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Baby Bread--A Great New Technique

Jan 21, 2007 | From the kitchen of Rose

Friday night UPS delivered my new little Lodge cast iron 2 quart Dutch oven and within minutes I mixed a half recipe of the no-knead bread and set it to ferment for it’s 18 hour visit in the 70ºF/21ºC bedroom.

This is the way I’ll do it from now on as with just two of us and the limited shelf life of the bread it’s the perfect amount for dinner and the next day. It was so delicious I ended up making an open-faced butter and grated chocolate dessert after dinner!

The preseasoned pot is so adorable and so easy to lift in and out of the oven I’m going to use it for all sorts of other things as well. I happen to adore cast iron and have a sizable collection of odd shapes and frying pans of all sizes. I even have my grandmother’s which is about 100 years old!

Here’s the recipe for the little loaf as I did it:

TIME REQUIRED:
Minimum Rising Time: About 20 hours (TIMING based on room temp 80°F.)
Total Baking Time: 1 hour preheat, 40 minutes baking
Oven Temperature: 450°F.

Makes: 6 1/2 inches wide and 3 inches high round loaf

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

Harvest King flour (or half unbleached all-
purpose/half bread flour)

1 1/2 cups

8.25 ounces

234 grams

instant yeast

1/8 teaspoons

.

0.4 grams

fine sea salt

1/2 plus 1/3 teaspoon

 

5 grams

water, room temperature (70 to 80°F.)

3/4 cup plus one tablespoon

6.7 ounces

191 grams

Technique for mixing is the same as for the big No-Knead—Whisk together the flour and yeast and when the yeast is mixed in THEN whisk in the salt.
With fingers or a spatula stir in the water just until all the flour is moistened.
Cover tightly and set in a 70º/21ºC. room for about 18 hours. It will have risen by more than double and be filled with little bubbles.

Here comes the fun and new part:
With oiled spatula, scrape it out onto a floured silpat and with floured fingers and bench scraper quickly and loosely fold it in thirds first in one direction, then in the other.
Re-flour the silpat and set the dough seam-side-down on top. It will be 5”x 2”high. Flour the top, cover it with a plastic dome or bowl , and let it rise in an 80ºF/26ºC. room for 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until it is 7" wide. and still 2” high.

While the dough is rising, preheat the oven and pot (with lid) for a minimum of 1 hour at 450ºF/230º/C.

Remove the pot from the oven. Sift a little flour evenly over the top of the dough and brush off any excess flour from the silpat. Now lift up the silpat and invert it over the hot pot. Unless you used a ton of flour the dough will be sticking slightly to the silpat which is perfect because all you have to do is curve the two edges of it and hold them together with one hand and gently push the dough away from it with the other.

What I love about this method is that your hands get nowhere near the very hot pot but the bread does. And where the bread tears slightly at the top, where it had stuck onto the silpat, it creates an interesting design.

I have an oven stone in my oven so I set the pot with the bread on top (covered with the lid of course) and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and bake for another 20 minutes or until the top is the color you want it to be, rotating it if it is browning unevenly. Even with the hot oven stone the bottom didn’t burn. I think it was the bran that caused it to get too brown in my last 10 larger loaves.

Empty the loaf onto a rack to cool completely.It will be 6 1/2 inches wide and 3 inches high.

Comments

Just curious, I have a 2qt lodge, and like the idea of using the full recipe to make 2 baby loaves. Can I make 2 batches of dough, and bake one after another with the same 2qt dutch oven - or should I cool down and then clean the dutch oven out from the first batch?

REPLY

Thank you for the tip about uncovering it sooner. I will definitely try that on the next round of baking.
And I tried the trick to dry the crumb as you mentioned and it works beautifully. Thank you again!
It's amazing how such a simple recipe could produce this quality of bread. I can't wait to make it with my daughter when she's a little older.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Stitch
10/15/2011 04:14 PM

great stitch! so happy to hear it worked for you. yes, the thick crust is due to its being covered for the first 20 or so minutes. you might want to play with uncovering it sooner. my gripe is the extreme moistness of the crumb so what i do after cooling is slice it and let the slices sit on racks for a few hours. then it's perfect and the slices i freeze for later don't stick together when frozen!

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I just found your website on this baby NKB and want to thank you. I can't possibly make a full loaf since hubby is not a crusty bread eater.

I followed your recipe almost to a T except for a 3 things:
1. I completely missed "Instant" part of the yeast and used AD instead.
2. I only did 13hr on the first rise.
3. I used a stainless steel 4qt pot with tempered glass top (which I covered with al foil in case of breakage) for the baking because we have a flat stovetop which won't take cast iron.

