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What is the best way to stabilize whipped cream for frosting a cake?

Mar 26, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose

Whipped cream tends to water out slightly after beating so to keep this from happening I use a small amount cornstarch which does not affect the texture.

It will not hold up well at room temperature but in the refrigerator will stay well on the cake for 24 hours! Many people have reported that this recipes has saved their lives!

For 1 cup of heavy whipping cream, use 2 tablespoons of powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon of cornstarch (if your cream is very low in butterfat use 1 1/2 teaspoons), and 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract.
Refrigerate the mixing bowl and (preferably whisk) beater for at least 15 minutes.
In a small saucepan place the powdered sugar and cornstarch and gradually stir in 1/4 cup of the cream.

Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, and simmer for just a few seconds (until the liquid is thickened). Scrape into a small bowl and cool completely to room temperature. Stir in the vanilla.
Beat the remaining 3/4 cup cream just until traces of beater marks begin to show distinctly.

Add the cornstarch mixture in a steady stream, beating constantly. Beat just until stiff peaks form when the beater is raised.

Comments

Hi Rose

I tried this recipe earlier just to test it out. I cooked the cornstarch mixture till it formed like pudding and then left it to room temperature. By the time I add to the cream, there were small lumps of the cornstarch mixture. I am wondering if the part to thicken the cornstarch mixture is just about to thicken (still in liquid form) or has to thicken like custard?

Thanks.

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Susan Theriot
Susan Theriot in reply to comment from Woody
06/21/2013 01:06 PM

Thanks

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Hi Susan,
Albert Uster Imports is the source for cobasan.
Rose & Woody

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Susan Theriot
Susan Theriot
06/21/2013 12:56 PM

Does anyone know where I can buy some Cobasan? I want to try it to stabilize whip cream. Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from tracy
06/13/2013 11:50 PM

HI Tracy,
We have heard that Dr Oetkers Whip It which contains dextrose, modified corn starch, tricalcium phosphate works well. We have not researched xanthum gum or Dr Oetkers Whip It for stabilization or how it compares to cobasan, since there are so many other stabilizers that can be used for the typical time period that whipped cream is applied and its serving.
most buttercream do need extra stabilizing as they can be stored frozen or in the refrigerator and allowing a few hours before serving to reach a creamy consistency.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you woody agreed I probably will spring for it just one question what do you think of xanthan gum or any of those types for the whipped cream or even butter cream as stabilizing agents thanks again

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from tracy
06/12/2013 11:34 PM

Hi Tracy,
We have not seen anything else that performs like cobasan. Besides the recipes above, Rose has also incorporated gelatin into the whipped cream, which stabilizes it well but also adds some sponginess to the texture. The whipped cream with gelatin works well for filling a cake.
Although cobasan is expensive, the 2.9 pound bottle of cobasan will likely last you a lifetime as a teaspoon will stabilize a few cups of whipped cream. I am still using the 1/2 cup of cobasan that Rose gave me 5 years ago.
Rose & Woody

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Hi cobasan is alittle to expensive for me lol can I make something similar myself for butttercreams and whipped creams thanks so much

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from lina
05/12/2013 10:06 AM

Hi Lina,
We suggest you look at the several recipes that are in The Cake Bible, The Pie & Pastry Bible, and Rose's Heavenly Cakes. They include recipes from adding gelatin or cornstarch to making one in a food processor. We also recommend using Cobason for stabilizing dairy whipped cream.
The flavor of dairy whipped cream is a major reason for using it over non-dairy whipped cream.
Rose & Woody

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hi wilton,
first of all thanks for the reply.i dnt have any particular thing for nondairy whipped cream but i have heard it's more stabilized thus i used it.can u plz tell me any solution using dairy whipped cream?i can try that too.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from lina
05/10/2013 10:09 AM

Hi Lina,
We really do not have an answer for your question as we do not work with non-dairy whipped cream products.
We suggest to first contact the manufacturer of the product that you are using. There are also many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in sugar free, dairy free, gluten free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and contact them for substitution recommendations. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.
Rose & Woody

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hi rose,i am a novice at baking and i recently attempted to make a three tiered cake for a frnd's bday.the cake was really good but i had too many difficulties with the whipped cream.it was non dairy whipping cream.i added sugar,gelatine and followed evrythng still neither it volumed up to double nor was of nice consistency for piping.though after freezing ovrnight it was of spreadbale consistency but no piping could be done.it's quite warm in here.can dt be the reason?but i have heard nondairy cream with gelatine is pretty stable..i jst coludn't figure out where i went wrng.since u always have the solution to every problem will u please help me with this?

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Hi Rosa,
We ask what are you looking to make?
If you are making a frosting, then adding strawberry puree to the Dreamy Creamy Frosting will give you a strawberry flavored cream cheese frosting.
If you are looking for more of a spread for bagels, then blending some strawberry butter and cream cheese together will work.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rosa, I have a question for you, how do I make Strawberry cream cheese? Or do I have it in one your books but the only one I have seed is the Dreamy Creamy White Chocolate.....P.S. I have all your cook books.

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Thanks for your detailed explanation Woody, I completely understand and only asked because I preferred not to rely on those blogging sites for the recipe.

I do have a login already for Rose's website, and when I have the book I'll be happy to share my thoughts, ask questions from the experts and learn from other fellow bakers too :)

Thanks,
Sara

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sara
06/ 6/2012 01:20 AM

Hi Sara,
We have found that other ingredients or techniques have provided the needed stiffening for Rose's buttercream recipes. You may want to experiment with meringue powder as an addition to an author's recipe to see how you like it.
We have not tried it for whip cream or cream cheese adornments.
We are pleased that you are interested in The Cake Bible, but we do not have the White Chocolate Cream Cheese recipe posted on this blog. The recipe is also in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
Over the years, many bloggers have asked for recipes to be available on the blog. This is a practice done by many blog sites as the owners of these sites are typically backed by advertisers, presenting versions of recipes from cookbook authors (many times without the author's or publisher's permission), and/or linking products to websites for commissioned sales.
Rose is a writer by occupation, in which she writes cookbooks, articles for magazines and newspapers, and postings for websites. These are sources for finding Rose’s recipes. Although, we do have several recipes in the Recipe section.
To offer recipes on the blog site, we would either have to adopt one of two practices commonly done:
>Have a section of the blog, entered thru a password after having paid an admission fee to access the recipes.
>Link up with advertisers, who would pay by the number of visitors.
We prefer to neither as the million plus visitors last year and years to come like the blog as it is. Uncluttered by advertising (that in many cases has no connection with food). No underlined words that can portal a blogger to advertising and advertiser’s videos. No special club for which a blogger has to pay admission.
Rose’s books are available whether one wants to buy new, buy used, or check them out for free from many local libraries.
The blog is here to connect a worldwide baking community for helping each other to solve baking questions and discovering new ideas.

