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Cranberry Walnut Bread

Apr 2, 2007 | From the kitchen of Rose

As promised, here's the recipe for the cranberry walnut bread I made for my recent plane flight.

(Recipe on the main page)

Cranberry Walnut Bread

TIME REQUIRED:
Dough Starter (Sponge): Minimum 1 1/2 hour, Maximum 24 hours
Minimum Rising Time: About 3 1/4 hours
Baking Time: 50 to 60  minutes
Oven Temperature: 375°F.

Makes: 2 pounds, 3.3 ounce / 1000 gram  loaf

The optional stiff sourdough starter adds flavor but what is most important, it extends shelf-life, keeping the bread soft and moist.

Equipment: A 10 inch or longer  baking sheet, preferably insulated, or a double layer of 2 baking sheets, top 1 lined with parchment, or sprinkled with  flour or corn meal.

Early in the morning or the night before prepare the cranberries, walnuts, and start the dough starter (sponge)

Cranberries

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

dried cranberries

1 cup

5 ounces

144 grams

hot water

1/2  liquid cup

4.1 ounces

118 grams

1) Soak the cranberries
In a small bowl, place the cranberries and water. Cover with plastic wrap and let the dried fruit soak until it is softened and plump, stirring once, for 30 minutes. Drain the cranberries, reserving the liquid in a 1 cup liquid measure. (You should have 3 fluid ounces.)  Add enough water to come to the 1 cup level and set it aside covered. If planning to mix the dough the next day, cover the cranberries and water with plastic wrap and refrigerate them overnight.

Flour Mixture

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

walnuts halves

2 cups

7 ounces

200 grams

whole wheat flour, preferably stone ground

1/3 cup

1.7 ounces

50 grams

bread flour

1 cup

5.5 ounces

 156 grams

instant yeast

1/2 teaspoon

.

1.6 grams

2) Prepare the walnuts and flour mixture
 In a preheated 325ºF. oven, toast the walnuts very lightly for 7 minutes. to bring out their flavor and loosen the skins but do not brown them. Transfer them to a clean towel and while still hot, rub them to remove as much of the bitter skin as possible. Coarsely break 1  1/2 cups of the walnuts and set them aside. Place the remaining 1/2 cup of walnut halves in a food processor along with the whole wheat flour and process for about a minute or until ground fine. Pulse in the bread flour and yeast. Set it aside.

Dough Starter (Sponge)

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

bread flour

1 cup

5.5 ounces

156 grams

instant yeast

3/4 teaspoon

.

2.4 grams

malt powder or barley malt syrup, or sugar

1 tablespoon

.

9.3 grams
21 grams
12.5 grams

reserved cranberry water, room temperature (70 to 90°F.)

1 liquid cup

8.3 ounces

236 grams

Optional stiff sourdough starter

about 1/4 cup

2.6 ounces

75 grams

3) Make the dough starter (sponge)
In a medium bowl whisk together the bread flour, yeast, and malt, or sugar. In a mixer bowl, place the cranberry water and tear in the starter. Allow it to sit for about 30 minutes or until softened. Add the flour mixture and whisk until very smooth to incorporate air, about 2 minutes. The dough will be the consistency of a thick batter. Scrape down the sides. (If using a bread machine, you can mix in the container with the dough blade(s), but you’ll need to scrape the corners several times.) Lightly spoon the ground nut/flour mixture on top of the sponge. Cover it tightly with plastic wrap and allow it to ferment for 1 hour or up to 4 hours at room temperature. The batter beneath the flour will be very bubbly and spongy in texture. Some of it will break through the flour mixture.

Dough

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

salt

1  1/4 teaspoons
(+ 1/8 if adding starter)

0.25 ounce

9.5 grams

vegetable oil

1 tablespoon

about 0.5 ounce

13.5 grams

reserved broken walnuts

1  1/2  cups

.

.

reserved cranberries

1 full cup

.

.

bread flour for kneading

1/4 cup

1.3 ounces

39 grams

4) Mix the dough

Mixer Method
Add the oil and walnuts, and with the dough hook, mix on low (#2 Kitchen Aid) about 1 minute, until the flour is moistened, to form a soft rough dough. Scrape down any bits of dough. Cover the top of the bowl with plastic wrap and  allow the dough to rest for 20 minutes.

Sprinkle on salt and knead the dough on medium speed (#4 Kitchen Aid) for 7 minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. After the first 3 minutes, if the dough still appears sticky and does not begin to pull away from the bowl, add a little of the flour a tablespoon at a time. Sprinkle the counter lightly with a little more of this flour. Place the dough on top and cover it with plastic wrap. Allow it to sit for 20 minutes to relax the gluten.

