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Corrections: The Pie and Pastry Bible

Jul 8, 2007 | From the kitchen of Rose

The following is the partial list of errors and corrections from The Pie and Pastry Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Use the comments below to report anything else you find.

Blind baking (prebaking) flaky pie crust, page 19, For the most even baking, set the tart pan or pie plate on a preheated baking stone or baking sheet. After removing the weights start checking for doneness after the first 3 minutes.

weight of sugar for the Crumb Crust for a 10-Inch Pie on page 69, it should be 0.6 ounce/17 grams.

Clarification of when to add the cranberry purée (people have asked when does the purée get added)
In the Custard Filling for the CRANBERRY CHIFFON PIEon page 152,the cranberry purée is strained into the bowl with the sieve set over it to receive the custard. They are then stirred together.

In the Fruit Turnovers on page 135, the unsalted butter is 1 tablespoon but the weight is 0.5 ounce/14 grams. on page 137, for the Mini-Turnovers, roll each piece of dough large enough to cut a 4 inch circle.

In the Custard Filling for the GINGERY PEAR CHIFFON TART on page 164, To ensure that all of the gelatin dissolves and offers a firm texture to the filling, it is best to soften it in 2 to 3 teaspoons of the reserved poaching syrup. Stir to moisten the gelatin and allow it to sit for a minimum of 5 minutes. (If longer cover it tightly with plastic wrap to prevent evaporation.) After stirring the poaching liquid into the egg yolk, stir in the gelatin mixture.

In the LEMON MERINGUE PIE on page 178 under "make the filling," do not use a double boiler and be sure to bring the egg mixture to full boil to ensure that it will thicken properly.

In the CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE on page 204 under "make the filling," it should read remaining 2 3/4 cups of milk.

In the APRICOT-CHEESECAKE TART on page 208, in the chart, the yolks should be 1.3 ounces/36 grams. On page 209, Add the crème fraîche or the cream, egg yolks, and remaining white.

In the FIG TART WITH MASCARPONE CREAM on page 211, the Marsala should be 1 to 2 tablespoons/0.5 to 1 ounce/14 to 28 grams.

In the CHOCOLATE OBLIVION TARTLETS on page 308, the amount for the eggs should be only 3 eggs/5.2 ounces/150 grams.

In the Hungarian Poppyseed Strudel on page 403, proof the yeast with 1/2 teaspoons of sugar not 1 teaspoon of sugar.

In the CRÈME BRULÉE CUSTARD on page 440 , the filling is 2 3/4 cups.

In the BRANDIED RAISINS on page 514, the cognac is 1/2 liquid cup.

In the PASTRY CREAM on page 560,the 2 cups of half and half weigh 17ounces/484 grams.

The following changes are in current printing (3). The printing number is on the copyright page. It is a row of numbers and the lowest one is the printing of the book. For those who have earlier printings ADD:
Note: I have found that it is best to apply the foil ring to the protect the edges of the pie crust from the beginning of baking.
p 321 on the chart for peanut butter mousse pie tiered, filling should be 1/3 cup, 2/3 cup, 1 3/4 cups, 2 1/2 cups, 3 1/4 cups, 4 1/4 cups, 4 3/4 cups
page 84 flaky cream cheese pie crust for a two-crust pie
p 594 in the chart: 2 12-ounce bags
p 131 The liquid will be about 1/3 cup....Cool the pie...(Brush the exposed cranberries with golden syrup to keep them moist and shiny.)
p 140 ...spread rounded 1/2 teaspoons(not tablespoons) of Apricot Lekvar...
p 19 4th line from the top: ...bake for 20 minutes (15 minutes for a 4 1/4 inch pielet)...Return the shell to the oven for 5 to 10 minute more (3 to 5 minutes for a 4 1/4 inch pielet)...
p 77 The second chart "The Amount of Cornstarch and Sugar for 4 cups of Fruit": the sugar for 1 cup of cherry should be 200 grams (7 ounces)
p 89 and 592 for the streusel (crumb) topping, for a crisper topping melt the butter before adding it.
p 260 ...very thin lemon slices that have been simmered, covered, for 20 minutes in 1/3 cup sugar dissolved in 1/3 cup water,...
p 262 under Pointers...If a 3 inch pear is available, poach it along with the other pears, slice it and place it in the center. During baking, the pears will shrink making space e for it.
p 287 roll the pastry to a circle roughly 16 inches in diameter. Using a pizza wheel or cardboard template and a sharp knife trim it so that the edges are even. It should be 15 to 15 1/2 inches....Scatter the cranberry mixture evenly over the dough, covering a 12-inch area...
p.294 Gâteau Basque: Add about 1 tablespoon of cream to the yolk and vanilla. After mixing the dough pinch it together and it if still crumbly and won't hold together add a tiny bit more cream. Change baking temperature to 325˚F.
p.421 just before store...1 day before completing the last 2 turns for a total of 6 turns.caramelize the topping or protect the edges of the pastry with foil rings...

Comments

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I am really inspired with your writing abilities and also with the layout in your
blog. Is that this a paid subject or did you modify it yourself?
Anyway keep up the nice high quality writing, it's uncommon to see a nice blog like this one nowadays..

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Appreciate another excellent write-up. Wherever else might anybody get that form of info in their normal best way of creating? I've a presentation in a month's time, that i'm on the seek out these kinds of info.