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Hello Rose,

I was wondering about your opinion in using mirangue powder for stiffening?
I know it crusts and stiffens certain buttercreams (according to the Wilton method of cake decorating) but can this also stiffen whipped cream or even crust/stiffen cream cheese icing for piping? I certainly would like to try your white chocolate cream cheese icing but I don't have the recipe as I don't have your cake bible book yet (hoping to get it for my birthday and already hinted to my husband ;)

Pls advise on the mirangue powder as I'm curious to know!

Thanks

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Thanks so much Woody, will certainly order Rose's Heavenly Cakes soon - in the meantime can you pls share this recipe with me?

Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sara
06/ 3/2012 09:48 PM

Hi Sara,
We recommend Albert Uster Imports which is listed in the sources section of Rose's Heavenly Cakes pg 461.
We have good stability with the Dreamy Creamy Frosting for stability when piped. We suggest you try it.

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Hi Woody, first of all thanks so much for your response to my question :)

Can you pls advise where is the best place to find Cobasan?

And does the white chocolate cream cheese icing hold up well in terms of stiffness for piping a swirl/rosettes/flowers on cupcakes? I do find that most cream cheese icing recipes (butter, shortening, cream cheese and lots of confectioners sugar) still does droop after half hour even in 70 degrees temp.

Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sara
06/ 3/2012 12:18 PM

Hi Sara,
We have seen that piping gel is similar to adding gelatin for stabilizing whip cream. Our preference for stabilizing whip cream is to add a few drops of Cobasan, although it does not work as well with some brands of ultra-pasteurized whip cream.
The White Chocolate Cream Cheese is our preference for a stabilized cream cheese frosting. In fact, I just frosted and piped this for an event last night on a cheesecake. It held up without watering out and only softened a little in a room over 80˚F for several hours.

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Hi, I was just wondering if the piping gel method to stabilize the cream is exactly the same as adding gelatin or agar? Can this be used for piping?

And which is the best stable cream cheese icing that can be piped or swirled on cupcakes especially in warm weather, is it the white chocolate cream cheese recipe ?

Thanks!

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hello Iam looking for the powder cream its like the fresh cream but powder can you help me pleas its give the test of the fresh cream do you now the name or supplier THANK YOU

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jenny
01/ 6/2012 12:07 AM

Hi Jenny,
The Gelatin-Stabilized Whipped Cream in Rose's Heavenly Cakes page 446 is basically the same recipe using powdered gelatin instead of piping gel. It works beautifully. The recipe you have shown should work very well.

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You dont have to fool with cornstarch if you just use a generous squirt of Cobasan in the whipped cream. I find it can be added before or during whipping. It works on any kind of cream, in my experience, I just use a lot more for ultrapasterized cream, a stream of about 2-4 seconds or even longer directly into the cream, depending on how much cream you are whipping. It never hurts to add more than you think you might need.

I've used it like this since I learned about it when I first bought the Cake Bible. I love it!!

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if you whip heavy cream fast enough it should not turn to butter. Also, everything, cream, beaters and bowl, should be really cold, that will help.

Maybe you live in a very warm climate where the cream warms more than mine does in the whipping process? that could be a factor in getting butter.


Anne

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Has anyone tried using this recipe for stabilizing whipped cream?
1 cup heavy whipping cream
2 tbsp confectioners sugar
2 tbsp piping gel
1 tsp vanilla

It seems to be that it has both corn starch from the sugar and the gelatin from the piping gel making it super duper stabilizing? Anyone tried this?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Anushka
12/18/2011 02:56 PM

Hi Anushka,
We recommend to only use dairy whipped cream. Rose's recipes in her books give stabilized whipped creams beyond whipped cream and sugar with additions of cornstarch, powdered sugar, or gelatin. If you are over whipping, we suggest to just experiment with different timeframes of not whipping it as long.
Generally, we say any reputable brand of whipped cream should work fine. The key is having your mixing bowl and beaters refrigerated for 15 minutes or longer before whipping.

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Hi, If we over whip the heavy whipping cream the common problem is it turns into butter. Can we use (Rich's) Whip Topping a non dairy topping instead of heavy whipping cream so that it doesn't whip to butter. But i tried using this once the results are not satifying (no stiff peaks formed). Can u suggest me a good brand of heavy whipping cream which can form really stiff peaks and can be used for icing cakes. Thanks

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Hi, If we over whip the heavy whipping cream the common problem is it turns into butter. Can we use (Rich's) Whip Topping a non dairy topping instead of heavy whipping cream so that it doesn't whip to butter. But i tried using this once the results are not satifying (no stiff peaks formed). Can u suggest me a good brand of heavy whipping cream which can form really stiff peaks and can be used for icing cakes. Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from eliza
12/ 5/2011 04:31 PM

Hi Eliza,
We would say that "velvet" is from the velvet crumb from using the egg whites compared to similar recipes using whole eggs or egg yolks. We suggest make Rose's White Velvet Butter cake and the All-Occasion Downy Yellow cake so that you can taste and see the differences. Both are in The Cake Bible.

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What makes a red velvet, blue velvet or white velvet cake "velvet" - can anyone tell me? Thanks!

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Hi Bina,
We suggest to experiment with a small quantity to see if the stabilizing techniques work for the brand of cream you are using and with your weather conditions. You can also contact the manufacturer for their advice.

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In Hong Kong where I live, more often than not the only whipping cream available is the ultra pasteurised kind with "emulsifiers" listed on the label. Would the same stabilising techniques work? I am making the Black Forest Torte from The Cake Bible and temperature at the moment is in the nineties - and humid!

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Hi Anushka,
We ask that you please read through all of the chapters in Rose's books that you are making recipes. The Understanding sections in The Cake Bible along with the Ingredient and Equipment sections in both books will answer most of your questions beyond what any recipe describes or offers for variations.
Happy reading .

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anushka, Rose's new cake book has a recipe for her orange glow chiffon cake, done on cupcakes. the book is called Rose's Heavenly Cakes, and the recipe for The Bostini, uses the chiffon as cupcakes as on component.

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can we use the chiffon cake recipe for the best moist cupcakes.

