doesn't have all the information.

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My flour was fresh, but it was 13.8% protein (a Japanese 'extra high gluten flour' I bought here in Taiwan), so it sounds like that plus the extra gluten was the reason. Thanks!

(I'll be trying Gold Medal for the 2nd batch, as it is available here, although at a premium price in import stores)

"the point of keeping it pretty dry is that when you add the soaked grains it really softens up."

LOL -- I had posted just before reaching that step. You're right, of course.

BTW, I'm having trouble getting a feel for what constitutes 'very sticky' vs. 'sticky' vs 'slightly tacky' just from the verbal descriptions, and am very curious as to your opinion on the "Press-and-Lift Dough Consistency Test" shown in photographs on this page: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6597/italian-bread-and-bread-baker039s-apprentice. Given the stickiness shown in those pictures (2/3 of the way down the page), what verbal description would you give that -- 'very sticky'?

Thanks a million, Rose! I've just bought your book, my very first on baking bread, and it's very useful. It's a real pleasure to be able to chat with you in person via this blog, too.
Kent, in Taiwan

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kent, i use the vital wheat gluten and do not increase the water. it's good to know, however, then when adding vital wheat gluten to a recipe that doesn't call for it, for each teaspoon of vital wheat gluten add 1 1/4 teaspoons more H20.
if your mix was that dry it could be your flour (assuming you weighed it) is a higher protein or older and therefore dryer but the point of keeping it pretty dry is that when you add the soaked grains it really softens up. i would do just what you did: if the dough has loose flour, i'd spray it will just enough water to pick it up. if you add too much water you can always adjust it after the final dough is kneaded. of course too much additional flour throws off the balance of salt and yeast. if i'm working from someone else's recipe and it's way off and needs lots more flour i weigh how much i'm adding so i know how much more salt and yeast i'll need to add as well.

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The errata say "in THE TEN GRAIN TORPEDO on page 396, step #4...knead for 7 minutes. The dough will be dry." However, like Darrell above, it couldn't possibly still be THIS dry, as the dough was unable to pick up all the flour in the bowl; Even after an additional TBSP of water the dough was able to pick up all the flour but was unworkably stiff and dry (I ended up adding a total of 1.5-2 extra TBSP water in all). Is there an update to the errata I've missed?

My guess is that the culprit is the lack of a water adjustment to accompany the optional 4 tsp of vital wheat gluten.

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put it directly in the frig.

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Dear Rose,

I wonder if you might clarify a question a few of us have had over on the forum, about the stud muffin.

On p. 530-1, under step 3, should we allow the dough to rise until doubled at room temp, then chill it? Or should we put it directly into the fridge to rise/chill, without first undergoing a room temp doubling?

Thanks so much for your time and for all you do, your books are a treasure.

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Sam, if you search "foccacia" on the blog, you'll find a sourdough version. Rose's Rosemary foccacia is in the Bread Bible, available in most libraries. If you're like me, once you check it out, you won't want to return it and will want to keep it until your copy arrives from Amazon!

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sam macrina
sam macrina
02/15/2009 03:05 PM

Can someone send me the instructions and recipe for Rose's Focaccia bread. PLEASE

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ciabatta doesn't have a distinct shape--by it's very definition which means slipper it is a free form sort of bread. go with the flow!

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Hi, Rose. I've made the Ciabatta several times and have always had the darndest time inverting the dough without it getting misshapen. Any hints on how to do this correctly would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

Roger

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Hello..I have two question.

In your recipe for butter-dipped rolls the measurement in volume for the dry milk powder doesn't weigh what it says it should. Which should I go by?

Should I use bleached or unbleached flour when making cinnamon rolls?

Thanks

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I am in the process of making Monkey Bread. I let the starter set all night with the flour on top. After mixing and letting it autolyse, then mix again for 10 minutes, it was not coming into a ball. I have had to add almost a cup of flour. I know I didn't add too much water because I used a 2 cup measuring cup. I know it is going to be too sticky to roll...What do you think happened?

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also i bet la cuisine in alexandria has it!

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i got mine at albert uster but i suspect there is a minimum order so you should try specialty stores like dean & deluca, williams sonoma and sur la table--also google!

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Where can I find chestnuts in syrup for your panetone?

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Thank you all for the comments, must be really the measuring spoon size, I should get a standard one. Cheers!

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measuring spoons vary. add water by the droplet as necessary to obtain a stiff dough that is not sticky. it will be just fine! and when you spray the container with non-stick vegetable spray be sure to run the nozzle under very hot water not only to ensure that the spray will work well the next time but also to avoid contamination of the starter by a buildup or residue on the nozzle.

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Tamas, I've made this specific scrap and poolish at least 5 times and haven't had a problem. There isn't an error in the scrap or poolish recipe. Are you working by weight or volume?

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Well, only 1/2 a tablespoon, the rest is discarded. And really, my problem is that the 2 tablespoon + 2 teaspoon water is not enough for the Scrap Dough.

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Tamas--keep reading to step 2. You will use the remainder for the Poolish.

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Laura, Rose uses nondiastatic malt powder. I ordered mine from King Arthur.

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Dear Rose,

thank you for the wonderful recipes from the Bread Bible! (I'm using the first edition)

I'm now trying to make the Baguette but got lost with the amount of water is needed for the Scrap Dough. According to the ingredient's list (page 337) it's 59g, but than in the description is only "2 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons", which is less than half of the 59g. Can you please advice?

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Hi Rose,

Your recipes for Ciabatta and Pugliese both call for "malt powder." What kind of malt do you mean? I bought malted milk powder without thinking. Do you mean either diastatic or non-diastatic?

