Welcome to Real Baking with Rose, the personal blog of author Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Watch the Baking Bible
Come Alive
BEN FINK

Spend A Moment with Rose, in this video portrait by Ben Fink.

Check out my new creations




Rose's Alpha Bakers

RSS AND MORE



Get the blog delivered by email. Enter your address:

Eat your books
Previous Book

Roses' Cookbooks

The Baking Bible

The Baking Bible

Buy from Amazon: USA | Canada | France | Germany | UK

Buy from Barnes & Noble
Buy from IndieBound

Next Book
See Tour Dates

Current Announcements

The time for the CIA demo and book signing on Monday, December 8 has been changed to 11:00 am. It is open to the public.

Cake Questions Three

May 17, 2008 | From the kitchen of Rose

It has happened again! Cake Questions Too has become so long a thread it takes forever to load so i have closed the postings options for this Thread and Reopened it as Cake Questions Three.

Please also use one of the 4 categories under Cake Questions:
Equipment
General
Ingredients
Wedding

Comments

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Christy
11/ 4/2011 09:14 AM

Hi Christy,
We suggest to divide the recipe in half and make two single layer cakes to accommodate for your oven's capacity. The chocolate mixture can be made first in its entirety and divided in half.
We have had to do this many times in testing with different recipes to establish a control cake from which to try different versions.

REPLY

Hi rose/ woody,
I know that it is more advisable to bake the genoise batter right after I had mixed it. Unfortuantely, my oven is not big enough to place 2 9inch pan Tgt side by side. N if it is place on differenct lvl rack, it will burn as it is advise nt to open the oven door b4 the cake is set, else it will collapse. Is there any solution for my case?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Anonymous
11/ 3/2011 11:47 PM

Hi anomymous,
Yes. The higher percentage affects both the sweetness level and possibly its incorporation when adding it to the cake. You will need to add sugar with the chocolate when cooking it. 70% chocolate has 8.3 grams of sugar/ounce where 62% chocolate has 11 grams of sugar/ounce. Definitely, cover the pan tightly with plastic wrap when it is cooling to prevent water evaporation. We would hope there is a candy/chocolate shop or cake bakery where you can buy the correct percentage chocolate so you at least have a control.

REPLY

Thanks woody for the reply. I had read the section n understand more about chocolate. However, I still hv qns regarding the substitution of 70% chocolate instead of the original recommended 60-62% chocolate. Does it affect anything if I substitute a higher % chocolate into the moist chocolate raspberry genoise?
Once again, thanks so much!!:)
Cheers!

REPLY

Thanks Rose. I think I am going to need a van for this trip.

David

REPLY

david, stock up on baker's joy--it keeps for years and is the best!

REPLY

Hi Rose / Woody,

I am going to Great Falls, Montana in a few weeks and am wondering if you could give me a few names of the flour spray that Rose mentioned in her recipes? For some reasons, it is not sold in Canada, at least not where I live.

Thanks so much,

David

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Xinru
11/ 2/2011 03:43 PM

Hi Xinru,
Please read the Ingredients section that talks about chocolate, which also lists chocolates that we prefer.

REPLY

Hi,
Firstly, I would like to ask if it is a must to use dark chocolate which contain 60-62% cocoa for the cake moist chocolate raspberry genoise? If so, why is that so?
Secondly, most of the chocolate cake require 60-62% dark chocolate in heavenly cake. Can I use 70% instead?
Thirdly, what is the brand of chocolate that u Would recommend me to use?
Lastly, is it a must to use chocolate that is specially for baking?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from joanna
10/26/2011 09:51 AM

Hi Joanna,
You can use your hand-held mixer as Rose gives the times. The stand mixer makes it easier for: longer time frame recipes like genoises, which take a minimum of 10 minutes with a handmixer and only 5 minutes and no holding it with the stand mixer; larger recipes; and buttercream frostings. As far as pans, we both use basic pans which are recommended in the Equipment section. You can make your own cake strips. Using weights with a basic digital scale is what we both use for accuracy and convenience.
A good cake to start with is the All-Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake.
Enjoy your new discoveries.

REPLY

Hi Rose and All! Thank you -- I am wowwed by this site, just discovered it tonight, have been online now for hours inhaling it. I am ABOUT to buy Cake Bible, heretofore have loved using Rose's Holiday cookies book, and am EXCITED to try to master cakes, albeit intimidated.

Advice please? As a newbie to "formal" cake baking it's overwhelming to see all the equipment and special ingredients that yare required for the cakes. I have been baking for literally years with positive results (according to enthudsiastic reactions from family and friends). But, I've only used pretty "basic" equipment (had no idea about cake strips, for example), haven't experimented with a variety of flours, etc.Now I am determined to blearn this science more and hopefully see even better results! Rose suggests that a hand mixer is really all that is required if short on storage space, even though it looks like all her recipes assume one has a Kitchen Aid mixer. Am I ok with a hand-held electric beater? WHat about new cake pans...silicone/coated/light metal/dark? Help Please? THANKS!