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Hi Anushka,
Yes. you can substitute whole eggs for egg whites at a 1 whole egg: 1-1/2 egg whites.Please read Rose's ingredient section on eggs. The baking powder will change. It will need to be increased depending on which recipe you are doing.
Please read our blog article on The Power of Flour where we tested baking powder levels for all whites, all yolks, and whole egg for Rose's basic butter cake recipe.

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Hi, I wanted to make white velvet cake for a party. Is it fine to use a whole egg instead to just egg whites or will this effect the moistness of the cake. And what portion do we replace the egg white with the whole eggs.

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Anushka. The pistachio cake in Rose's Heavenly cakes, is probably the most delicious cake I have ever tasted. I make it all the time.

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ST, in addition to Hector's good advice to avoid overwhipping, you can also focus on making things colder. Your cornstarch/cream mixture may not have been cool enough, or your soft peak cream may not have been cold enough.

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Hi Anushka,
Yes. Rose's Heavenly Cakes has a wonderful pistachio cake on page 65 with a pistachio enhanced buttercream.

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Hi Rose,
I want to make a pistachio cake. Can u pls. suggest a perfect recipe.

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st, i would try whipping less time. seems to me
that the cream is been overwhipped.

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I have tried making the cornflour-stabilized cream from the cake bible twice this week and failed both times. After I added the cooled thickened cream to the partially whipped cream, instead of stiffening up, the cream curdled. My cream has 35.5% butterfat and I am using 1 tsp of cornstarch for 1 cup of cream. What do you think I'm doing wrong?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mark
12/29/2010 10:55 AM

thank you mark--that's just great!

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Will hold in the fridge for 24 hours? Try over a week, and still fresh! I used this recipe as the top layer of a five-layer pumpkin cheesecake (gluten-free) for Thanksgiving. It was a real hit. Thank you, Rose!

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deb, if you have my newest book (rose's heavenly cakes) on page 444 you will see several choices of stabilizing whipped cream and the advantages of each, including the difference between cobasan and dr. oetker's.

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Can someone please tell me what the difference is between Cobasan and Dr Oetker's Whip it? Or are they one in the same? Thanks!

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i'm afraid not, but why don't you try googling it. at least you'll find dr. oetker's products and then you can find where they distribute.

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Where can I find "Whip It"? Do you know which supermarkets carry it? Thanks!

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bill, yes yes and yes and whip it is in the new book.

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Rose:
have you ever tried "Whip it"? I see it in the supermarket all the time...just wondering. Looks so easy. Does it work? Does it affect the flavor?

AS you can see...not so many patients this morning, and lots of baking coming up...trying to get as much info that I will need and catch up with everyone.

Oh, and on a totally separate topic, I noticed your reference in the aknoledgemnts in the new book to "silver towers". I'm not asking where you live, so don't comment if you aren't comfortable, but my other half lived there for years, and I practically lived there for 5 years (Before I knew about your books) so perhaps we've spent time in the elevator together. oh, and I also have a nephew named Alexander. The conincidences go on and on LOL

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I just made the stabilized whip cream to top pumpkin flan for Thanksgiving, using a large star tip. Twenty-four hours later, the whipped cream on the left-over flan still held the sharp definitions of the star pattern, with no seepage.

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Susan Simon
Susan Simon
12/ 2/2009 05:43 PM

Does anyone stabilize whipped cream by adding a little powdered milk? I don't know where I read this, but I do it all the time for whipped cream that I'm serving at home; there's no effect on taste or texture, but with the powdered milk addition, the whipped cream does not water out. For a cake that I am carrying elsewhere that will be out of the fridge for a while, I use Rose's gelatin method.

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page 237 with end not on page 238

be sure to use white chocolate that contains cocoa butter which is what gives the room temperature stabilization.

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Thanks so much ..I have my cake bible right here ....

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i would definitely use the white chocolate cream cheese frosting from the cake bible with the note on butter amounts for warmer weather.

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HELP!!! I need to stabile cream cheese frosting for red velvet cupcakes for an outdoor wedding reception next weekendJune 6th 2009!!Is there any thing I can add to make the frosting hold up in the humidity and heat of east tennessee????

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I have used Oetker's Whip it and it's a very good, fast option. Though the above recipe is pretty darn cheap when you consider how inexpensive the ingredients are.

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Has anyone ever tried the product, Dr. Oetker Whip it to stabilize their whipped cream? Here's a link for the product: http://www.oetker.ca/en/product/baking-ingredients/pouch/11140

Irene

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Hector-
Your concern is respectable, but whipped cream is not going to make anyone sick if left out at room temperature for a few hours. I am a Certified Pastry Chef and I work in a resort bakery. If leaving whipped cream out at room temperature is high risk, then there are thousands of people who would have gotten sick from our products. It is near impossible to find unpasteurized dairy products in America these days. So please rest your concerns.

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Gail, if pictures say a thousand words, your writing said a thousand pictures.

Reading made me hungry and drool even w/o smell and w/o picture!

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what a stunning rendition--i do hope you took photos and will send one for the blog.
we all thank you for your generosiy in sharing all these fabulous details.

this is the blog come alive!

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Thanks to Rose and everyone else who shared their knowledge of strawberry and cream filled layer cakes here. After reading and re-reading these posts, I made a special cake for a baby shower. To everyone's delight, it was remarkably good. I learned a few things in the making and thought it only fair to post that information here. The cakes were baked in an 11x15x2 inch pan. I made two cakes, one using Ruth's genoise recipe (2.5 x the recipe with 10 large eggs) and one cake using Christopher Kimball's recipe (2 x the recipe, also with 10 large eggs). In addition to the vanilla, I added the finely grated, colored-part-only rind of one orange to each. Both were very good but for this recipe, I preferred the genoise which better absorbed the juice from the macerated berries. The final cake had four layers! I generally like to use the heavy cream sold here by the pint at Trader Joe's since it is not ultra-pasteurized. It has a very fresh taste and has a very high butterfat content. I thought the day would be very hot and so resolved to use Hector's super stabilized method. But I found this cream a bit too stiff to spread nicely. And worst of all, I did not have enough cream! My husband came to the rescue. He dashed to the local supermarket and brought back 3 more pints of the store brand "heavy whipping cream". I did not have time to cool the powdered sugar/cornstarch mixture and so just went with the gelatin. The bowl and beater were ice cold, the cream right out of the store cooler. I used the microwave to heat the softened gelatin and sugar mixture till the gelatin was dissolved and then added the vanilla using this recipe x 6: 1 tsp. powdered gelatin, 4 tsp. water, 1 cup heavy cream, 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar, and 1/2 tsp. vanilla. No time to cool it at all! Then the cream seemed like it would not whip! Panic! But just as it was starting to thicken, I added the gelatin in a thin stream while beating at full speed. Voila, creamy, fluffy, springy and delicious. Easy to spread and decorate with. The first batch provided a nice base coat as one would do for a wedding cake. It held up inside the layers. The second batch then glided on. With a pastry tube and large rosette tip, I made a rectangular (7x4) grid plus a nice shell border along the edges and the base. Just before serving, I cut the most perfectly shaped, unsugared, washed but dried strawberries, with the hull left on, in half from tip to hull and positioned each at a slight slant, one per square. It made a really stunning presentation. I had to transport this cake from San Diego to Los Angeles. As always, Rose knew what to do. Following her advice, I got a large Styrofoam shipping box from Box City. The cake was sitting on 3 of those large rectangular cake sheets made by Wilton. I held them together with a bit of double-sided tape. Also, I put a thin layer of Italian meringue on the top cardboard sheet (hidden by the cake though) before placing the first cake layer on it to keep it in securely in place. It fit the box perfectly. To keep things cold, I made my own frozen gel packs. Add 1 quart of water to a one gallon zip lock freezer bag. Then add 1/2 T of Soil Moist and let it stand for 5 minutes - it keeps the ice frozen for much longer. Double bag for security. I froze these overnight, keeping them flat. I used 6 of these on the bottom of the box and then added some Styrofoam peanuts to make a level surface. The cake traveled perfectly despite some bumpy roads and sudden stops! The best part was watching how the guests really enjoyed this special cake. Could not have done it without you!