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Hi Ian,
We would be delighted if you would like to blog about baking through the Pie & Pastry Bible. We suggest you check the Heavenly Baker's Bake Along and Marie Wolf's blog Breadbasket Case. The first are bloggers baking through Roses Heavenly Cakes and the second is Marie baking through the Bread Bible. We ask that you write and include pictures, but please do not include any recipes as they are copyrighted by the publisher. Enjoy your adventure.
Rose & Woody

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Hey Rose,

I've written to you before about your Open Face Designer Apple Pie which ,i did bake for the party and have to say every one loved it.I always loved baking growing up but never really pursued it,until moving to New York,even then when i bake it will be simple cakes and cookies,never in my dreams would i think i could make one of your pies until i tried it and i was amazed with how well it came out.It may seem silly but ever since i saw Julia and Julia i always wanted to bake my way through a book but never felt inspired by the huge collection that i have until i came across your pie and pastry bible. I tried searching to see if i can find someone who did the same thing that they did with Rose's Heavenly Cakes,but i didn't have much success,Im not sure if you know of anyone.When i mentioned it to my mom she taught it would be great idea and to bake my way through your book and even suggested a i create a blog,Rose im 25 years old and don't even know the first thing about blogging but she still said i should try.I told her il give it some taught and also to check with you to see if it would be OK if i decided to go through with it,and if i can blog about my progress through your book.

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paula (operaflute) coincidentally i'm listening to maria stuarda for the first time broadcast from the houston symphony orchestra.

rough puff is my fav puff pastry--the tart sounds wonderful!

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Thank you. Using it today for a glazed roasted pumpkin/mascarpone/pecan tart.

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6 turns as stated in the recipe.

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Regarding rough puff pastry recipe in the Pie and Pastry Bible - how many turns, total? It's unclear to me whether it's 4 or 6.

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Thank you, Hector!

That's good to know. I am very much a gelatin novice.

Many thanks!!!!

--ak

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Anne, i would not go overboard on this because honestly, i never made this new procedure correction ever and i have zero issues with gelatin.

you just need to know how gelatin should be handled. it needs to hydrate first, then heated up. and best to dust it on the liquid as a thin layer or stir well.

stirring the gelatin with the yolk mix hydrates the gelatin just fine (from the water content of the yolks). the instructions does say to stir till well blended, so i don't see where the issue will exist unless you rush and don't stir till well blended.

gelatin (powder) actually doesn't need a full 5 minutes to hydrate. it hydrates within seconds (if not instantly) when each granule of gelatin touches liquid, so if you stir well or you dust your gelatin and form just a very thin surface, it will hydrate fast! you can visually see the gelatin when it is wet, it turns translucent (from matte white).

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Hi, all!

Is it safe to assume that the correction below also applies to the Apple Weincreme Chiffon Tart (on page 166)?

[quote]In the Custard Filling for the GINGERY PEAR CHIFFON TART on page 164, To ensure that all of the gelatin dissolves and offers a firm texture to the filling, it is best to soften it in 2 to 3 teaspoons of the reserved poaching syrup. Stir to moisten the gelatin and allow it to sit for a minimum of 5 minutes. (If longer cover it tightly with plastic wrap to prevent evaporation.) After stirring the poaching liquid into the egg yolk, stir in the gelatin mixture. [/quote]

Also, am I correct to have struck "gelitan" from the next instruction: "In a small heavy nonreactive saucepan, using a wooden spoon, stir together the sugar, salt, gelitin and yolks until well blended."

With thanks!

--ak

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Paula
12/24/2011 12:49 PM

Hi Paula,
You are correct as that cornstarch is not part of the recipe as cocoa has being used instead. Just sift "the sifted flour" over the egg mixture.

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Can I confirm there is NO cornstarch in the "Light Chocolate Sponge Cake Layers on p 585? The instructions on page 586 say to "sift the flour MIXTURE... As far as I can tell, the flour is not mixed with anything (unlike the sponge cake layers of page 583.) I presume this is because in the chocolate version, the cocoa stands in for the cornstarch?
Thanks!

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Just want to inform you that I bookmarked your article for future reference. Thanks!

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Thanks, Woody! Can't wait to get to the farmers' market tomorrow--one of the vendors said she'll have concords:)
Best,
Erica

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Hi Erica,
..place the grapes and squeeze the liquid from the peels into them; reserve the skins....
The missing instructions are:
Bring to a boil and simmer, covered for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and cool completely.
Press the grapes through a fine sieve and discard the pits. Add the grape peels AND THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS. (the pulp with the skins is 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons.)
.....Transfer the grape mixture to the pie shell.

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Erica Huang
Erica Huang
08/ 3/2011 12:11 PM

Dear Rose,

Please forgive me if I'm asking a question that has already been addressed, but I believe my Pie and Pastry Bible is missing directions for the recipe for concord grape pie. (My book was copyrighted 1998.) On page 128, there are instructions to "...place the grapes and squeeze the liquid from the peels into them; reserve the skins.... Transfer the grape mixture to the pie shell." Within these directions, there is no mention of the sugar, cornstarch, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and unsalted butter from the ingredients list. Could you please clarify how to incorporate these items? I am a beginning pie maker, so please be as detailed as possible.

I am truly grateful to you for your books and what they are enabling me to discover, learn, savor, and share.

With thanks and kindest regards,
Erica

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Hi Bill,

Don't know if your blueberries happened to be the wild variety, but if they are that explains it- the wild variety, often grown in Maine, give off a lot more liquid than the domesticated type. They have a beautiful flavor, though.

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Nope...no microwave. Tiny kitchen, and I found that I only used it to make popcorn, melt chocolate and reheat leftovers, so when I renovated the kitchen, the microwave went. My stove can go down to very low heat...I'll just do it slowly. Not sure when the next blueberry attempt will be...but I will keep you posted. thanks again for your help

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Bill
05/31/2011 10:34 AM

i hate messy pie fillings but equally detest over-thickened sludge! if you have a microwave, i would use that to boil the syrup as stove top always risks slight caramelization unless you use low heat and stir constantly. but at least that way you can trouble shoot.

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Yes, I actually baked it late at night and we ate it the next day...so it cooled over night.