REPLY

Soula, would it work to have the drum that is turned on its side made out of either styrefoam or rice krispie treats? The other cakes could all be regular cake. I haven't tried to rest a cake on its side, but it sounds like it could be troublesome. If there will be enough cake servings without that one, perhaps it will be less stressful to make it out of something else.

REPLY

Perhaps the Chocolate Domingo cake. I have never tried to stand it on its side, but it is much denser and stronger than the All american. Rose says that is very rich...almost too rich for frosting. But, I have used it in a very large frosted cake and it worked out fine. Also, because it is rich and dense, you get a lot of servings, because a little piece goes a long way

REPLY

Soula Papadopoulos
Soula Papadopoulos
09/17/2011 10:05 AM

I have been asked to bake cakes in the shape of a drum set.

I want to make one of the (round) cakes stand up on its side. I am planning to use fondant to ice them.

I always use Rose's All-American chocolate cake for my decorated cakes, but I am worried that it will not be "tough" enough.

Could someone suggest a cake from any of Rose's books that would be strong enough to withstand being on its side.

REPLY

Xinru, for a light and fluffy cake, I enjoy chiffon, which is made with oil and remains soft when refrigerated.

My copy of the Cake Bible did not have a reference to baking powder on p.455. Usually, "level 1 baking powder" is a reference to the Rose Factor system in the wedding cake section in the back. There is an example of how to use the Rose Factor on p.489.

REPLY

Thanks Julie,
Can u recommend me any cake that is light n fluffy in the cake bible?
And can I ask what does lvl 1 for the baking powder mean in pg 455 of cake bible?

REPLY

Xinru, Rose is travelling, but perhaps I can help.

For butter cakes (like the white velvet) Rose's goal is a velvety, tender texture rather than the light/fluffy texture that comes from the creaming method of mixing.

All cakes with butter become firm when chilled, because the butter firms when chilled. These cakes can be stored in the refrigerator, but then should be brought up to room temperature before serving. For a full-sized cake, this takes several hours.

Rose's butter cake batters should fill the pan between half and two-thirds full, any more or less will affect the quality of the finished cake.

REPLY

Hi rose,
I've bake the white velvet butter cake. Is the cake suppose to be light and fluffy? Or just soft as describe in the book?After it was put in the fridge, the cake became harder and denser. As if it was made several days ago.Is this suppose to happen? Or did I do something wrong? I rmb I transfer the batter from one pan to the other because it was too full, could it b this? Pls help!! Thank u!:)

REPLY

GRACE-LEESBURG, FL
GRACE-LEESBURG, FL in reply to comment from Bill
07/28/2011 01:42 PM

No, they are not frosted cakes. Thanks for your help. I will do as you suggested.

REPLY

Most baked goods freeze just fine. Are these cakes going to have frosting? There are a lot of posts on this website about freezing cakes...pretty much be sure that they are wrapped air tight in plastic wrap, then foil (I'm obsessive, I then put it in a zip-lock freezer bag). If the cake has frosting, you want to put it in the freezer unwrapped until the frosting is hard, then wrap it as above. I usually defrost my cakes under a cake dome, or loosely wrapped. Hope this is helpful.

REPLY

GRACE-LEESBURG, FL
GRACE-LEESBURG, FL
07/28/2011 06:52 AM

I have to make several different cakes and brownies for our Church bake sale. Can I make them ahead and freeze them? If so, what is the best way to freeze and defrost cakes for later use?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Eshita
07/ 2/2011 03:11 PM

Hi Eshita,
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in gluten free, lactose free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes as these are not our genre of baking. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free for egg replacements. Our recipes include both butter and oil recipes for which each these works the best.
Our recipes have been carefully researched, tested, and perfected for their ingredients as other ingredients maybe a compromise. We do state substitutions when they work or as a variation.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I make cake without eggs.....can u pls. tell me any egg replacements in cakes by which i get more tender and soft cakes without changing the flavour of the cake. And also let me know can we use oil instead of butter in your cake recipes.....which is more better...and what difference does it make.

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Holly
05/13/2011 01:50 PM

Hi Holly,
The Cake Bible's Rose Factor page 490 states surface area for two 9 inch layers is similar to a 9 x 13 inch cake, which is close in surface area to a 10 x 10 inch cake.
Depending on the cake recipe, leavening may change and be slightly effected by the shape of any given pan.
For future reference, The Cake Bible also discusses flour in the Ingredients section.

REPLY

When making a square cake recipe say for a 10" cake I normally use the conversion factor for a 14" cake.

I was wondering though, how do I adapt the baking powder as I realize the difference in exposed surface area between a circle vs square cake?