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Mila,
You can look on the nutrition information label for your chocolate and see how many grams of sugar it contains per serving. You can use that information to calculate how much sugar you need to remove from the original recipe.

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Hector thank you! I know about refrigerating raw milk products but 2 things: 1) nothing will happen with the cake having whipped cream in it if it'll spend 1 hour outside the fridge (how do ppl serve it then?) 2) most of the dairy available storewide in NYC is ultrapasteurized... not raw. It has much longer shelf life than the raw.
As to the white chocolate and cream - ilove White Ganache from the Cake Bible and use it often as ppl like it aswell (in my community buttercream is not the filling/icing of choice) the only thing why i asked about it is that i've never done Strawberry Cloud Cream before so i have no idea what is the original sweeteness level and how will it behave while serving.

Bill, thank you. I love cocoa butter hint in cream especially if it's strawberry shortcake, charlotte or anything with strawberries and even raspberries.

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I have used white chocolate to stabilize whipped cream...it works beautifully but it definitely adds a cocoa butter taste to the cream...I prefer using gelatin. I like my whipped cream to be flavored only with a touch of sugar and vanilla...so I stay away from the white chocolate.

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Mila, I hate to tell you this, but whipped cream (in any form without chemical preservatives) must be kept refrigerated at all times. It is a raw milk product and I believe FDA recommends this.

I've never added white chocolate on whipped cream, but I do think the sweetness of white chocolate is 1.5-2 of white chocolate = 1 of sugar. White chocolate brands differs on sugar content, so you will just need to try by taste.

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I'd like to update and clarify my question :) If i substitute sugar for 3 oz of white Green&Black chocolate for 1 recipe strawberry cloud cream will it be sweet enough? Any thoughts?

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I have stabilized whipped cream with geletin as per the recipe in the cake bible...the cake holds at room temperature without a problem for a few hours. Whipped cream and strawberries is my mom's favorite...I baked an angelfood cake, split and filled it with whipped cream and strawberries and frosted the outside with the whipped cream and transported the cake in a cake keeper from where i live in New york City, to my sister in Western New Jersey...in terrible traffic...and it was fine when I arrived a few hours later.

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Can anyone advise me on strawberry cloud cream? I'm planning to make a baby shower cake with Biscuit de Savoie and Strawberry Cloud cream. My question is - can i add white chocolate to it and if so how should i go with sugar, what would be the best amount of chocolate/sugar and will the chocolate add that much of a stabilization that the cream will hold for 1-1,5 hours in 70-72F?
Thank you.

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they are one and the same.

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Rose - what can you tell us about confectioner's vs. powdered sugar?

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Cathy, I think the whipped cream with Cobasan would stay at room temperature for about 4 hours =)

Patrincia, as far as I know, confectioners 'always' have corn starch. But powdered not necessarily. Powdered sugar, w/o corn starch is found at specialty or commercial stores.

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That helps, Hector. Thank you. I never understood that stabilization referred to refrigeration time. That makes a big difference.

So, when you do a wedding or party of any sort (in which the cake will be displayed/out for any length of time), you don't use whipped cream for filling or frosting? Moussiline is quickly becoming my favorite for more reasons than just taste, looks and texture! (And that was quite a lot already :)

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Aren't confectioners sugar and powdered sugar the same? I believe the terms are used interchangeably, so either would contain corn starch. (unless you make your own by grinding granulated white sugar in your food processor. I've never done it, but I've read that other have).

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Cathy, ALL whipped creams should be kept refrigerated until serving time! The most the super stabilized would hold at room temp would be 15 minutes I would think! If you are in a very cold air conditioned room, perhaps 30 minutes.

My super super stabilized is just like the regular super stabilized, except I do use confectioners sugar instead of powdered sugar. Confectioners sugar has corn starch, so I dissolve the sugar in the gelatin first.

The stabilization methods we mention are just for how long you can store your cake refrigerated: several days. Without stabilization the whipped cream would break in a matter of hours, refrigerated.

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Hector, Thank you for your response. I understand about the Cobasan. Would that be called a preservative?

I have been wanting to try the Super Stabilized Whipped Cream. How long can this be out at room temp? I am considering it as a filling (fresh berries added) with White Velvet butter cake for an upcoming event--3/4 sheet cake. Would I run into trouble with time/room temp and/or refrig/room temp combo with butter cake?

Don't you have a super-super stabilized whipped cream I have read about here? If so, can that be left out for longer?

Thanks so much!

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Elise - Firstly, welcome to the board, it's nice to have you. Now for my suggestion, why don't you try Rose's chocolate version of the Mousseline Buttercream recipe in The Cake Bible? It would be lovely sprinkled with the dark chocolate as you described. It's also silky smooth, not overly sweet, and it will hold up very well in warm temperatures!

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Cathy, I have successfully froze Super Stabilized Whipped Cream (with gelatin) on its final shape. This already applied as frosting on a cake or as piped decorations (roses, pipings, etc).