Next time, if it happens again, I will try to boil the liquid on the stove and see what happens. Thanks for your input. The pie was delicious, none the less...just messy!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Bill
05/31/2011 10:22 AM

billy, you ARE letting the pie cool for 4 hours before cutting right? did you try pouring off the juices and boiling them for a minute to see if they would thicken? cornstarch needs to come to a boil and then boil for 30 seconds. what you could do is to cook the mixture on the stove top until it boils and let it simmer for 30 seconds. then you'll know for sure if the berries are the culprit. if it's fairly thick then let it cool and pour it into the pie shell and bake it. if it seems really watery, you can add more cornstarch by dissolving it in a little cold water, stirring it into the simmering berries, and it will thicken right away. this is really odd!

another thought is to try the recipe where part of the berries are cooked and the rest remain uncooked and get folded into the hot cooked berries. that gives more control over the consistency and is my favorite way to eat blueberry pie!

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Good Morning Rose! I hope you had a good Memorial Day Weekend! (We had beautiful sunny weather, thang goodness).

OK...I have a pie problem. I will start by saying that I'm not a "pie person". When it comes to dessert, I much prefer cake to pie, but "my other half", My mom, and my best friend all prefer pie to cake (I just don't understand why someone would eat cooked fruit when they could have something chocolaty...but to each theri own! LOL).

Anyway, thanks to you, I now make an amazing crust. I have been having a problem, however, with Blueberry pie. When I cut the pie, about a gallon of blueberry soup comes pouring out. I thought I had solved the problem, because I was putting the pie dish on a cookie sheet, as instructed, but it was an INSULATED cookie sheet (yes, I'm an idiot) and so it probably wasn't getting hot enough. Last go-round (which was Friday), while the pie was baking, I realized what I had done wrong, snatched the pie off the sheet, put it right on the bottom of the oven, and let it bake till the juices were really boiling and sputtering. Guess what...it was a soupy mess inside. Any thoughts? (I also have tried potato starch as recommended by Cooks Illustrated...still not thick enough. Does the D'Agostinos on east 56th have preposterously juicy Blueberries?

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My goodness...I totally agree. Rose: you are a lady to the tips of your tallented little fingers

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What a gracious reply!!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from TessaLeeds
05/17/2011 03:36 PM

not really tessa! the book is exceptionally large and detailed. you'd be surprised how many errors most books have. my husband told me years ago that even medical books have print errors--that there's a given % of errors. but we're so lucky to have the book reprinted giving me the opportunity to fine tune it!

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Wow, that's a lot of errors/typos in one book! tsk tsk...

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Paula
05/15/2011 06:38 PM

and i noticed it only after digging into my files and asking my husband to work out a formula and guessing it would be 4"!

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Of course I noticed that riiiight after hitting "submit." :p

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Paula
05/15/2011 06:33 PM

thank you paula for calling this typo to my attention! i'll add it to the corrections. it should be 4 inches (as you can see in the next sentence, you can also roll out the dough into a large rectangle and cut out the 4" circles. it was correct there.)

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Page 137 - tiurnovers

regular turnovers and mini-turnovers both use a 6 inch circle of dough?

BTW - made your strudel dough yesterday (with a filling of my own experimentation - pumpkin feta). What fun and so easy!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Jake
04/23/2011 01:56 PM

thanks jake for being such a good sport! ii'm sorry you had to go through adjusting it but so glad you found a clever solution. always a good idea to dissolve cornstarch first in a little cold water.

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I knew there was something wrong with the chocolate cream pie recipe when the filling didn't thicken. Only after checking back and forth with the recipe did I realize that I had added one more cup of milk than I actually needed. To thicken it up, I removed a cup of filling, added another T of cornstarch to that cup and returned it to the filling. Not the best solution (cornstarch didn't dissolve very evenly), but I think it worked. Then I checked your web site and confirmed what I figured out!

PS: I love your pie cookbook anyway!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Walt
01/ 9/2011 10:37 AM

walt, you can figure this out both by the weight and by the fact that i would never list 4T instead of 1/4 cup! so yes, the mistake is in epicurious. but thank you for pointing it out.

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Hi Rose,
I haven't seen mention of a typo in the Basic Flaky Pie Crust:
Page 22 of PPB, #1, the pastry flour measure shows
1 1/3 cups + 4 teaspoons.
The reprint in Epicurious Nov '98 shows
1 1/3 cups + 4 tablespoons.
Which is correct, teaspoons or tablespoons?

Thanks, and I LOVE this book!
Walt

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Heidi
11/25/2010 11:24 PM

i met bo friberg many years ago at the CIA greystone. i looked up to the towering giant of a man and said: "i love your book!" he looked down at me, smiled, and to my amazement said "and i love yours!" it was a magical moment. and that's my answer to your question.

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Correction: I just found out that they are using the edition of this book called

The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef - Bo Friberg

and there is now also a newer edition called

The Advanced Pastry Chef: WITH Baker's Manual, 5r.e. - Bo Friberg (Author), Joseph Amendola (Author)

She's just starting the course so has no reviews on the book.

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Friend of mine is taking a professional baking course and they use:

The Professional Pastry Chef: Fundamentals of Baking and Pastry (Hardcover)
by Bo Friberg

Amazon.com





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I have this book and I use it a lot. Not sure it is going to have exactly what you are looking for, but I find it an excellent resource.

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How about Wayne Gisslen's Professional Baking?

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Does anyone have a recommendation for a good commercial pastry recipe book? I love Rose's recipes and would like to be able to adapt them to larger batches for a small retail pie bakery my husband and I are starting. We would use a larger food processor to make the pie dough.

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Julie, your explanation is exact! i have made this preparation countless of times and never curdled. yes, the temperature of the finished caramel is important.

i am using an induction burner so i have zero problems from overheating caramel, but when i don't, i find useful to dip the pot in cool water to stop the heating at once! cool it only for a few seconds, so the caramel doesn't harden, but if it does, just pour the milk and the caramel will dissolve again when heated.

someone also posted that UHT milk may be more prone of curdling. those milks often sold in Europe or Asia, that comes in a box and doesn't need refrigeration.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Julie
11/23/2010 01:30 PM

thanks julie--i remember that!

i try to avoid heating the cream if i have a choice because the flavor of uncooked cream is so much more delicious!