REPLY

Moving from a 9" to a 10" (square or round), multipy all ingredients by 1.23. That is, assuming both are the same height.

REPLY

I need to enlarge a 2-layer 9" cake recipe for 2 10" pans. Any ideas?

REPLY

Rose, thank you! I did make the orange poppy seed - sour cream cake and increased the orange by half and used baking soda. My guests loved it! I will make the lemon version for a good friend's birthday. He has fond memories of his mother's lemon poppy seed cake. I'm interested to see the difference. Is your favorite orange cake your chiffon? I just love orange cake and would love to try something that you think shows off the orange flavor the best. Thanks again.

REPLY

karla, i've made the poppyseed cake with orange and much prefer the lemon. the orange has a much less vibrant flavor. i think sour cream would overwhelm it completely but when using sour cream you need to use baking soda.

REPLY

I am trying to decide between an orange poppy seed pound cake and an orange poppy seed-sour cream cake, using Rose's lemon versions of each. Which would work best for conversion? If I make the sour cream cake version, should I use baking soda instead of baking powder? Will orange work okay with sour cream? Anything else I should think about? Thanks!

REPLY

I was wondering if anyone can explain the difference between the vanilla velvet cake and the white butter wedding cake?

Which is best for a tiered cake and why?

REPLY

LaPiccola, Check your private messages

REPLY

LaPiccola Nat
LaPiccola Nat
04/15/2011 06:18 AM

Hi to everyone!
I'm planning to bake the ethereal pear charlotte but as I have to prepare it ahead I was considering to freezing it.
Since I have never freezed a cake or its components I'm a bit concerned by the consistency :
- will there be a difference between a cake that has been freezed & a fresh cake ? (I am mostly fearing that the biscuit roulade in addition to the bavaroise & the defrosting process might be some sort of damp...)
_ And is it better to prepare separately the components (poched pears, bavaroise, biscuit roulade for the bottom & biscuit roulade with raspberra jam) freeze them, and then assemble everything 1 day ahead or is it better to prepare and assemble the whole cake and then freeze it?
Thank you very much

REPLY

To convert round pans to square pans (where the diameter of the round pan is equal to the length of one side of the square pan) multiply by a factor of 1.27 for the same height of batter.

REPLY

Hi Holly,
You will need to calculate the volume for your pans and then look at the charts and base formulas on pages 490 to 492 in the Cake Bible to see which volume of round pans match closest to the square pans, so that you can convert the Base Formula on page 491. A round pan will be 3/4 the volume of a square pan of the same size (page 456).
You are going to need to experiment for the square shaped pans and we suggest making two batters: one for the 14-inch pans and the other for the combined 6 and 10-inch pans to adjust for the difference in leavening, as we did for the wedding cakes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes for making separate batters for: 6 and 9-inch, and for 12-inch layers.
I did some website searching and did not see any conversion charts or actual recipes for these sized pans.

REPLY

I am currently trying to scale the white cake base recipe for my tiered bridal shower cake. It will be a 14", 10" and 6" cake.

Someone mentioned that the scaling calculations are only based for round cakes. Is there some scale I can use for my square cakes and how does this affect my levening agents etc.

Thanks so much!

REPLY

Hi Tim - a cheesecake is done baking when the temperature at the center reaches 150F. Of course you have to allow time for "carry over cooking" to occur as it cools, then chills completely (usually 4 or more hours).

REPLY

I have a question about cheesecakes. I swear by Rose's basic recipe and technique, and even when not called for I will bake the cake in a water bath. I am planning on making a a new recipe but it is for a 10-inch springform pan rather than the usual 8-inch. Any suggestions on how much to increase the baking time?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from yennisa
03/ 9/2011 09:47 PM

Yennisa,
We do not have an answer as we do not have cakes using shortening. All of Rose's recipes and research have been with butter or oils such as canola or safflower. You want to check Harold McGee's "on Food and Cooking" pages 555-57, which he briefly talks about shortening in cakes.

REPLY

i have a question!??beside beign more tender, what else is different about a cake made with hight-ratio liquid shortening from one made with other fats, such as an AP shortening? ama student of pastry chef in york pa

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ruth Kahn
02/ 9/2011 12:07 PM

Hi Ruth,
You might trying Rose's "Flaky Vegetable Shortening Pie Crust" page 36 in the "Pie and Pastry Bible". Then adapt it to incorporating some of the toffutti cream cheese, as her favorite crust has cream cheese.
Enjoy, Woody

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Lynn
02/ 8/2011 11:10 AM

Hi Lynn,
There are several recipes in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" that are for 10 cup bundt pan, which the butter cake recipes weigh from 1200 grams to 1360 grams. That is roughly 120 to 140 grams per cup. You can then adjust for your larger pan. However, the leavenings may need some adjusting beyond the increase for the larger pan.
We currently do not have any recipes specifically written for a 12-15 cup bundt pan. You may want to try using other recipes and then adapting one of Rose's once you see how the proportions of ingredients work.
On checking your oven, we recommend making her All-Occasion Yellow Downy Layer cake from "The Cake Bible" and compare your baking time to the recipe's times. Both ovens I used for testing "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" needed to be adjusted up from 5 to 15 degrees. I have used Taylor and CDN oven thermometers as a reference to the above test.
Yes, you should adjust for baking in darker pans, which need a lower oven temperature of 25 degrees.
Good luck on your bundt quest. Please share your discoveries on the Forums for the rest of the bloggers to see.