I wouldn't recommend to freeze whipped cream before being applied to its final shape (like freezing a bucket of it that later you can use), because you would need to re-whip, and whipped cream DOES NOT like to be whipped more than needed or it will separate or become grainy/clumpy.

I've never tried Cobasan, and do not plan to. I feel using Cobasan would put me on the commercial bakery category, no longer in the homemade goods category.

By the way, my completed peach shortcake (like a strawberry shortcake with sponge cake and whipped cream, but with canned peaches instead of strawberies), was frozen for 1 month, and when served NOBODY noticed that the whipped cream wasn't freshly whipped! It also had a pool of chocolate ganache. Indeed that was Josephine's Biscuit de Savoie.

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A quick question...

can I freeze Perfect Whipped Cream made with Cobasan?

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I am desperately looking for a light-colored creamy chocolate frosting for a dark chocolate cake. I plan to sprinkle dark chocolate shavings over the top. I tried a recipe this morning with 2 oz white chocolate and 2 oz unsweetented baking chocolate and added just a dollop of Crisco (no yuks, please, I was desparate to smooth out the sense of confectioner's sugar graininess. The result looked and tasted good (although a bit too sweet and I could still detect sugar graininess but not so bad) but too soft to hold up in heat. My problem is that this cake has to be in warm weather in 10 days on display for several hours. Would gelatin help to stabilize? How would I add it (to butter-sugar fluff in mixer, to melted chocolate, dry or in liquid???). I am new to this forum but have greatly enjoyed all the comments. Please help me!

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I am looking for a recipe for Sicilian Bread made with almonds, raisins, macaroon paste, raspberry, cranberries and etc. Can someone help me. thanks, sue

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You're welcome Elicia! I hope your uncle brings you all the stuff you asked for.
Rozanne

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Hi Hector, What wld we do without cakes? I have crazy cravings for cake all the time, even for breakfast! So I always try to make sure there's some cake in the fridge! I've not walked my dogs with a slice of cake in hand, though! Haha!

Chiboust is pastry cream lightened with whipped cream. You can make it very simply by folding whipped cream (stabilised with gelatine) into any pastry cream you may have on hand - the proportions are in the PPB. Rose's Chiboust uses lots of vanilla (love the vanilla seeds speckles too!) and Grand Marnier which amazingly marries well with it. I think its a great alternative filling (with fresh fruit/berries) for cakes in place of whipped cream. You know why I hardly work with basic Super Stabilised Whipped Cream - it because my local gelatine have a bit of a taste. But in the Chiboust, the gelatine is masked by the wonderful vanilla and GM.

Now m probably going to the cake specialty shop and search for this essence of strawberry! I made the puree without it, so I want to try another batch with it!

I agree - we all keep each other going!

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Hi Elicia, I've just had my LAST piece of Copper Topper. I made it again last week and froze a slice. It was good, specially good because tonight I didn't have to lift a finger to bake it!

What is the Chiboust Cream, let me catch up the reading on the blog. And, I am going to make strawberry conserve pretty soon (the French wild strawberry arome is on its way).

I've learned a lot, too from Rose's blog, and all of you, but most important, this blog keeps me going, keeps me baking more often than usual!

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Oh Hector, the jello is a fantastic idea! Will definitely try it! I have no problems with mousses as my mousses are flavoured, so I won't taste the gelatine. It only bothers me when I make Super Stabilised Whipped Cream.

I've really picked up so many wonderful tips and tricks since I started blogging here! Thks!

Oh BTW, the Chiboust Cream turned out fantastic. I layered it with the strawberries on 2 layers of genoise soaked in Grand Marnier syrup. I also topped the genoise with a thin layer of strawberry puree. And since I decided not to keep any leftover chiboust cream (I made 1/2 the recipe), I piled it on the top of the cake, drizzled some puree and swirled it like you wld in a cheesecake! It was a great small 6" cake that I made with 'leftovers' or, 'over-runs' as you may call it, in my fridge(genoise and strawberries)... and I had it for breakfast!

Oh... and Copper Topper will probably be the first I'll make once I get the book!

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Very good Elicia, now we can compare notes with Rose's Celebrations. Copper Topper is there.

Instead of knox, you can do by with regular jello. My Mom used that all the time. Substract 1/2 the volume of sugar from the whipped cream recipe per volume of jello. Find a jello flavor that will match your cake, or if you want the flavor unnoticeable you can use pineapple or lemon jello flavor, these are almost unnoticeable on whipped cream since they just add a tangy twist which is almost desirable!

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Hi Rozanne, Thks so much for the offer! I've actually emailed my uncle a whole list of items to bring back for me as they are coming to Malaysia in Sept! Knox is one of them! We do get Hershey's here but sometimes it can run out of stock for a couple of months - so I tend to stock up... same goes for Crisco shortening (local shortening is just not as white!), and even corn syrup.

My uncle will also be bringing back a copy of Rose's Celebrations!

So thanks a million anyway, and in any case if I can't wait till Sept, will definitely let you know!

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Elicia,
I live in Canada and if you would like to have some Knox gelatine I can mail some to you. Let me know and I will give you my e-mail address so we can exchange mailing info.
I know how frustrating it can be when an ingredient you want is not available. We don't have Hershey's cocoa powder here and that used to be very frustrating. Thankfully Rose recommended a better (far better) cocoa powder from England which I can buy here. So that dilemma was solved thanks to Rose.
Rozanne

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Hi Cindy, I don't have the luxury of choosing gelatine here. Only powder form is available! My uncle brought back Knox for me from Canada once, and I thought it was much finer and didn't have any taste (my local ones sometimes do). I find it very simple to melt gelatine in a microwave, but you must be careful to fully melt it (you may have residue sticking on the sides of your cup/bowl.

Oh Hector, the strawberry tart looks yummy! Just have an idea to whip up a simple cake (since I have some strawberries in the fridge and an extra sheet of genoise in the freezer) - strawberries with chiboust cream (pastry cream lightened with whipped cream) - as per Rose's Hiroko tart recipe in the PPB. Hmm... maybe today...
Oh BTW, we just make do with any strawberries we can get our hands on here - sometimes flown in from Australia or NZ, or local ones from the highlands. I'm a raspberry fan though, and stock my freezer up with frozen ones whenever they are available. Rose's raspberry puree is pure heaven!

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http://chocolateandzucchini.com/moblog/archives/2007/06/my_mothers_tart.html#comments

If I like strawberries on a pie or a tart, THIS IS HOW I WANT IT DONE! Very simple, clean, and with wonderful wild strawberries.

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Thank you both Hector and Elicia for your tips and encouragement.I treasure this very much. Do you use gelatin powder or gelatine sheets, which is easier to work with?