Thanks,

Laura

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thanks monica--i'll add it. planning to make it for woody when he comes to proof the new book manuscript in two weeks!

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Hi Rose,

I found a correction for the Bread Bible. On page 182 for the Dutch Baby recipe for the hand method, the addition of milk has accidentally been omitted.

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thank you john. yes, that correction was made in a subsequent printing--wonder if i should add it to the errata above.
really amazing about the baparoma steamer!
and re your brother--is there anything better than infecting people you love with the best bread bug?!

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John J Swain
John J Swain
07/28/2008 01:15 PM

Rose--
A bit confusing, but it must be a different John. I always use my middle initial "J". Interestingly, I had just posted an errata when I read your acknowledgement of my focaccia comment. Was the errata a duplicate? Did you know that The Steam Baking Master by Baparoma, which you mention under "Equipment" is not made anymore, and on EBAY they go for close to $100. WOW!! I finally convinced my brother who live in Pennsylvania to make some other bread other than the whole wheat recipe he has been making for 15 years. I had brought him (from here in Tucson) some sourdough starter that I developed from scratch, and he made a recipe with 300g Prairie Gold (Wheat Montana) hard white Spring wheat, 600g AP flour, 120g whole rye flour, 360g ripe starter, and 23g of salt. He had to uses his triple beam jewelers scale to weigh out the 23g of salt( he had never weighed ingredients!). Anyway, with much apprehension and trepidation he made two beautiful loaves that had an oven-spring of almost double. He called me ecstatic and said "I'm a convert!" He said it was by far the best bread he had ever tasted, and had come out of his very own oven. Now I need to recommend or send him "The Bread Bible"(yours of course!) and a digital scale for future baking success. Long winded post, but thought you might appreciate the sentiment. By the way, we have both been grinding all of our own whole grains(mainly wheat and some rye) for years with a grain mill by Magic Mill http://www.magicmillusa.com/items.php?category=28. What a difference!!

Sincerely,

John J.

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John J Swain
John J Swain
07/28/2008 12:40 PM

Rose--- I decided to do your Sourdough Rye today which begins on page 451. On page 453 under "The Starter for the Bread" you write ("you will be increasing the starter by 4 times ,from 25 grams to 10 grams"). I guess you mean from 25 grams to "100" grams. If I missed this in the errata, sorry for the duplication. Good for the next edition. I also recently posted a little note to your blog about your focaccia. You are great and it's wonderful to see Gold Medal recognize your talents and accomplishments!

John J.

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thank you john for this beautiful 'testimonial'! and, by the way, anyone who reads this chain will be able to see the correction you pointed out (this IS the same john right--the other postings don't have a surname?).

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John J Swain
John J Swain
07/25/2008 01:30 PM

Dear Rose

I just need to let you know that you really have the only good focaccia recipe that I have ever made!. All of the others use so much less water and the extra hydration is what makes it great. I love watching it and knowing that some time at around 20+ minutes, it will(guaranteed!) come together and clean the side of the Kitchen Aid and make a great, very fluid dough. Have to remind myself to add the 3/4 tsp. of salt and sugar at that time.
I have used the focaccia as the "pizza bottom" for a pizza with an Alfredo sauce, strips of pre-sauteed chicken, black olives, and oil-packed artichoke hearts. I bake the focaccia and then top it, and pop it back in the oven for a few(4-5) minutes. Fabulous!
By the way, I have a dedicated non-stick sheet pan for my focaccia, because it has a tendency to stick to a scratched pan, even with a lot of olive oil. I have convinced so many people to buy "The Bread Bible", after they have tried my breads which I regularly make from it. I have also convinced them to go to: http://www.oldwillknottscales.com and buy an inexpensive scale that measures in grams and start baking bread as the pros do, using weights, not volume. Thanks for a great book!

John J.

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you're absolutely right about the percentages. i must have increased the durum and forgotten to recalculate. i'll submit it for the next printing but won't add it to the corrections above as it doesn't affect the making of the bread. thanks for pointing it out!

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i'll double check this soon but meantime, no matter what the % it's the one i prefer.

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Rose replied:
"do the calculations by weight."


Bread Bible p. 364
Dough Percentage
Flour
Bread 74
Durum 26

The biga is 1/2 cup plus Bread flour (75 grams)
The dough is 1/2 cup Bread flour and 1/2 cup Durum.
(71 grams each)

71g durum
(75+71)= 146g bread flour
total flour = 217g

71/217= 33% durum
146/217= 67% bread flour

It still is not 74/26.


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thanks so much both of you. i knew about it and it's corrected in the book as well now but never posted it so i just added it!

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Hi Karyn - Rose has that error listed on her errata page. Check it out:
ttp://www.realbakingwithrose.com/book_errata/

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Hi Rose,
I hope you are enjoying summer so far.. I just wanted to let you know that I found an error in your Cake Bible. It's in the Lemon Chiffon Cake.. not sure what page it is. In the ingredients list you have Baking Soda at 2.5g and then in the instructions you have Baking Powder. I had previously made the Orange Chiffon Cake which had 10g of Baking Powder, so I guessed that it was Baking Soda required in the Lemon Chiffon Cake and that's what I used and it turned out GREAT! Both cakes in fact got rave reviews and that was without any adornments.
Best regards,
Karyn

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do the calculations by weight.
thank you.

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p. 364
Dough Percentage
Flour
Bread 74
Durum 26

The biga is 1/2 cup plus Bread flour
The dough is 1/2 cup Bread flour and 1/2 cup Durum.