Even with the changes the bread came out really really really good. The only negative I have if I were to find one would be the thick crust. But other than that I am in absolute love with this bread. Thank you for putting a step by step method on a half loaf.

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Great recipe. Thanks for including the weight of the water. many books switch to fluit ounces.

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I use parchment paper instead of the Silpat. I can lower it in and lift out when done MUCH easier. I also put one of those metal steamer baskets in the bottom of the pot so the bottom crust doesn't burn or become obstructively chewy....

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please check out the errata page on this blog--this and other errors are addressed there.

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I am having a problem with page 326 of the Bread Bible. The weights of the bread flour do not correspond to the volume measurement and there is NO rye flour. Please advise - I am trying to recreate the rye of my husband's youthful memories

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Thank you for taking the time to answer my question Rose. Since the bread re-heats well b/c of the moist crumb, I think I'll stick with it.

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so happy for your success.

the moist crumb seems to be the nature of the bread but people have offered several suggestions that might help such as leaving it in a turned off oven or making holes with a skewer before the last 10 minutes of so of baking. check all the postings--it's a very long one but you'll get lots of ideas. also the bread reheats really well in slices, partly because of it's extra moisture.

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I made the no knead bread for the first time today. The crust was to die for. The finished height was about 2 1/2". I made the above recipe but doubled it b/c I baked it in a 5qt Lodge cast iron dutch oven. The bread tasted amazing. Thank you Rose!!!! I encountered one problem though. The inside was a bit too moist / gummy. I am new to bread baking and was wondering what I could do to prevent this. If I bake it longer the crust might get over done. Can I cover it with foil to prevent this or will it affect the crispiness of the crust? It had holes like the picture above. I used Gold Medal Better for Bread Flour - the reason I made the bread in the first place. I was so excited when I got it that I just HAD to bake bread. I did a search on the site but couldn't find a solution. I hope I didn't miss it. If I did I'm sorry. Hopefully someone can answer my question.

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very kind of you!

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Hi Rose,

Just a quick note to thank you for answering my question so soon after your return. I'm well aware you have tons of posts to respond to, and it's not an easy task to tackle them when you still must have a jet lag.

I live in Japan, so I don't have access to harvest king, but will keep experimenting with different type of bread flour.

Thanks once again!

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it probably is a combination of things--the size of the container and also the type of flour. try the harvest king which is more extensible than bread flour and will give a higher rise.

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Dear Rose,
Thank you for taking time to create this informative site. I've made NK Bread countless times since you introduced it on your site, but I am not gettig consistent results; i.e. the height of the bread. Often times it just does not rise like the ones I see here, and I cannot figure out why.
For example, I tried this half portion yesterday, but after the second rise, it spread more than it has risen, and the final product was only 2 inches tall looking like an UFO.
The crumb and the crust I have no complaints, but whether I make it in full portion of half, mine are never as tall as yours.
I use bread flour and bake them in a oven-safe glassware (with lid). Is it the size of the glassware vs. the amount of dough? Any suggestions or pointers would be greatly appreciated.

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lodge has a great website with reseasoning instructions. i've done it and it works. if it really is rust you need to scour it out before adding the oil. and once all the oil is burned off it won't smoke again.
i've never had it deseason when used only for the bread though. also the bread has never stuck.

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susaninfrance
susaninfrance
10/ 1/2007 03:02 PM

any tips on what to do when my (pre-seasoned) Lodge cast iron dutch oven starts to rust inside? I tried seasoning it a bit and then it just smoked when I put it in the oven to pre-heat for the bread?? This is after about 6 months of making the no-knead variation type bread.

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ps -- too much flour on top, not in the dough...

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Rose --

I've had your bread bible for a few years now and love it, I've learned how to make many a loaf from those pages.

I just finished my first no knead from this recipe, with a brand new painted "Outset" brand cast iron dutch oven -- and it turned out beautifully! Although with my fear of sticky dough, I think I used a bit too much flour.

Anyway, I'm so excited I just hope it tastes as good as it looks.

Thanks!
-- angela

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I made 3 hr french bread but adapted the NK technique of using covered pot. It turned out perfect! I have oval Le Creuset dutch oven and a stoneware covered baker. Both yielded a perfect loaf! I did have to knead the bread, but if you only have 3 hours you can still make bread with that nice, thin, crispy crust. Recipe at www.steamykitchen.com

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Paul R. Mosso
Paul R. Mosso
04/10/2007 10:15 AM

Hi Rose, I would like to know more
about "Biga". For example, if it rises
and then collapses can it still be used.
(I have used it after collapse and it
did make a good Ciabatta). Should all
Bigas not show collapse for best results?