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Sue, I'm not Rose, but was able to solve a similar problem with curdling caramel creme anglaise. In my case, the problem turned out to be that the caramelized sugar was becoming too acidic, so that adding the hot milk to the acidic sugar resulted in curdling.

For me, the acidity was both from using blonde organic sugar (which has a bit of residual molasses), and from taking the caramel a bit too dark (the darker the caramelized sugar, the more acidic it becomes).

When I switched to refined white sugar and used a thermometer to make sure it didn't exceed the recommeded temperature, the problem disappeared.

Hope that helps!

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Feedback: Rose,
I am a trained pastry chef and a great admirer of your books. All your recipes have been exacting and fool proof until recently. I made the caramel ice cream out of the pie and pastry bible and had a great deal of trouble incorporating the hot milk into the cooked sugar. Much to my dismay, the mixure kept curdling. I strained it but there was lots of residue. I then made the anglaise and tempered it with the caramel that had been strained out. I still wasn't happy,...the mixture didn't have the caramel flavor I wanted and there was still a lot of curdled residue in the strainer. I then poured the entire mixture into the blender and voila, everything came together. I restrained the mixture and there was very little residue this time. Finally, I added the caramel custard mixture to the cold heavy cream that had vanilla bean seeds in it. The recipe was written so that the hot milk was added into the cooked sugar and reduced to 3/4 cup. The problem is that milk can't stand up to this kind of cooking. Wouldn't it have been better to add part of the heavy cream to the caramel instead and then add all that to the anglaise and finally the heavy cream (minus 1 cup cream/add 1 cup milk) steeped with vanilla bean seeds. Anyhow, that's how I would make it on my next try.
Please let me know what you think.
Thanks,
Sue
Share:

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Julie
11/22/2010 10:48 AM

bingo! julie thank you. it should indeed be 200 grams/7 ounces (though sometimes i use only 14T/175 grams/6 ounces if the cherries are not as tart--it varies from season to season.

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Has anyone reported the error in the second chart on page 77? For Cherries, 100g of sugar does not equal one cup. It looks like it should be one cup and 200g of sugar.

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hds, yes, according to Rose's directions in the Pie/Pastry Bible, you do thaw frozen cherries until they separate before using them in a pie.

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hds, what a coincidence- I just made a pie from sour cherries that I pitted and froze this past July. It was absolutely perfect, I could not tell that it had been made from frozen fruit. I did freeze the fruit according to the directions in the Pie/Pastry Bible, which is to add a little sugar before freezing.

On your second question, about concentrating the juices, you can definitely do it, but then you'll need to adjust the corn starch lower and the sugar lower as well. I have reduced the juices that came off frozen cherries by half and it was a wonderful pie, but so concentrated that I'm not sure if you really need to do it.

Good luck with your cherry pie!

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Epicurious.com has a number of recipes that call for the use of frozen sour cherries. That might be a good source of info for you. Just type "frozen cherries" into their search box.

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Let me say this, I haven't made a cherry pie from frozen berries. However, if you're objective is to reduce and concentrate their juices, freezing followed by thawing is the best way I know how to release all that juicy goodness.

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Thank you. I did see that. I suppose my question is whether allowing the cherries to thaw before using them will do any harm. They were fresh when I bought them obviously but have been sitting in the freezer for six months.

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I've got some pitted frozen sour cherries from last summer that I'd like to make a pie with. Has anyone used Rose's method of exuding the juice then concentrating it (as in the peach gallette and apple pie recipes) with cherries? I know that these cherries are very juicy. If not this method, do you use the cherries directly from the freezer or should I thaw them first? Thanks

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Mike, use an Italian meringue recipe. as explained on Pie and Pastry Bible, Cake Bible, and Rose's Heavenly Cakes.

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MIKE HOOLEY
MIKE HOOLEY
11/11/2010 07:22 PM

HOW DO I KEEP MY MERINGUE FROM SWEETING AND LEAVING PUDDLES ON THE TOP

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from David Chau
10/24/2010 11:29 PM

nothing is a no no if it gives good results! what you do probably makes the dough extra flaky and layered so GOOD!

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...And I thought I made a boo boo in the ingredients. Thanks so much, Rose.

Now, I have another question for you. Since I don't like freezing left over pie dough; so, when I roll out the dough, I use a pizza cutter wheel to cut the dough into a circle; then I lay the loose pieces in the middle of the dough and roll it again until I get about 11 inches in diameter. This way I retain the round shape and not having any left over.

Is that a big NO NO in your pie making?

David

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from David Chau
10/21/2010 11:26 AM

david, most pies don't bubble up but this is a safe-guard rather than to have a mess on the oven stone or oven floor. sometimes people use smaller pie plates and that could cause bubbling as well.

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Hi Rose,

In most of your pie recipes that I have read and made; you always mention to have a catcher for the juice during baking.

The problem with my pies was that the juice never bubble or dripping over the sides during baking. Did I do something wrong?

David

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from susan
09/16/2010 11:13 PM

susan, i've never baked pecan pie from the frozen but i think it would work better than baking it and then freezing it! in fact i'm quite sure it will work just fine. you'll need to add a few extra minutes baking time--my guess is about 5 minutes so watch carefully toward the end of baking that it just puffs up and starts to bubble around the edges.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Erika
09/16/2010 11:11 PM

yes erika, that's true. some cookies such as shortbread have only flour, sugar, and butter.

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Hi Rose,
I am a big fan and have been for over 20 years. I make a lot of your recipes and post them frequently, on my blog. I want to make some pecan pies and want to freeze them. Should I bake them and then freeze or can i make the dough, fill it with the filling and then bake them the day I want to serve them? I freeze fruit pies, but haven't really frozen a pecan type of pie! Thanks in advance for your response! xx Susan

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On page 60 with the tender nut cookie tart crust variation, if I eliminate the yolk and cream I have no liquid left in the crust. Is this correct? Thanks.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Barbara
09/13/2010 10:57 PM

yes, raw dough freezes very well. use the same baking temperature but add about 10- 15 minutes baking time.