67/33 not 74/26??? Or am I missing something...

I've enjoyed the cookbook very much!

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I use unblanched almonds that I coarsely chopped myself and 75 grams measured a bit over 1/2 cup.

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Almonds are used twice in this recipe--1 cup slivered and 1 cup sliced. I didn't have any slivered on hand, but I just weight out 75 grams of sliced almonds, and it was 1 cup. Sliced almonds weigh a lot less than regular almonds by volume. What kind of almonds did you use?

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Hello Rose
I was making your wonderful New Zealand Almond and Fig Bread today and I was weighing the almonds on the scale placing them in a 8 oz. measuring cup and 75 grams measured 1/2 cup and not 1 cup as stated in the book. When I've made this bread in the past I did not notice this because I measured by volume and not by weight using a cup of almonds. Is 1 cup or 1/2 cup the correct amount of almonds to use in this recipe?
Thank you.
Oriana

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Matthew
As I said above, I skip the refreshment stage and go right into the bread itself.
Concerning the liquid starter, I use it only in recipes tha call for it. I keep a jar of liquid in my freezer. It lasts for months without refreshing.
The stiff starter is easy enough to work with, so that is what I use.
Harold

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Hi Harold,

I have a question for you regarding the starter. I too have a very, very active starter (I use rye flour for mine). I'm wondering can I just skip the refreshing and head right into the bread itself? I have a liquid starter, does this matter? Should I just add the flour that would have been used for the 'expanding'into the recipe since the stiff starter contains more flour that the liquid? Anybody??

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Loren,
If you notice, Maggie says to use stiff starter that has been refreched 24 hours before using. That is the same as in the Bread Bible.
However, I have found that my starter, due to frequent use, is active enough to just go ahead without a new refreshment.
Actually, what I do for the sour rye is to make a double recipe. I follow the recipe in the BB but double all amounts. and ignore instructuions to "discard the rest" of the sourdough starter and the bread starter. Also I add 1/8 tsp instant yeast after the autolyse.
I do all rising (in the winter) in my closed oven with the light on.
I do the last rising in a 10 qt cold cast iron dutch oven until it rises above the rim, take it ou, and pre heat the oven, and put the DO back in to bake. It takes the same temperature and time as in the recipe, although I use a thermemeter to check on doneness. I get a great oven spring and wind up with a fantastic loaf that I cut into quarters.
I slice one quarter and freeze it, using slices as I wish. The 3 others are also frozen, or given away, and defrosted for slicing when I nees them.
Harold

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Loren, is there something specific you're having a problem understanding? I don't remember having a problem with this recipe. You basically double the stater twice the day before and then bake the next day.

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Loren Strunk
Loren Strunk
01/30/2008 09:19 PM

Rose,

The Bread Bible is a stand-by, but with one exception:

I'm afraid your instructions for sourdough rye don't make sense. (That's not to say that the instructions are the problem.)

Could you re-state the process for starting the bread, beginning with the assumption that I have an adequate supply of a fresh, ripe "firm" sourdough starter (I'm using the formulation in Maggie Glezer's Artisan Baking.)

Thanks,
LGS

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the aluminum foil need only go just past the rim of the pan. The most vulnerable part of the bread is the top as it gets the most heat, but the foil should be loose, not crimped tightly, to allow for air circulation.

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amy Ruhlman
amy Ruhlman
01/ 5/2008 07:10 PM

could you be more specific on tenting in your golden honey bread. Does the tin foil go around the whole pan or just over the top and over the rim

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Ron Stijepic
Ron Stijepic
01/ 3/2008 10:33 AM

Thanks Matthew,
I intend to follow the process. I am just on day three. What got me wondering is the fact that my starter is quite thick - much thicker than a pancake batter.
So, should I give it more time than Rose suggests on pages 432 and 433, or stick to the timing as well?

Thanks,
Ron

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Ron,
Sounds like you're off to a good start. The best advice I can give you is to go through the process that Rose lays out, but don't think you have failed if it doesn't follow her exact time table. It will work eventually. Time seems to be the largest variable, and it will likely take a little longer for you in Canada in winter time. As long as you see signs of activity, things are working.

Stiff and liquid starter are essentially they same thing--one just has more liquid than the other. You may convert freely between them. Rose has more details on conversion in the sourdough section.

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Ron Stijepic
Ron Stijepic
01/ 3/2008 09:06 AM

Hi Rose,
This is my very first post.
I have used The Cake Bible extensively and love it. I just received The Bread Bible for Christmas and am starting a sourdough starter.
My question is is the method on p. 432 for a stiff sourdough starter?
On day one, the mixing of the flour and water - 4.2 ounces of each - is supposed to result in a stiff dough consistency, but by day three it is supposed to be the consistency of thick pancake batter.
I believe my starter is working - beer aroma and a damp surface - but it is still a quite thick.
Also, the sourdough starter pictures between pages 192 and 193 suggest that the method on p. 433 is for a liquid starter.
Could you or anyone clear this up for me?

Thanks,
Ron Stijepic
Thunder Bay, ON Canada

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thanks--i knew everyone would figure that out but i'll add it to corrections just the same!

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John Bicherl
John Bicherl
12/31/2007 04:19 PM

Hi Rose,

I love your "Bread Bible" and use it all the time.

A minor correction to the Beer Bread recipe: I believe on page 376 the second paragraph of the "Mixer Method" should read, "If it is too sticky, knead in a little flour" rather than "not at all sticky."