Bread Machine Method
Add the oil and broken walnuts and mix 3 minutes. Allow the dough to rest 20 minutes. Then knead 7 minutes. (Add the salt after the first minute or two after mixing. Add cranberries by hand after resting 20 minutes because they are soaked so would smooch in the machine.

Both Methods
Roll the dough into a rectangle (about 14 inches by 10 inches). Sprinkle the cranberries evenly over the dough and starting from the short end, roll up the dough as you would a jelly roll. (Do not use the machine to mix in the cranberries will break down and result in a dark compact crumb.)

Form the dough into a ball and knead it lightly. After the cranberries are added the dough becomes a little tacky (sticky) and will need a little more of the extra flour. (The dough should weigh about 2 pounds, 6 ounces / 1075 grams.)

5) Let the dough rise
Place the dough into a 2 quart dough rising container or bowl, greased lightly with cooking spray or oil. Push down the dough and lightly spray or oil the top of the dough. cover the container with a lid or plastic wrap. With a piece of tape mark on the side of the container approximately where double the height would be. Allow the dough to rise (ideally at 75°F to 80°F) until doubled, 1 1/2 to 2 hours (a little over 2 quarts).

Using an oiled spatula or dough scraper, remove the dough to a floured counter and press down on it gently to form a rectangle. Give it 1 business letter turn (I), round the edges and set it back in the container. Again, oil the surface, cover, mark where double the height will now be and refrigerate over night or allow it to rise until doubled, about 1 to 1/2 hours. (It will fill it fuller than before because it is puffier with air). Note: If refrigerating overnight, deflate it once or twice to prevent over-proofing.

6) Shape the dough and let it rise
Turn the dough onto a lightly floured counter. Press down on it or roll it to form a rectangle and shape it into a 8 to 12 inch long torpedo shaped loaf.  If 8 inches long it will be about 4 inches wide by 3 inches high. If 12  inches long it will be about 3  1/2 inches wide by 2  1/2 inches high. Set the dough on a baking sheet lined with non-stick liner or parchment. Cover it with a large container or oiled plastic wrap. Let the dough rise until almost doubled and when pressed gently with a finger the depression very slowly fills in, 45 minutes to 1 hour (12 by 4  1/2 by 2  3/4 inches high or 9 by 6 by 3 1/2 inches high).

7) Preheat the oven
30 minutes before baking preheat the oven to 400°F. Have the oven shelf at the next to lowest level and set a cast iron pan or sheet pan on the floor of the oven before preheating.

8) Slash and bake the bread
Allow it to sit uncovered for 5 minutes to dry slightly.  With a sharp knife or straight edged razor blade, make 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep horizontal slashes in the top of the dough about 1 1/2 inches apart.
Mist the dough with water and quickly but gently set the baking sheet on the oven rack. Toss 1/2 cup of ice cubes into the pan beneath. Immediately shut the door and bake 5 minutes. Lower the heat to 375°F. and continue baking  45 to 55 minutes or until the crust is golden and a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean. (An instant read thermometer inserted into the center will read about 200°F.) Tent loosely with foil after the first 20 minutes of baking. Halfway through baking, turn the pan halfway around for even baking.

9) Cool the bread
Remove the bread from the oven, lift it from the pan, and transfer it to a wire rack to cool completely, top-side up (at least 2 hours).

Pointers for Success
Don’t set the pan on a preheated baking stone as this bread tends to brown faster and could over-brown.

Soaking the cranberries not only softens them but also produces a naturally sweetened liquid that permeates the bread and turns the crust a magnificent golden brown.

The walnuts are toasted very lightly to keep them from turning blue in the crumb. As some of the nuts work their way to the top of the crust and continue to brown, it is best to toast them only lightly.

This bread takes longer to rise because of the extra weight of the whole wheat flour, cranberries and nuts. Extra risings makes the grain more even and lighter.

A softer dough results in a lighter texture ideal for this bread. Don’t work in too much flour.

If using malt syrup instead of malt powder, it will produce a browner crumb instead of the rosy hue. As the long baking required for this large loaf and the cranberry soaking water containing sugar conspire to making a very brown crust, this bread should not be baked on a baking stone.

The Rose Ratio
flour: 100%
     bread: 86.2%
     whole wheat: 13.8%
water: 58.9%
yeast: 1%
salt: 2%
oil: 3.4%

Comments

carmen rosetti
carmen rosetti
11/17/2011 09:44 AM

ok.thx. i will be sure to let you know how it came out.

REPLY

PS amazing coincidence, i'm about the shape this very bread. i refrigerated the dough overnight after the first rise. that also develops more flavor.

REPLY

carmen, please reread step 3 where i say to tear in the starter.

the optional starter extends the shelf life and adds flavor but the bread is still fantastic without it. if you want to make a starter the directions are in my book "the bread bible" or on the web. you can even purchase a starter. if you get a liquid starter just add enough flour to make it into a stiffer dough consistency.