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I would like to make and freeze unbaked apple turnovers from the Pie & Pastry Bible. Is this possible, if so how long would I bake them and at what temperature? Thank you.

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thank you very much--i will make those corrections. really appreciate it.

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Some errata for the errata :)

-The fruit turnovers correction should be 14 grams not 28?
-The cranberry chiffon is on page 152
-The Almond Fig Bread is in the Bread Bible

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thank you for the correction helena, yes it's 2 yolks, 1.3 ounces/36 grams, then it should read add the yolks and the remaining white. correction made on the blog as well.

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Re: Apricot Cheesecake Tart recipe (Pie & Pastry Bible, pp. 208-209).
Needs clarification as to the amount of egg yolk and egg white used.
The recipe Ingredients table specifies using 2 egg yolks: "1 large egg separated + 1 yolk". The volume of 2 yolks is correctly shown to be "2 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon"; however, based on "Basic Pastry Ingredients Weights & Measures" table, the corresponding weight of 2 yolks should be 1.2 oz/36 g total, NOT 0.6 oz/18 g (as incorrectly stated in the "weight" column of the recipe, since the latter would be the weight of just ONE yolk).

Also, the recipe instructions are confusing as to how much of each of the egg component to use, in view of the discrepancy between volume and weight of these in the Ingredients section. Specifically, the instructions tells us to "add the creme fraiche or cream, EGG YOLK [singular form] and WHITE..." to cream cheese/spice mix. If we are to use 2 yolks, then singular "yolk" should be changed to its plural form "yolks" (unless we ARE supposed to use just one yolk after all). The word "egg white" in that same sentence should be replaced by the expression "remaining egg white", since acc. to the Ingredients table, 1 tablespoon of egg white is used to moisture-proof the tart crust - unless, of course, we are supposed to use an ENTIRE egg white in the cream cheese filling, plus an additional amount for brushing on crust.
Thanks.

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Bill, I think having a wide variety is key, which sounds like what you are doing. There is a crustless apple pie in the pie bible you could probably work with. Being a rude/demanding guest (or host) knows no dietary bounds, and it sounds like your relatives don't fall into that category anyway. The pendulum swings both ways though, and I think the Atkins/South Beach protein-heavy crowd are harder to deal with/please than vegans!

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Trust me, no one will take any offense. You go ahead and say what every you want...it is all of the postings that aren't about baking that let us get to know a little more about WHO you are, and that can be really fascinating. I will be baking three desserts for this get together, and one will be some sort of fruity, vegan-ish dessert that the albany people will eat, the rest of us will eat the carrot cake from the new book and the chocolate fudge cake with white chocolate mousseline.

thanks for your help, and for that little personal touch.

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i'm so glad no one has taken offense yet by my indiscreet remarks! maybe i should stick to baking advice and keep away from philosophical issues!

i hope your albany relatives don't read this blog. i'm pretty sure my crisco loving relatives don't. this is one way to find out anyway. i do love them despite our extreme difference in opinion about the butter issue.

i must say it pleased me no end--i'm sorry but i AM only human--when after years of ppl chosing margarine over butter for what they perceived to be health benefits it was discovered that margarine was the worst culprit for heart disease. seriously, i deeply believe in moderation--smaller portions of what taste good and to trust your instincts on that front.

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I will say, that these Vegan relatives from Albany are really considerate about it. They really don't want anyone to go to any trouble, and are willing to eat what ever the part of the meal they can eat. They are eating vegan because they believe that it is healthier for them, not because of animal or enviornmental issues. I refuse to enter into the discussion of the healt benefits of being a vegan. If I didn't prepare a vegan dessert, they would just sip some coffee and eat some fruit if it were available, if not, just coffee would do.

I don't know these relatives very well. because of a misunderstanding that happened when I was a baby, my Grandmother stopped talking to that part of the family...so I only met them a couple of years ago after my Aunt mended the fence. After the big reunion, at my mother's request, I entertained them in my apartment. At that time, there was a problem with the lock on the bathroom door...we had a system to prevent any embarrassment, but the Albany relatives didn't follow directions, which lead to some horrifyingly embarrassing moments- the details of which are better left unsaid. If a vegan pie can make up for the embarrassment that my broken bathroom lock caused...I'm all for buying Margarine.

Oh, and Rose...you have relatives that bake pies with Crisco? On purpose? and they are related to you? AHHHHHHHH!

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i also admire them but i must say i admire ppl less who impose their personal dietary choices on other people when they come to visit. it's one thing if they are allergic but it takes a lot of time to make a dinner for people, especially these days, so when i invite people who have special needs or requirements i make the entire dinner around this, for example vegetarian.

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I have to say that I personally admire vegans because they have the discipline to modify their diet based on their awareness of the source of our food, whereas most of us have to pretend that we don't know what horrible things are happening to animals in the name of food--acts we would never dream of doing ourselves. That said, there are plenty of wonderful sorbets that are vegan as well as many breads. Pie crust from crisco is not bad at all--there is even a recipe in the P&PB. I would give it a shot and see what you think.

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Bill - I don't know if this helps but you can also make baklava. I believe Rose has Pistachio Baklava recipe in her book. I don't have the cookbook with me but my limited knowledge of baklava tells me that it uses oil (olive oil) and not butter.

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it's not made with butter but clarified butter or oil is brushed between the sheets. you could even spray them with cooking spray instead. i still say get rid of those relatives or maybe more kindly make a separate dessert for them. last time i did that for relatives who said they didn't eat garlic, i.e. i made two coleslaws one with and one without and NO ONE touched the one without the garlic though they were clearly marked.

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Great Idea...thanks Rose, I always assumed Filo was made with butter. I will check the recipe!

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bill, i would say get adopted into my family but here's why that won't work: my second cousin who always makes the thanksgiving apple pies, uses crisco and--get this: her last name is butterfass which means butter churn!

of course margarine will not give you the wonderful flavor of butter but it is formulated to perform in a similar way so texture-wise it should be fine. what about making the gascogne apple pie which uses fillo and would suffer less from lack of butter? precooking the apples til tender crisp will give you the best texture.

