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A Fabulous New Bread Recipe for the New Year!

Dec 22, 2007 | From the kitchen of Rose

Golden Honey Oat Bread

I’ve been working for a long time on a healthful bread with delicious flavor but also my ideal of a perfect texture. The result is this nutritious bread which is also amazingly light, soft, and slightly chewy with lovely crunch from the flax seed. The wheatiness of the whole wheat, flax and oat or barley flakes together with the sweetness from the honey conspire to make this one of my top favorite breads so I am offering it to all of you as my Winter/holiday present for a happy and healthy New Year.

Be sure to use the vital wheat gluten, available in many supermarkets and health food markets. It is the secret to the marvelously light texture of the bread which usually becomes quite dense with the addition of whole wheat and other grains.

Note: Though the photo shows a sprinkling of barley flakes on the crust, I prefer not to sprinkle the top of the loaf with oat or barley flakes as they tend to get hard and fall off when cut.

Note: If anyone wants to make a version using old starter see notes at end of recipe!

TIME SCHEDULE Minimum Rising: About 3 hours Oven Temperature: 400°F/200°C, then 375°F/190°C Baking Time: 35 to 40 minutes

Makes: One Loaf about 4 1/2 inches high

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

 

volume

ounces

grams

water, room temperature (70 to 90°F.)

1  1/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons
(11 fluid ounces)

11.5 ounces

325 grams

rolled oats or barley flakes

1/2 cup

1.3 ounces

37 grams

flax seed, cracked

1/4 cup

1.3 ounces

37 grams

unbleached flour such as Harvest King or bread flour

2 cups

11.3 ounces

320 grams

whole wheat flour

 3/4 cup

about 4 ounces

110 grams

vital wheat gluten

2 tablespoons

0.6 ounces

18 grams

powdered milk

1 tablespoon

.

10 grams

instant yeast

1  1/8 teaspoon

.

3.6 grams

honey

 2 tablespoons

1.5 ounces

40 grams

oil such as canola, safflower, or lite olive

2  1/2 tablespoons

1.2 ounces

33 grams

salt

 2  teaspoons

.

11.5 grams

 

Equipment: A 9 by 5 inch/ 7 cup bread pan, coated lightly with cooking spray. A baking stone set toward the bottom rung and a cast-iron pan on the floor of the oven.

1) Make the dough (Bread Machine)
In the bread machine container, combine water, oats, and cracked flax and mix to moisten. then let sit covered for a minimum of 15 minutes.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flours, gluten, powdered milk, and yeast.
Add the honey, and oil to the oat mixture and then the flour mixture. Mix 3 minutes and allow to rest (autolyse) for 20. If your bread machine always restarts with a 3 minute mix allow it to do so while adding the salt and then go into the kneading cycle for 4 minutes. If it starts with the kneading cycle also run it for 4 minutes, adding the salt at the beginning of the kneading cycle.

Stand Mixer
Proceed as for the bread machine method, mixing for about 3 minutes and scraping down the sides until all the flour is moistened. After the autolyse, knead on medium low speed for 4 minutes.

Both Methods:
The dough will be a little tacky and stretchy.

2) Let the dough rise
Using an oiled spatula or dough scraper, scrape the dough into a 2 quart container with cover or bowl, greased lightly with cooking spray or oil. Push down the dough and lightly spray or oil the top of the dough. It will be 4 cups /943 grams/33 ounces.). Cover the container with a lid or plastic wrap. With a piece of tape, mark where double the height would be. Allow the dough to rise (ideally at 80 to 82°F./28°C) until doubled, about 1 hour, 15 min. For extra strength and elasticity, you can stretch it after the first 30 minutes. To achieve a moist and warm temperature I put a small container of very hot water—about 1 cup--under a plastic box to create a proofer and change the water every 20 to 30 minutes. (You can retard the dough overnight after the first rise by gently deflating it and refrigerating it but it seems to rise best when baked the same day. If you refrigerate it overnight, remove it to room temperature. for about an hour before shaping.

3) Shape the dough and let it rise
Turn the dough onto a lightly floured counter and press it down to flatten it slightly. It will still be sticky but use only as much flour as absolutely necessary. Shape it into a log and allow it to relax covered for 20 minutes. (This is essential for an evenly shaped dough.)
Shape the dough into a loaf set it into the prepared baking pan. It will be about 3/4 inches from the top of the pan.

Cover the shaped dough with the plastic box or oiled plastic wrap and allow it to rise until almost doubled and when pressed gently with a finger the depression very slowly fills in. The highest point will be about 1 1/2 inches higher than the sides of the pan. Using the plastic box and hot water it takes 1 hour 15 minutes to 1 1/2 hours. At a cooler temperature it will take longer. Meantime preheat the oven for a minimum of 40 minutes.

4) Slash and bake the bread
If you like the look of a bread with a slash down the middle, with a sharp knife or straight edged razor blade, make a 1/2 inch deep slash down the top of the dough. You can also leave it unslashed. Mist the dough with water, quickly but gently set the baking sheet on the hot stone or hot baking sheet and toss 1/2 cup of ice cubes into the pan beneath. Immediately shut the door,lower the temperature to 375ºF/190ºC, and bake 20 minutes. Turn the dough around, tent, and continue baking 15 to 20 minutes or until the bread is golden brown and a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean. (An instant read thermometer inserted into the center will read about 205°F.).