Thanks for a great book that has really helped my bread baking immensely!

John Bicherl
Portland, ME

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lately i've been using 1 T oil instead of 4 teaspoons. it seems to be enough. i haven't, however, done large batches. i think the problem could be when dividing the dough. i would cut it with scissors and tuck under the outside part to make it smooth and let it rest covered for 20 minutes before stretching it.
try the potato dough pizza--it works well in larger quantities and is really terrific too!

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Hi Rose, I can honestly say I've never tasted anything like your pizza dough...it is AMAZING, not to mention the topping recipes, the Arugula Bianca is sensational! My question is about increasing the recipe as I am feeding a family of four...do you double everything exactly--even the amount of oil placed in the bowl? I've made a single batch and a double and the single seemed to come out better. Thanks!

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ahha! that's not my book. there's another "bread bible" by beth hensperger. on page 82 of my book there is a technique section. the recipes don't start til page 94. boy i thought i was losing my mind!

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Sesame Whole-Wheat Bread

Page 82, The Bread Bible, 1999 -- No edition noted on back of title page.

A million thanks, again, for such good recipes and instructions.

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i was referring to the recipe i just published on this blog so please tell me exactly which recipe you're referring to by page number (so many recipes so little time!)

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Thanks so much for the speedy reply. I would ask, tho -- how much milk powder? (FYI, I saved the start by going to the Swedish Rye recipe, which has very nearly the same initial ingredients.)

On balance, I think your publisher disserved you with the book's typos and omissions, but I am very pleased with it overall -- Everything I have made from it so far has been superior.

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sorry, there's milk powder and water but you can opt to use milk instead. be sure to scald it and let it come to room temperature.

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In the Sesame Wheat loaf, you mention adding milk in the directions but there's no milk in the ingredient list. What's the milk measure?

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no--the rye doesn't have molasses and other ingredients that would brown too much at too high a temp.

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Regarding Mathew' question on the temperature for sourdough pumpernickel, does that also apply to the sourdough rye bread?
I have been making double recipes of each, and baking them in an unheated DO. In fact, I do the last rise in a sprayed DO, and bake ar 400, 20 minutes covered, and 40 minutes uncovered. Should I reduce the temp to 375?

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woops--it's actually 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons or 1 cup minus 2 tablespoons!

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you're absolutely right! use 3/4 cup milk. thank you!

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Hi Rose,
In your 'Butter Dipped Dinner Rolls' it says that one can replace the milk powder with 1 cup of scalded milk in place of the water. The problem is, there is only 3/4 cups of water in the sponge. As a novice baker, i'm not sure what to do!
Thank you, and fantastic book :)

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p.s. sprinkle the sesame after the glaze which helps it to adhere.

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i checked my original manuscript and it is 400, 375. i don't know how they changed it to a higher temperature. thank you. another thing to list in the errata.

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Hi Rose,

A quick question regarding Sourdough Pumpernickel. In the 'Time Schedule' at the beginning of the recipe it states the Oven Temperature as 400 degrees, then 350 degrees. Later, in Steps 7 and 8 it says 450 degrees then 400. Which is correct?

Also, in the Shiny Glaze, do you mix the sesame seeds in with the glaze or sprinkle them on after brushing with the glaze?

Thanks!

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elicia thank you for the inspiring testimonial!

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you've probably found out by now that it's just fine! i asked brinna why she added salt to the biga and she said to slow it down. makes sense! great recipe no?

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I decided to make the BRINNA'S PUGLIESE tonite, I have been keeping a liquid sourdough starter for years and recently activated it. And (I think) roughly converted it to the biga. I consider my sourdough starter 1/2 water and 1/2 flour and add accordingly. But one thing confused me. the BRINNA'S PUGLIESE is the only biga that calls for salt! Is this correct or is it a typo? also, the mixer recipe does not tell how to add the dough ingredients to the biga, so I will do it the same as the bread machine, and let it rest 20 min. I guess I will find out in the morning if the salt was in or out, based on how my biga looks! Thanks,
Janice

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I totally totally agree with Matthew. Your recipes are the greatest. Gone are the days when I dread toiling over "creaming butter and sugar" for my butter cakes too!

I use your butter cake recipes and mousseline buttercreams for my cupcakes, and was very proud to get an order from a designer brand distributor company - the lady says she has tasted many cupcakes from the local boutique bakers but none were as 'delicious' as mine, ie your recipes!

Your books are the only ones I trust!

Thks to you, I have made a small business out of my hobby - it's not like I'm making a lot of money - but the satisfaction of hearing the 'best' comments from all my customers is just so inspiring!

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thank you for the lovely lovely note!

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Hi Rose,

I am a proud owner of all your cookbooks and have developed a full blown baking addiction! I have made Chocolate Oblivion Torte with Brandied Burgundy cherries. Pecan Pie, Great Pumpkin, Lemon Meringue, Chocolate Cream! All so delicious my friends were astounded.

The real treat though came when I received my copy of the Bread Bible. First I made the Basic White Sandwich loaf. It was perfect. We ate the entire first loaf in an hour! Next, a friend and I simultaneously made Brina's Pugliese. It was amazing that with everything done exactly the same we had two distinctly different loaves. A triumph.

Now I have another biga going, and have my scrap dough and poolish fermenting for a go at baguettes. I can't wait.

I just wanted to personally say thank you. You have added such a lovely activity to my life. Your recipes are always delicious. I enjoy making them and my friends and family enjoy eating them. All the best :)

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i bet that's just how my dad felt--he grew up in the bronx right near yankee stadium!