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Good Morning Rose:
I can't believe I'm about to ask this question. I'll be doing some baking for a family get together at my Mother's house and I have been informed that the Albany relatives are now- GASP- Vegans!. AHHHHHHHHHH! Relatives of mine? Vegans? How can this be?

OK...here's the question. Am I courting disaster if I make a pie crust with ..... Margarine....?(I can't believe I just typed that)

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Amanda - I have freeze Rose's croissant dough after the 4th turns (before shaping and proofing) and it turned out fine. I have never freeze them after shaping so I can't speak from experience, but I would think you can do that. Make sure that you increase the amount of yeast (I think Rose specify by how much) - since some would die when you freeze them.

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Hi- I'm in the process of making croissants for the first time from the Pie and Pastry Bible (which I love btw!)I was wondering if when freezing the unbaked croissants should i freeze them before or after proofing. Also should I shape them first or freeze the dough before shaping? Thanks

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Thanks for pointing this out. The correct amount is 1 T 14 grams

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Hi Rose,

For your fruit turnovers on pg. 135, it says unsalted butter is 1 tablespoon, but in grams it's listed as 28g which would equal 2 tablespoons. Is it 1 or 2 tablespoons?

Thanks,
Monica

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marble and granite flooring stores, it is a floor tile.

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Hector, where do you get the marble tile from?

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i have a 18" marble tile, and refrigerate it overnight (takes that long to cool because it is a dense surface). it is often too cold to use, so i place a large silicone mat on top, and it becomes perfect! like rolling pastry in a pastry room where temperature is controlled just around the melting point of butter.

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Thank you, Rose and Hector. I do have a marble board, and I'll use a Plugra-type butter. I am pretty comfortable making cakes and breads, but pastries totally intimidate me. But I know I'll never get better at it until I practice it more, and I think my family will forgive my failures as long as lots of butter is involved!

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also be sure to use high fat butter.

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If you have air conditioning you will be fine, or a chilled marble tile works wonders too for butter pastry layering. Also, working the dough in the evenings rather than in midday helps.

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I wasn't quite sure where to post this, but it is a pastry question and here goes: I am considering making croissant dough for the very first time. However, I live in Florida, and I am worried that my kitchen will never be cool enough to achieve any type of layering of the butter! Just as high altitude folks have to adjust, I feel that down here in the capital of heat and humidity, certain recipes just don't want to work. Does anybody have experience making puff pastry or croissant dough in warm climates and are there any special tricks besides patience to get these doughs to work? Thanks!

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Linda, so glad you share this, it a great book and very technical. I don't think Rose will make a pastry bible second edition, however if you own her many other books, plus all the info and updates on this blog, you truly have the whole world.

Pastry bible is currently on its 4th or 5th reprint? and the errata or updates are the ones posted on this blog.

happy baking.

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Hi Rose!

I saw a copy of "The Pie and Pastry Bible" sitting in the home of my sister's boyfriend and since I absolutely LOVE baking, I immediately picked up the book and looked through it for what seemed like hours. I absolutely love your work and have always wanted to know about the science behind baking, especially about pastry.

I want to get my own copy of the book now, but I was wondering, will there be a second edition of the book? I wanted to know what recipes there are for each section (such as a list of recipes and their page numbers) and didn't find any. I thought perhaps, if there is going to be a second edition, that may be a suggestion you might like to know!

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Small typo on page 98 (rhubarb pie). In the instructions for the lattice, change "over the cherries" to "over the rhubarb."

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Thanks so much for your quick response, Rose! I am hoping that now it is completely cool it will just be soft and not runny. I just didn't know if this was normal. I usually do a test run first, but didn't have time...

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it has never been runny but even if it were i think it would still be delicious!

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Hello, folks. I have a question for anyone who has made the Brownie Puddle Tart. I baked it for the recommended time (in fact, a minute longer) at the correct temperature. It tested done one inch from the edge as specified in the book. However, when I poked the holes for the ganache, the tart was looser and looser the closer I got to the center. In the precise center itself, the hole filled up a third to a half of the way with liquid batter. Well, at that point I had a tart already full of holes, so I hoped for the best and filled them with ganache. I cooled the tart completely and then put it in the freezer. Based on the fact that the test for doneness is performed one inch from the edge, I would assume it is supposed to be softer in the middle. My question is whether it is supposed to be runny. I am hoping that the cooling process firmed it up some, but would appreciate any input from someone who has made it or the supreme authority herself! Is it okay to serve my guests or will there be an unwelcome surprise? Thanks so much for your input.

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thank you wanghwa--i will add it to the corrections asap. it should be 1/2 cup.
best,
rose

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Rose,

I have been a big fan of your books. I checked your site and did not see any one pointed out on p.514, brandied raisins, the cognac 1 cup is not equal to 4oz or 112 grams. When I made the recipe, I just use 1/2 cup of cognac. Is it 1cup or 1/2 cup?

Thanks again for the excellent work you've done!

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Dear Rose

I purchased the pie plate a couple of months ago. I tried baking the apple pie!It was perfect!
My problem here is, how should I slice or unmold the pie without any diffcilty.

Kindly assist.
Thanks and Regards
Ragini D

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Ugh - I can't tell you how often I've tried to look something up in TCB index, but don't find what I'm looking for listed where I think it should be (even though I know very well it's in there somewhere). Then I spend the next few minutes trying to figure how/where to find what I'm looking for - grrr! I've been tempted to rewrite the whole darn thing on several occasions, but that would be a monumental undertaking.

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Me too! Indexing is one of those under-appreciated jobs. I have an old college friend who is an indexer (she has a degree in biology so tends to index books in that area). The trick is do the job really well, yet quickly enough to meet the publisher's deadlines and not end up making $1.00 an hour!

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I'm so happy to hear that!

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yes--thank you! you'll be happy to know that the indexer for the upcoming book is an old friend and long time journalist so we should have a really useful index!