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jaon definitely increases flavor to add dough from one bread to the next batch.

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suzan, carol field has a wonderful bread book "the italian baker." i think there's a good chance you will be able to match your bread memory using one of her recipes.

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I couldn’t resist: I must be obsessed. I just started my first batch of Baby Bread! Before I grew my sourdough starter, I was making only N-K Bread. When I remembered, I would take out about 80g. of the dough before I shaped. When I remembered, I would use that dough in my next batch. Do you think that would add significantly to the flavor? I love the idea of smaller loaves: twice the aroma of baking—almost as good as the eating!

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How did I miss this thread? I can't wait to try the Baby Bread. I've got that Lodge pot!
Is a Silpat the same as a Silpain liner?

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SUZAN WHITE
SUZAN WHITE
03/21/2007 10:55 AM

I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO MAKE ITALIAN BREAD LIKE I USED TO GET IN PITTSBURGH'S STRIP DISTRICT (MANCINI'S, ETC...)WITH NO LUCK...SOME KIND PERSON GAVE ME YOUR' WEBSITE IN THE HOPE OF FINDING THE PERFECT LIGHTWEIGHT CRUSTY ITALIAN BREAD RECIPE. I AM NOW IN HOUSTON, TEXAS. THERE IS ABSOLUTELY N-O GOOD ITALIAN BAKERIES OR PIZZA SHOPS HERE. I GUESS I WILL HAVE TO MAKE MY OWN!

THANKS FOR ANY HINTS OR SUGGESTIONS...SUZANNAHA

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Re: Gummy Inside of NKB
Hi!
Although I consider myself an experienced sweets baker, I was a bread baking virgin until I tried the NKB recipe. I, too, found a nice crust and a somewhat gummy interior, even after patiently waiting to cut it. I was considering lengthening the covered baking time, but decided to try something else first. I put my pot with the lid next to it, not on it, inside the pre-heated oven for its 30 minutes, to make sure the inside of the pot was exposed to nice heat circulation. Well, it must have worked, 'cause I finally got a nicely risen good textured loaf.

Hope this helps someone!

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are the holes really as LARGE with the durum? that surprises me! but maybe it's worth it for the marvelous flavor durum provides.

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My Le Creuset Deep Skillet worked great! It was the perfect size and the best part was that I already had it. In researching it on the web, I discovered it (and the rest of my LeCreuset) is considered "vintage". I keep telling myself I was very young when I bought it!

I substituted 1/2 cup of flour with 1/2 cup of durham flour and got a little more depth of flavor. The initial rise was 18-19 hours. Next time I will try a little longer. It didn't seem as bubbly as before with all bread flour but baked it was a nice texture with lots of holes.

Rose, we had the bread with Gulash soup -- wonderful!

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stephen--that sounds terrific though how you cut that wet dough is beyond me! if it's a digital photo you can just send it to the e-mail address and i'll have my blog master post it!

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HI: read last post and jealous. I have done about 10 loaves and still can't get
the 3 1/2 in height. Mine tastes fine but only 1.5 to 2 inches high. Anyones suggestions would be helpful. Allen

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holly--that would be just fine (but not over 450 degrees please).

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Hi Rose.

I think I'm on batch number 20 of NK bread. This time I did something a bit different that you might want to share with your readers. After the initial 20 hr rise, I cut the dough into six pieces (I originally had the thought that I would make mini-loaves or even rolls.) However, when baking time came around, I could not find my extra dutch oven, to make the bread in two separate pans. As a result, I used a single 4 qt. LeCreuset chicken roaster (as I usually do.)

I placed the five rolls around the perimeter and one roll in the middle and gave the pan a little shake. Then I baked as directed. The resulting loaf of bread is gorgeous. It looks like something from an artisinal bakery. If you tell me how, I will send you a photo.

Thanks for your help. Your insight on the NK bread has been terrific.

Stephen

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What do you all think about baking the baby bread in a Le Creuset Deep Dish Skillet (enamel/cast iron). Its diameter is 7 1/2" and it is 3" deep with a raised lid that adds about another 3/4". The inside is a black satin enamel. I've had it about 30 years and can count the times I've used it on one hand so I would like be able to get some return on my investment after all these years! Will the black interior have a positive or negative effect?
With this loaf I'm substituting a 1/2 cup of bread flour with a 1/2 cup of durham flour.

