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Great Tip for Your Thanksgiving Pies!

Nov 19, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose

Protecting the Pie Crust Borders from Over-browning

In the Pie and Pastry BIble I suggested making a foil band and setting it on top of the crust after it starts browning. I've since discovered that it is easier and better to apply the band at the beginning of baking. The crust will brown perfectly under the foil.

For those of you who don't have the book, to make the foil band, cut out a large circle of heavy duty foil and then cut a smaller circle in the middle to expose the top of the pie and cover only the decorative border. Bend the foil band at the edges to curve down over the sides.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Comments

Hello people, it is Thanksgiving Day! I'm enjoying my extra day off, and I am planning to doing something fun that'll probably involve a bike ride and seeing something new in Plymouth I haven't seen yet.
You write new post at Thanksgiving?

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Rozanne, NOT true! I'm a leftie who doesn't fit the description although I do have problems with my cup-cake liners. But I'm letting Bill solve the problem then he can share the solution - I rest my case!

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Apparently left handed people posess the same qualities as you. Not sure how far it is true:)

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Got it. silicone pan on a rack, rack on a sheet. Thanks so much. Next time I bake cupcakes, I'll give it a whirl! It's cheese cake tonight for my friend Helen from San Diego (she arrives tomorrow)- Cheese cake is her favorite.

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don't forget the rack or they won't bake evenly

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Bill, get yourself a 1/4 sheet pan or two. You can find them at the usual kitchen/restaurant supply places. One should easily be able to accommodate a 6-muffin silicone pan.

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Rose:
Thanks. I haven't bought them yet, so I'll know what to look for. My oven is the small Viking (24") so a sheet pan only fits at the top and bottom positions(the convection fan gets in the way and the oven door won't close when you try to put it in the middle). I don't want to bake cup cakes at the top or bottom of the oven...asking for disaster. A cookie sheet fits, though. I have those double insulated cookie sheets...can I put the silicone muffin pans on that..or should I get a regular cookie sheet that isn't insulated?

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bill, the trouble with giving partial info is that it is...well...partial! here i am, about to go to sleep exhausted when suddenly i remember what i wrote about silicone muffin pans: only get the kind that have two rows as the three rows have a middle row that bakes slower than the outer rows. also you need to set the silicone muffin pan on a ss rack or the cupcakes won't bake evenly as there won't be even heat distrubution. i set the rack on a sheet pan to make it easier to get it in and out of the oven. that's the whole story!

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I'm not left handed...but I'm interested in the connection. Are obsessive, neuortic, computer-inept, perfectionists in general - left handed? Or is handed-ness somehow related to ones ability to keep cupcake liners in place? AHHHHH!

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Bill, are you by any chance left-handed?

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that was three times--i already deleted one. please be careful...

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oops. Sorry. didn't mean to post twice

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use them for when you want to give cupcakes away--then they keep them fresher.

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Rose:
I love you. And thanks. At least the silicone pans can be folded up and don't take a lot of space. But what to do with the beautiful, natural, unbleached, earthy crunchy looking cupcake liners I bought last night at 10:55 PM as the Food Emporium was closing and my oven was preheating? (By the way, this last batch...not so bad. Didn't care for the crumb, but they didn't shrink and they tasted good)

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absolutely right buteryum!

bill--i'm taking pity on you and giving you a tip: i find the best shape come when using silicone muffin pans (without liners of course).

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Obsessive compulsive? Me? Don't be silly. I'm still on the quest for the perfect cupcake, one that is even with the top of the cupcake liner, slightly domed, perfectly symmetrical, without the papers peeling away as the cupcake shrinks and cools, and still tastes delicious with a pleasing texture. I've started to try to formulate my own recipe. Stated with Rose's Sour Cream butter cake (which I find incredibly yummy) and have altered it and tweaked it based on things I've seen in "cup cake" recipies to try to get them to not shrink out of the paper and to dome a little. So far I have baked way into the wee hours of the morning, many times these past few weeks...and what have I come up with? Cupcakes that look great but have no taste, and terrible crumb, Cup cakes that Taste great but shrink out of the papers, cupcakes that look and taste great, but fall to crumbs when I tried to peel the paper off, Cup cakes that shrunk up from the bottom, leaving this strange space between the bottom of the cup cake and the paper liner, as if it's pants didn't fit right. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

I'm not obsessive.