5) Cool the bread
Unmold the bread onto a wire rack and allow it to cool, top-side-up until barely warm.

The Rose Ratio flour: 100%
white flour + gluten: 75.5%
whole wheat: 24.5%
oats/flax: 16.5%
gluten: 4% (2 teaspoons per cup of flour)
water: 63.4% (including water in the honey & oats and flax in the flour totals)
yeast: 0.69% (including oats/flax in flour total)
salt: 2.2% (including oats/ flax in flour total)

To make a version using old sourdough starter:
Use about 2/3 cup/150 to 159 grams /5.5 ounces old starter torn into the water and oat flake mixture.
Increase the salt to 2 1/4 teaspoons/13.5 grams
Use an 8 to 8 1/2 cup bread pan OR cut off about 1/2 cup/155 grams/5.5 ounces of dough and shape it into a mini loaf or 4 rolls.

SLICE OF BREAD WITHOUT STARTER

SLICE OF BREAD WITH STARTER

Comments

I like it whenever people come together and share ideas. Great website, stick with it!

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Hi Rose, I've made this bread several times with success however it always rises very large either on the counter or in the oven. The last few times I have always added 200 grams of wheat and another 230 gms of white-it turns out nice. This time I added 210 gms wheat and 230 grams of white flour and I also usually add about 335 grams of water. I also ran out of milk powder , so omitted it. After it was finished I had a very gummy textured bread. I threw it out thinking that maybe I didn't bake it long enough and tried again. Another loaf baked at the prescrbed times - another gummy loaf. I will try another time and put the milk powder and not use so much whole wheat this time. Any ideas why this happened since I've made this loaf a dozen times with no problem (except these last two times I had no milk powder)?

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the sourdough starter is not instead of the yeast it is an optional addition. i use my stiff sourdough starter that i feed once and week and then freeze the extra that doesn't get stored. when ready to bake bread i add some of it to the dough.

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What is meant by 'old' sourdough starter? I used starter to make this bread and it doesn't seem to be rising well. So I'm not sure if the starter is to blame or it's some other issue.

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I have done this several times. I put a cup of boiling water in the side of the microwave and immediately add the bread bowl. Leave til doubled, about 1/2 hour. Replace the boiled water as it cools.

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I'd love to use my microwave for raising my bread. How long, etc. Thanks

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Type-o. Check out what people are saying about baking breaK in the forum...

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I make this wonderful bread quite often. I always triple it and have never had any problems. I do adjust the flour as needed to get the dough how I want it, but I'm not sure what the difference is from the recipe. Everyone loves this bread and I get requests for it. I don't use a bread machine or mixer, I just mix it and knead it by hand in a big bowl. Thank you Rose:)

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Does anyone know if this recipe can be doubled or tripled in one batch without modification.

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I have made this bread twice now. Today, I had to add a little more flour - the dough was just too sticky. It has been raining for two days. I used all bread flour as I do not have Wheat on hand and also used active dry yeast....and I've had great results both times. I don't keep my heat too high, so rising took all afternoon. Patience = Great Bread

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i quite agree--i also love this one.

the good thing about proofing in the microwave as opposed to an oven with the light on is that no one is likely to turn on the microwave!!!

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Oh, Rose. The whole wheat sandwich loaf just got bumped down one notch. The Golden Honey Oat Bread is awesome!!! I love the texture, chewiness, and taste. Plus, it was easier to make. (I shaped it after the first rise and put it in the refrigerator over night as you suggested) I'm a novice and I didn't know what to do after shaping it into a log and allowing it to relax for 20 minutes. I flattened it out into a rectangle and shaped it into a loaf. Right or wrong, it was the best bread ever. This is officially my new favorite bread. (P.S. I don't have a proofing box, but I used my microwave as one.)

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you didn't mention what kind of flour you are using or whether you are weighing rather than measuring but i can tell you for sure that this recipe works. in fact, as i wrote in the head note, it is almost the same as the soft white bread but with more yeast.
it will be helpful to know that bread dough refrigerated overnight develops more flavor but will rise less high. do try it again and refrigerate for just 1 hour.
be sure to use a commercial supermarket honey such as golden blossom or sue bee as specialty honey can kill the yeast.
i wonder if that's what happened as i can't imagine how two batches of yeast would be dead! you did use instant yeast right?
please report back after you try it again.

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We've tried twice to make the English muffins and though the flavor has been quite tasty we don't get the timing to work nor achieve the 3/4" height.
Like the previous post on English muffins (Jan 14 2008), we left the dough in the refrigerator over night and then rolled it immediately in the morning and proceeded to cut the muffins. Last time we never even got closed to 1/2" height after waiting more than 2hrs - so we thought it was the yeast and got new yeast. This time, same thing ... not growing! What is the issue? is there a step missing in the directions from taking the dough out of the refrigerator?? Please let us know.
Thanks!!

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I made this for the first time yesterday. Wow! What a gorgeous, delicious loaf of bread! This recipe is a keeper.

