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Zito's Lard Bread in the Bread Bible

Sep 16, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose

i've been waiting to post this exciting news until the new gold medal harvest king flour launched but now that any day it will be on the shelves i can restrain myself no longer!

i was never entirely happy with the recipe as it appeared in the bread bible and finally got to the bottom of it. zito's never actually made this bread--it was made by parisi bakery and they told me the secret. instead of 3 ounces of prosciutto they use a combination of 6 ounces of prosciutto, pepperoni, and spicy hot sopresseta. They also add about 2 tablespoons of lard to the dough. NO WONDER!!!

for extra intensity, they wait til the end of the day when all the meats have had a chance to dry more and use the hard dried ends.

the reason i was waiting for the terrific new harvest king flour to become available is that it is the perfect protein content for this bread. if it isn't in your market yet and you just can't wait, use half bread flour half unbleached all-purpose.

Here's a preview of the new headnote that will appear in the fourth printing of the bread bible, but if you have the book all you need to do is omit the bacon fat brushed on top, add the lard to the dough together with the water, and use the delicious meat combination (cut into pieces 1/4 to 1/2 inch in size).

sadly zito’s is now closed, but the bread can still be purchased at parisi bakery on mott street. they call it by its original name: lard bread. parisi shared another important secret with me that makes all the difference: In addition to the prosciutto, they also add pepperoni and spicy hot sopresseta. they use the dried ends of these sausages for extra flavor intensity. And they also add a little lard to the dough both for flavor and a crisper crust.

Comments

Mohammed Abutair.
Mohammed Abutair.
09/17/2010 08:12 AM

Messers. Pls provide us with manfacturers addresses for cake,bread improvents in your good country.yours faithfully ,MOHAMMED aBUTAIR.aMMAN . jORDAN . tHANKS.

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Kevin,
Rose works very hard to make her recipes specific. But even Rose would tell you that some practice is required. When a recipe works the first time most experienced cooks are slightly surprised. There are too many variables in baking. Especially with the recipe you have chosen. So much would depend upon the ingredients in this recipe and for a bread recipe there are a lot. I would keep trying. I think you will be able to make a better loaf than Zito's.

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Also formerly from 11231(Henry between Union and Sackett). Try Mazzola's on the corner of Union and Henry. Like it better than Caputo's.

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Kevin, there isn't an error. The recipe says transfer the bread while on silpain or parchment to the stone. After baking a while, you move the bread directly to the stone. Perhaps you should try the revised version posted above.

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Kevin Parker
Kevin Parker
01/ 2/2009 04:52 PM

Talk about an editor: I would like to correct my 3rd sentence to " Either you or, I expect, the editor..."

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Kevin Parker
Kevin Parker
01/ 2/2009 04:48 PM

I hounded my wife to get me the Bread Bible for Christmas only for your (Zito Brothers) recipe for for lard bread. I made it but was really disappointed by your recipe. Either you of expect the editor really screwed up the directions. Put the dough on the baking stone or baking sheet and bake in one case. In another paragraph it was, after this, transfer the dough to the baking stone. If you haven;t already done so. please check this out and let all of us know what is the proper procedure. My first resulting bread was okay, but next time I'm going to make it to Arthur Avenue to get the real thing.

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as a fellow former bklyn 11231 resident, (see my post about caputo's below), i encourage you to try the revised recipe that rose has... it comes pretty close, don't skimp on the rising time or on the fat...

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Tim Chaloux
Tim Chaloux
12/ 2/2008 10:02 PM

Im looking to make that same lard bread thats from Caputo's.I tasted the bread and thought it was to die for.Can someone help me?I now live on the west coast.I will probly never get a chance to get back to the east coast.Please someone help!!!!

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jade harris
jade harris
05/ 4/2008 05:27 AM

what can i use as a substitute for bread improver? and will i need it for making gluten free bread?

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I hadn't realized you revised this recipe, but I tried my own variation on it recently. Using the original recipe, I substituted the prosciutto with an equal weight of chopped sun dried tomatoes packed in oil. I reserved the oil from the tomatoes to brush onto the bread. As a result, the bread had a nice rusty hue. 7.5 oz. jar was just right to match the original weight. The bread had a pleasant interplay of spiciness from the black pepper and subtle sweetness from the tomatoes.

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I would like to know what I can use as substitute for bread improvment and quantity per kg of flour?
I heard about vitimin C, and soya flour?
I live in Africa (Botswana) at 1200meter altitude and each time I make my bread in the bread machine , the bread crater in the middle. I tried to lessen the water or add a bit more flour but nothing helped so far.
Hope you can help me
Thank you
Dedee

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actually all you have to do is scroll to the top of this thread.

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the third printing of the bread bible is the most current and does NOT include the lard bread revision which you will find when you do a search on this blog.

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oh my - i have confused myself now ...

i currently own the cake bible and pie bible, and no not have the bread bible.

what is the best version of the bread bible to get? is the 4th printing contain all of the corrections (including the lard bread??)

i guess i was getting miked up with the newly revised cake bible which i understand has some corrections in it (i may be ready to re-purchase this one, as my copies binding has nearly completely fallen apart!!!)

thanks for clearing this up!

