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Making a Cake in a Different Size Cake Pan

Mar 4, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose

DIANNE QUESTION

I wanted to bake your white chocolate whisper cake but use a tube pan instead of the round cake pans. Is this possible and what do I need to know to make this work?

ROSE REPLY

on page 455 of the cake bible is a chart listing the volume of most cake pans. of course if you have an odd-shaped pan you will need to measure the volume yourself by pouring water into it. if it's a two-piece pan first line it with a clean garbage bag.

compare the size and volume of the pans specified in the recipe to the one which you want to use and then either increase or decrease it proportionately.

a cake in a tube pan will take longer to bake than in a 9 x 2 or 9 x 1 1/2 inch pan but use the usual tests of springing back when touched lightly on top and a cake tester inserted in the middle between sides of pan and tube comes out clean.

Comments

Hi Nicole,
We are assuming that you made the recipe with good results for a single layer.
If you are simply filling more of the same size pan, then there should not be any problem if you are making the batter with a mixer that can handle the extra volume. Your baking time will likely increase for baking all three layers at the same rime.
If you are converting this recipe to a larger pan and the batter is softened butter or oil based, then you need to lower your leavening in proportion to the rest of the ingredients. This is explained in The Cake Bible.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

I tripled a cake recipe, but it didn't work, didn't rise. The recipe required 6 eggs so I tripled and added 18 eggs, tripled all other ingredients. What did I do wrong?

REPLY

Thanks, Woody, I have had a copy of The Cake Bible for years and am finally finding time to use it since retiring. Thank you for giving me the difference in percentage between the two pan sizes.

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woodywolston
woodywolston in reply to comment from Laura
03/23/2017 06:17 PM

Hi Laura,
We recommend if you do not have it to get a copy of "The Cake Bible" (which we do sell and sign copies). In the Wedding and Special Occasions chapter in "The Cake Bible", Rose gives her Rose factor, formulas, and calculations for butter cakes for: scaling up or down from a given cake pan size, baking time guidelines, servings, approximate batter weights, and baking powder adjustments. There are also base batter formulas for butter, genoise, and cheesecakes. Several frosting recipes are also included. We have found that the formulas and calculations will give you a starting point for working out favorable results through testing.
You are scaling up 20% in ingredients from a 8 inch round to a 9 inch round cake pan, with the leavening being scaled up slightly less.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

To increase the batter for the two 8-inch layers in the Tropical Wedding Cake (RHC, page 391) to enough for two 9-inch layers (not for a wedding cake), what should I multiply the ingredients by? Thanks!

REPLY

For anyone else who might be interested: I don't have 8-inch x 1 1/2-inch round cake pans for the Down-Home Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake recipe in TCB, so I experimented using other size cake pans and found I had very good results using one 9-inch x 2-inch square baking pan (Parrish Magic Line) and leaving the baking soda at 2 teaspoons as written. (I did not wrap the cake pan with cake strips.) I baked the cake between 25 and 30 minutes. I consider this to be a simple, easy-to-make snack cake, so baking it in layers and frosting it with a time-consuming frosting isn't important to me, anyhow.

REPLY

Hi elizabeth,
"The Baking Bible" states a 8 x 8 square inch pan which has virtually the same area and volume as a 9 x 2 inch round.
It is great that you are weighing your ingredients. However, if one does not have a scale that can measure to the tenth of a gram, then it is best to use accurate measuring spoons. The recipe calls for 3/8 teaspoon of baking soda. (For this cake we generally just use our Pourfect measuring spoons.)
Also, using bleached cake flour makes a big difference in the texture of the cake. This cake can be scaled up to larger pans, but we only recommend using bleached cake flour for larger pans.
Rose & Woody

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Hi. I made the cream cheese butter cake. The recipe calls for a 8" round pan but I had a 9". I went ahead and made the cake however it came out only 3/4" high and the cake was gluey consistency in the middle. I measured everything with the exception of the baking soda 1/8 of a tsp which is very difficult to weigh so I did like a pinch. Any idea what may have happened?

REPLY

Thanks, Woody, I will try that soon!

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Hi Laura,
From our experience, bundt cakes require slightly MORE baking powder in proportion to the other ingredients due to the inner walls providing support for the rising batter. If you converting a recipe for a one layer cake baked in a 9 x 2 inch round pan (8.66 cups) to a standard bundt pan (10 cups), you can usually increase all of the ingredients by 20%. However, the leavening will be increased by slightly more. This will prevent it from forming too high a dome.
Rose & Woody

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To bake a butter cake developed for a 2-inch-deep round cake pan in a Bundt-style tube pan, besides determining the difference in volume, should I adjust the proportion of baking powder in the formula? I cannot find information in the back of TCB that addresses this.
Thanks!