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This bread was wonderful, as usual when making a RLB recipe. You really take the guesswork out of the equation with your exhaustive research and trials. Thank you!

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lillian,some threads got so long it took forever to scroll down to the end and get the most recent comment. having the most recent one at the top is helpful to most people and especially to me as i save time and am able to answer more questions. it's just a question of knowing that's the way it works. the response is usually quite close to the original question.

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Just recently found your website... love it. Question? Why does your answer to the question come before the question, assuming one starts treading from the top? Thanks Lillian

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Louise Allen
Louise Allen
04/15/2008 08:46 PM

Hazelnut meal in challah - sounds great. How much hazelnut meal in the dough? thanks, Louise

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I frequently use hazelnut meal, walnut meal, or almond meal and have never had to soak them. I also use them as a base for pie crusts instead of regular flour because of friends who can't have flour. The nut meals are great substitutes and add a lot of nutrition. My husband has added hazelnut meal to challah occasionally, and people always ask what makes it different. Try it!

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OK, second try went much better--now I am wondering about adding hazelnut meal to some of the cereal? would I have to soak this as well, or just add it into the flour mix? Anyone have experience with this?

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Rose, I have been a devotee of yours for awhile now, and couldn't wait to make this bread. I even went shopping so I could follow all instructions--dry milk, vital wheat gluten, using a 10-grain cereal blend for the oats, and I use SAF yeast--and didn't knead in any additional flour. As usual, I did the first rise on the lowest setting of a heating pad--it nearly exploded out of the bowl after an hour! I returned to check it and knew I had trouble--sure enough it collapsed in the oven after a short second rise. Was the v.w.g. or dry milk responsible for the extremely rapid rise? This is the first time I have used either in a recipe. Should I have skipped the second rise altogether, or was it already too late? I am planning to try again, any help would be appreciated! (It smells heavenly.)

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Sherry Wilson-Garvin
Sherry Wilson-Garvin
04/07/2008 05:36 PM

I have some recipes with metric measurements for compressed yeast and want to convert to an English measurement for dry yeast. Can you please help me? Thanks!

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder right? Thanks though :).

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Your bread looks really good, Patrincia, and so do your cakes! You do beautiful decorative work, I am full of admiration of you.

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Patrincia, what a beautiful loaf with a gorgeous shape. If you want a softer, more delicious crust, next time brush it with a little butter (clarified tastes best) when it comes out of the oven. For extra shine, you can also do it before you bake it. I always add salt as the very last thing, but I think what you did obviously worked well too. The main idea is that it doesn't come into direct contact with the yeast.

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Tasted the bread first thing this morning... we love it - very moist and flavorful interior. Bottom crust is crisp and buttery, but the top crust is kind of dry and cardboard like. I removed the loaf from the oven at 206F - would the extra 1 degree contribute that much to the dryness, did I maybe do something else wrong? (maybe I should have punched down the dough during step 3 ???)

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Here's my first attempt at this loaf recipe from the top of this thread. I wasn't sure when to add the salt, so I mixed it into the water/oatmeal mixture. I also had a hard time figuring out what to do in step 3 - should I squish down the "log" and re-roll it into a "loaf" after the 20 minute rest, or should I not disturb the 20 minute rise and just tuck under the ends so the log would fit into the loaf pan? I ended up tucking the ends. The finished loaf looked great on one side, but not so great on the other.
[IMG]http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u206/Patrincia/DSCN0882Small.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u206/Patrincia/DSCN0883Small.jpg[/IMG]

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I am planning on making this bread and since I don't have whole wheat flour at home, I had to go to the grocery store to buy some. It wasn't as easy as I thought........there was whole wheat flour in three varities: pastry, AP and bread. I know I shouldn't be using the one for pastry, that leaves me with two options. Since the white flour in the recipe is AP. Which whole wheat flour do I use, AP or bread? I am new to bread making. The only bread I bake (all the time)is Rose's Ricotta Bliss Bread. Can someone point me in the right direction? Thank you.

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It was very nice to "meet" you at your NYU gig on flour and I was happy to learn that your demos are as interesting and educational as your books :-)

I just made this bread today with what I had on hand. Switched quantities with the unbleached flour, white wheat flour, used Trader Joe's blend of rolled wheat/rye/barley/oats, no vital wheat gluten, and butter instead of oil. And it turned out very nicely -- not heavy at all, and had a nice al dente bite to it. I can smell it all through the house and am having a hard time waiting for it to cool!

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tiv--thank you so much! i think the rule is that one is allowed to publish up to 3 recipes from a book.

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that's why the term baker's dozen! bakers traditionally gave "extra" because baking makes one so happy it translates to generosity!

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Claudette Mogle
Claudette Mogle
02/05/2008 04:58 PM

Rose -- please thank Ruth Redburn for the information on the Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book. I will follow her suggestion and see if I can find one that I can afford. I might even be able to find it through my library. From now on I will be a frequent visitor to this site and will follow it with great interest. It's amazing the interaction and the wealth of information that you and your guests provide! It's wonderful that people are so generous in helping others.

Shalom.