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thanks brian--i didn't know you can order directly from norton!

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Jeff,

I think it might be a while until the 4th printing is out, since the 3rd just came out in September of '06. I received one through Barnes and Noble for Christmas that was the 3rd printing. I also ordered one directly from WW Norton and you can request that they ship you the most current printing.

Brian

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i somehow have never purchased a copy of the Bread Bible. realizing the opportunity to get the improved 4th edition, how can i ensure i get this newest, revised edition? amazon does not seem to specify this.

thanks!

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i would triple the yeast. more than triple and you might want to use a little less.

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If I triple a bread recipe, do I need to triple the yeast quantities in the starter?
i.e.
1 cup flour
1 cup water
2 pkg yeast
Therefore
3 cups flour
3 cups water
6 pkg yeast
Or
3 cups flour
3 cups water
2 pkg yeast

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If it is the proscitto ring ,then I know where to find it. Thank you

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also do a search on this blog for both lard bread and prosciutto ring bc i've added some improvements like hot sopresetta and about double the meat!

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Cindy Chiu,

seeing that you asked this question a bit ago, it may have already been answered but just for to make sure I'll give it a go. I assume you're asking about the "lard bread" since the pugliesi is actually called pugliesi in the bread bible. Anyway I'm not sure what page the "lard bread" is on, but it is called "proscuitto ring" in the bread bible, so now you can look it up. Hope I helped.

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Which page of the bread bible book is this bread from?Thank you.

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that's the same hydration as my pugliesi so i'll try it with that as i haven't made it for months and really miss it.

went out to get the cabbage first thing this morning and the biga's rising in the wine storage unite so tomorrow's the day!

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thanks for the added info. will let you know how it works for me as soon as i get a chance to try it.

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I'm so pleased you liked it. I use 500 grams of flour, 7 grams of dry yeast and 400 mls of water. Yes it was the technique that I wanted to share. You could do individual dinner rolls if you wanted to. I just drop the entire dough in the middle of my baking tray and let the bread grow into what ever shape it wants. All you have to be sure of is that the dough is well covered with the cabbage leaves. Oh another things I forgot to mention. Pop the cabbage leaves in the oven to wilt slightly, makes it easier to wrap around the dough. I love to hear how your bread turns out.

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this is so intriguing veronica--thanks for sharing!

i shall certainly try it as i hope will others!

if i understand correctly, your bread dough weighs about 500 grams (a little over a 1 pound loaf) or just the flour in which case it would be a little over 800
grams--a 1 3/4 pound loaf. just curious bc of course the technique would work for either size. i bet the moisture in the leaves makes the crust nice and crisp too.

i LOVE the entire concept.

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Thank you for getting back to me. I will definately try one of your cakes with all of the ingredients and see. Off my original question now, I wanted to share a recipe with you for a most delicious loaf of bread. The recipe comes from my birth country Madeira. All I do is get 500 grams of bread flour, yeast and water and pop it into my bread oven on the dough setting. The machine does it's thing and once it's finished I get a few cabbage leaves from my garden and pop one (if it's big enough for the dough) on a baking tray. I spray the leaf with cooking oil and put the dough on top of it. I then spray another leaf and put it on top of the dough and it then goes in the oven to cook. The idea is to cover the dough completely in the leaves, you can even use broccoli leaves. Spraying the leaves with cooking oil makes it extremely easy to remove the leaves from the bread once it's cooked. What you end up with is a beautiful golden crust, with the veins from the leaves marked all over, never mind delicious bread. The method of cooking the bread came about because the women only had wood ovens to work with and wanted to protect the dough from getting dirty with soot and coals. It carried on through the years even though it's mostly gas ovens now because of the unique look and flavour. I do hope you try it. The tourists who visit are mad about it.

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there is no substitute i know of that gives the complete reliability of cream of tartar to prevent over-beating egg whites but you can certainly leave it out if you're careful to beat only to stiff-peaks and now allow the egg whites to dry out which will ruin the texture of the cake. using 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar per egg white this will never happen. why don't you try it one time and see if you can detect the flavor in a cake. if you do two cakes side by side and taste without knowing which is which you will know for sure!

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Hello

Just received THE CAKE BIBLE in the mail a couple of days ago and I'm in awe of your work. The cakes pictured in it are stunning. I cant wait to roll my sleeves up and try the recipies. I'm a chocolate freak and the cakes look as though they will melt in your mouth. I also wanted to ask a question. I've used cream of tartar before to make buttermilk, but I didn't like the taste in the cake. I now use vinegar to make my buttermilk. Can I use something else to subsitute the cream of tartar the recipe asks for in your book?

Thanks

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i'm sure it's an optional ingredient as a good recipe does not require this kind of help or short cut to good texture and flavor. if you want to try adding it i've seen it available throuh the king arthur catelogue. they also have an 800 help line that's really great and can tell you specifically what the improver contains. it usually has a tiny bit of ascorbic acid which strengthens the gluten.