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Don't the best bakers all have a touch of Baking OCD? :)

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Bill, do you have obsessive compulsive disorder?

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Thank you, Matthew!

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Thank you Maureen! For the cherry pie, I followed Rose's recipe in the P&PB, so I didn't need to moisture proof the crust. I have done it for other pies/tarts though, where the crust is prebaked. Egg white works well, chocolate (including white), works the best, but must be compatible with the filling.

I'm not sure how that would work with a lattice however, since it takes a full bake to get the lattice to brown (and even then it needs to be brushed with egg yolk and cream). I am afraid you would over bake the bottom crust. I haven't made anything like what you are doing, but jam has less moisture than pie filling, so I wouldn't think it would make the crust soggy, as long as you don't make it too far ahead--just a guess though.

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Matthew, your pictures are amazing. I'm wondering: for your cherry lattice pie, did you take any special precautions to ensure the bottom crust wouldn't get soggy? Can you prebake the bottom crust with a glaze to protect it, then add the filling and the lattice -- or will that not work?

You're a true artist, Matthew. Bravo. The design work on the fillo is also gorgeous.

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Thank you all for the kind comments. Since these are Rose's recipes, I guess I didn't think to mention that they were also delicious--it almost goes without saying! Suffice to say, everything tasted even better than it looked!

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Matthew...These are absolutely beautiful. Amazing job!

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Matthew, these are glorious!! You have a wonderful talent for turning out beautiful pies, and I bet they tasted as good as they look. Thanks so much for sharing, very inspiring!

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it would also make great end paper for a book!

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Gasp - that montage would make a fantastic poster! What wonderful art!!!

Stunning!!!!!

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Great pictures Matthew! The pies look awesome. You are one talented baker!!!

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Sales of the book are likely to go way up when people see these pictures! Excellent!

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matthew, I am so proud of you! Mr Pie!

Shall PPB need to be translated or republished, YOU should do the new photos. Your pies and everything I've seen from you is very accurate to what is in the book!

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either you are a food stylist or should open a bakery--perfection!

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It has been a while since I've shared pictures, so I thought I would post a few pictures of some pies I have made since June. All of these are from the Pie and Pastry Bible (with the exception of the cheesecake ice cream and pumpkin cheesecake).

Pie Pictures

From top to bottom, left to right:
Plum Flame Tart
Pumpkin Pie Cheesecake (adapted from Rose's Pure Pumpkin Cheesecake)
Kiwi Tart with Lime Curd
Gascon Apple Pie (Pastis Gascon)
Cherry Lattice Pie
The Best All-American Apple Pie with Triple Vanilla Ice Cream
Open-Faced Fresh Blueberry Pie with Cheesecake Ice Cream
Coconut Ice Cream Pie
Concord Grape Lattice Pie

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Thanks Hector. Maybe I'll buy some.

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Rozanne, in Hawaii what is called apple bananas are like regular chiquita bananas (yellow skin, white flesh), just as thick but shorter. The only difference is that apple bananas are super tasty and sweet, and if bought fresh or home harvested you can leave them out until the skin turns near black and thin, and the flesh is still good (not as firm, a bit mushy, but great flavor).

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Hector, we do have pasteurized cream (as opposed to ultra-pasteurized) here in Canada, but we do not have unpasteurized cream. I am so glad we do b/c as you said pastry cream and creme fraiche taste so much better. By the way what do apple bananas taste like? I remember seeing a posting from you about it.

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Hector:
I have not seen unpasturized dairy products...but we do have milk and cream that are pasturized...but not ultrapasturized. The dairy company is called Ronnybrook Farms...and they are quite pricy. I'm sure that the unpasturized products...if available...are to be found somewhere in NYC.

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Bill, your Napoleons could not sound any more delicious, thanks for sharing.

Can you find unpasteurized milk/cream in your area? You must try it for any pastry creams confections. I've read you can find some from Canada.

Your cupcakes must be perfect by now, from all that experience you have been sharing.

Glad you all could eat from my Thanksgiving meal thru the computer! I need not post a picture of my full freezer now!

Rose, I've just received your cookie book as a present, the first thing I've pointed was the cathedral. I do want to make it, but thanks for the advice, it must be a team effort. Will look for an opportunity in the future.