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Hello Rose! Here is the recipe translated for you. I do not know about the copyright,you might need to take this away from the comments as I have not asked any permission to publish it?
I hope you´ll enjoy the bread - waiting for your comments!!! Pls let me know if the text is not shown properly.

SPEJA
(to my knowledge means some kind of cake decorating tool – maybe they have named this bread after it because of its texture, looks like beautiful decoration with apricot,raisin and walnut)

Speja is a perfect match with all kind of cheese.

Ingredients:
300g/3dl water
400g/6,5dl wheat flour (does not specify, but I think they meant unbleached all-purpose flour. I myself would probably try a mixture of all-purpose and whole wheat)
100g/3,5dl coarse rye flour
100g/1dl wheat sourdough
100g/1dl rye sourdough
10g yeast (fresh yeast, dissolved in cold water)
6g/1tsp light syrup
15g/1tbsp salt (they use only seasalt)
260g/4dl raisins
160g/2dl apricots (if they are hard soak them in luke warm water for 10 minutes)
160g/4dl walnuts

1.
Mix all ingredients except raisins, apricots and walnuts.
2.
Use the stand mixer with mid speed for 12 minutes or knead for 20 minutes.
3.
When you have 20 seconds left from this time mix in the fruits and the nuts.
4.
Let the dough rest in a bowl under a baking cloth for 2hours.
5.
Cut the dough into three pieces and shape as shown on page 18 in the book.
6.
Let the pieces rest for 10 minutes.
7.
Press down the pieces, use wheat flour if sticky. The dough should be approx. 5cm (1,97inches?) high. Sprinkle a little flour on the pieces.
8.
Put the breads on a tin plate and let them rise for 2 hours. Please note that they will not rise that much because of the amount of fruit and nuts.
9.
Warm the oven to 250degrees Celsius/ 482F?
10.
Put the plate into the oven and spray also water into the oven.
11.
Lower the temperature to 210degrees Celsius /410 F?

Please note: This juicy bread will be preserved a longer time than others, thanks to the fruits and nuts. If you are allergic to nuts, use figs instead.

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Ruth Redburn
Ruth Redburn
02/05/2008 01:42 PM

I must add this too.
Thanks for all your wonderful recipes. Your bread book was the only book our librarian at the local library recommended when I went looking for bread books.

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Ruth Redburn
Ruth Redburn
02/05/2008 01:34 PM

Rose,

You might forgive me for suggesting another bread book, but for Claudette Mogle, who uses whole wheat exclusively, The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book is one I would buy. I got s used copy on Amazon for very little money, good condition, and their recipes are fine. Fondly, Ruth

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the only recipe i have for 100% whole wheat is on this blog! but if you decide to get the book it would be an interesting challenge to try to convert the recipes. you always need more water but once you try the basic hearth bread you'll know how much more and i would advise additing vital wheat gluten (amounts given in the book) to improve texture.

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Claudette Mogle
Claudette Mogle
02/04/2008 01:39 PM

Rose: This is my first time on your website (my spam blocker wouldn't let it through before, but I caught it and fixed it) and I am impressed with what I have seen before. I do not have your book -- yet. My question is: Does your book include recipes using only 100% whole wheat flour? We do not use any white flour. All the other ingredients I've seen listed so far are no problem for me to get. Using white flour is a big problem. Is there a good way to substitute 100% whole wheat, and if so, what would the ratio change be?

Thanks for any help you can offer. We really love baking our own bread. My husband makes whole wheat challah every week, and it's wonderful. Everyone wants to be the person who takes home the end of the loaf each Shabbat!

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tiv, thank you so much for the offer. i'd love to have the recipe translated for the dried apricot bread!

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great textire zorra!

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Sorry for the "flax seed question" - I just saw there is already the answer.

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Rose, I just baked this tasty bread. I replaced half of the unbleached flour by spelt. Delicious! If you would like to have a look: http://kochtopf.twoday.net/stories/4671481/

Just one thing, how do you crack the flax seeds?

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I went to home depot looking for unglazed quarry tile to use as a baking stone - and came home with unglazed salito - it looks like an unglazed Mexican terracottta tile. Does anyone know if that will work? One big tile was $1.08 so, if it works, you can not beat the price! thanks, Louise

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Louise,
I buy my pumpernickel flour and caramel powder from King Arthur. You can substitute rye flour--it will be close, just not exactly the same. One of the store brands (I want to say Hodgson Mills) or organic rye is rather coarse, and it is closer to pumpernickel flour. I have also made caramel powder at home by burning corn syrup and then grinding to powder. I posted instructions on the blog last year. It is primarily a coloring agent, so it is not absolutely necessary.

Regarding La Cloche, yes it can go into a hot oven. Preheat the dome as Rose says, and let the bread rise in the base. La Cloche is not necessary either, but I do prefer breads baked in it. The crust is nicer and the crumb seems moister. I think it is worth the money if you plan to do a lot of bread baking.