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Re: gelatin - I read an article in Cook's Illustrated (July/August 2000) that states the amount of gelatin in each packet can vary drastically. After they measured the contents of several packets, some contained as little as 1 3/4 teaspoons, and others as much as 2 7/8 teaspoons. The gelatin company apparently has acknowledged that the individual weights per packet could vary as much as 5%, but the magazine noted actual differences of up to 20%. They go on to state that a recipe calling for 1 packet of gelatin is expecting that the packet used will contain 1/4 ounce (or 2 1/2 tsp). In conclusion, they suggest you open several packets and measure by weight or volume instead of relying on the accuracy of these machine filled packets. The Cake Bible states 1 tsp of gelatin weighs 6 grams.


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To ensure stabilized whipping cream for both fresh and frozen use, try Whip-Cream Aid. I purchase this powder from Sugar and Spice Cake Decorating and Candy Supply store in the San Francisco area (they also complete mail orders.)
650-994-4911
Your whipped cream will not seperate, weep or loose volume.

Many local Baskin-Robins stores use this product from their frozen cakes, as well.

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Elicia, it is AMAZING how much we help each other, and how similar techniques we use!

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Hi Cindy, I tried the Stabilized Whipped Cream (cornstarch) once, and it didn't work very well for me in my hot kitchen either. The Super Stabilised with gelatine is the best, or if white choc flavour matches, then try the White Choc Ganache which is actually whipped cream with white choc added to stabilise it.

Like what Hector said, you have to work fast and keep everything cool. If you're afraid of leaving the cream in the fridge for too long (thus having the gelatine set too much), try sitting the bowl of whipped cream in a bowl of ice water instead. The cooling effect is less drastic!

President works well for me in my climate, but remember never never to overwhip - the cream can just turn to butter in a split-second!

Oh- do try moulding your cake in a cake ring (as I've described to Theresa) as it is faster and you do not risk the cream warming up.

Anyway, don't despair! Give it another go!

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Will give this a try. Thank you.

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Hi Cindy, I use Cake's Bible recipe for Super Stabilized Whipped Cream. The powdered sugar and corn starch method of Stabilized Whipped Cream (not Super) doesn't hold very well in my hot weather.

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It is good to know that you also use dairy cream. I used the method of powdered sugar and corn flour. If using plain gelatin ,how much gelatin to use per each cup of whipping cream and should I add it before or after whipping? Is this method in the cake bible?Thank you very much.

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Cindy, YOU NEVER can rewhip whipping cream, and I never use vegetable whip cream.

Which stabilizing method did you use? There are several. My prefered one is using unflavored gelatin.

If your room is hot, there is no way I work with whipped cream. Often I wait until night time to proceed.

These may help: your cake layers must be refrigerated very cold prior to frosting with the whipping cream, this helps inmenselly. Also, you need to act quickly, I never take my time to smooth out all the frosting on the cake. If you "play" with it for over 15 minutes, you need to stick it back in the fridge until it cools again. I also keep my mixer bowl with the whipped cream in the refrigerator, and I only take some out gradually as I frost the cake. If I am planning to do piping, I reserve some of the freshly whipped cream in a separate bowl in the refrigerator, so it is not melting while I am taking time frosting.

Be aware, that with the gelatin, the whipped cream can become hard like jello if you refrigerate it too long. Your finished cake will keep for a few days, perfectly fine in the refrigerator, and always take it out only prior to serving.

Good luck, and I hope there is an again ok?

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Cindy - you over whipped your cream and it started to form little lumps of butter. Have you tried Rose's recipe for stabilized whipped cream, or super-stabilized whipped cream? Hector recently posted something about a version of super-super-stabilized whipped cream that he came up with. If you can't find it on the blog, I'm sure he'll be happy to tell you about it.

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I had 2 disappointment yesterday . The first one being the biscuit de savoie turning wet and sticky and the other one is the cream . I used "President" whip cream which has 35 % milk fat. I used the stabilizing method. The weather was very hot. After I put the cream on top and sides of my mousse cake , It became very soft already and so I try to whip it up again for piping. To my disappointment ,the cream curded turning into lumps and some liquid. .I know many people put vegetable whip cream for the outside of a cake and piping which whip up stiffer. But vegetable whip cream is usually sweet and I prefer the taste of fresh cream. What can I do . Help very much appreciated.

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bravo hector!!!

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Hi Ted, if I may:

Make Biscuit of Savoie!!! about 1.5 to 2 inches high, cut your sheet in two or three equal pieces, and make a 2 or 3 layer shortcake.

Or make Biscuit Roulade, thinner and roll it or build it into bricks layered with conserve.

In either case, make Strawberry Cloud Cream (whipped cream with strawberry puree). Use this to fill your layers, and if you want to frost with this, too, try gather extra strawberry seeds so "it shows." For a more intense Strawberry flavor, thinly spread some Cordon Rose Strawberry Conserve on each layer of biscuit.

Make sure to moist your biscuit with syrup. I get syrup out of fresh strawberrys by chopping a few, adding a dash of salt, and let it sit on a strainer overnight in the refrigerator, then optionally thin this syrup with simple syrup or a liquor. You can also add a watered down solution of strawberry puree or conserves.

My favorite filling for strawberry shortcake is plain Whipped Cream mixed with fresh chopped strawberries.

Have fun! Hope you let us know what you decide on, and be sure to get extra strawberris to make Cordon Rose Strawberry Conserve enhanced with Wild Strawberry Arome!

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hi rose--
with strawberries in season, and a 20 person cook-out over the weekend, wondering if you have any suggestions for a shortcake recipe that i might be able to make in sheetpan?! thank you kindly for any ideas you might have--
best
ted

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annond, i can't address safety but if the room isn't hot and you stabilize the cream as suggested above it should hold up well. people often have whipped cream fillings sitting for a few hours at cool room temperature.

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I am making a filling of cream and cookies for a wedding cake for this weekend. It has real whip cream and oreos. My question is? How long would it be safe for the cake to set out? It's in a building so it won't be overly hot. I'm so new to this cake business and would love any advice you have. Thank you, Annond

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Rozanne, thanks on all counts. /H

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Hi Hector,
When I said "Hector's method" I meant the method you used above. I didn't give you credit for Rose's method...just kidding!!!!
Anyway...your niece is one VERY cute little girl. She has the most amazing eyes. I'm sure she'll grow up to be really good looking.
Rozanne

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heating the confectioner's sugar in some cream is Rose Levy's method. Lavender sounds nice, we are starting to grow it in Maui and the Big Island, a little goes a long way.