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My thanksgiving Baking was a success. I made Napoleons for the first time. The were inhaled by my sister's guests (why waste all that time chewing?). I had prepared all of the components of napoleons for other recipies...but combined the pastry cream, quick puff pastry, and fondant together for the first time. I had been using Julia Child's puff pastry recipe for years...and always felt like it was a cop-out...sort of cheating. Rose, i was so happy to see the recipe in the pie and pastry bible and to see your note that sometimes it can work even better than classic puff pastry (depending on what you are using it for). I also prepared a coconut cake and chocolate fudge cupcakes with mousseline buttercream (all my cupcakes were perfectly uniform thanks to a pastry bag and scale. YEAH!

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Hector:
Bravo! Everything looks delicious

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the turkey looks so perfect and 'whole'--wish i had been there--all my favorite food (haha!) and so expertly prepared.

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Dear bloggers, hope you all enjoyed a great THANKSGIVING, or heard about it (for the countries that don't celebrate).

My 6 dinner guests thanked all evening long to Rose's recipes. Everything was good, and the baking and cooking techniques learned were great to practice! I do recommend not 1 but 2 sous chefs.

Please click on the link below and scroll down, the final pictures are posted. My favorite part was the stuffing. I will offer to make the stuffing all the years to come, it is so tasty and a show stopper when baked inside the turkey after such neat surgery. I may improve and work a little on the food styling of the stuffing, make it more decorative than just a pile of brown picks and bits.

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/thanksgiving/Rose-s-Celebrations.html

Enjoy, will be posting my Saturday Thanksgiving a bit later.

P.S. But above the stuffing, was THE PIE!

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Let me shoot the first product of my Thanksgiving table. I tried to post last night after my wonderful 6 guest left w/o first helping me wash all dishes, but I felt sleep on my computer, which is rare!

THE PIE. Following Rose's recipe for pecan pie(tart). Pre-baked shell. The chocolate lace is not just beautiful but compliments the taste. I think this pie & lace is on the cover of a food magazine, I've spotted last week. Bitter chocolate lace, thin profile pie as a tart on a flaky cream cheese unsweetened non-cookie crust, are like putting each of your feet on a separate scale and register the same weight: perfect balance. The pie was served with a dab of extremely lightly sweetened bourbon whipped cream. One of my guests, the one who can't cook, gave compliments! The lack of sugar on the whipped cream enhanced the flavor of dairy, and the touch of alcohol made this flavor very palatable (try drinking heavy cream straight from the box, and you will know what I mean). Rose: thank you for doing the research for us on how to assemble the best pecan pie! I hope the pictures give credit to this incredible composition of flavors, texture, and color.

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/thanksgiving/01-THE-PIE.html

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the beautiful pink reminds me of the background color of the new forum!

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Back to gobbling a la Rose's Celebrations.

November 19th, I assembled the Graavlax with everything I can find locally. I used 1 lb each of 3 different fish, instead of only 3 lbs of salmon. Fresh island Mahi Mahi, flown in Atlantic Salmon, and fresh island grade #1 Ahi (red tuna sashimi). It was very inexpensive, except for the Ahi: you do find Ahi inexpensive in Hawaii and indeed excellent freshness and taste, but my fish monger tempted me with the grade #1 which is not even red (but pink due to the high fat content and lack of cartilage).

Photo here, pay attention to the colors, the photo captured the true colors pretty accurately!

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/thanksgiving/2007-11-19.html

and click on any picture to take you the full progress page.

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Matthew, very easy to do, the difficult part is making the raspberry sauce, but if you this stocked ahead of time since it freezes/re-refreezes well, then it is a blitz.

I would suggest you simmer the cranberries for shorter than the recipe's 10 minutes, if you want to keep the sauce more whole. Cranberries turn into puree soon after they pop, one of those fruits that seem hard and tough when raw, but turn softy when lightly cooked.

And most definitely make it ahead of time, weeks ahead. Basically this is a conserve which I believe improves in taste when aged.

I made my batch yesterday. I did find it a bit bitter, perhaps due to too much lemon grind. Lets see how the flavors merge in a month.

I am hoping my guests will be impressed that one can make their own cranberry sauce. It is an iconic U.S. fruit, hope Luca's parents enjoy it! (they are flying back with us on 11/17).