Enjoy, Woody

REPLY

Everything I bake must be absolutely dairy-free (highly allergic, late in life). I favor chocolate and vanilla to mask the loss of butter flavor (I use margarine, toffutti cream cheese, sour cream, soy milk). Among others, pie pastry remains a problem: I used to use half-butter, half lard and loved the result. Any suggestions?

REPLY

Is there any way to tell by the amount of the ingredients whether a recipe will fill a large (12-15 C.) bundt pan? I have one of the Nordicware Platinum series pans and would like to have the satisfaction of seeing a cake actually rise up and fill the pan! So far, no luck. Just tried a lemon cake based on 3 C. sifted all-purpose flour and 4 eggs, and which called for a 12 C. pan, but it hardly rose at all (also smelled like it might have been setting too fast, and turned out with a darker crust than what the picture showed.
If I am limited to only Rose's recipes, can you point me to those that would fit this size pan? But, I do have a whole booklet of 1950s recipes for this type of pan, and am constantly tempted by other recipes I find browsing around the internet. What do you think?

Another question, possibly related to my recent lemon cake: how do you judge whether your oven temperature is off? I find myself more likely to trust an expensive oven than a cheap thermometer - but maybe some of you have a thermometer to recommend that you absolutely trust.

Also, do you adjust time and temperature for the color of a bundt pan? The one I just used is beige, but the others I have are dark.

REPLY

I've come up with a couple tricks for piping ganache. 1) use a piping "gun" like the Wilton Dessert Pro. It looks like a cookie press, but the nozzle holds icing tips/tubes. 2) use a traditional piping bag, but wear a heat-proof kevlar glove like the Ove-Glove. It will keep the heat of your hand from melting the ganache or buttercream. You can also wrap a traditional piping bag with a layer or two of parchment, but the glove works better for me.

REPLY

if you keep your hand chilled in a bowl of ice water from time to time and don't overfill the bag you should be able to do simple designs though basket weave might be tricky. the cream cheese frosting would be easier for this purpose.

REPLY

Hi, Rose and everyone,

I love white chocolate frostings and think your recipe for White Chocolate ganache sounds wonderful. But will I be able to pipe decorations with it? Nothing too fancy, just a basic basketweave design. Or would the White Chocolate Cream Cheese recipe work better for that purpose?
Thanks!

REPLY

I was so pleased when I realized that would work. I have a 24" range, and the way the racks are attached the the sides of the oven, there is very little interal space. I can't fit 2 9" pans on one shelf...and no matter how I try to rotate the pans, front to back, top to bottom, staggered, on top of each other...they never come out quite the same. I CAN fit 2 8" pans with no problem...and...no math involved!

REPLY

a question from an aspiring pastry chef student, regarding baking rose's heavenly cakes carrot cake on a single 10-inch pan

dear baker, i started my apprenticeship in 2006 at your age, so go for it: life gets sweeter with age!

if you want to find out the perfect heavenly cakes carrot cake the way it was done by Rose, you should first make it on the pan size indicated on the recipe. then experiment to what anything you would like and see what works best for you.

heavenly cakes carrot cake uses 2 x 9-inch pans. a 10-inch pan will be worth trying, but i will predict a moister center or perhaps a sunken center. heat will need to travel 1-inch deeper from the borders to the center, thus the character.

i would recommend strongly using cake strips, maybe wrap two! to retard the overbaking of the pan edges as much as possible. i use rose's silicone cake strips, and on this youtube video you can see how can you wrap several ones to fit larger pans http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2009/06/hectors_utube_demo_of_roses_he.html

test, test, test, and let us know what are your results. you can also read the Cake Bible from cover to cover, for in depth science and understanding on how cakes work, pan sizes, leavening, oven temperatures, sunken or domed centers, etc.

i am assuming you know how to calculate volumes, don't assume that 1 10-inch pan equals 2 9-inch pans ok? scale accordingly.

diameter height volume volume
2r h PI()*(r^2)*h US
in in cu in cups

3 2 14.1 0.9
4 2 25.1 1.7
5 2 39.3 2.7
6 2 56.5 3.9
7 2 77.0 5.3
8 2 100.5 6.9
9 2 127.2 8.8
10 2 157.1 10.8
11 2 190.1 13.1
12 2 226.2 15.7
13 2 265.5 18.3
14 2 307.9 21.3

REPLY

bil, that's a great suggestion--to make cakes designed for 2-9" x 1-1'2" pans in 2-"8 x 2" pans!