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I have used up to 1/2 cup of Hodgson Organic Rye Flour. The results are excellent. We prefer 1/3 cup. I have also added "Ten Grain" and "Harvest Grain" mix from King Arthur Flour..about 1/3 cup...very yummy. You may have to adjust the water just a bit.

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Cindy in SF
Cindy in SF
02/ 2/2007 04:50 PM

I've had great success with a whole wheat version of NK, but have failed miserably with all my attempts to do this with any percentage of rye flour. Has anyone used this method with rye, or is it just not suited? I was really hoping to fix my light rye habit with a easy to deal with dough like this.

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the boxes are just storage boxes large enough to invert over a rising bread. they come in all sizes. stores like hold everything also have them and the container store or if there's a plastics store in our town.
re the bread, i would divide it just before shaping and then refrigerate the half you want to bake the following day.

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Rose,

You have created a monster - and it's all your fault! :-)
The only bread I will eat now is fresh home baked, oven warm bread! I have a half loaf of no-knead that's a day old and all I want to do with it is make toast or French toast with it! I only want to eat my utterly fresh, right out-of-the oven bread!

This technique has obviously brought a lot of people (like me) into bread making, and that's great.

Question: Because I like fresh-baked, I tried the half loaf and it was great, but it's virtually the same amount of work, mess and hassle as a full loaf. So here's my question: Could I make the full recipe and at some point, cut the dough in half, bake half and stash the other half in the fridge for a day or so to bake later? If this is workable, at what point in the process should I split it? I'v been doing a 5 hour rise, overnight in the fridge, about 5 hours more the next morning and then moving to the second rise. Any advice?

A while ago you mentioned some plastic boxes for proofing that you got (I think at BB&B). Could you say more about those? I haven't located them yet.

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I've updated my breadmaking page with new pictures of my second attempt - fresh from the oven and after cutting. Sorry the cutting photo is blurry - I have the camera set on auto and I'm not sure how to get it to focus on the object itself and not on the background when i have flash turned off, etc. Camera manual is one big PDF and I hate reading large PDF files.

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Rena McClain
Rena McClain
01/31/2007 01:15 AM

I have done the NK bread twice. The first time I was not too happy with it but I think it was the oven temperature. I did it in a cast iron Dutch Oven and the bread's crust got very overdone after the lid was removed. And yes, I did decrease the temperature in the oven. The 2nd one I made was a smaller loaf in a Pampered Chef stoneware bowl and cake pan that worked very much like a junior La Cloche.

With both of these I used a sourdough starter as the leavening agent. On the Breadtopia site there is an adaption that uses 1/4 cup of liquid starter as the base. You mix it with 1 1/4 cup of water and add that to your flour and proceed with the usual method of making the bread. With the long rising period you definately get a sourdough flavor to the bread. I do recommend this method of leavening this bread, makes a great loaf with little effort.

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Yes - I just mixed the ingredients together until it was all moist and blended. Right now the dough is resting after having been folded and shaped. Going to pop it in the oven in a couple hours or so . . .

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Lola, your second attempt hasa really good looking crumb. Did you mix the dough the same way in which the no knead is mixed i.e. minimally?

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I have used the same recipe but it seems I did not wait enough at the second rising so it did not end well. But with 1 cup of starter and maybe a little more attention I, the rookie, may reach a conclusion.

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Okay . . . I've taken pictures of my first attempt and second attempt (still at dough stage). Second attempt dough was put into glass bowl to rise at 6pm and moved upstairs to the guest bedroom, where temperature is more consistent and slightly warmer than in the kitchen.

My Sourdough NK Bread Experiment

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mare--that's the one--the bread can rise higher bc the lid is curved giving it extra height.

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Rose, I tried your baby bread with Harvest King flour, and the proportions are perfect. The bottom burned a little in a Corningware casserole, so I want to get the 2-qt Lodge dutch oven. Do you know what model number it is? The only one I can find is 2+7/8" deep, which doesn't sound deep enough..

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Lola, I am also going to try it tonight with 1 cup of dense starter. Let's see what happens.

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In the interest of fair play I should have reported that I followed the original NK recipe, but substituted 1/4 cup starter at 50% hydration instead of the yeast.