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Ok - on to my next question. I am making my way through to make sure I have all that is necessary to make the pumpernickel bread. The first problem is finding pumpernickel flour - and king arthur is currently unaviable (not just out of stock)! But that is not why I am writing.
I have a question about the carmel powder and the Ls Cloche.
Where do you get carmel powder?
I have 2 questions about the La Cloche. First, the Authentic Pumpernickel calls for the La Cloche and the Sour Dough Pumpernickel does not. Why are they baked differently? Also, I was just reading the reviews of the La Cloche on Amazon and there were alot of comments about the La Cloche can not go into a hot oven - and it is not good to start a bread in a cold oven. Any truth to these rumors? I would love your expert advise before I invest the money.
thanks, Louise

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Louise--I think the pans are easier to use, but the couche is more traditional. When you use the couche, you have to carefully transfer the baguettes to the stone or a pan to bake which can be tricky without deflating them--some people use a baguette board to do this. I don't know that it would be that much easier to store. If you go to the PBS website, you can watch any of the baking with Julia shows--I think there is an episode where someone uses a couche if you want to see it in action.

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Rose -thanks so much for the quick response. The blog must take up your full time - how do you do any other work?
I was on the king arthur website and saw they have 2 different types of baguette pans - the one you typically see like you have in the book and the other is a Baker's Couche which is a folded canvas cloth - which I assume will take up less storage space. Do you have any experience or thoughts on the Baker's Couche and which is better to use? thanks, Louise

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I am getting ready to order Malt Powder from King Arthur and noticed that there are 2 types - Diastatic Malt Powder and Non-Diastatic Malt Powder. Which is better for baking bread? thanks, Louise

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do the sour dough version.

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I am still fixating on the pumpernicklel bread. Purusing the BB last night, I noticed that Rose has 2 pumpernickel breads - so my question is which one should I make - the "Authentic" Pumpernickel or the Sourdough Pumpernickel? Rose - which one does your Dad prefer? Has anyone else tried one or both? thanks, Louise

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Have you ever eaten the raisin pumpernickel rolls at Joe's Stone Crab on Miami Beach? They are the best ever (well, I have not had the Bread Bible pumpernickle so maybe I am not qualified to say the best ever). They are rich, dense, sweet but not too sweet, moist and flavorful. So, I want to try the Bread Bible Pumpernickle recipe and I have few questions.
1. Can the dough be made ito rolls? If so, what are the changes to the recipe?
2. Do you recommend adding a starter? If so, how much?
thanks!
Louise

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I have also the book from Riddarbageriet. It is absolutely beautiful and the recipies are also marvellous. If there is some recipe you would like to try, I will gladly translate it from Swedish into English - I am not a professional,but can translate it so that you could bake!
Now that you mentioned, I do have one acquaintance working in a bakery, will ask about the gluten. Yes, agree - why keep a good stuff a big secret!?

Yeast has also been an issue for me. We do not have instant yeast which is mentioned in many American books. We have fresh yeast in 50gram cubes, stored in fridge and can also be freezed. And then we have dry yeast in 11gram packages. Dry yeast must be mixed with a little bit of flour and the water must be 42celsius/approx 107F. The manufactors say that we have here a very good yeast culture and I agree. Both work very well. If the recipe includes instant yeast I have put just a little bit more of our dry yeast -which I think would be your active dry yeast.
Will try the psyllium and will let you know. I was also wondering which one, gluten or psyllium, is healthier? Both are anyway natural products, but some people cannot have gluten in their food.

I appreciate all different metric info in your Bible, but did print extra paper for Fahrenheit to Celsius which we use here.

It might take a while before the psyllium adventure is done, but will let you know! Best regards! :)

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p.s. it used to be like that here too---i would beg to buy fresh cake yeast from the local bakery. now it's available to the consumer and now i prefer active dry instant yeast!

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totally makes sense. what doesn't make sense to me is that other countries seem to reserve the good stuff for industry instead of sharing it with home bakers. maybe you could get a baker to let you buy some. i love the bakery in stockholm called riddarbageriets. i bought his book though i can't speak swedish! it won an international award of design and truly deserves it.
we all eagerly await the results of your test!

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Best regards from Finland Rose! Thank you for your wonderful website and the amazing Bread Bible! It is also very comforting to know that you are active here on the site if problems occur! I have one question of this golden honey oat bread recipe: vital wheat gluten. I had never heard of it before. I checked from one mill and health store and they told me that this wheat gluten is used here only in bakeries, i.e. professional use only and it cannot be purchased. Tried to order from Amazon, but it is not allowed to be shipped (customs reasons or something...).
Then I heard from one health store that in Scandinavia for gluten free baking they use a product which makes gluten free breads fluffier and easier to handle. This product is psyllium, Plantago psyllium, also known as plantago or flea seed, small, dark reddish-brown seeds which form a mucilaginous mass with water.
The health store suspected that this could probably also be of help in whole wheat and grain baking.
If I could have ordered vital wheat gluten, I would have tested both and tell if there is any difference.
I am about to test your recipe anyway with psyllium seed powder, but wanted to ask you already now if you would know anything about this?
If I understand now right, it is quite funny that vital wheat gluten is gluten and psyllium is free of gluten - quite opposite, but sounds that the result in baking should be approx. same?!

Hopefully I could explain this that it makes some kind of sense.... :)

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Thank you Rose! This bread is so unbelieveably easy and tastes great. I will definitely be making this regularly. I love your recipes and your enthusiasm is definitely contagious!