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Ooops sorry Rose, I should have mentioned that I used the your recipe for Super Stabilized Whipped Cream from pg 256 of the Cake Bible but used Hector's method (heating the cream, confectioners'sugar etc.)I didn't put the lavendar into the cream with the gelatine. I infused it first, cooled, strained it and then heated it with the gelatine.
Thanks,
Rozanne

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which of all the possibilities listed above did you do?

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Rose,
I made the stabilized whipped cream for the first time last week and it was wonderful. Thank you for this recipe. I used it to frost chocolate cupcakes and lemon cupcakes that had to sit out for a while and it didn't water out. I did however make a slight change to the flavour. I infused a little of the cream with dried lavendar, strained it when it was cooled and proceeded with the recipe. I used it for the choc. cupcakes and for the lemon ones I used a little dried thyme in the cream. The flavours were very subtle but added a nice touch.
Thank you again for such a simple but really good recipe.
Rozanne

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Thank you! and I forgot to say that your tip of using White Chocolate Ganache in lieu of Whipped Cream, I must try.

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Hi Hector,

Great borders! Your piping skills are excellent to me! I also made a simple cake for my stepdaughter's b'day 2 days ago - our fave moist choc genoise with choc mousse and choc glaze. I usually mould my mousse cakes in cake rings and just love the smooth sides when I unmould them! I copped out and decorated it with lovely Godiva truffles I found stashed in the fridge! M going to be spending the next 2 weeks practising piping before I start on my baby daughter's cake.
FYI, I came across a pretty castle cake made out of several stacked up swiss rolls of different heights with stacked mini marshmallows as turrets. The swissrolls were covered with fondant, but I think they will still stand up well with buttercream frosting. Good idea to keep in mind for future, right?

And Rose, thanks for your feedback. Have made the pistachio marzipan but I think I can't tint them. So I will probably shape the flowers and then try using petal dust to colour them instead (finally found a specialty shop that sells edible sparklers and petal dusts). Hey, if you're going to Hawaii for book signing, I may try to wrangle with my husband for a holiday trip to Hawaii! Haha! Then I can finally meet dear Hector as well!!

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Hi Elicia, here is the photo of a simple cake I am working for my adorable niece, May 5th. It is done with the Stabilized Super Stabilized Whipped Cream!!! (sorry for the long link, click on it or copy and paste may do). Hey... my piped borders ain't that horrible huh?

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/3%20layer%20Biscuit%20de%20Savoie%20moisted%20with%20canned%20peach%20syrup%20-%20filled%20with%20canned%20peach%20whipped%20cream%20-%20frosted%20with%20Stabilized%20Super%20Stabilized%20Whipped%20Cream%20-%20topped%20with%20chocolate%20ganache%20PICT0008.JPG

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it might but i never tried it.

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Rose,
You mention Whipit as an alternative stabilizer to Cobasan in the Pie & Pastry Bible for whipped cream. Would it also work as an alternative to Cobasan in ice cream?

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Be careful what you ask for, it will come true. 16 months until this Hawaii trip?

If I ask the Tourism, Food and Beverage industy of Hawaii, "who uses Rose's Bibles?" I will get a huge answer. More, local universities have great culinary programs and also travel industry programs!!! We also have the shopping malls with the largests foot traffic in the nation!!!

You may need to pick where to appear, everyone here will fight to get you.

Mai Tais provided.

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i like that "shop up"!
don't worry, i'll be posting all my appearances. hey hector--maybe you could somehow organize some major event (i wouldn't put this past you)that would tempt the publisher (see why it has to be major) to send me to hawaii!

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Whipped cream, buttercreams, and the new book are HOT toppics. Rose, TELL US, when you are doing book signing, lets have one for the bloggers!!! I may shop up with my leather bound original Cake Bible copy!!!

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i haven't tried the india tree powdered sugar in the fondant but i bet it would be that much silkier and smoother.

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Good to know---C & H doesn't mention the percentage of cornstarch, and India Tree does, so I thought it was less. BTW, which powdered sugar should I use in your fondant recipes?

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this is GREAT to know. of course it will have a tendancy to lump without the cornstarch.

i am a great fan of all of india tree's products but have to add that all powdered sugar contains only 3% cornstarch.

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Rose (not THE Rose, just A Rose)
Rose (not THE Rose, just A Rose)
05/ 3/2007 02:11 PM

During my Passover baking this year, I found a powdered sugar that has no cornstarch. It's made by Lieber's and is called Confectioners Sugar. I bought it at my local Gelson's (probably only during Passover), but you can find it at Amazon and elsewhere online. I also like the fondant / icing sugar made by India Tree. It is much finer than regular powdered sugar, and and has only 3% cornstarch.

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thanks for offering this. my personal preferance is to use other stabilizing methods because the cornstarch in the powdered sugar is discernable as it never gets cooked. when i add the cornstarch i cook it with a little of the cream first before whipping the rest to have the benefits of the cornstarch without the residue of it.

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Try this recipe for whipped cream. I made it and 4 days later, it still was not "weeping."

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/231046

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thanks for your enthusiasm!

i even frozen marzipan. if you make the decorations and refrigerate them, be sure it is in an airtight container so that they don't dry out or if very humid absorb moisture. fondant is more hygroscopic as it is mostly sugar.

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Hi Rose,

Can't wait for your new book - hope we can get it here in Malaysia as fast as US! Yes, I've also used a little cream cheese or even mascarpone with whipping cream for stability. It's great to share these!
By the way, can marzipan decorations be refrigerated? I've read that fondant decorations will spoil if refrigerated. What's the lowdown on fondant vs marzipan? Any advice, Rose?

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coincidentally i have a variation of this in the upcoming book--but less cream cheese as i don't want to taste too much of it. there's a range of how much you can use but it is a good stabilizer. thanks for the contribution!

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On the subject of stabilizing whipped cream, this isn't exactly the same thing, but I've used this in place of the traditional whipped cream. First, Whip 1 cup of heavy whipping cream, as you normally would, and refrigerate (no sugar or vanilla at this stage). In another bowl, beat 8 ounces of room temperature cream cheese (full fat), with 1/2 cup confectioner's sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla, until completely smooth. Fold in the whipped cream, until completely incorporated.

I've used this countless times as a filling in strawberry shortcake (cake version, not biscuit), as well as adding various flavorings, with great success.

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Central PA??? I was there last weekend; State College to be exact! (We are - - Penn State - - )

If I were you, I'd keep the cake covered for as long as possible so there won't be an opportunity for airborn debris to fall onto, and stick to, the frosting. Have a great trip and enjoy "Happy Valley"!