Hey, try the Rick Rodgers turkey breast roll breast, it is super easy, and there is just no better way to make a breast roll than filled with prosciutto and covered with panceta! It just can't get dry this way.

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I'm going to try that cranberry sauce this year. Let me know how it turns out.

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Thanksgiving brings friends and a lot of pies together: Great Pumpkin Pie, Pumpkin Chiffon Pie, and Low-Profile Pecan Pie.

I will pie my life away this year with the book Rose's Celebrations. Please enjoy the daily progress:

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/thanksgiving/Rose-s-Celebrations.html

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Elicia, the cream cheese does not impart any noticeable flavor to the crust! Neither the vinegar!

Not sure which one is flakier, the cream cheese one or the cheddar one. I am sure Matthew would know!

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Hi Hector, M very tempted to try the cream cheese crust but worried it will be a tad less crispy and maybe not suited for savoury tarts. So, to have a cheese flavour, the cheddar one seems to be the only option! Looks like I can prebake a few days ahead - will do a trial batch and report back.

Thks Patrincia for clearing the air! I just want to make sure I'm making a proper quiche for the party!

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Hi Elicia - I'd say pie pastry is the most popular crust for quiche in the US, but anything goes - even no pastry at all: Italians call it Fritata (although I do prefer it with crust).

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Elicia, I am very happy with the Cream Cheese Flaky Pie Crust. It is plenty flaky!

Re: blind baking ahead and storing airtight. I have stored tartlets crusts for 8 weeks! In a vacuum jar, refrigerated. If you don't have a vacuum jar, I would store at room temperature, and perhaps for only 1 week.

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Thks Patrincia & Matthew, I've blind baked pate sucre and packaged frozen shortcrust pastry and stored airtight for several days and it was ok. Just worried abt flaky pie crust though as I've never done it and it is humid here!

In fact, I've not done quiche before, and have always thought that it was done with puff pastry and not flaky pie pastry! The ones I've tasted from french bakeries seemed puffy, crisp and flaky like puff pastry, unlike fruit pies! Am I mistaken?

Nice to note that the filling mellows after a day. However a very crisp and flaky crust is a must! Thot of attempting the cheddar crust as I cannot use the lard crust (the requirement is for 'meat-free'). Any good advice?

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I think you will be fine to bake the crust a couple of days ahead of time and keep it at room temperature. I can only think of one time that didn't work for me, and like I said, it was unusually humid so it lost some of its crunch. My experience with quiche is that somehow the filing can taste even better the next day, but the crust isn't as good after refrigeration. Of course, if you have time, a small test batch is great to see how it will work where you are.

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Thks Matthew! I will definitely shape and line the tartlet pans ahead, but am worried I won't have time to do the baking of the crust in the morning - its for a brunch and I have tons to do! I figure I will have to bake 3 batches(blind baking) as I wld only fit one tier into the oven at a time - that wld take an hour blindbaking and an extra hour to bake the filling! Maybe when I bake the filling, the crust will re-crisp!

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Elicia - Rose does mention on page 436 that the quiche can be covered and refrigerated for up to 2 days, then reheat in a 350F oven for 15 minutes.

Do you have time to experiment a little? I don't see why you couldn't make the pastry shells through the prebake step listed on pg 346, cool completely, and then freeze them in an airtight container until you are ready to proceed. Isn't that what the premade frozen pastry cup people do?

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If possible, I would bake the crust the day of the event. You can make the dough a few days ahead and refrigerate it, or even freeze it, already shaped. If that is not an option, then I would store the baked crust air tight at room temperature. Definitely avoid refrigerating the baked crust as it will loose its crispness. Humidity and moisture are the enemies of baked crust, so if it is humid where you are, you may have trouble storing it already baked.

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Hi baking buddies, Need some advice in the pastry dept! Am doing some party bites for a friend's small marriage registration reception, and mushroom quiche is on the menu. Since I have to prepare several types of food, am now planning on whatever I can make in advance!

Will be making the morel mushroom quiche in PPB in individual 4" portions (replacing morel with shitake of course, as we do not have morel here!) Was wondering if I can prebake the crust 1-2 days in advance? If possible, shld I store it at room temperature airtight, or in the fridge? I've prebaked shortcrust pastry, but have never made flaky pie crusts! Any expert advice?

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Wow, top 100 list. I hope you'll share your list sometime Rose.