REPLY

Hi Gail,
Is it one of our recipes?
If not, what does the author state for pan, baking temperature, and time frames?
Rose & Woody

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gail tolbert
gail tolbert
07/27/2016 08:23 PM

I am trying to bake a pound cake in a 9x3 tube pan and want to know how long to bake it at 325 degrees. The girl I am baking for don't want a big cake.

REPLY

Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald in reply to comment from Woody
11/26/2015 06:58 PM

Cake now complete Woody based on your recommendation I did 10 x the base for the two 12x12 square layers. It came out perfectly - not much of a dome and the texture looks great. It also cooked in exactly the time stated in the Cake Bible - 40 minutes on the nail.
Thanks again
Lesley

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Thanks Woody. Very helpful. Regards Lesley

REPLY

Hi Lesley,
The math for a 12 by 12 cake pan: area: 144 volume: 19-2/3 cups
13 round cake pan: 133 18
14 round cake pan: 153 21
We suggest if you are making a (1) layer 12 by 12 cake, you will need to do a 5 times base (1/2 of the bases for (2) 14 inch round pans).
Your baking powder will be at the Level 3 (1-1/8) or slightly more x 5 bases. The reason why it may be slightly more is that square and rectangular pans usually require more baking powder to give you a flat, unless you want a domed top or that you will level the top with a knife.
You will have extra batter which you can make into 2 to 3 cupcakes.
We have not made any of the Base Formula recipes in a 12 by 12 pan, but are going from our experience with other recipes.
Rose & Woody

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Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald
11/22/2015 11:33 AM

I am about make a 12 inch square butter cake and have out my trusty CB and master chart. Just double checking before i dive in. Should I use the quantities for a 13 inch round? That seems to be the equivalent in volume from my rusty math. That makes it 9 times the base and wanted to check the baking powder volume at 1 1/8 x base. So since the cake volume is 9 times the base, do I just multiply 1.125 x 9? Thanks Lesley

REPLY

Hi Beretta,
We can only state for our recipes baked in a water bath, with the springform pan wrapped in two layers of heavy duty aluminum foil.

Temperature: 350 F/175 C.
We have not made a cheesecake in a 13 x 9 inch pan, your timing will be somewhere in-between the times below.
Time for 9 inch: 45 minutes w/ oven on, then 1 hour w/ oven off.
Time for 18 x 12: 1 hour plus 50 minutes w/ oven on, then 1 hour w/ oven off.
then 1 hour at room temperature, or until the cheesecake is cool to the touch to go into the refrigerator for 6 hours.

Rose & Woody

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Yes that is a great help but you never mentioned oven temp or how long to cook it. Double batter needs more time or is it the same. Thanks.

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Hi Beretta,
A 9 x13 inch pan's volume capacity is almost the same as (2) 9 inch round pans.
We suggest make a double recipe of one of our many cheesecake recipes in Rose's books. Fill the pan up to 3/4 full. If there is remaining batter, you can use it for cupcakes or discard.
If you have not made a cheesecake from Rose's books, we eliminate some of the problems of over browning and cracking tops by wrapping the pan in a double layer of foil. The cheesecake is then placed in a waterbath for the baking.
Rose has several YouTube videos on making cheesecake.
Rose & Woody

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Bought a 9x13" spring form pan to make a cheesecake but it didn't come with a recipe. I need one as cheesecakes are tricky to bake. HELP!

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Caitlin Graf
Caitlin Graf in reply to comment from Woody
09/17/2015 11:07 PM

Thank you! I have been weighing my ingredients so your instructions are perfect. Weighing is far easier and faster, as you said. I will adjust the recipe accordingly.

REPLY

Hi Caitlin,
In the equipment section for cake pans we state the volumes of different diameter 2 inch high pans. A 6 x 2's volume is 3-3/4 cups, A 9 x 2's volume is 8-2/3 cups.
Since the leavening in a genoise cake are from the egg component, one can increase or decrease a recipe for the volume of the pan.
If you measure your ingredients by weight, you can then you can make a 43% batter of the 9 inch batter recipe to work in the 6 inch pan.
If you have not been weighing, we suggest that you do because it is: faster, more accurate, easier, and gives you the ability to check the weight of your batter to compare it to the weight of ingredients.
Rose & Woody

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Caitlin Graf
Caitlin Graf
09/17/2015 10:39 PM

Hello! I am interested in trying my hand at making a genoise. I don't want to make a large cake, preferring to make a cake in a 6x2 round cake pan. I saw online that the 6x2 is 4 cups in volume versus the 9x2's 8 cups. Would I just halve the genoise recipe? Also, how high does a genoise rise, and do you ever use cake pans deeper that 2 inches?