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Well, I tried the sourdough recipe, using the following proportions:

1/2c starter
1c flour
1/2 tsp plus 2/8 tsp kosher salt (didn't have a 1/3 tsp spoon)
1/4 c water

Result: After sitting overnight on kitchen counter, in glass blowl and covered with saran wrap - no detectable rinse. Smells very alcoholy. Right now it's sitting on my cable box which has been turned on (great source for consistent heat temperature) to see if it'll rise some more (I doubt it).

Next batch I'm going to ramp up the sourdough measure to 1 cup.

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Rose, as my latest try at sourdough NK just went in the trash, I agree with you that it won't work. After 18 hours the dough appeared to have lovely gluten strands while still in the bowl, but when I turned it out and started the folds it broke down completely. Wish I could have reported success with this one, as I do love that sourdough flavor. Maybe Lola and Sertac enjoyed success this weekend and will report on it soon. I sure hope so.

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where was it televised? it's from the cake bible but i used a silicone pan which i prefer to cast iron as it's non-reactive and the cast iron looses all it's seasoning due to the acidity of the pineapple. that's the only difference.

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Where can I find your pineapple upside down cake that was televised today-1/27?

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I am going to feed my starter now and tomorrow morning I will use this starter to make the bread. I will keep you posted. Lets see if it will happen.

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great lola--really interested to hear the results!

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Somebody posted a successful report of NK Bread using a starter at The Fresh Loaf, in the NYT thread. Since I have a jar of lively sourdough starter, I'm going to try this out sometime this weekend and see what happens.

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i don't think no knead bread would work with starter bc the acidity causes the dough to be very soft and the lack of more vigorous kneading and gluten development would probably not serve this dough well. but try it--that's how i found out all i posted above!

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Can I make it with starter?
1 c starter
1 c flour
1/2 plus 1/3 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 water

Technique is the same.

Thanks

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Thanks for figuring this out. Allen

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Can the "baby bread" (half recipe nkb) be baked successfully in a 5 qt size enamel cast iron dutch oven? Or does it really need to be baked in a small pot?

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brava angela--a bread rising station--so inventive!

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Angela, I had the same concern...when I made mine it was snowing outside! So I invented my 'Bread Warming Station'! You can see it in action with pictures here:
http://buttermilkclouds.blogspot.com/2007/01/no-knead-bread.html

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and don't turn the oven on as it would be too hot. if you have a pilot light it will also be too hot. ONLY the light of the electric bulb!

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it will still work in a lower temperature room, just more slowly. you could, as i suggested in the bread bible, make a little warm environment by using a plastic box and some hot water. you can't use the oven as you'll be preheating it! but if you have a second oven, just use the oven light as a perfect way to heat it to 80.

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What a great idea!

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Angela Taormina
Angela Taormina
01/24/2007 11:45 AM

I'd love to try this bread...have been intrigued by the no-knead concept since I saw the NYTimes article.

But wondering how to get around letting it rise in an 80-degree room, since I don't want to blast the no-zoned heat in my house. Put a space heater in the guest bathroom with the dough for 2 1/2 hours? Hmmm. I bet you - or one of your intrepid fans - have got a better solution.

Thanks!

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I've had great success making a rye version using similar proportions of bread flour and rye (I've been using light rye) as in your Levy's rye bread: 12.5 oz. bread flour and 2.5 oz. of rye, and 1 heaping T. of caraway seeds, but using less water than the usual nkb, about 1 1/4 cups. It seems rather dry when mixed, but is fully hydrated after the long rise.

The finished loaf doesn't have as many large holes as nkb, but it is an outstanding sandwich bread.

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For those interested in variations on the bread, there is a whole discussion on the Fine Cooking message board.

I have a 2 qt. le creuset. I'm going to try a 1/2 batch!

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marie did that on her blog breadbasketcase.blogspot.com and lliked it. i'm feeling the same way--i love the texture and huge holes of the 100% white wheat flour but i'm longing for a little more flavor so guess what! i have my sourdough rising to bake tomorrow night in the little pot. stay tuned!

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I love nkb, but I'm missing the flavor that I get with your Pugliese bread recipe. Have you given any thought is replacing a portion of the bread flour with durum? Thanks for all your advice!

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Zach,

Baking in cast iron...I make peach and apple cobblers and crisps (don't do berry versions as they are too acidic). I also bake a variety of quick breads in my deep skillets (corn bread and banana bread are my favorites). My grandmother always baked her biscuits in her 14 inch skillet.

Oh, and I've also baked bread pudding in my 12 inch (which turned out really great).

I haven't tried to make apple tartan, but I hear making it in cast iron is worth it.