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I am trying to do a soft bun and it contained bread improver. What is the bread improver? please help. thanks.

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it's a similar principle in a loaf pan--it's always about structure.

yes--larger pan less leavening proportinately. you can read all about this in the cake bible and also if you do a search on this blog--probably it's in the FAQ section bc people are always asking about this.
deeper pan never gives you as good a texture no matter what you do.
if it's not rising enough are your sure you're filling the pan as full? or is the texture more compact in which case you will want to increase the leavening. also, you could use = weight bleached all-purpose flour (gold medal or pillsbury for more more structure.

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this is not baked in a cake pan - i bake it in a loaf pan. so there is no issue of dipping in the middle - it just does not rise as much overall.

your last statment not has me totally confused - so when baking in a larger pan, you use proportionately LESS leavening?

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if the cake/quick bread is not dipping in the middle then you don't have to increase the leavening.if it's dipping in the middle you have to decrease the leavening. or raise the temperature 25 degrees so it sets faster. this strengthens the structure. but you should also try wrapping the pan with moistened cake strips so that the sides don't get too brown. the main heat you want is from the bottom. you may also need to tent the top if it's browning too fast.
one more thing, if there's baking soda in it, it will brown more, especially in a larger cake so you may want to play with the balance of bs to bp. consider that bs is = to about 3 times the power of bp.

hope this helps

proportionate increasing means that if a pan is 4 cups in volume and you are using a pan 6 cups in volume everything but the leavening gets increased by 1.5.

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i do not think it is a mixing problem either...

i think it is a oven temperature (more "stuff" soaks up more heat) or a leavening issue (i rememebr from the cake bible you talking about altering the quantity of leavening depending on the cake pan size - i figure the same would hold for a loaf pan & quick bread).

what do you mean by indreasing the ingredients proportionate to the volume of the pan? naturally, if the pan is 20% larger, i am putting 20% more leavining (due to the natural scaling up of the recipe) but do you mean that the baker's percentage should go up as well? meaning, that after scaling up the recipe by 20% for the volume, i should also increase the leavening again by 20%. example: if i start with 10 grams og baking powder, i would scale up by 20% = 12g, then scale by 20% again = ~14.5g?

thanks - i really want to figure this out - i love the banana bread, but prefer to make it in quantity.

thanks!

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you need to increase the ingredients proportionate to the volume of the new pans. cakes don't bake well in pans that are either too large or too small.

if you're using a stand mixer the mixing probably isn't a problem but there's a good chance otherwise that by increasing the batch size the batter isn't getting mixed well enough so you need to increase the mixing time.

please report success!

don't worry about the terrible typing the message is the important thing.

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(and sorry for the terrible typing!!!!)

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sorry for the off-topic question.

i have a bana bread (quick bread) recipe that i have used for a while, and it always turns out wonderful. so, i recently tried to make multiple batches. two changes - first, miking engredients in bulk, and second, when i went to buy extra loaf pans, they are larger than the one i have used before. the loaves made in bulk do not rise nearly as much as when i was making one at a time.

what shall i do? change oven temperature? change amount of baking powder / soda? something else?

thanks!

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i'm sure it's the higher gluten flour. have your mother bring her flour next time as a double check. unbleached plain means you're in a UK country right? i don't know what other options you have to lower the gluten without adding self raising cake flour! part cornstarch would certainly help.

i like electric convection ovens but only if the convection fan can be turned off when you don't want it.

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I am trying to duplicate middle-eastern spinach and meat pies. The dough which is stuffed with filling and formed into a triangle shape from a "round"is a bread dough. The problem that arises during baking is the triangle "pockets" open and separate. This happens to my Mother-in-law when she comes to visit, who makes perfect ones at her home. Is it my oven/or the flour we are using (unbleached plain)? My 2nd question is which oven is better for baking a gas/electric? And what about convection?I am building a house and will have double wall ovens. Thank you

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it sounds like a cousin the the parisi bread! (it too stained the bag)

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Have you ever had the lard bread from Caputo's in Brooklyn (on Court Street)? I have not had reason to eat the Parisi one because this one is just everything I could look for. We used to live a few blocks away from Caputo and on Sundays the line would stretch around the corner for warm loaves of this bread that is studded with sopressata, prosciutto ends, and unidentified deeply cheesy bits that are also probably dried ends. The bread itself has generous amounts of freshly ground pepper and a lot of fat in it, so much that it stains the bag sooner or later. Not that that's a problem, we usually have it half-eaten by the time it is cool.
Mmm. Just had some this weekend, because the bar mitzvah was in Park Slope. Not near at all, but worth the detour.
Perhaps it is time to try making it myself!

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thanks kevin--beautiful buns--provalone is also an excellent addition. actually it was quite good as it was but that much more delicious with more meat especially the spicy variety.

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Rose,
I've made the lard bread twice -- and always added more proscuitto. The recipe inspired me to make these Bacon Buns a month ago:
http://seriouslygood.kdweeks.com/2006/08/bacon-buns_115671728302153976.html

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