REPLY

Hi Rosalie,
We do not have a Rainbow Cake in our recipe files, although there are several in cookbooks and on the internet. A 13 x 9 x 2 inch cake pan has a volume of 6 cups, which is slightly more than two 9 x 2 inch round cake pans. If you are working from a 2 layer, 9 inch round cake recipe, you will likely need to slightly increase the leavening to produce level tops for your 13 x 9 inch pans.
If you have "The Cake Bible", the Wedding Cake section has formulas and charts for calculating how much batter is needed for most 2 inch high pans, as well as recipes for batters and frostings.
Rose & Woody

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Hi can you tell me, how much batter I need to make for a rainbow cookie cake. I have 3 -13x9 pans.I want to make it from scratch.
Thank you
Rosalie

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I need a general formula to convert a standard recipe to a 2-Layer half sheet cake (12"x 18"x 2")

Rose’s Yellow Cake Recipe bakes in a 9” springform pan. It makes: one 1-3/4 inch high cake

INGREDIENTS

4 large egg yolks
sour cream 5.5 ounces 160 grams
pure vanilla extract 1.5 teaspoon 6 grams
bleached cake flour 7 ounces 200 grams
sugar 7 ounces 200 grams
baking powder 1/2 teaspoon
baking soda 1/2 teaspoon
salt 1/4 teaspoon
unsalted butter 6 ounces 170 grams

Just for my own convenience, can I use two 12” x 2” round cake recipe shown in the 3-Tiered wedding cake chapter of the Cake Bible for a one layer half sheet cake?

Thank you.

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from m1h2
08/28/2013 09:18 AM

Hi m1h2,
We have not seen one as you have described if it is larger than a16 cup angel food pan.
ROse & Woody

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looking for a double size angel food cake pan - round, tube type not rectangle TY

REPLY

Hi Rosa,
Our next book, The Baking Bible, to be published by Houghton Mifflen Harcourt,
will not be available for purchase until sometime summer or fall of 2014. The publisher will alert us when the book will be available so that we can announce it on the blog with links for ordering it.
We just submitted the manuscript and are a long ways off from the book actually being printed. Did you mean this book or did you order one of Rose's previous books?
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Rosa,
Technically, each layer requires a different leavening level. We somewhat compromised in Rose's Heavenly Cakes by making a combined batter for the 6 and 9 inch layers, which the 6 inch layers are usually domed and trimmed to be flat. If you look at the wedding cake recipes you will see that the baking leavening levels are adjusted per batter for the different layer sizes.
We recommend, as we stated previously, to use The Cake Bible's wedding cake section charts, because you already have most of the math worked out with RHC's 9 inch layers.
Most bakers are not satisfied with their results if they try to make a single batter formula for all of the layers. By making each pan size batter separately, you will get your best results and can easily fill the pans to the right level.
Enjoy calculating and hopefully not too many test cakes to lock in your perfect carrot wedding and special occasions cake.
Rose & Woody

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oh p.s. I have ordered the new book and stiil waiting...lol.

REPLY

hi Woody I was looking at the Carrot Cake recipe from Rose's Heavenly Cakes,that have two 9"inch layers and could I just x all by 2 and the baking powder by 3.36?

REPLY

Hi Rosa,
We have not specifically worked out every recipe we have written for each layer size for any particular cake.
We recommend that you look at the Wedding and Special Occasions chapter in The Cake Bible, in which Rose gives her Rose factor, formulas, and calculations for butter cakes for: scaling up or down from a given cake pan size, baking time guidelines, servings, approximate batter weights, and baking powder adjustments. There are also base batter formulas for butter, genoise, and cheesecakes. Several frosting recipes are also included. We have found that the formulas and calculations will give you a starting point for working out favorable results through testing.

If you are making the Carrot Cake recipe from Rose's Heavenly Cakes, you have the 9 inch layers figures. From these, you can calculate the 6 and 12 inch layers and make separate batters each size. If you are making the Cordon Rose Banana Cake from The Cake Bible, we suggest that you increase the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon to see if this results a level top. A second test maybe required to find the right amount. You can then calculate the other layers with Rose's charts. If you are using the Dreamy Creamy Frosting, The Cake Bible has a wedding cake recipe version for it as well.