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Victoria wrote: "My question is that, since he loves this bread so much, I really should make it a bit healthier. Has anyone used white whole wheat flour with success? And would I also need to add vital wheat gluten with the whole wheat?"

My last two batches of NKB have been with some alternate flours. The first was with 1/5 or 1/6 of the flour as whole wheat. That loaf was great, with more interesting flavor. The latest loaf was with 1/3 of the flour as rye. It was a bit too moist on the inside for me, but certainly not a disaster. My next NKB experiments will be with herbs (esp. rosemary) and seeds or nuts or whole grain (like whole grain cereal or rolled oats).

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The wasitband of my jeans is getting tighter and tighter... :) I've made 3 full-sized loaves of this bread in the past three days-- my husband and I are having difficulty keeping up! I bought a KitchenAid hard-anodized 4.5 quart saucepot and it produces lovely 7-1/2" diameter by 3-1/2" high loaves.

My question is that, since he loves this bread so much, I really should make it a bit healthier. Has anyone used white whole wheat flour with success? And would I also need to add vital wheat gluten with the whole wheat?

And I have to mention that I was interested, but a bit hesitant, about making this no-knead bread. I kept this recipe on my bulletin board through the holidays as I spent countless hours in the kitchen baking and cooking, but I never had the nerve to give it a try. Until I found the Real Baking With Rose website and read the posts. It gave me the kick in the pants that I needed to actually do it, and I thank you all for your insight and tips (especially you, Rose!)

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Rose,

What a great idea, I have that little cast iron pot. I think they call it a serving dish or something. I've used it in the past for the bottom half of a homemade double boiler for melting chocolate and making ganache.

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Has anyone tried replacing water with milk for the NK-Bread? Curious as to how this would turn out . . . I'll have to look for that 2 qt. cast iron pot so I can do experiments on a small scale.

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Moe, I might try baking again on pizza stone no pot and steaming with ice cubes again. If I recall the bread might have been dryer when I did this the first time.
Thanks
Oriana

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Moe Rubenzahl
Moe Rubenzahl
01/21/2007 01:18 PM

Oriana said:

"...the bread had a nice crisp crust but I’m still not happy with the inside as it is still too soggy for me. I think it might be the Canadian flour."

Yes, that has been my issue with the full-sized no-knead bread. Still grappling with it. See my posted comment on that article,

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/12/noknead_balloon_bread_loaf_10.html

Getting better but still not there.

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Thanks for the quick response. The ciabatta always turns out beautifully with nice holes. I will try adding more water to nkb and removing lid sooner and using a different brand of flour. Will let you know.
Thank you.
Oriana

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wait til the photo gets posted--great holes must be the flour. or do you get good holes with the ciabatta in which case you need more water. take the lid off sooner or bake it longer with the door open at the end to get rid of excess sog!

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Rose,
What a coincident that you should post a ½ recipe for nkb. I did exactly that on Friday as I am still experimenting with nkb and thought the smaller amounts would be more manageable and less wasteful. I used a corningware pot with lid and the bread had a nice crisp crust but I’m still not happy with the inside as it is still too soggy for me. I think it might be the Canadian flour. I used half and half unbleached all purpose and bread flour and I replaced about 35 gr. with whole wheat flour and threw in a couple of tablespoons of flax seeds. I am looking for the inside to resemble that of your ciabatta but perhaps that is not possible with nkb. Btw I use your method of the silpat when I make your ciabatta recipe. I found it the easiest to invert the ciabatta.
Regards
Oriana

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Zach Townsend
Zach Townsend
01/21/2007 12:22 PM

Thanks, Rose. Excellent tip! I'll let my mother know as the skillet she was planning using is well seasoned.

Thanks,
Zach

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zach, if using the cast-iron skillet to make pineapple upside down cake I would line it with foil because the acidity of the pineapple will take all the seasoning off the pan.of course it's easy to re-season the pan but i love the pan too much to want to do this anymore despite the fact that this cake is made traditionally in a cast iron pan!

REPLY

Zachary Townsend
Zachary Townsend
01/21/2007 10:51 AM

Rose,

Congratulations on the arrival of the pot! I'm a big cast iron fan, too. There is just something about it that makes certain things so much better.

I occasionally try different things in cast iron just to see if it bakes things better. My mother cannot wait to make your pineapple upside down cake from the Cake Bible that calls for a cast iron skillet.

I'd like to hear from other bloggers how they've used cast iron with baked goods. I think it would be fun to share ideas.

Thanks, Zach

REPLY

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