REPLY

always a good idea to take a little of the buttercream and try different things such as the liquor, or heating, or chilling. so glad you saved it julie!

REPLY

Julie,
Like I said, you are usually more intuitive about this sort of thing than I am...also, you are clearly a genius! Well Done!

REPLY

Bill and Rose, a spoonful of rum fixed the pineapple buttercream emulsion and it now looks smooth and good. Rose, I remembered your saying that liquor helped the emulsion of buttercreams, and figured I'd give it a try before making a new batch. It worked!

REPLY

Bill and Rose, thanks so very much for your speedy replies! I'll admit I was hoping for a quick fix, but had suspected what you both confirmed, that more bc is needed.

REPLY

Bill that's just what I was going to suggest but only add as much as the new buttercream can accept before thinning. Freeze the rest in batches for future additions to buttercream keeping in mind that it must reach full room temp before adding it.

REPLY

Julie:
Just my two cents here...but I think I would make more plain buttercream and then gradually beat the first batch into the second. (I'm not sure...and you are usually more intuitive about this sort of thing than I am...and I wouldn't want you to waste a whole pound of butter if I'm wrong...but that was my thought)

REPLY

Rose, I goofed on neoclassic buttercream and added too much liquid to the finished bc. Is there a way to fix it?

I've made the pineapple version, but it turns out my pineapple puree was too watery and now the buttercream is very soft and looks a little curdled or broken. High speed beating did not smooth it out. I strained the puree, which I realized afterwards made it too watery.

REPLY

Think of wrapping the base of the pan in foil. The foil isn't around the inside of the sides of the pan, it is just covering the base.

REPLY

Louise Allen,
You fold the aluminum foil under the springform pan's round base. Then clamp on the springform side ring to sandwich the foil inside the ring and the base.
This should work on most springform pans.

REPLY

I am a bit confused about the method of using tin foil to move the cheesecake from the pan. is the tin foil inside the side ring or outside the side ring? If it is inside the side ring - are the sides of the cheesecake still smooth? thank you

REPLY

What a beauty that pan is! Now, I just have to hope my husband can track it down to put under the Christmas tree!

REPLY

rebecca, thanks so much for the report! check out today's posting "seeing through things" for the perfect solution for cheesecake bases!

REPLY

I, too, had success with the office party Cranberry Crown Cheesecake. I couldn't find the chubbier biscuits, so I used thinner ones and just cut them down to the suggested length. I also tried Woody's suggestion of wrapping the base in aluminum foil, but I felt like my springform pan wasn't closing securely so I took the foil back off. I was afraid to try to lift the cake from the base, so I erred on the side of caution, even if it was less chic. But it convinced my husband's coworkers that I had actually made it at home, because they all thought it came from a fancy bakery! And he did save me a piece, and it was the wonderful cheesecake I have come to expect from your recipe, Rose.

REPLY

bill, i always think of gig and how she said to her sugar beau: i'm not a changeable kind of person.

quant à moi, i've had the same hairdo for 30 plus years! i love the past but come to think of it the present and future aren't bad either!

REPLY

I think it is pretty amazing just the way it is in the book...and I don't like change. ever. LOL

REPLY

hey bill--you may opt to make it like this always!

REPLY

Rose:

You are correct again. Denser and fudgier. Everyone ate it...and what was left was taken home by guests! All is right with the world.

REPLY

thank you katherine! the recipe is in my newest book "rose's heavenly cakes."

happy holidays,

rose

REPLY

Good Morning, Rose!
I loved listening to to you last evening on Lucinda Scala Quinn's radio program! However, I am constantly rustrated with Martha's many fabulous programs and guests because I only have Sirius in the car and can't stop to jot down tips or recipies.

My questions is about the Trifle with the lovely light cake and lucious filling you were discussing last evening. I would love to make it this weekend...where can I find the recipe?

Have a wonderful holiday!

Katherine

REPLY

I doubt there will be anything left. I made 1 1/3 recipe and baked it in 9" x 2" pans. There will be 20 people at the party. The slices are going to be small as it is (if everyone eats it). Besides, my waitline definitely doesn't need it. Oh...and just a quick note on the recipes from the cake bible and the 1 1/2" pans. I recently started baking them in 8" by 2" pans...works perfectly and no math!

REPLY

well for heaven's sake ask him to save you a small piece--you deserve it!

REPLY

I won't be there...but I will ask for a full report.