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I just finished making my fourth+ sour rye bread exactly according to the directioins in the Bible.
The first time I made it, my wife thought she was transported back to the Bronx. It is wonderful!!
I use the Kitchen Aid, and if the kitchen is too cold (not a problem here in Arizona) I do all the rising in the closed oven with the light on.

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I have a question about the Jewish Rye Bread. I've seen a few questions about the bread machine in regards to it, but I'm still not sure if it is advisable to make it in a "Zo" bread machine. Is it possible to do the sponge part of it in the machine, and then the mixing, or would it just make more sense to do it in a Kitchen Aid? Now that it's turning colder, my kitchen isn't all that warm!

Thanks,
Beth

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marcy collins
marcy collins
08/24/2007 12:38 PM

Tried everything on this website to find a bread recipe off one of the flour sacks from the '50s, it was a white bread, with yeast, no knead, rose in a covered bowl first, then in the bread pan, was baked and wonderful. Very easy to do and only took a couple of hours from start to finish. Lost the recipe and have tried to locate it for years. Would enjoy making and eating it again. Do you know where I might be able to find it?

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Hi Harold - 79??? I melt if it's over 72 :)

Actually I live in VA and it gets pretty warm here too. We live with the air on from April - Oct.

Hope to see posts from you more often - welcome!

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Patricia, it is a good thing you don't live where I do.(Arizona) I just turn the air conditioning to 79 degrees and very much enjoy my baking.

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Rose - sounds interesting; can't wait to hear about it. It's a good day for break baking on the East Coast (cold and rainy). I'm going to give the Ricotta Bliss Bread a try for the first time today - I've been wanting to make if for a while, but until this week the weather was way too warm to bake. It sounds so good, I can't wait to see how it turns out.

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thanks for the feedback. this fall i'll be posting a recipe for a new and very different bread i'm working on today!

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Re: Buckwheat bread, I baked the bread with the modifications last night, and I thought it turned out perfectly. The crumb was unusually moist and "velvety." I agree that the original correction would also work, but the extra water does bring the dough to the right consistency, and probably contributes, along with the sour cream, to the extra moistness of the crumb.

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isn't he just!!!

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Matthew - you are fantastic!

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Thank you for the fast response. I made the sponge this morning, but I will just add the extra water before I mix tonight.

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turns out i shouldn't have felt so confident! because there was no room for the recipe in the book i had to make it a variation and the easiest way was to say replace half the water (2/3 cup) with the 3/4 cups sour cream which would work but the ideal is the use 3/4 cup + 1 tablespoon/192 grams water in the starter (then it will be less stiff of course).
if you didn't wait, you can just add hte extra water now. thanks for bringing this to my attention. i'll change it on the errata page.

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i feel confident that my corrections are correct but i'll reanalyze and get back to you very soon.

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I started the sponge for the velvety buckwheat bread this morning. It seemed a tad dry to me, although it is hard to tell because of the thickness of the sour cream. I took into account the correction for this recipe, but I want to make sure I understand it correctly.

The original recipe is 66.6% hydration (322g water to 484g flour)

The modified recipe is 60.8% hydration (294g water to 484g flour). 294 = 129 grams of water in the sour cream, plus 165g water (322 - 2/3 cup water [157g]).

My questions:
Should the hydration decrease or did I miscalculate the amount of water I needed to add? Does the additional fat compensate for the decrease in water?

I haven’t mixed the dough yet, so I could easily add 28g of water (about an 1/8th of a cup) to bring it back to 66.6%

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thank you both--that is very gratifying. i once told the copy editor i was giving her credit in the book. she started smiling until i explained that it was so ppl could write angry letters to her instead of to me!

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Hi Rose, I agree with Matthew - the errors are insignificant... especially since you have a very active website where you response so quickly to our further queries beyond your already very informative and detailed books!

I own this very beautifully designed dim-sum cookbook that had many obvious errors in it (the quantity of some ingredients are so wrong - eg 600g of lard to just 300g cake flour being the oil dough component of the flaky pastry!) - too much lard making it impossible to fold and turn a flaky pastry, too little water that a 'pau' dough cannot even come together etc etc! I've emailed the publisher trying to get a response on the errors and had nil response! That being a reputable publisher and a renowned chef!

So we are so lucky to have you Rose! Your commitment to your work is just so commendable!

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I'm always astounded at how few errors your books have, considering their remarkable scope and breadth. There are over 300 recipes in the Pie and Pastry bible. To have only 5 recipes currently listed with an error is amazing. All I can say is they are definitely missing out--their loss!

Peri--I don't think that is an error in the Pugliese recipe. The 20-minute autolyse you are referring to is part of the mixing process (but not in this recipe). This is part of the rising and folding (see Rose's note about this technique in the preface to the recipe).

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In the recipe for rose's pugliese it says "let rest for 2 minutes" on p. 362. Should that be 20 minutes, which is what most of your other recipes indicate at that stage?

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good catch. i'll submit it for the next printing but won't put it on the errata page as it's not critical (the 1 hour you guessed is right on). i already got a response from one person that since my recipes have so many mistakes they think there may be more and they want to be taken off the subscription list! (they should only know how many mistakes most books have that never get reported.)

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I noticed what I think may be a very minor error on page 363 for the Pugliese recipe. On step 5, it appears there should be a range of times. The ending time is 1.5 hours, but the beginning time is missing (probably an hour?).

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xiuwen, i checked the third printing of the bread bible, page 308 and it was a copy editing mistake that should have read: replace 2/3 cup of the water with 3/4 cup/6.5 oz./182 grams sour cream. hope i caught you in time. do let us know ho you like the bread!