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sherry--so glad to here this. yes bread needs to cool completely to finish baking--even english muffins!

vernita--thanks for the great feedback. this bread is going to be one of my staples!

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Thanks, Rose. My english muffins ended up being very good after they had cooled...we only have one left! :-)

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I made the Golden honey oat bread on Friday. I tripled the recipe, knowing that I would be taking some to a potluck. It turned out beautiful, as do all the recipes I make of yours, Rose.
I used brown flax, coarsely ground in the blender, EVOO, and no milk powder. I mixed some golden flax , sesame, and poppy seeds with some flaky kosher salt and sprinkled it in the bottoms of my pans and on top before doing 3 diagonal slashes. They rose wondrously, browned beautifully and tasted heavenly!!! The bread was complimented at the potluck and we've mostly finished off the other loaf as toast, P & J sandwiches and even grilled cheese. The bread was open, but not holey, with a moist crumb and holds together well for sandwiches! I learn so much coming here and seeing what everyone is doing! I also have really been enjoying thefreshloaf.com....very interesting! Thank you so much!

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I ended up buying the flaxseed meal because the sales associate in the store told me I needed a mill to grind up the whole seeds. It was stored in the refrigerator with a sell by date of Sept/2008, so I think it'll be okay. Thanks for your responses.

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Patrincia, I eat flaxseed meal every day at breakfast. I haven't found it to be rancid, but I do keep it in the frig once I bring it home from the store. I bought golden meal once when they didn't have the regular, but didn't like the flavor, so I discarded it. Somehow it wasn't as "nutty." Perhaps I should try grinding my own, but I find it very handy to have the meal, as I can take it with me when I travel. I think I will try grinding my own soon, just to taste the difference and see if I like it better.

Beth

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sherry--the king arthur dried milk is heavier than the supermarket variety. i think it would be fine to use the same weight.

the recipe says to roll out the chilled dough and then to let it rise. it is a slow rise bread as that gives more flavor but if you want it to rise faster use the proof box method i write about. i don't have a proofing cycle on my oven and might not trust it if i did!

baking bread on a griddle, such as english muffins or crumpets, never does a great job of baking the center of the dough which is why even store bought eng. muffins are almost always toasted. alternatively you could finish them off in a 350F oven.

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buy whole flaxseed and process it in a blender or food processor until coarsely ground. the meal is likely to be rancid and offers no texture.
not sure about standard vs. golden. i've never seen the golden.

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Hi Rose - I started gathering the ingredients for this Golden Honey Oat Bread. My health food store says they don't sell cracked flaxseed... can I use flaxseed meal? It's not finely ground like flour, it's more like a coarse corn meal. Also, is there a difference between standard flax seed and golden flax seed? Is either one preferrable for this bread?

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Hello,

I just made the English Muffins from the bread bible and didn't get the results I was hoping for. I started them Saturday and cooked them on my electric griddle this morning. After ten minutes on each side they were nice and golden, but still white around the edges and a little gummy in the middle. I put them back on the griddle for a few more minutes on each side and it didn't seem to make a difference, other than getting the top and bottom too crispy. The dough had been in the refrigerator overnight and I took it out this morning and immediately rolled it and cut six muffins. The recipe didn't say to let the dough come to room temperature, but I'm wondering if I should've. One other thing I wasn't sure about was the amount of dry milk to use. I threw out the first flour/dry milk mixture because I was weighing 40 grams when I realized that was WAY more than 2 T. I started over and just added 2 T. This morning I checked the weight on my scale and it takes about 4 T. to even get to 20 grams. Were any of these things my problem? Should I try them on lower heat for longer? Please help...my family loves english muffins and I would love to have success with homemade ones. Also, do you recommend using the proof cycle on the oven to raise dough that isn't supposed to be a slow rise? I did that when raising the english muffin dough and it still took over an hour to get 3/4" high. Thanks for your help!

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Belmari Bauer
Belmari Bauer
01/14/2008 05:57 AM

Hello from Puerto Rico.I have a great interet in learning how to bake bread. Will be ordering your bread bible soon.Any suggestions... My question is how to join your blog or forum. Thanks for all the good advice you give us. Sincerely, B.Bauer

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see why measuring by volume is so inferior?! it all depends how long the flour has been sitting in one place and why the street vibrations are as to how much it settles, whether you dip and sweep, scoop into the cup, stir up the flour first, etc. etc. for my recipes 1 cup of unbleached flour by dip and sweep which has first been lightly stirred = 156 grams 5.5 ounces. oh yes and the measuring cup you use as they all vary.

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Acording to General Mills one cup of their unbleached white
flour weighs 4.27 oz per cup. In your recipe for golden honey oat bread a cup of flour weighs 5.65 oz per cup.
How should I measure the flour for this recipe?

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Lisa,
If you want to knead it by hand, knead for 5 minutes, let it rest covered for 20 minutes, then knead again for 5 minutes. Proceed from step 2 afterwards.