REPLY

bill, i'm pretty sure it will be just fine, especially since it's chocolate, i.e if it is a little more dense it will be slightly more fudgy and delicious! do let us know

REPLY

Good morning Rose. Hope you are faring well in the cold this week. OK...so I goofed a bit and I was wondering if you think I need to "rebake". I was making the All american chocolate butter cake for my other-half's office Christmas party. Now, I have probably made this cake more often than any of the other recipes in your books. I make it a lot. I love it. My nephews especially love it. I know the recipe by heart. So I was making the batter. I added the first 1/3 of the egg mixture and I said: "something doesn't look right". I tasted the batter. NO SUGAR! ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!. Now since the 2 stage mixing method mixes the butter and flower...which protects the flour...and helps prevent over mixing...I figured I was OK to add the sugar. So add the sugar I did...beat for 1 1/2 minutes, and then added the other 2/3 of the egg mixture. The cakes look fine. The little film stuck to the parchment tasted fine. So I frosted and decorated and boxed the cake and it is in my fridge. The Party is tomorrow. Do you think I'm OK? It doesn't have to be perfect...but it needs to be edible. Help! Please! I'm exhausted. I don't think I can stay up late another night.

REPLY

Thank you so much, Woody. I will give that a try!

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Rebecca
12/15/2010 07:34 PM

Rebecca,
Here is our best idea that Rose and I have worked on for easily removing the cheesecake without inverting and reinverting.
Wrap the bottom of the springform pan with aluminum foil with the ends of the foil under the pan. When you are ready to serve the cheesecake, unfold the foil from the bottom to extend outwards. Remove the side ring. You can now use the extended foil as handles to lift the cake off the springform pan base and use spatulas to transfer the cake to a serving plate.

Enjoy, Woody

REPLY

I am planning to make the Cranberry Crown Cheesecake for a holiday party in a few days. I could probably make the Cordon Rose cheesecake in my sleep, so I think I've got the baking part down pat. But I've always made the Cordon Rose without a crust, so it's been easy to invert it to get the springform base off. I see this will not be possible with the the Cranberry Crown, as I do want to use the ladyfinger border and crust. What would be the safest approach to lifting the cake off the base? Thank you Rose or any other experienced bakers who can help me!

REPLY

i always give the weight of the dried fruit as there's no telling just how much water each will absorb depending on how long you soak it etc. but if you are creating your own recipe i would measure how much water it absorbs and decrease it from the rest of the recipe. this goes for grains as well.

REPLY

Now that I have gotten more interested in accuracy and weighing ingredients, I was wondering about how to measure dried fruit/liquid proportions in a quick bread recipe. I think the dried apricots I use are unusually moist, and the recipe calls for soaking them in a cup of boiling water. Would I then reduce the amount of liquid to compensate for the moister "dried" apricots, or is that exactly the wrong thought?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tim
11/27/2010 11:24 PM

Tim,
Although we do not have any carrot or banana roll cakes in The Cake Bible or Rose's Heavenly Cakes, I found several recipes for them when I googled either cake on the web.
Enjoy, Woody

REPLY

Hi, Rose.
I've thoroughly enjoyed your books. I love knowing the science behind baking. I cook a lot but am less comfortable experimenting in the pastry kitchen. I really like doing cake rolls and they draw a lot of attention. Is it possible to adapt things like carrot cake or banana cake to a rolled form, or would the ingredients be too much for the delicate structure of the cake?

REPLY

Wow...that was fast!. Thank sooo much. That's actually what I was going to do, but I thought there might be a quick formula. This is a blueberry cake that my mom makes...and well...blueberries and sourcream! YUM... and I, in genral, really love yellow cakes with sour cream rather than milk.

Thanks. You are the best!

REPLY

i've actually tried sour cream with baking powder and unlike buttermilk it gives a nasty flavor! you don't need to replace ALL of the bp with baking soda. i would compare recipes from my book using sour cream to see what proportion of bp and bs is used for X amount of flour and butter and go from there.

REPLY

Good morning Rose!
I have a question regarding baking soda. I know that when a cake batter has an ingredient that is acidic like buttermilk or sour cream, there will be some baking soda in the leavening to neutralize the acid. Here's the question: is that because of the chemistry involved in the leavening or is it a flavor issue? Here's the thing...I have an old family recipe for a cake that includes milk and the leavening is baking powder. I would like to try this cake with sour cream and don't know how to adjust the leavening...or if it is even necessary. I know that baking soda has four to five times the "lift" of baking powder...but what should the proportions be...etc? The recipe calls for 2 teaspoons of baking powder

REPLY

if the recipe is from a cookbook it should explain what they mean by dark cocoa. i have no idea! black cocoa i find disagreeable in flavor. i would just use a good quality alkalized cocoa in the amount called for.