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Great catch Matthew!

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Very minor correction--in the index, the listing for vanilla should be 652-53, not 52-53.

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sarah i just love hearing this. my secret which is to be a pie missionary going around the world showing people how easy it is to make a terrific pie crust!

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Thank you all, for your repsonse to my query, I shall now consider purchasing the P&PB, another to add to my vast collection!

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well said

for foam cakes (genoise, biscuit, chiffon, angel food) where you fold-in the flour instead of beating it (to develop structure in the batter which is characteristic of butter cakes), the flour type is not as critical. it is on a butter cakes that kate reported.

cake flour does taste better and readilly absorbs water and fats (best emulsifcation/tenderness), but again is more for the butter batters!

for pastry, as long as you don't overknead or knead at all, you can do by with various kinds of flour.

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Jeanette, I'm in the UK too (as you know) and use the P&PB ALL the time. Just use good old plain flour in place of the pastry flour in the recipes. I haven't had a failure yet since moving back from the US. As Hector says, cakes are more tempremental but I use plain flour for all Rose's cakes too. I just made Chocolate Genoise yesterday and it's exactly the height Rose specifies - the crumb is just not quite as fine. I would definitely advise the P&P Bible!
Annie

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valid concern, but I would worry the least than cake bible or more than bread bible!

you shouldn't have an issue finding flour suittable for pastries as you are in the uk which is closer to france and italy and the many other european countries. it is in europe when most all pastries were invented!

ppb is extensive on all the european classics!

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Just reading the remarks and the corrections to the P&PB makes it seem an attractive book to me. However, I'm reluctant to order it as I am in the UK and have difficulties sourcing the flour used in the Cake Bible , can i ask what flour is used predominantly in the Pie Book?

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Hi Rose...I used the P&PB for the first time and made the Quiche Lorraine with the Basic Flaky Crust. Pie dough has always been my downfall and I've tried umpteen recipes and never had any success...until now.

The dough was a dream to roll out, fitted into the tart pan without any tearing, and was crisp, flaky, and delicious. I even managed to unmold it without mishap. It was picture-perfect beautiful.

The whole thing, from crust to custard, was wonderful and received rave reviews from my guests. Thank you for teaching me how to make pie dough!

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I think the directions specify 6" diameter rounds of dough for regular turnovers (1.75 ounce/50grams), listed in the middle of the page; and 4" diameter rounds of dough for mini-turnovers (.75 ounce/21 grams), listed at the bottom of the page.

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Marcia--it says cut 4 inch circles in the next sentence.

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Hi Rose, I'm about to make turnovers for someone who loves pie crust. I noticed that on p. 137 the regular turnovers call for a 6" circle, as do the mini-turnovers. What should the correct dimensions be?

I know I'll be able to roughly estimate the size using the weight of each section, but I thought I'd ask.

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So did I, but my fingers didn't. Lol!

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Patrincia- I knew what you meant.

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Kim - Oops, I meant to type 1 liquid ounce equals 2 tablespoon below.... sorry about that (brain arthritis).

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Great... updating my copy now. Thanks!

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yes but i would start with 1 tablespoon as i'm not sure if i used 1 or 2. either will be fine depending on how much marsala flavor you want.

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So the correction should be
2 tablespoons, or 1 ounce, or 28 grams?

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i'm so glad i was there. but if ever i'm not and you need to make an immediate decision, know that many things especially that have to do with flavor can be adjusted to taste (within reasonable amounts before affecting the texture).

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Thanks Rose! I appreciate the quick response. I'm just about to start now that my ingredients are at room temperature.

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this is indeed a mistake. look at the marsala on page 213 for the correct volume to weight. It's been a long time since i've made it so what i recommend is that you use 1 tablespoon and if you want more of the flavor of the msrsala add it to the finished cream.

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Hi Kim. 1 tablespoon equals 2 liquid ounces.

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On p. 211 of the Fig Tart with Mascarpone Cream, it lists sweet marsala at 1 Tbs, 2 ounces, or 56 grams. I don't know if I should use the 1 Tbs. or the 2 ounces.

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Thank you Hector for pointing out this. I probably will make tarts more frequent with this method.

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Cindy, most likely yes, will get soggy.

Best not to freeze baked crust or baked pies or tarts in general. Best to freeze the crust unbaked, an even with the fruit on you can freeze.

In fact, for apply pies, and fruit pies in general, when frozen (unbaked and with the fruit on), the crust comes out crispy since it bakes first and faster than the fruit the remains still frozen. Explained in length on the PBB.

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I love tarts but do not make them often at home.This is the first time I tried this tartlets based on the recipe from Rose's PPB. The crust is the cream cheese flaky crust which is good.
Rose apple tartlets before baking
Rose apple tartlet
I made the crust a week ago and frozen it and Itook it out yesterdy and bake them , Let them cool and assemble the apple slices and bake again.Will the crust be soggy if I freeze the baked crust and use later?Kindly advise.
Thank you in advance.

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Maybe the white chocolate had both: vegetable oil and chocolate butter?

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The chocolate had cocoa butter, it was Ghiridelli...not one of the more luxurious brands...but has always worked fine. Perhaps the temp was too high...Thanks for your input Hector...you are amazing as always! In the end, everything worked out fine...it was just odd, and had never happened before.

Bill

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Bill, oil/butter separating from chocolates is normally due to too much heat. Once I "cooked" chocolate and noticed this. Also can be due that the chocolate has vegetable oil instead of cocoa butter?

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You would think by now I would have a better handle on how and where to post a question...but anyway..here goes. My move is essentially over...still stuff to do...but I'm working in the new office...and I engaged in a little late night celebratory baking yesterday. I made eclairs...first time using your recipe for cream puff paste. (cordon rose)...
I had two little problems. 1) some of the eclairs were perfect...and amazingly light, some collapsed (just a few)...I'm guessing they were underbaked...not sure...but the ones that worked...were amazing!!!!
The pastry cream (which I've used before) is just perfection...thanks so much for that recipe. But something happened, that never happened before, when I made the chocolate glaze...which I've made hundreds and hundreds of times. As I stirred the cream into the chocolate, it seemed as if an oil was separating out. Not sure what that was about. I tried to mix it back in, wouldn't combine. I spooned it off the top, added some more hot cream, and everything worked great. Question: Was this oil from the chocolate? from the cream? has anyone had this happen before? I haven't changed technique, or brand of chocolate or cream.