For our new book we had some cakes that only took one try and fifteen tries for another one to formulate the ingredients for the wedding cakes chapter.
Rose & Woody

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hello Rose and Woody this is Rosa Maggie again...lol.lol. , I hope that all is good with yous and I would like to know if yous can help me with the Carrot Wedding Cake sizes / a 6"/ 9"/ 12"...p.s. how do I work the math?....thank you for taking the time to ready my message...Rosa Maggie.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Louise
02/ 1/2012 05:12 PM

Hi Louise,
The Cake Bible has formulas for cake pans mainly deals with volume. We do not have a given formula for crossing between different. In general, a deeper pan will need less leavening. We suggest to make the recipe for two loaf pans with the same leavening as the recipe and after seeing the results to make adjustments. You can always make a half recipe to see the results.

REPLY

Woody - thank you - is there a formula to convert the leavening? Is it in rose's cookbook?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Louise
02/ 1/2012 04:49 PM

Hi Louise,
We have not tried making this cake in a loaf or loaf pans. The center tube of the bundt pan helps in making sure the cake is fully and evenly baked. You may want to convert to (2) 8 x 4 inch loaf pans so that your pans' widths are similar to the width of the bundt pan. You will likely need to change the leavening.
Please tell us how they worked out.

REPLY

Hi - I am makimg Rose's Swesidh Pear and Almond Cake for a large group - it would be prettier to platter if made in a loaf pan - but was not sure it would work with the cream filling etc. I would appreciate any suggestions. I know how to work out the volumne - more concerned about the ake itself Thanks! Louise

REPLY

Hi Bonnie,
Yes. You will need to measure the volume of your pan. If it has straight sides, its volume should be around 22-1/2 cups. If your cake pans have straight sides, then they each are 8-2/3 cups x 3=26 cups. You will need to proportionally increase all of your ingredients, except the leavening which needs to be increased slightly more as is explained in The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
If you plan on using different pans than the ones in a recipe or multiple cakes, The Cake Bible has a chapter with base recipes, formulas, and charts. And we strongly recommend to use a scale which makes measuring more accurate and faster.
You may need to experiment to determine the quantity of batter and whether you want the sheet pan cake to be mostly flat or domed. Your baking time will likely increase.

REPLY

Bonnie Fortney
Bonnie Fortney
12/13/2011 08:26 AM

I am making a red velvet cake for a party using an 11x15in x 2in sheet pan. dDo I have to increase the amt. of the cake recipe? The recipe I'm using calls for 3 9in. pans.

REPLY

thnx a lot for reply. I am always worried before baking cake as my cakes have always been disastrous.

hopefully this time things will turn in my favor.

REPLY

Hi Smita,
The times are always identical.
Along with the recipes, please read the other chapters especially the Understanding, Ingredients, and Techniques. We suggest making the All-Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake as one of your first cakes as that cake is a base recipe for most of the butter cakes. You may also want to read the Power of Flour articles on this blog which analyzes using different flours.
Enjoy many discoveries.

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smita singh
smita singh
11/15/2011 07:59 AM

hi rose,

I am new to baking. Just purchased your book " the cake bible". I have a simple question. when a recipe says bake a cake at 375 F and I have a counter top oven which has temperature in Celsius. I know how to convert between both temperatures , but do I have to alter time also. Means if temperature is in Fahrenheit and converting it in Celsius, will increase or decrease in time. or time will remain same.

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Oh, fabulous! Thank you, Rose! I do have a muffin pan. And smaller servings are better for our waistlines. *sniff*

I don't yet have clear cups suitable for the bostini, but I MUST find a way to make those. From when I was a little kid, Boston cream (pie, doughnuts, etc) was my favorite dessert. Can't wait to try the bostini!

REPLY

do it like the bostini, page 352. it's a smaller batter so you'll get about 9 cakes instead of 12.

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I want to make the Coffee Chiffonlets in RHC. But I have a very small kitchen with little storage space, so I don't want to buy specialized pans if I can help it...Can I use a 9 X 2 nonstick pan with sloped sides, where 7.5 cups fills to within 1/4" of the top?

Or a nonstick bundt pan, with the recipe times 1.5?

Or 10-ounce Pyrex cups?

REPLY

All my pans are 3 " high. How do I convert the regular 2" pans to 3 "??? Thanks for all your comments!

REPLY

Hello to all of you wonderful bakers!

I saw a woman in a video making a batter for pound cake. She was baking abou 8 9x5 inch size loaf pans, and the batter was mixed up in a very large silver bowl.

Does anyone know how to increase a recipe to make a very large cake batter? I want to bake about 10 cakes (I have two large ovens) at the same time, so I want enough batter to fill each pan.

Any help or information will be deeply appreciated.

Thanks to all :)

REPLY

Thank you, Rose, for your reply! I will do as you suggest.

REPLY

Adjustments will be needed to make it as a sheet cake and as we haven't tested it I would advise to double or triple the recipe and use the same size pans as the original. If you bake more than one at a time it will take 5-10 more min. To bake.