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thank you matthew. amanda if you use the same amount of dough for a smaller pan it will pop the lid off. either get the pan specified at jb prince or decrease the recipe proportionately (you'll have to figure that out by volume)

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looks to me like i divided the recipe in half and forgot to double the sourcream for the final. i'll double check as soon as i can but i'm almost 100% sure!

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Amanda,
There is no explicit recipe for hot dog and hamburger buns in the Bread Bible; page 243 indicates that you could use any of the white bread recipes (and their variations) to make hot dog and hamburger buns. You could also check out the recipe recently published in the Washington Post. Finally, you should search this blog as there are several tips on making hot dog and hamburger buns, including adding oil to some of the recipes in the bread bible.

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Hi Rose, You are a genius: everything from your Bread Bible recipies all the way down to the book's title! I love baking bread because of your inspirations. I am however looking for a hot dog/hamburger roll recipe and your index says there is mention of it on page 243--but I just don't see it there! Can you direct me to the correct recipe page? (I'd scan thru myself but am too busy baking!)
Best,
Amanda

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I fell in love with the results of your Basic Hearth Bread recipe (page 305), and am now in the midst of making the Velvety Buckwheat Bread variation.
My question is this: In the instructions for the sponge starter, you ask readers to replace the 1 1/2 cups water with 3/4 cup sour cream. I tried it out, but the results were far from the 'consistency of a thick batter' (which is how it is described on page 306). It was more like soft pastry dough. Am I using the wrong type of sour cream, or is there a mistake somewhere?

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Life-changing. Thank-you.

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i see i wrote in the recipe that the sponge is the consistency of a thick batter. if you measure instead of weighing you will have to use your judgement as to exactly what that means. i'm sure it will come out just fine in the end.

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if you're measuring and not weighing, be sure to stir the flour before dipping and sweeping. you might be getting extra flour--i don't know how you're measuring or what flour you're using.
but it is more stiff than other doughs before the seeds and grains are added because that adds more moisture to the dough.

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Darrell Nicholson
Darrell Nicholson
05/ 7/2007 08:00 AM

I've made the Tyrolean 10 grain bread twice now and both times the sponge/starter is so dry that I have had to add water. Is the liquid the correct amount or am I incorrectly measuring the flour?

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Dear Mattie:

Rose has an answer to your question about substituting rye for pumpernickel on this page:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/12/from_the_heart_hearth_milwauke.html

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I want to make Brinna's Pugliese this weekend but only have organic rye flour, not course rye or pumpernickel flour. Can I do this substitution? Any adjustments needed? I have noted the correction of the water amount and also plan to add a bit of my starter for enhanchment. Anyone's feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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Whoops! I just found the answer in the errata sheet. It's in the same paragraph with the Brinna's Pugliese corrections, so I missed it the first time.

Sorry!

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A question about the instructions for the Golden Semolina Torpedo (pp. 365-369): step 3 mentions "adding more of the reserved 1/4 cup of flour" but the earlier steps don't say anything about reserving any of the flour (or is this a reference to the 1-2T bread flour for kneading?). Also, step 2 only seems to use 1/4 cup out of the 1 cup of flour even though the instructions about "flour blankets" at the beginning of the book indicate that all the remaining flour would be in the blanket.

What am I missing or mis-reading?
(My copy of the Bread Bible appears to be from the first 2003 printing.)

P.S. I'm not new to bread baking, but am new to The Bread Bible, so excuse if I've missed something really basic that appears somewhere else in the book . . .

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amber, the mistake is in the note. the amount of water should be 1 1/3 cups not 1 1/2 cups. it is not an open grained bread but nicely dense.

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ah nevermind i realize what's wrong. i didn't know the business letter turn, was the same was the business letter fold. i had just figured it meant a 90 degree turn or something like that. i will try the pugliese tomorrow, and see if the fold makes a difference.

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I noticed in the recipe for your pugliese, in the 'let the dough rise" step, it mentions 'repeat the stretching, folding and flouring' but in the step before that there is no nstructions to fold the dough. Should the word 'folding' be emitted, or is there a step missing? Or maybe i'm missing something myself. I'm making the pugliese as i type, so hopefully not folding, won't be a problem.

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I played with a variation of the cinnamon raisin loaf yesterday, at it was a success with the family.

First, I'm posting here because, whenever I make that recipe, I have to add close to a cup more water to the sponge than the recipe calls for to get the right texture. But no biggie. After working with your book for a while, I know what a sponge should be like, so I can adjust.

Now, the variation.

I soaked the raisins (about two cups, I think) in a mixture of boiling water, cinnamon, sugar, and a couple teaspoons of kahlua (could probably have used a little more, but I wanted the flavor texture, not a strong kahlua taste) for about an hour. Then I drained the raisins, keeping the liquid. To the liquid, I added a cube of butter, some vanilla, powdered sugar, brown sugar, and more cinnamon and brought it to a boil. (Sorry, I didn't measure. I've made glazes before and just did it until it felt right.)

After the first rise, I rolled the dough out like I would for cinnamon rolls, only a little extra thin. I brushed the liquid from the raisins over the entire surface, generously sprinkled a cinnamon sugar mix, then added the raisins.

Next, I cut the dough into thin strips, and then cut the strips into pieces of various sizes, but roughly an inch and a half long.