REPLY

carmen rosetti
carmen rosetti
11/17/2011 09:00 AM

i dont have a sourdough starter. do i need it? i see the term optional used but no directions if i dont use it. can u email me a recipe to make one. thx. i am hooked on this bread( store bought from bakery) and i would love to try to make my own. thx.

REPLY

kristine, The optional stiff sourdough starter adds flavor but what is most important, it extends shelf-life, keeping the bread soft and moist.

REPLY

I'm confused as to why you would be adding a sourdough starter to a starter? isn't the purpose of the starter to give your bread a tangy yeasty flavor? why add an already tangy yeasty flavor? wouldn't that make it over the top tangy yeasty flavor?

REPLY

sweetened ones are best lisa!

REPLY

Lisa Bilsky
Lisa Bilsky
12/17/2010 02:31 PM

By dried cranberries, do you mean sweetened ones such as Craisins or should I look for unsweetened dried cranberries in a health food store?

REPLY

diastatic malt has an active enzyme that converts the starch in flour to sugar. for more details please see page 552 in the bread bible.

REPLY

Linda Hanner
Linda Hanner
11/30/2009 03:22 PM

Rose, Love The Bread Bible!! I have a question--What is the difference between diastatic malt and non-diastatic malt?
Thanks, Linda

REPLY

Hi Alice, yes, this bread is easy to make by hand.

REPLY

I don't have a mixer with a dough hook. Can I mix it with regular beaters and knead by hand?

REPLY

what an amazing coincidence--i just wrapped a loaf of this bread in parchment as i'm bringing it as a house gift for a dinner party tonight! so glad you enjoyed it too.

REPLY

Great recipe! This recipe taste very similar to the Trader Joe's cranberry nut bread. It's delicious toasted with a little butter or cream cheese for breakfast.

REPLY

the instructions are right in the recipe for using a bread machine but NOT to bake it in the bread machine.

REPLY

Can this bread be made in a bread machine? How would it be made then?

REPLY

Hi Rose, Thanks so much for this cranberry bread. It is my all time favorite!! I have made this 3 times following all the ingredients exactly ( except I messed some of the steps the 1st time). The bread turned out so fragrant and tasty I just couldn't help eating them!! I do have a question that why the bread turned out a litte flat all the time. Where did I go wrong that it was not holding higher?? Can I also make this into little rolls ? Thanks again for such a great recipe!! Marj

REPLY

i'm sorry but i've never tried using it and a quick google search only revealed that whey is the liquid part of the milk that separates during cheese making so you'll have to do further research with the companies that produce it.

REPLY

I was wondering if you could tell me the differences between Whey flour and Powdered Milk. Also, can whey be substituted for Powdered Milt and vice versa??

REPLY

Isn't it better when someone else does 'real-baking' for you? My dearest friend Natalie, graphic designer and cake assistant, neighbor, and local fan #1, shared these with me today...

(quote) "healthy" oatmeal scones filled with dried cranberries, walnuts and lemon zest. �Great for breakfast (end quote).

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/bloggers/NatalieOatmealScones.htm

REPLY

step #3: Lightly spoon the ground nut/flour mixture on top of the sponge. (this includes the flour and yeast to which you refer)

REPLY

I am a novice at bread baking and can not tell from this recipe when to add the additional flour and yeast???
Thank you to anyone who can clarify this for me.

REPLY

Yummy! or you can try the cran-raspberry sauce. I still have some from Thanksgiving, and it keeps well!

Basically, you boil the berries in some light sugar water until they pop, then add some of Rose's wonderful raspberry sauce.

REPLY

Sarah,
Why don't you use the cranberry quickbread in the first recipe chapter of the BB? It uses fresh cranberries and it is outstanding.

REPLY

fresh cranberries would add pockets of moisture and a very sour taste. the dried ones are tart but also sweetened slightly.

REPLY

Sarah Evans
Sarah Evans
12/13/2007 12:57 PM

I have several cups of fresh cranberries; could I use those somehow with this bread recipe instead of dried? Would I need to freeze then thaw them to break them down a little and add some sugar to the recipe to compensate? And what would be a good substitute for the cranberry soaking water? Thanks.

REPLY

yes--typo--it is 1 full cup.

REPLY

i'm sorry--i have no idea what you're asking but my suggestion is that you copy the posting into a word document and make the font larger as all the info. you need is in the recipe.

REPLY

Doreen Jordan
Doreen Jordan
11/18/2007 08:05 PM

I don't understand how many cranberries are left (after soaking). i believe it says 12 full cup. print is small; I may be wrong.