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I just made Rose's delicious Refrigerator Banana Cake with Dreamy Creamy Frosting from Heavenly Cakes and it was a huge success. I made it as a dry run for my son's birthday party this weekend. But, I will need a lot more cake for the party, since we'll have about 35 adults and kids. Can I simply double the recipe as is (to make a layer cake) and expect it to work the way it did in the single layer pan? What if I want to make it in a large sheet cake pan? What do I need to be careful of when scaling up? Many thanks!

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I have a question regarding different pan sizes for a lemon drizzle cake. I am using 8, 10, and 12 inch pans. I am trying to work out the adjustments of the batter for the 10 (25x9cms), and 12 (30x9cms) inch pans. I am using an old family recipe, which has always been baked in a 8 inch pan.

225g butter
225g caster sugar
4 eggs
225g self raising flour
1 tsp baking powder.

I am baking this for a good friends wedding this week so any advice would be greatly received!

Many Thanks.

REPLY

measure the volume and correlate it to the size of the closest round pan.

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Kindly advise me the quantities need for a butter cake, if you make in oval shape pan of 6" x 12-3/8". I mean the quantities of flour, sugar, eggs...etc

Would very much appreciate your help

REPLY

no! if it's not baking through you need less not more batter. i recommend you do it in the 9 inch pan the way you did it before and were successful. then you'll see if the problem is your oven. look to see how much it fills the 9 inch pan and do the same for the smaller pan. if it fills the 9 inch pan less than half full do the same for the 6 inch pan. this is not my recipe so i can't tell you how to bake it but since it worked for you in your last oven and with a 9 inch pan change nothing but the oven!

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Thank you. I guess i was putting too less batter below half of the vessle. I will try it again. Will feel the vessle till 1/2 the level and bake it at 375 deg F.

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i think your problem is that a 6 inch pan is not half the size of a 9 inch pan. you need to measure the volume of the pans when you alter recipes. in this case you are putting too much batter in the 6 inch pan so it's not baking through. normally you don't change oven temperature when you change the size of the pan but you do fill it to the same capacity, i.e. if the 9 inch pan was filled half full you fill the 6 inch pan half full.

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I was making a great vegan cake, had been baking for past 2 years. But suddenly the other day i had problem when i tried baking in half the quantity. plus i have moved to the new house, and tried baking cake for the first time. it gave good results for eggless oatmeal bars. but with eggless cake it was the flop show. Recipe mentioned the temperature was 375 deg F. So for half the quantity and 6 inch pan instead of 9 inch, should it be 400 deg F?
Thank you

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abc, in principle, if it's sinking it needs higher temperature to set the batter before it falls. but then i don't know what cake you are making or if there is a problem with the balance of ingredients in it.

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Do you have to reduce the oven temperature for 6 inch cake because my cake sunk this time with half quantities of ingredients.

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Caroline--you could just try it with beaten eggs whites in place of the whole eggs.

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Caroline Campbell
Caroline Campbell
10/ 1/2008 11:04 AM

Question? I am attempting to make a cake sold at a local bakery. The name of the cake is Philly Fluff. I search the internet for the reciepe. However, all receipes although made with cream cheese contain eggs and are heavy. The bakery, I believe, has no egg yolks because it is white and very fluffy. Can you recommend a substitution for the eggs that will create a light (almost like angel food) cake and white pound cake made with cream cheese?

Thank you.

REPLY

I realize that this is all about cakes but I am hoping you can answer this question. Instead of making 2 9" pies can I put everything in a 9x12 baking dish? The "crust" is madde from a cake mix, not the typical pie crust. Would the temperature and be the baking time be the same as one pie?

REPLY

sorry--i've never done it but i can tell you this--it is high in acidity! do let us all know how it turns out.

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thank you rose, i would have made that cake and been dismayed at the result.

if you don't mind my asking, do you know of a way to incorporate champagne in a cake? i hate to use recipes that aren't yours and "champagne" is the theme of the party.

REPLY

chiffon cake will not work in a pan of this size or without the center tube.

mousseline is an excellent idea!

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rose, i am the subway cake baker from 2006 (see above), returning to ask yet another question about cake pans. tonight i am making a cake for a champagne-themed party. the plan is to make a champagne castle cake set on a platform with a champagne moat. i live by the words of The Cake Bible but it does not have a champagne recipe, so i found one for chiffon cake online which looks good:

http://bakingbites.com/2007/12/champagne-chiffon-cake

the problem is that i have to make a 13x9 sheet cake - not use a tube pan.

question #1 is: can i pour chiffon batter into a flat pan and bake it at 325? will that work?

question #2 is: what type of frosting do you recommend? i have to frost it with something, as it is a novelty cake and i am decorating it with candy. i was thinking maybe your mousseline buttercream?

as always, thank you very much!

marie

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good point matthew--why didn't i think of it!