Then, I took piece of caramel candy, and wrapped it in one of the strips. Then I haphazardly added more strips (packed on fairly tightly, especially in the middle so the caramel doesn't leak out, but not too tightly for the pieces to open up a bit while baking), until I had a ball about two inches thick. I repeated that until the dough was gone. I thought about giving it another rise, but didn't. People were getting impatient. Maybe I will next time.

I put them about an inch and a half apart on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. The paper is important, unless you love cleaning baked-on sticky stuff from your baking sheets.

I drizzled on a small amount of the glaze, then baked the balls at 400 for about 25 minutes, or until the balls (now spread into buns) felt done when poked with a skewer.

I took them out, drizzled on more glaze, and let them cool.

The result was some really fancy looking cinnamon buns that disappeared quickly. My family jokingly called them "Scott's Sticky Balls," but there are probably more appetizing names...

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Harold,

Rose has several posts on this site concerning that bread. You should use the search feature in the left-hand column.

Here is a sample link:
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/12/noknead_balloon_bread_loaf_10.html

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Harold Pachtman
Harold Pachtman
03/18/2007 12:46 AM

I don't have a comment, but I do have a question:

I have read somewhere that you have developed a method for baking bread in a cast iron Dutch oven. I recently bought the Bread Bible, and do not find any information on this in the book,

Would you please tell me where I can find this.

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Amber Smith
Amber Smith
03/15/2007 10:02 PM

I think there is another typo in your Bread Bible. I was making your Basic Hearth Bread, and the recipe called for 1 1/3 cups water. It did not make a very sticky dough, as indicated--I had to add a few teaspoons at the end. At the end of the recipe there is a notation that you may use "1 1/4 cups instead of the 1 1/2 cups called for." 1 1/2 cups is a lot different than 1 1/3! At any rate, the bread turned out horribly, not hole-y at all, very dense. I am sure it has more to do with my meager skills, but I thought it deserved a mention.

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yes--it is king arthur's special dry milk and i even reweighed it this morning. i'm sure it won't hurt to use 40 grams of what ever you have so don't worry.

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Hi Rose.
I was still concerned with the amounts listed in your book for dry milk, so I did a little searching on the net. One of the places I looked at was Carnation Milk found at
http://www.spiceplace.com/nonfat_dry_milk.php
It listed a box of Carnation® Instant Nonfat Dry Milk 4.4 lbs or 2kg. (2000 grams)
It also stated:
Ingredients: Nonfat Milk, Vitamin A, Vitamin D3 D
Contains about 87 1/3 cup servings (87 cups reconstituted milk). Package contains 29 cups of nonfat dry milk powder.
So as listed the box would contain 29 X 4 = 116 , ¼ cup servings, weighing a total of 2000 grams or 2000 divided by 116 = 17 grams per ¼ cup not 40 grams. I did my own weight test and a level tablespoon came in at 7 grams. Four tablespoons would equal 28 grams. That is almost a 50% difference more. On page 290 in the recipe for dough starter you list 1 tablespoon as 8 grams. On page 559 in the description on milk you list a special King Arthur Special Dry. Is it a heavier dried milk? We do no have that one here. The one I use is Carnation.
Rick

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on page 572 dry milk is listed as 1 tablespoon=10 grams so 4 T/1/4 cup=40 grams and that is indeed the correct amount.
if in doubt, weight is my primary method.

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Hi Rose.
I picked up your book at the library last week and have been reading it with interest. I am Canadian and thank you for including metric measurments in your recipes. I weigh all my ingredients using a digital scale. I noted in the Bread Bible on page 245 for the Basic Soft Sandwich Loaf your volume of dry milk was 1/4 cup or 40 grams. I weighed it out and it came to almost 1/2 cup. Since 1 ounce = 28.34952 grams, 1.5 ounces (also stated in the recipe) would be 42.52428 grams or close enough to being the same weight. My question is, do you rely more on weight than volume. I used the 40 grams and will see later as it is in the first rise now. I plan on getting your book from Amazon.ca in the near future.
Rick

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Though a small point, on pg. 306 of The Bread Bible, the sponge chart for Basic Hearth Bread indicates 11.2 oz. of H20 and if using 28.35 gm = 1 oz., this value should be closer to 11.4 oz. H20, yes? I have opted for 11.3 oz. total water and computed a 78.7 (more or less) percentage biga for this bread, for convenience, as it has been my fav so far (plus it's easy, thanks to your clear and revelatory recipes!). The results have my wife and neighbors very happy indeed! As a side note, at first, when I was trying to convert this sponge recipe to a biga, I had some confusion with weight vs. volume in the biga percentage hydration guidelines on pg. 35 of the Ten Essential Steps of Making Bread section. I think that the last paragraph, pg 35, beginning with "To make a biga:" , the phrase in parenthesis beginning "(also of course adjusting the...)" should read adjusting the amount, i.e. weight, not "volume" as written, "...of water to fall within the 50 to 78.7 percent water of the flour ratio)." When converting a recipe using a sponge starter to a biga starter, the difference is substantial. Using weight as the basis of this percentage, I find that my biga is stiff and works great. Am I still confused on this point? Anyway, thanks for the wonderful book. What fun!

Ken

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try putting the stem of the thermometer in boiling water to see if it registers 212 (assuming you're at sea level) at any rate, if the bread's done at 208 that's all that matters--instruments of measure are not always as realiable as the results!

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Hi Rose,
I have enjoyed making many of your recipes in 'the bread bible'. Usually the timing for each recipe is extremely accurate for me. However, whenever I make the Cracked Wheat Loaf, I find it takes much longer than the recipe states. Following the recipe as per preheating the stone and baking at 350, even at 80 minutes I'm always around 204 degrees. To reach the recommended temperature of 210 never seems to happen. Any thoughts?