REPLY

hi rose! i just want to ask, say if a recipe calls for a dark chocolate cocoa powder and the only i can find is the regular cocoa powder can i use it instead and just increase the amount? if yes, by how much should i increase it to if it calls for 3/4 c dark cocoa? thanks!

REPLY

Jeannette Mara
Jeannette Mara in reply to comment from Anonymous
10/24/2010 11:49 AM

What a coincidence!!! I have just put my Christmas cake in the oven, the recipe I have been using for well over 30 years, ...yes,it is Delia Smith's!
And of course it is in a 3" deep tin, well insulated with greaseproof paper and brown paper because it will be in the oven for four and a half hours! But well worth the long baking time, it is so good and will last for months, staying moist till the last crumb.

REPLY

Treasure those pans! As Bill says, they won't do for Rose's recipes. They were designed for a purpose, perhaps recipes from another part of the world?

It would be interesting to learn how and why your mother acquired them. But meantime, I can say for sure that your little pans are perfect for classic English fruitcakes. They'd make an ideal gift for Christmas, and late October is perfect timing to mix them up and let them mature. Delia Smith has an excellent recipe at her website. The true McCoy bears no resemblance to what has been foisted on the American public by commercial interests.

REPLY

In general, Rose always says that her recipes do not perform well in 3" deep pans.

REPLY

For Christmas, I had thought I would make a few smaller cakes -- to give as presents but also to give myself more opportunities to practice my cake making/decorating skills -- but now I don't know if that is such a good idea. My mother has some very old three-tier cake pans; they are @4 inches, 5 1/2 inches; 6 3/4 inches. BUT...they are about three inches deep. If I adapted a recipe from cake bible, it sounds like it could get very complicated with these sized pans, no?

REPLY

when i wrote the cake bible, 2" high pans were very difficult to find so 1-1/2" high pans were the ones i chose. now both type of pans are readily available and i prefer to use the 1-1/2" high for recipes created for them but if you do want to make them in a 2" high pan, for one layer do 2/3 the amount and decrease the baking powder by 1/8 teaspoon (or for 2 layers make 1-1/3 times the recipe and decrease the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon).

REPLY

andrea, i never recommended gel paste, i recommended the liquid food color!

REPLY

Hi Rose! Quick question for you: I just made four versions of your Red Velvet, each using gel paste food colors. The food color made each SO BITTER! Eeek! Should I be using something else? Like the watered-down supermarket coloring? The beet color has been dismal -- ugly. I like that bright red. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks,

Andrea

REPLY

Thanks in advance for the shortening tip. If I can master my digital camera, I'll try taking a shot of this one at Christmas! I'll check out the torting video.

REPLY

oh anita--what a tragedy! when i made rudi sprungli of lindth chocolate's wedding cake years ago the film in the camera didn't advance but luckily i have 2 polaroids. so sad. we all would love to have seen it.

when making the fondant, be sure to use spectrum shortening as the new non-transfat crisco is reported not to work.

and check my you tube demo of torting!

REPLY

Hi, Rose,

I am a novice baker, and I have been having so much fun with The Cake Bible. For my mother's 82nd birthday, I made a white chocolate whisper cake with a coconut rum moistening syrup, I made your lime curd and added that to the Silk Meringue buttercream for the filling, and then made a White Chocolate Moussiline frostinig with Godiva white chocolate liquor. I decorated it with a basket-weave design (my first ever attempt at decorating - it was far from perfect, but still looked nice) and topped it with fresh pink-purple Hydrangea from my mother's garden. It was gorgeous (if not perfect) and tasted fabulous -- and the left-over cake froze very well. If I hadn't inadvertently deleted the photos (brand new digital camera!), I would try posting shot! For Christmas, I am trying a yellow-cake with ganache filling and the rolled chocolate fondant with red chocolate rose decorations. My greatest challenge is still torting and trimming the cake.
I'll keep you posted.

REPLY

Bill thank you for your reply, If I had taken the time to read Rose's comments on the new cake bible the question would have been answered. You could have just told me to learn to read lol. Thanks again Pete

REPLY

Pete:
In the newer editions of the cake bible, Rose recommends using 1/3 more batter when using 2" pans. To tell the truth (sorry rose) when I first bought the cake bible, I had an early edition...and I never measured my pans...and so I was baking all of the recipes for 1 1/2 " pans in 2" pans. The only thing I encountered was that it took a little longer for the cakes to be done (apparently, the extra pan height, shields the batter from some of the heat) but my cakes always came out fine.

REPLY

Sorry about that last post being put up as anonymous.
Forgot to fill out thetop before submitting.
Pete

REPLY

This is not a comment, but more of a question. In the Cake Bible most of the pans called for are 9x1-1/2 inches. Roses Heavenly Cakes calls for 9x2 inch pans. I have 9x2 but no 9x1-1/2. Will it make a difference in the cake and its structure if I used the 9x2, or would it be better to bake the ones calling for the lower pan sides in an 8x2 inch pan? Help from anyone would be greatly appreciated. Pete

REPLY

Thank you, Rose!
And happy anniversary :o) I very much enjoy baking from RHC in the bake-along.