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Debbie--you could also watch the video for Rose's lecture on flour where she discusses this.

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thank you debbie. please do a search on the blog for flour and you will see many interesting explanations of the difference. the short answer is use unbleached only for bread.

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I was reading over the comments of 2/1 and saw remarks about UNbleached verses bleached flour. I've always used these interchangeably. Will you clarify the difference.
Also, what will your next book be? I can't wait. When will you be releasing it?

Your my hero!
Debbie

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yes! 7 inch pans are exactly half the 9 inch!

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I was able to score some 7" pans at the Broadway Panhandler...and they work really well with 1/2 a recipe for 9" cakes. I have four of them. I often bake four layers in my 7 " pans and make two small layer cakes...one for us at home (only two of us...how much cake can we eat?) and one to give away...always have lots of friends on hand when there are rose's cakes to give away!

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I should add that when making a butter cake, the leavening doesn't scale proportionally, so I use Rose's charts in the back of the cake bible to make the appropriate adjustments.

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Thanks for offering this information Michelle--I made an excel sheet like this last year because I often bake 6'' cakes. I wanted to share how I apply these calculations to a recipe because it is a slightly different approach.

I calculate the volume of the desired size pan and divide it by the volume of the original volume of the recipe. For example, 6x2 pan is 57 and 9x2 is 127. 57/127 is .45--I then multiply the grams by 45% to have my scaled down recipe.

This corresponds to Barbara's practical advice that a 6'' pan holds half as much as a 9''--and it is easier just to use 50% instead of 45% in this case, and simply have a tiny bit of batter leftover.

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Thank you, Michelle!

I'd like to add a few quick conversions that I use often -- these are all for pans of approximately the same height.

One 9-inch round pan holds about the same as one 8-inch square pan.

One 6-inch round pan holds about half as much as one 9-inch round pan. (Handy for testing recipes.)

One 8-inch square pan or one 9-inch round pan holds about half as much as a 9x13 inch pan. (Good for recipes for bars, brownies or sheet cakes.)

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Thanks for taking the time to post this info Michelle. It is very useful.

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Michelle - I really appreciate your post... thanks so much!

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Regarding different sized pans: I, too, have struggled with this. One way to determine both the FULL size of your pan and the amount of BATTER you need:

A) Your pan is square or rectangular:
1) Use the formula Length x Width X Height. Measure all dimensions in the same unit (for those of us in the US this will likely be inches). This will give you your FULL pan volume, in cubic inches (or cubic -insert units here-). Let's assume a sheet pan of dimensions 11" X 15" x 2".

volume=11" * 15" * 2"
volume=330 cubic inches

2) Go to http://www.onlineconversion.com/volume.htm

3) In the "Convert What Quantity" box, type in your FULL pan volume (330)

4) In the From: box, select the units. Again, in the US, you will select "cubic inch"

5) In the To: box, select "cup [US]" (or whatever measure you need)

6) This will give you your FULL pan volume in cups. The example in #1 above will result in 22.9 cups [US].

7) Here's the important bit: Since Rose's cake batter is only supposed to fill half the pan, divide that FULL pan volume in half.

BATTER = 22.9 / 2
BATTER = 11.45 cups

(Frugal types round down; messy types like me, round up. :-) )

8) Now you have the cups of BATTER you need to make.

B) Your pan is circular:
1) Find (or know) the diameter of your pan (the length of pan at its widest point). Divide it in half. That's your radius.

2) Use the formula pi (3.1415) * (radius squared) * height of pan. So, if you have a 10" pan that is 2" high, your calculation would look like:
3.1415 * (5 X 5) * 2
3.1415 * 25 * 2
157.075 cubic inches

3) Follow steps 2 thru 8 above.

C) Your pan is oval:

1) Use the formula pi (3.1415) * (Length of Pan at longest side/2) * (Length of Pan at shortest side/2) * height of pan. So, if you have an oval pan that measures 10" at its longest side and 4" at its shortest side, and is 2" high, your calculation would look like:
3.1415 * 10/2 * 4/2 * 2
3.1415 * 5 * 2 * 2
62.83 cubic inches

2) Follow steps 2 thru 8 above.

D) Irregular-shaped pans (Wilton, character pans, etc):

1) Use Rose's method of pouring water into it to see how much water it will hold. You can use whatever measure you like here. We'll use US ounces.

2) Go to http://www.onlineconversion.com/volume.htm

3) In the "Convert What Quantity" box, type in your FULL pan volume.