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Hi Rose,
I am new to the bread baking world. The only 2 breads that I have learned to make are the Sour Dough and Amish Friendship Bread. I have starter for both. I am interested in making this New Years golden honey oatmeal bread but as a baby to the world of baking breads, I need the recipie spelled out more simply and for use by kneading and hand mixing as I do not have a bread machine. Would it be too much trouble to rewrite the recipie in simpiler terms? Please?

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Lynn, I share your excitement!

Marie, I visited your site and as usual your bread looked perfect!

Tammi, please do a search on the blog this has been addressed.

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I have a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer and the instructions for using the dough hook say not to use it at a speed higher than 2. I noticed in your instructions that you say to "knead on medium low speed for 4 minutes". Do you know if it's ok to actually use the dough hook on a higher speed?

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Rose,
I finally had the time to bake your golden honey oatmeal bread. I did the sourdough starter version, and it was fabulous! Flavorful and light, with the crunch of flaxseeds. Thanks for this great holiday present! (Photos at www.breadbasketcase.blogspot.com)

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Rose, you are my new best friend! ;-) I made the Jewish Rye Bread yesterday and it turned out perfectly. It has been a lifelong dream to be able to make a great loaf of bread, and this is my first success after years of placing that dream on hold. The crust is perfection -- it cannot be described in any other way, and the loaf is oh, so tasty. Next stop: Sourdough Rye! Can't wait!

Thank you so much for a lovely book and such exquisite instructions.

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Sandhya Karandikar
Sandhya Karandikar
01/03/2008 08:43 PM

Dear Rose,
A very Happy, prosperous and successful new year to you.
I like this bread recipe very much. I am going to try it soon. I will have to do a lot of sustitutions. But still I am going to try it.
I have enjoyed your free recipes very much. I will post a comment after I make the bread and let you know how it turned out.
Thank you for such a wonderful baking experience.
Regards,
Sandhya.

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Holly Zhang
Holly Zhang
01/03/2008 07:26 PM

If I use old starter do I still add yeast?

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the best solution is to use as high a protein flour as you can find--hi gluten would be great, bread flour...let us know! and thank you!

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Holly Zhang
Holly Zhang
01/03/2008 07:00 PM

Hi Rose,

I live in Beijing and don't have access to vital wheat gluten for the honey oat bread - but have everything else - I know you said it is a must but is there anyway to make this without it and still have a fabulous light textured bread?

I have been using your bread bible for the past several years and have made almost all the bread recipies and now make regularly sourdough, and pugliese oh and also pizza. Wonderful breads and a wonderful book. Thank you.

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Thanks, Rose, for the wonderful New Years' gift recipe. I wondered what you felt the differences were in taste profile in the sourdough starter vs. no starter versions? On my monitor the pictures look very different and the non-starter looks quite pale! I love to use my starter which I made last spring from the Bread Bible protocol.

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yes, in the book i explain the temperatures you want the dough to be and mixing from the frig keeps it from getting too warm during the mixing process.

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Hope,
I don't use a mixer, but I believe you can go direct from the fridge for mixing. I think only the hand method requires bringing the dough to room temperature. You add the salt after the 20 minute autolyse--it specifies this in the mixing instructions.

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Kim,
In my experience, you get the best oven-spring from a slightly under-proofed dough and steam in the oven. The steam helps keep the crust moist so that it can expand before it sets--you can even spray the actual loaf to enhance this effect. If the loaf is fully proofed, it will also expand less in the oven.

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my blog master tell me all you need to do is copy and paste. (it works for me)

2T milk powder = 1 cup milk

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Hi Rose,
I, too, would like to see a printer-freindly version of the Golden HoneyOat Bread. For now, I just copied it down by hand...I bake bread for my "family"-a husband and 5 parrots-about 3 times a week, and they love to see new recipes coming out of the oven! (The birds actually refuse toast made from store-bought bread!)

I also have another question, a problem that has plagued me before. I'm not getting any oven spring these days. The last time I had the problem it turned out to be the cheap, store-brand flour I had bought. Since then I use only King Arthur Unbleached and whole wheat flours. The bread rises beautifully in the bowl and the pan, but doesn't budge when it hits the hot oven. Sometimes it even collapses a bit. My oven is accurate and always preheated well in advance, so it's not the temp that's the problem. I used to use Red Star yeast, but switched to Fleischman's in case that was the culprit but no luck. Since most of what I make contains a good portion of whole wheat flour I tried adding vital wheat gluten, still no luck. Any ideas? It tastes just fine, and looks okay since it rose in the pan to a decent level, but I really miss those nice, high loaves that used to come out of my oven!

Thanks for your help!

Kim

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HOpe Santoro
HOpe Santoro
01/03/2008 07:17 AM

would like to make the basic Hearth bread in your Bread Bible book, but do not understand-- for a better flavor in the notes at end of recipe you say to allow the sponge to ferment 1 hour at room temp. and 8 to 24 hours in Fridge. Now is this mixture that is refrigerated, the sponge plus the flour mixture added to the sponge?
If so, if using the mixer with dough hook the next day when it is taken from the refrigerator, is it necessary to bring it to room temperature before continuing to knead the dough in mixer and is this when the salt is added?