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thank you Rose! will do.

Luca asked if I could find Torta Linz in your bibles to make the world a better place . . . he is very Northern Italian!

I will use a 9" tart pan, instead of a 10" as your recipe lists. (don't have one that size, and I to buy silicone next). I think the 1" less will be perfect, I will have extra dough for future use, plus I will need less conserve. I've just opened my third jar and that should suffice the linzertorte. I don't want to open my last jar of Cordon Rose Raspberry Conserve, which is HEAVEN IN A JAR, this last jar is saved for you know what . . .

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p.s. i don't like supersweet things which is why i make my own less sweet conserve as i know you will do. but for anyone who has any doubts as to whether this recipe is worth trying know that it is one of my 100 top favorites!

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my 'educated'guess is yes. it's a cookie dough. i don't see why more preserves would seep in before baking than during baking.

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Rose, quick question. Baking Linzertorte. Can I assemble it (crust, conserve, lattice, etc), and then bake it 2 days later? Normally for flaky pie crust it would be ok, but not sure about this almond crust, plus I do notice that conserves soften the crust!

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great report! some of these little gadgets really are amazing additions to technique!

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Thanks for the advice. I got a rolling pin sleeve (what an excellent trick!) and kept the flour in the freezer. I was not so deft in the "working fast" department, but the quiches turned out to be wonderful and the crusts were delicious.

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the best pastries and sauces I ever made were in this horrible unheated kitchen in Bradford, West Yorkshire I rented as a student. It was so cold, esp. in winter, that the pastries came out ultra light and flaky. Custards were great as well, because the stove was very underheated, and the ambient temperature was very low, so it took ages to cook, never curdling. An incredible texture.

On the down side, all the labels used to come off the cans and bottles, due to the dampness (don't let's talk about the walls).

H

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the only pitfall is august in MN, i.e. heat and humidity--the enemies of pie crust. so keep everything cold--freeze the flour, use a pastry cloth and sleeve, and work quickly.
so nice to hear from you marie!

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I'm planning to bake a few quiches for my book club next week. Of course, I've read through the quiche recipes in The Pie and Pastry Bible, and I bought some lard--the first time I've ever tried baking with it. Do you have any hints or thoughts about what pitfalls I might encounter?
Thanks,
Marie Wolf

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since this question comes up often, i have listed it in the FAQ's. here's what i wrote:

on page 455 of the cake bible is a chart listing the volume of most cake pans. of course if you have an odd-shaped pan you will need to measure the volume yourself by pouring water into it. if it's a two-piece pan first line it with a clean garbage bag.

compare the size and volume of the pans specified in the recipe to the one which you want to use and then either increase or decrease it proportionately.

molly, please understand that i have tested each and every size of each and every cake listed in the book as a wedding cake. if you use another recipe there is no predicting accurately what will happen as not all cakes expand well. but at least you have the quide of comparable size cakes so you can do ratio's of how much flour to baking powder in the original recipe and how much i have decreased it proportionately etc.
but you must do at least one dry run to see if further adjustments need to be made.

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Molly Flyer
Molly Flyer
12/02/2006 12:58 PM

Rose, I have aquaired a reputation within my small social group for being "the best" at baking cakes, (due to use of your BIBLE and recipes). Several young women are insisting I bake their wedding cakes next summer. The wedding cake calculations in your book would be helpful, but one of them wants square layers in carrot cake. Another wants me to use BAKER'S brand German Sweet Chocolate Cake recipe and make layers that are Hexigone shaped. Each has offered to buy her own pans but I do not know how to calculate the baking power / soda needed for the larger pan sizes when multiplying the recipe. Do 12" round, Hexigone, and square pans all hold the same amount of batter (I would think not)? Can you please explain how I can determine calculating to multiply the recipes and adjustment of levening for recipes not in your book such as the BAKER'S recipe?
Deepest thanks, and your book is a treasure.

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brian, you sound like a born baker! i like your observations.

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Rose,

I made your pumpkin pie (2 of them) for Thanksgiving, and what a hit! It really has a fantastic texture from the food processor, and your level of spices were just right for my taste. Also, it was my first experience with your dough which was also great to work with and came out nice and flaky. (It was interesting because I tasted some of the uncooked dough after I rolled it out and you could taste the cider vinegar - it was almost a bit sour). But after the dough cooked, any trace of the vinegar was gone and it had a great flavor.