4) In the From: box, select the units. Again, in the US, you will select "ounce [US liquid]"

5) In the To: box, select "cup [US]" (or whatever measure you need)

6) This will give you your FULL pan volume in cups.

7) Here's the important bit: Since Rose's cake batter is only supposed to fill half the pan, divide that FULL pan volume in half.

Sorry this was more detailed than I planned, but I thought it would be helpful for more people than just myself.

Michelle

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I am looking for a recipe for a pound cake made with cream cheese and swirled with chocolate.

I am also looking for a pan that wide at the top tapering to a narrower bottom.

Can anyone help?

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What size pan would I use to double brownie recipe that calls for an 8 inch square pan. I want the brownies to retain the same texture. Thank you

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it sounds like it would work but you never know for sure unless you try it. of course use the same techniques as you would any sponge roll and roll it right after baking to ensure that it stays flexible.
i met artur rubinstein many years ago at tanglewood. it was before a performance i i'll always remember him rubbing his hands together to keep them limber (and flexible!)

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Hi Rose,

I just made a delicious nut-based cake for a friend's birthday. It comes out of an old cookbook by Artur Rubinstein's wife, called Nela's Cookbook. The cake is a gorgeous Polish recipe called Torte Orzechowy, with a luscious chocolate rum butter filling, and a dark chocolate icing, and to me it's very similar to a Passover nut cake, consisting mainly of walnuts and eggs. I'm wondering if this spongy nut batter would work as a bûche de noël, baked in a 15"x 10" jelly-roll pan, rolled around a filling and frosted. I'd be very pleased to know your thinking on this. The recipe is posted on my blog:
http://fingerineverypie.typepad.com/my_weblog/2007/12/nuttiness-as-pr.html

I know this is a busy season for you, but if you have a moment to check it out, I'd love to know what you think.

Thanks,

Julie
http://fingerineverypie.typepad.com

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in the cake bible i list that cakes that take 30 to 40 minutes in an 8 or 9 by 2 inch pan take 35 to 45 in a 9 x 13. your cake may take less time perhaps because you are using 8 by 1 1/2 inch pans? if so, there will not be enough batter for a 9 x 13 which is about 15 cup capacity. it could look kind of skimpy. but if you are using 8 by 2 inch pans then it will be perfect.
use the usual tests for doneness and you should be fine. let us know!

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Gwendolyn Rafter
Gwendolyn Rafter
10/31/2007 05:41 PM

I have a great Red Velvet Cake recipe that I make in two 8 inch pans BUT this time I want to make it in a 9X13 rectangle pan. How long should it bake? I usually have to bake the two pans for 20 minutes at 350 but I have no idea how long to bake the one rectangel cake. Thanks for any help you can give. I want to make the cake as a gift for my mother. She have been a member of her church for 73 of her 88 years and they are giving her a surprise appreciation program.

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try sweet celebrations in MN

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Where can I get the boxes to fit the top layer of cake that the bride takes home? It's 6"X6".

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since carrot cakes happen to be delicious when refrigerated i would keep them cold until absolutely necessary to set them out for serving if the weather becomes hot.

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I am baking carrot cakes for my son's wedding on Sept. 2 - my future daughter-in-law wants cream cheese frosting. Is there some way to make the frosting stand up to heat and humidity should the weather be warm? The cakes will not be stacked, but will be displayed on stands of different heights. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Arleen

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robin, i'm glad you have the cake bible bc it is ideal for the answer to your questions about how to get the weights of ingredients used for cakes and also how to develop your own cake formulas by understanding the way in which the ingredients interact.
re the baker's %, you simply use the weight of the flour as 100% and everything else as a fraction or percentage of that, i.e. if you are using 200 grams of flour and 7 grams baking powder, you divide 7 grams by 100 to get the % of baking powder.
in the bibliography of the cake bible i list several books that will interest you should you want to pursue this further.

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it's in the cake bible!

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I really need help ASAP. My son's graduation party is Saturday 7/1/06 and I need a basic wedding type white cake recipe for a 12 x 18 sheet cake pan. If someone could either e-mail me one or point me in the right direction I would be ever so gratefull. My email is ggallet1@twcny.rr.com.

Thanks,
Gary

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Robin Bingham
Robin Bingham
06/26/2006 09:07 AM

Dear Mrs. Beranbaum,

Hi-this is the first time I've logged onto your website. I happen to own your book The Cake Bible and have found it particularly useful in further developing my understanding of baking cakes. I am currently a Baking and Pastry Arts student about to enter my second semester. We were briefly introduced to the concept of Baker's Percent last semester. I'm quickly finding that my growing knowledge will also have to take place out of the class setting. My current question is if you have a recipe written in cups, teaspoons, etc. how do you begin to convert it to weight and apply Baker's Percent to create a formula? For example, 3 cups flour, 6 eggs, etc. Furthermore, are there any resources (i.e. books, websites) that delve into the concept of Baker's Percent and creating your own cake formulas? Thank you. Robin

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p.s. somehow the statement "i am the subway cake-baker" makes me think of phantom of the opera!!!