Thanks for responding though.;

REPLY

barbara, i would use the nut flour in the dough because it give such a good texture. since he's not allergic to nuts it won't be a problem bc i bet he'll never know it's there! then you can just add some extra raisins if you like.

cindy i'm sure it will be good without the starter. in future, save a little dough from any basic bread you make and freeze it. then add it to the dough for this one and you will get extra flavor as well.

REPLY

Dear Rose,
I made this bread for a gathering once and one of my friend really like it and she started making it herself also. The only difference is that she did not use any starter.Would there be much different ? If one omit the starter but let the polish and second rise develop slowly in the fridge ,will that make it close?
Thank you

REPLY

I have been making this bread on a regular basis with a little change everytime.
I made a sponge with 1 Tbsp of yeast, 1/2 c whole wheat flour and 1/2 cup water and left it for 2 days.
I added a heaping Tbsp of the sponge to the bread mixture with a 1 Tbsp of Olive oil and some fresh rosemary. Baked it in my cast iron pot as usual. The result was about 40% higher rise and softer bread, nice crust, good for sandwiches too.
Salma

REPLY

I have a spouse that does not like nuts (so sad) but loves everything I have made from your Bread Bible. Do I need to substitute for the volume lost by the lack of nuts, and if so, suggestions?

REPLY

coing, i have a great recipe for rye bread in the bread bible. you could certainly add currants and nuts to it.

REPLY

carolyn, new book will be out fall of 2008.

REPLY

marvia, you can certainly make the bread with raisins and pecans. i have that recipe in the bread bible.

reeni, i'm sorry i don't know the answer to the shelf life question but king arthur sells it so they can tell you. i'm sure it has one but i don't know what it would be. i don't use diastatic malt--only non-diastatic.

REPLY

This sounds wonderful, I'll have to try it. At my school we needed to order a huge bucket of diastatic malt syrup from the supplier, but do you know if it has a shelf life? I put 2 oz into a 4 lb batch of multigrain bread once (since I wanted to use up more) and it was awful... gummy, dark and disappointing.
Any other uses you can suggest are appreciated!

REPLY

Carolyn Bergman
Carolyn Bergman
04/ 4/2007 01:34 PM

Rose-

Any chance for a new book to come out???

REPLY

Happy Birthday Rose!

Have a great time in France, we will miss you.

REPLY

it's a stiff starter described in the bread bible. and it's optional. tear means literally to tear it into pieces.

REPLY

Thanks for this recipe, Rose. It sounds delicious! I am anxious to try it but I am confused by this: In a mixer bowl, place the cranberry water and tear in the starter. What does "tear in the starter mean"? Is this a typo or am I missing something? Thanks for your help!
Freda

REPLY

Add a little bit of orange zest. Yum.

REPLY

This recipe reminds me of the currant-rye my husband
misses so much since the bakery phased it out. Would
I just apply the same approach to a rye bread, which would you recommend?

REPLY

Rose:
You have the best E-newsletter, website, cookbooks and recipes! What a wonderful teacher you are! Your instructions are so detailed, precise, easy to understand and do. When I'm in doubt about any other recipe, I head straight to your bibles. I don't know why I even go to other cookbooks as your's are so complete.

Question: Are there any changes in measurements if I exchange raisins for cranberries and pecans for walnuts? And do I have to do anything to the raisins or pecans?
Thank you for all your exhausting work,
Marvia

REPLY

craisins will be fine!

REPLY

The Cranberry Walnut bread looks wonderful. I have Craisins on hand. Will they work as a substitute for the dried cranberries?

REPLY

I prefer yeast breads over quick breads anyday and am glad to see one of my very favorite combinations used in a yeast bread! Printed and filed for future use!

Chiffy

REPLY

OMG!!!!! is this how Rose writes every day? It looks like a recipe from the Bread Bible itself, very methodic and detailed. There is no doubt that only Rose can write it!!! This recipe is inspiring me.....for Easter I am hosting Luca's birtday party. I was going to make pizza (a la Rose), but today I changed my mind and decided to instead make breadS (yes with capital S and plural). I will setup a buffet table with assorted breads, wine, cheese / butter spreads, and bruschetta toppings (of course Rose's oven dried grape tomatoes and SS's sauteed mushrooms)... glad I have already asked the guests to bring wine because that is something I can't make myself!!! I will start with Basic Sourdough Bread and use the Panettone experience, Plain Wonderful White Bread, and this Cranberry Wallnut recipe, to make the "other" breadS. Also, had a chance to spend the weekend in Hilo and found some local honey, lavender, arare salt, and goat cheese.......which some will go on the breads and some on the spreads. The birthday cake is Moist Chocolate Genoise with Light Whipped Chocolate Ganache shaped as a rabbit hidding on roses made with Super Stabilized Whipped Cream drunken blackberry troufles.

REPLY

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