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if you make your own pie shield out of foil it won't dent the fluting. i'm assuming you're using a commercial pie shield right?

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Hi Rose, I use a pie shield and find that it squashes the pie crust just a tad when I put it on at the beginning of baking -- so I wait until it's firmed up a bit before I put it on. Or does this just depend on what type of pie crust is used (I use a half-shortening half-butter pie crust recipe)? Or maybe it's the way we flute?

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yes--pale yellow is perfect. and it should shimmy slightly when moved until chilled.but with the cornstarch it probably won't shimmy at all!

thank you! i love the grand marnier cake so much i've worked it out as a wedding cake for my upcoming book.

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Hi Rose,

Many thanks for your advice. I'll try again next weekend. Also, please
let me know if the top of the cake and the sides are supposed to be a
pale yellow color when the cake is finished baking?

I love all the recipes that I've tried so far in the Cake Bible
especially the Grand Marnier cake.

Regards,
Angella

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the cornstarch will definitely make it more firmer. a small amount simply keeps it from watering out but the more you add the firmer it will get. most cheesecake recipes have flour or cornstarch. the reason mine doesn't is bc i like it to be very creamy. but if your family wants it to be more firm that's the solution.

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rose@realbakingwithrose.com wrote:
i don't bake on the floor of the gaggenau bc it's not totally flat-at last my model isn't--it's the really wide one. i use a baking stone and convection lowering the heat 25 degrees. if it's burning it means your thermostat is off so just lower the temperature some more and call in the service guy after the holidays to adjust the thermostat! using other ppl's ovens is always a risk bc one isn't familiar with how they bake.

patricia brogan wrote:
Thanks! Since the ovens have a built in thermometer, it never occurred to me they could be off--but experimenting w/them suggests they are both calibrated about 40 degrees too hot. The thermometer must be tied to the thermostat. You saved my pie! The pear almond tart was delicious.

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Hi Rose,

I love your Cordon Rose Cheesecake recipe. However, some family members prefer it to be more firm and dense. I've tried the 6 egg yolks (no cornstarch) and it did not seem to make it firmer than when using 3 whole eggs. If I use a higher oven temp would that make the cake more firm? Thanks for your advice.

Sincerely,
Angella

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i've never made them in that size but i would use the same temperature. for the estimated time, compare a layer cake timing to a sheet cake timing and that will give you an idea what to expect. keep your eye on it toward the end and it should be just fine.

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Hi Rose, I am reading your Cake Bible book and would like to make a Classic Genoise - but in 12x16 sheet pan. After baking, I will cut into 3 pieces and use those as layers. What would be the temperature and timing?

Thank you!

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i don't bake on the floor of the gaggenau bc it's not totally flat-at last my model isn't--it's the really wide one. i use a baking stone and convection lowering the heat 25 degrees. if it's burning it means your thermostat is off so just lower the temperature some more and call in the service guy after the holidays to adjust the thermostat! using other ppl's ovens is always a risk bc one isn't familiar with how they bake.

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Dear Rose,

I have Gaggen-woes . . .

I'm using my mother's small Gaggenau oven for thanksgiving pie baking. I've now burnt both the flaky cream cheese crust and the sweet nut tart crust, both in the prebaking stage. For the former I used the top and bottom heat setting and placed the crust on the floor of the oven. For the latter, I switched to convection, reduced the temperature 25 degrees, and cooked it the shorter amount of time. I noticed in the P&PB that you use a large Gaggenau and like it . . . any suggestions?

Thanks for your help and Happy Thanksgiving!

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i would put it in a cool area of the house, covered tightly and then "wake it up" in a 350 oven for 10 minutes before serving. freezing isn't great for the crust.

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I made a cherry pie for Thanksgiving on Tuesday night. I think I goofed cuz I meant to freeze the pie and bake it Thursday so it would be fresh. Can I freeze a baked pie? Or, will it be okay for two days? Should I refrigerate it?

Thanks! Great website.

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thank you ari and krystal. very kind!

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I love this site. Its helped me with alot of my recipes.

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I haven't tried it out yet, but I figured the same thing myself after trying to get a shield around a hot quiche half-way through baking last week. Ouch! :)

ps. Looooove your blog!

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