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what fun--the image of the twenty-somethings toasting little old(er) me!!!

now here's a continuation of wise brian's admonishions re the baking powder. it works best if poured into the pan as soon as possible after mixing. you must have worked very quickly to make the second batch. if you have access to a large enough mixer you can mix a double batch without a problem.

calcium phosphate baking powder is double acting but the larger part of the reaction takes place on hydration, i.e. 2/3 react on mixing and 1/3 on baking. sodium based baking powders are the reverse, i.e. 1/3 reacts on mixing and 2/3 on baking so if you have to do things in batches best to use a sodium based baking powder. sounds like what you did worked perfectly though! just have to throw in my two-cents.

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rose, i am the subway cake-baker from brian's post above. upon brian's stern warnings about the risk of quadrupling a recipe and killing the baking powder, i ended up making four separate batches of the white chocolate whisper cake. then i poured two batches into the half sheet pan and baked it. and then poured the other two batches into the pan and baked that. i can't say that it was the most efficient way to quadruple the recipe, but it was the safest! and i was very pleased with the result. i plan to use the recipe many more times - but hopefully, for smaller cakes.

also, a bunch of brooklyn twentysomethings toasted you at the birthday party. thanks for the wonderful recipes!

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brian this is beyond awesome! i can't wait to get back to my home computer so i can see the photos on the big monitor.

i suspect you could make a good extra living consulting with all the people who keep writing to me about how to figure out how much batter is needed for different size cakes not listed in the cake bible!

eating roosevelt island is some accomplishment!

thanks for sharing this masterpiece.

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On the topic of resizing the White Chocolate Whisper Cake, I thought you might like to see a version my friend Marie made for a birthday party this weekend--I sent her your recipe and together we pondered ways to make it into a two layer half-sheet cake cut into the shape of a Manhattan subway map (along with some of the other boroughs). After some volume recalculations and a couple of glasses of red wine, the end result is up in a photo album.

By all accounts the cake and the neoclassic buttercream were a great success. And the birthday boy ate Roosevelt Island all by himself!

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there are so many different shaped pans i would have to buy each and every one to determine this but i have a general approach that i hope you'll find helpful.

first, not all cake recipes rise the same amount. my basic layer cakes should fill the pans half full or a little bit more. most other recipes need to fill the pans 2/3 full to rise to the top.

on page 455 of the cake bible i list the volume of all round 2 inch high cake pans from 6 inches up to 18 and the standard rectangular pan and 18 x 12 x 2 sheet pan. also how to get the volume of any of these pans in a square shape by a simple mathematical formula.

on page 490 is the weight of batter if using my recipes needed for these pans as well.

all you need to do for odd shaped pans is pour water into them to see the volume of the pan and you can create your own accurate chart for the pans you use.

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Hi Rose,
Do you have any charts for how much batter to use for different shaped pans, (I.e. squares, octoganal, etc.). I know Wilton has one, but I don't really trust their numbers from experience. Thanks!

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wow! a singing posting--my very first ever!

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LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA !!! !!! !!! !!! ?? !! ?? !!

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i was just visiting with the people from wilton enterprises who specialize in these types of cakes as well as other elaborate cake designs. they advised a pound cake but agreed that my golden sour cream cake in the cake bible would probably be sturdy enough as long as it was given some support such as a wooden dowel. i like to use plastic drinking straws as i do in my wedding cakes. in this case i would insert it at an angle through both cake halves. also i would bake the cake a day ahead to give it a chance to set well.
if you want the cake to be white, i think the white chocolate whisper cake would be a good choice though it's not quite as sturdy. and the mousseleine buttercream or white chocolate buttercream is the most close to white and so dreamy to work with and to eat! do let us know how it came out!

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I have for years hosted my family's Easter celebrations and I have for even more years baked all my cakes from "The Cake Bible".

I'm now the proud father of two young children and for their amusement, I purchased the "Bunny Cake Pan" from Williams-Sonoma (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/sku7628514.jsp).

Now I'm facing the quandary of figuring out what cake to bake in that pan and how to dress it. I'm hoping for suggestions for a cake recipe that would bake well in a shaped pan and that would, upon completion, be sturdy enough to stand. I'd like my bunny to be white, so I'm also hoping for a suggestion for a buttercream or other topping that would compliment the cake.

--Tom B.

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