In the end the eclairs were a big hit...and the shells are amazingly light.

Rose you are the Best!

Bill

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Charlene, I also prefer to freeze crust unbaked. If baked, I have found that if you keep them vacuum sealed, it will keep long at room temperature, refrigerated, or frozen; but be sure to allow to reach room temperature before opening the seal, otherwise you risk humidity to rush in and soften the crusts. I keep store bough cookies the same way and perhaps helps me diet by making difficult reaching for them!

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i wouldn't change anything but i also have to tell you that i freeze crust unbaked so i really can't advise you except to say try a smaller batch to see exactly what your personal preference is.

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Charlene Koppel
Charlene Koppel
03/11/2008 11:53 AM

Dear Rose:

I want to blind bake some tart shells and then freeze them for latter use. Do I need to change baking times or anything else to ensure that the crusts do not dry out? I have taken to use your idea of the cream instead of water and regular flour. Also, if I make a large batch, do I scale up the baking powder accordingly? I would like to make 20 to 30 shells and freeze them.


Appreciate any help that can be given.

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Gail, this question comes up often, also for bread baking.

"Directly on the floor of the oven" applies for ovens that has a covered heating element. Most common electric ovens do-not have a covered heating element; the coil is exposed. You can't place anything on the coils.

For floor exposed element ovens, I would recommend placing a rack on the bottom setting, plus a well preheated cast iron pizza pan or pancake grill (large enough to accommodate flatly your pie/tart pan). I found this option the closest to 'directly on the floor of the oven' although it is still many few degrees cooler.

I've read of some people placing a baking sheet directly on the exposed coils, but this is very risky.

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I'm not sure what you mean by "directly on the floor of the oven". Do you mean you don't use a rack at all and put it it on the floor which would be, say in my electric oven, down there with the element? Or do you put the rack on the lowest setting and bake on the rack?

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i do exactly what i say in the book but i chose the option to bake it directly on the floor of the oven for the first 20 minutes to ensure a browned bottom!

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onehsancare
onehsancare
12/ 4/2007 09:09 PM

I've made the Great Pumpkin Pie several times, and it always is raved about, but I'm never quite happy with the bottom crust. After the first time, I wrote "parbake crust?" in the margin to remind myself to do so. After the second time, I thought, "Ah, that's what I meant--I really need to parbake the crust." Finally, after the third time (last week), I wrote "parbake crust 20 minutes" so at least there's no question anymore that it needs to happen--I just hope the 20 minute guess is a good one.

Do you parbake the crust? For how long?

(I do use a well-preheated pizza stone on the bottom of the oven, so that's not the problem.)

Thanks!

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i posted it in book errata but actually on further examination it's not a mistake! the cranberry purée is strained into a bowl. the sieve is set on top and then the custard is poured through the sieve onto the purée. the two are then mixed together. it took me a while to realize this so i can see why it would be confusing unless you just do the recipe and one step leads to another!

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Gwen, I had the same question! I have planned to make the cranberry chiffon pie with my leftover cran raspberry sauce.

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yikes! i'll add that to the errata page. see where it says stir until uniform in color and add the optional chambord? you add the purée to the strained custard and stir til uniform in color! you can have it sitting in the bowl under the strainer. thanks. you're going to love this recipe (now)!

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I'd like to make the cranberry chiffon pie for TG but looking at the directions I'm unsure where to add the cranberries. Does that mixture get added when you mix the custard, whipped cream and merangue- or is it part of the custard?

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Hi mimi - how much milk, butter, flour, sugar? What are the directions for your recipe?

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hi. i am trying to bake a sugar cream pie using my grandma's recipe and they will not set up. the recipoe calls for 1.5 cups milk, butter, flour, sugar and nutmeg. what am i doing wrong?

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that is an incredible challenge! i bet you are worshipped there for you pie baking and cooking skills.
my best peanut butter pie is the one that i do as a tart in the pastry bible. it has a layer of chocolate as well.

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Dear Rose, After living in California for many years and working at "Let's Get Cooking" in Westlake Village, I find myself smack in the heart of So.Korea! My husband retired from the animation business and is teaching here. The worst thing about living here is the food. It's awful! Thank goodness for my catering experience, as I'm keeping us alive, making the best of what we can buy. Your Pie and Pastry book is my very favorite, but has been packed in storage for two years, so I do miss the wonderful recipes. I am becoming popular for my pie baking here among the "westerners", and the koreans love it too. I came over here with over 100 aluminum pie tins, but cannot advertise to sell the pies, as I risk being deported. So now I just bake for fun, not profit, though it's so expensive to live here I could profit from a little profit! I was wondering if you have a recipe for a good "peanut butter pie" which someone has requested. The best one I ever tasted was at a cafe in Dunedin Florida, but never got the recipe. I am so glad I found your website! Pat Wilson

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Rose, page 606, Vanilla Custard Sauce (Creme Anglaise), after "rub the seeds into the sugar." I think "Remove and reserve the pods" was omitted. I've just made a big batcht, and it was a bit odd to return the now cooked pods from the remnants of the strained mess!

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Arrrrrgh! I just made the lemon meringue pie from the Pie and Pastry Bible for the first time today and was wondering if it was ever going to set up. I definitely didn't bring the egg mixture up to a boil. I'm glad you put this up, though. If I try again, at least I know what to look for.

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Rose, this is so very helpful. Thank you!

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i wish i had done it long ago--thanks for all your encouragement.

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How kind of you to share these corrections!

It's a standard thing to post errata for computer books -- I wish it were the standard in other books, as well.

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