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Do you have a "printer-friendly" format for the Golden Honey Oat Bread recipe? Also, is there a "formula" for replacing powdered milk in your recipes? I'm lactose-intolerant and while I can buy lactose-free milk, I can't buy lactose-free milk powder. Jerry

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coming down with a bad cold (they're always bad) but before i hibernate just want to ask you what kind of work brings you both to venice? i haven't been there since i was 16 but read 2 wonderful books--erika jong's serenisimo and 1001 and 1 nights in venice.
you made all the right decisions--no need to add old dough when making a biga. i've never made the ciabatta in the zo and i suspect this is one dough that works best in a stand mixer. i hope you have tried the bread i posted on the blog about a year ago from maine--price kushner's bread with carmelized onion. it requires the starter and is really an amazing bread--ciabatta style.

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Hi, Rose. I made the ciabatta from the BB today. We were in HEAVEN!!! I've been making almost exclusively whole grain bread, so my husband was especially ecstatic with this, and also because it's better than most of the bread we can buy when we're in Venice. That being said, I almost threw the dough away because things weren't going too well. Since I got the Zo, my KA mixer is in the closet, so I thought I'd try mixing in the Zo. I don't think it ever got to the right stage. Also, it was too low, looking like biscotti slices when done, but still so delicious we didn't care. Next I'll try Brinna's Pugliese, then the Pugliese. Would there be any point in putting old starter in these? I decided not to try. This morning when I got up, the biga was absolutely beautiful. Thanks for giving us a piece of heaven today. I also wanted to say in terms of bread not always coming out the same. When we're working in Venice, we go to the same small bakery every day, near where we work. They have some rolls that are similar to ciabatta. When they're great, they're wonderful. Sometimes they won't be as good, even for a week or more at a time. Don't know if it's the weather or what. It's great knowing that I can make something so delicious at home. Brava, Rose.

Beth

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sounds like a great success! you don't have to slash--it's just for appearance. if you use whole wheat berries you have to soak them for several hours to soften them. it pays to put the flax in a blender of food processor to break it up or it goes through one's system undigested and it's supposed to contain great anti-oxidants!

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Hmm. Forgot to say that I'd slashed it with a large knife. No wonder it fell! Like taking a hatchet to it. Too bad I didn't have a razor around! Just thought I'd clarify that it wasn't your directions but my heavy-handedness! When the knife didn't pierce it quickly I pressed too hard. But it really seems to have had no effect on the final fabulous product!

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Today I'm trying the "fabulous" golden honey oat bread made with an old bread machine for the kneading part which has become difficult for me with arthritis and arm problems. I'd lent it to my sister for the past several years but given my problems I'd gotten it back to try again! You're so right about the dough being too wet to knead without additional flour but the machine was perfect for that.

It rose beautifully and I baked it in my new cuisinart deep dish pie pan. It's now cooling down and I cannot wait to taste it.

Used a pack of Fleishman's active dry yeast, the only type available the other day here in Florida. But I realized too late (after already adding just lukewarm water) it wasn't the instant rise yeast. So I decided to add a couple tablespoons of warm milk, not having dry milk on hand, and disolved some additional yeast (Hodgson's) in it before adding it all to my mixture already in the machine, and 2 T more flour, HK, to balance the addition of milk. Fortunately I'd bought that brand of wheat gluten recently though I'd never used it.

Added 1 T bran, 1 T whole wheat berries, 1 T rye flour and my flax was whole since that was the only available. Am a hopeless recipe jiggler.

It rose beautifully after the initial kneading. Then I just folded it around a couple of times to form a round loaf and placed in in the pan where it rose in about 45 minutes, mounding up nicely over the top of the pan. Then I slashed it and it fell dramatically. But it looks great and light.

Okay, I'm going to taste it. Just cut into it! Wow. Great lightness, mild flavor and delicious! Thank you, Rose. I feel like I've found a gold mine, no kidding, and so easy!

My mom made bread when I was a child and it never loses its allure. I never thought I'd live to see the day when I could bake a great loaf so easily. This is the type of bread one wants for sandwiches and toast. I love the NYTimes "no-knead bread" but find the whole timing thing a bit annoying. Bless you, Rose. One reason I decided to bake bread again, though never very good at it, is that I hate spending $2.89 for a loaf of manufactured bread!

Note: Whole wheat berries are too hard to bite into. Flax whole was okay. Could use maybe 1/4-1/2 tsp more salt for my taste.

Question: Is the slashing just for looks?

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sure--you just have to knead longer and not be tempted to add more flour to the very sticky dough. if you have the bread bible i give the technique for hand kneading for sticky doughs but since your husband kneads by hand already i'm sure he'll do just fine as long as he avoids over flouring as it will toughen the dough.

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Rose,

We don't have a bread machine or a standing mixer (yes, low-tech, I know). My husband is the bread baker and he does all the kneading by hand. Would this recipe work for hand mixing and kneading? Any suggestions?

It looks wonderful!

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yes and you can also replace 1/2 cup of the water with 1/2 cup of milk that has been brough to the boiling point (little bubbles form around the perimeter) and then cooled to room temperature.
the milk gives a slightly softer texture and slightly higher rise.

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Can I leave out the powdered milk and still get a successful loaf?

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