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a styrofoam box with ice packs

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I'm making a cake for an outdoor picnic this weekend in central PA. The temp should be about 70F, but I want to frost and layer it with either the Real Old-Fashioned Whipped Cream or the Hector version of Super Stabilized, then cover with freshly shredded coconut. I'm also out of town from Thurs-Fri pm, so I'm making as much ahead for Saturday as possible. The cake needs to travel 2 hours. I don't want a melting puddle of cream on the cake! Any suggestions?

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i'm tempted to try to add this to the new book if there's still room! you'll be happy to know that i have a few new butter cream recipes using white chocolate that i think are really terrific!

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Hi Hector,

That's a good idea with the whipped cream. I will definitely give it a try! Usually, I use Rose's White Choc Ganache whenever whipped cream is called for. White choc works very well at stabilising whipped cream in our hot weather. In fact, I have to say I've developed a liking for white choc as an ingredient since using the Cake Bible... love it in cheesecake, in buttercream, and of course lately - in butter cakes too!A good quality white choc is crucial though.

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Just wanted to contribute my 2 cents regarding whipped cream. I come from a family of 3 generations of whipped cream lovers across 3 countries. When I was a child, our powdered sugar did not have any corn starch in it!!!!! Now in the USA, it does, and it is called confectioners sugar!!! The other day, I decided to make the Super Stabilized Whipped Cream recipe, but cooking the sugar instead. I took about 1/4 of the cream, stirred it with the unflavored gelatin (Knox) and confectioners sugar. Then, I heated it lightly until the gelatin and sugar dissolved. Cooled it at room temperature and poured it on the rest of the cream after soft peak point. The taste and texture was INCREDIBLY nice. Can we call this the Stabilized Super Stabilized Whipped Cream? I like to say so, since it is a method from both recipes combined!!!

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i don't know to which recipe you are referring bc in the pie and pastry bible i give a recipe for a chicken pot pie advising NOT to use pastry on the bottom as it's always soggy.

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Joyce Burrows
Joyce Burrows
05/ 1/2007 03:37 PM

Can your pastry shells be used for chicken pot pie?

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thank you for this tip
Dedee

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I have used Cobasan with manufacturer's cream and I didn't think it was stabilized enough. I've had good luck with just substituting fondant/icing sugar for regular sugar when whipping the cream. It works well.

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For all vegetarians, there is a very good substitute for gelatin. Read more about it here: http://www.asiafood.org/glossary_2.cfm?wordid=2345

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jam and preserves

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Still curious though about pectin - what can it be used for ? Thanks.

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Kosher gelatin, which is made of vegetable gum, tapioca dextrin and acids, is produced by Kojel Food Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11237.:800-83kojel www.vipfoods.com

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Do you know of any kosher gelatin ? Is pectin a good substitute and how would I use it ? Thanks.

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probably your cream is very cold so try adding the gelatin slightly warm and that should do the trick.

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Rose,

I have twice made the "super" stabilized whipped cream from the cake bible. I thought I followed the directions exactly. I added the gelatin while liquid, not warm. I poured the gelatin in a steady stream. I was using the wire beater in my Kitchenaid stand mixer. Both times I ended up with small lumps of gelatin in the whipped cream. What am I doing wrong?

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since this does not appear to be my recipe and i have no idea if the recipe is valid i can't be of any help.

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lucy gianelloni
lucy gianelloni
11/16/2006 10:38 AM

i have a problem with boiled frosting. ifollowed the directions but it still comesthick syrup.

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i've never tried this but i of course have tested adding the unsalted butter so i would think AMF would work even better since it contains no oil! please let us know. very interesting.

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Does adding Anhydrous Milk Fat (butteroil or AMF) directly into whipping cream make it more stable. AMF is simply pure milk fat and I was just wondering if adding this directly to cream would work. Do I need additional emulsifiers? I just calculated that buying a low fat whipping cream, then adding AMF is a much cheaper alternative to buying high fat cream, plus I have control of the milkfat content. I have a small specialty bakery and we use quite a lot of cream. I got this idea from the Pie and Pastry Bible where you recommended adding unsalted butter to improve whipping cream.

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this is how i would make the cake for a strawberry short cake:
i would make a genoise and collect the syrup from the macerated strawberries. check the amount of syrup needed for the genoise and then add to it or reduce it as necessary and brush it evenly onto the layers.

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since i already answered this question above perhaps some one else can come up with another suggestion?

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Hi, I was looking for a good strawberry shortcake recipe but I keep coming up with recipes that involve an actual shortcake or biscuit, which is a true shortcake. But I am looking for a recipe with a moist cake and whipped cream frosting stiff enough to last refrigerated for days with it liquefying all over the cake. Any suggestions? Thank you.

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hope she liked it felicity--i'm doing exactly this on tuesday! hope to collect so red-cap berries to add to the mix--there'll still in season here.

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Rose, thank you for this. It should make for an interesting bright pink cake (which would please my daughter to no end).

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elicia, i'm sorry i can't advise you about the sorbital. you'll have to experiment. but i can tell you that you must use cream that has not been ultra-pasteurized. why don't you try the cornstarch stabilization--many people swear by it!

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i would make a genoise and collect the syrup from the macerated strawberries. check the amount of syrup needed for the genoise and then add to it or reduce it as necessary and brush it evenly onto the layers.

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Hi Rose,
I have a question and wasn't sure where to post it, but as it involves whipped cream, I thought I'd put it here.

My daughter's birthday is coming up again, and her favorite cake is strawberry shortcake layer cake (loosely, layers of some sort filled with whipped cream and sliced macerated strawberries and covered with either whipped cream or buttercream). As I don't actually *have* a recipe for this, every year I end up improvising.

Last time I made it, I used two genoise layers split in half. I wasn't totally pleased with the results as the filling made the layers dry in some areas and soggy in others (I will drain the macerated strawberries more thoroughly next time). This year I'm considering using for the layers either a classic sponge or an orange chiffon (I would take the cake and split it into layers, and cover up any unattractiveness that caused with lots of whipped cream frosting).

Which of those two choices do you think would hold up better to the slightly wet filling and compliment it best (or do you have any ideas about what might make an even better cake base?)

Thank you!

All the best,
Felicity

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As I live in a humid and hot country, I really need to stabilise the whipped cream. We do not have Cobasan here, but I have found sorbitol. Is there a way to substitute cobasan with sorbitol and glucose, since these are mentioned in the Cake Bible as the contents of Cobasan?

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