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randy, your question got me started making another sourdough bread--anyway it was a good excuse. i followed my own directions and though they look very complex and confusing at first, when i followed each step it worked perfectly and all that info about weight and size was very reassuring.
but i probably didn't word that part to which you referred as well as i should have.
what i should have said was if STARTING to bake bread the next day, i.e. if starting to increase the starter...the rational here is that if you for example have a weekly schedule of feeing the starter every monday, but you don't want to start increasing the starter for bread baking until tuesday so you can bake on wednesday, you need to let it sit for 2 hours after feeding it and then refrigerate it until tuesday when you start the increasing process. all this is far easier to do than to put in to words!

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ruth, i don't bake in my bread machine so all you need to do is use the technique i outline in the bread bible for mixing in the bread machine and then bake it according to conventional methods. alternatively, follow the directions that came with the machine.

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Rose,
I've purchases all of your books and have a question about the Bread Bible. I am a novice baker and also recently purchased the Zojirushi Bread Machine. Where can I get specific instructions as to how to follow your recipes with the Zorirushi Bread Machine?

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Randy Elliott
Randy Elliott
01/20/2007 10:34 AM

In BASIC SOURDOUGH BREAD page 448 it states:

If baking bread the next day or the day after feeding the starter, refrigerate the starter after 2 hours at room temperature.

I find this sentence very confusing since you've just fed the starter the next day and the day after feeding the starter says the same thing. Particularly if I would want to bake bread the same day. Could you give me some clarification?

Thanks so much for a great book,

Randy Elliott
Albuquerque, NM

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thanks erin--i did catch that one but it still hasn't been corrected in the third printing.

food processor doesn't require a resting time.

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wendy, the pan size is right. the finished bread is always smaller than the pan because the bread shrinks in after baking.

i can't tell you what's happening to the dough that climbs the paddle since it has never happened to me but maybe someone else reading this will be able to address it.

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Hi Rose,

I think I found another typo (I have the first printing). In the beer bread recipe, p376 under the Mixer Method, it says "If it is not at all sticky, knead in a little flour". I think the "not" needs to come out.

Also, the food processor method in the same recipe does not discuss a resting time, but 20min is prescribed in the other two methods. Was this accidentally left out, or is there some difference with the processor that eliminates the need?

Thanks for such a great resource! I've always loved good bread, and having your book has been pivotal in getting past my trepidations and actually baking it myself.

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Hi Rose,

I love all your recipes...especially those in the bread bible! You have been my inspiration to bake my own bread...my family loves it!

Just two questions.
Firstly, I want to make the cranberry, banana and walnut quick bread and would like you to confirm the loaf tin size. The recipes states that the resulting bread will be 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch loaf...but under equipment is listed a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan???? HELP! I know that it is crucial to get the right tin size.

Secondly, when I make the Rosemary Focaccia Sheet the dough climbs right up to the top of the paddle where it attaches to the kitchenaid, after about 10 minutes of beating, so I can only continue beating the dough on a very low speed #1 for the remaining time. Why does this happen?

with kind regards
Wendy

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Speaking of the Jewish Rye. I just tried that recipe and I usually measure flour in oz. The oz. number has to be wrong--after seeing the dough I added the difference in grams and that seems to be correct.

The table lists 4.5oz / 351 grams. I think the oz number is off by about 60%.

In general when I use this book should I stick with grams? I know professional bakers prefer it because the math is easier.

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thank you very much for catchingt his error that noone else did! i'll submit it for the next printing. and ery kind of you to reassure me that you still love the book--believe me--i love it too enough to want to tweak it to editorial perfection!

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I posted yesterday about the typo, after going through some other recipes I believe the recipe should read 1 pound, 13.75 ounces which is very close to the 846 grams. This weight is the same used in the sourdough pumpernickel I believe. Again I want to say I just wanted to mention the typo and I know that's all it is and I absolutely love the book and can't wait to get some sourdoughs started. I just hope mine will look as good as yours in the book!

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Dear Rose,

Thanks to your book I'm now for the first time a regular bread baker, nearly every weekend I try something new. When I first started baking I thought I wanted to bake desserts like pies and cakes but bread had quickly become my absolute favorite.

Anyway, I've started a sourdough started recently and it's growing well so far, so I've been running through the sourdough recipes thinking of what I want to do first with the starter and unfortunely saw another typo not posted here. I'm not sure what printing I have but on the sourdough rye recipe, it claims to make a loaf about 1 pound, 75 ounces/846 grams. Maybe it was supposed to be about 1.75 pounds which is 793.8 grams. That's the closest relation I could find.

I know this typo doesn't effect baking the bread at all but I didn't see the typo posted so I figured I should.

Thanks again for the book!

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music to my ears! which brings to mind the fact that i just had to go off line to listen to a great opera on the radio bc with my new dsl it interferes with radio reception. has anyone else experienced this and/or come up with any solutions?

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OMG, I've never had a sandwich bread quite like your pain de mie recipe. It's one of those things that works first time, every time. Thanks, Rose, you've got me baking bread again as a regular thing.

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thank you very much! That is one of my favorite breads, so it grieves me that some people may be discouraged from making it because of the unfortunate copy editing error listing rye flour twice, whereas rye is only used in the first part of the recipe.

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Dear Rose,

I bought the Bread Bible several weeks ago. The first recipe I tried was the Jewish Rye, and it was a resounding success. Delicious, fantastic--and I've not made much bread in the past. Your recipe was easy to follow.

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