REPLY

Hanaa, yes, just sub equal weight wondra.

REPLY

Rose, some of your recipes call for Wondra flour. At the end of the recipe you include a substitution for Wondra flour which consists of cake flour + corn starch. I would like to know the opposite. From what I hear, using Wondra flour in chiffon cakes makes the cake ultra light. So, if a recipe specifies cake flour, can I substitute an equal amount of Wondra flour (by weight)? Thanks much for your help.

The recipe I'm interested in is the Orange Glow Chiffon Cake from The Cake Bible.

Hanaâ
HanaasKitchen.blogspot.com

REPLY

thanks so much

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Nicole
08/31/2010 09:35 AM

Nicole,
We suggest to look at Rose's "Cake Bible's" Wedding and Special Occasion Cakes section. She has worked out recipes for yellow cakes using yolks or white cakes using egg whites in all sizes. You could flavor these with vanilla bean,OR orange and lemon oils and zests. She has a chocolate wedding cake recipe using whole eggs.

Enjoy,
Woody

REPLY

Nicole, I'm not Rose, but perhaps I can point you in the right direction. The All-Occasion Downy Yellow butter cake uses yolks and rises higher and lighter than a pound cake. It is well-suited to wedding cakes, and is featured in the Cake Bible's wedding section. Hope that helps.

REPLY

Rose,

i just love your guts. here is my story/situation:

i make wedding cakes from my home. i'm a great decorator, but still trying to get a handle on the baking part. since it's just me, i'm trying to find ways to make more efficient my time. i would like to come up with one basic cake recipe that could easily be turned into like 5 or 6 different flavors (ie-vanilla, lemon, orange, chocolate, marble, etc.) i have found that pound cake works great for this, but it doesn't rise as well as i would like so i always end up making twice as much cake as i anticipated (for the height of the tiers.)

here is my question:
is there a way to make the pound cake rise higher (so i can get more bang for my buck?) or can you suggest a different (basic) cake recipe that can easily be turned into several different flavors & rise high as well? (preferably one that includes egg yolks?)

thanks so much ;)

REPLY

Woody

Thanks for the reference. I will check it out. But meanwhile, many of the recipes in Heavenly Cakes read as follows "cake flour (or bleached all purpose flour)". Are you saying that if you use the bleached all purpose flour option you have to adjust the baking powder? If the answer to that is in the Power of Flour section, I'll find it. Thanks

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from HDS
08/27/2010 07:21 PM

HDS,
Please read the two articles that we did on "The Power of Flour" a few months ago. Unless specified otherwise, we used cake flour in all of the recipes for Rose's Heavenly Cakes. You may need to adjust the baking powder for all-purpose bleached flour, and always for UNbleached flour to match the measurements of cake flour. The articles give suggested levels for baking powder, photos showing results, descriptions of texture and taste, and blending bleached and UNbleached flours with cornstarch or potato starch to try and match cake flour. All tests were done on white or yellow butter cakes. We will be doing chocolate butter cakes this fall. I hope the articles can help.
Woody

REPLY

Rose. I have had a bit of a struggle with several of the chocolate cakes in the new book using unbleached all purpose flour. I've had great success with all the chocolate cakes (and many other cakes (butter and chiffon) in the Cake Bible using bleached cake flour and chiffon and genoise using either cake flour or unbleached all purpose flour.

After many (I mean A LOT -- I've lost count) attempts with the chocolate layer cake on page 104 in which the the results included excessive shrinking, shriveling (but not dipping in the center)poor volume, poor height, and what to my taste was excessive denseness (on the fudgey side), I switched to bleached cake flour for the most recent attempt. The result was a cake between 1.5 and 1 3/4 inches high, very slightly domed, moist, chocolaty, with a fine crumb and smooth sides.

In none of the previous attempts with this cake and with the Devils Food cake and a couple other chocolate single layer cakes in the new book for which I used bleached all purpose flour did I have this degree of success. A couple of attempts including one attempt at the Devils Food Cake, were passable ,but none had the complete collection of characteristics typical of the butter cakes I've made with your recipes calling for bleached cake flour (or with unbleached all purpose flour in the case of genoise and chiffon).

As far as technique goes, I'm fairly confident Ive been avoiding typical mistakes by covering chocolate-water mixtures to avoid evaporation, measuring the temperature of liquid ingredients and butter with an instant read thermometer to make sure they were within the temperature range you suggest, weighing ingredients metrically and timing mixing times with a timer. My oven thermometers are accurate.

I've used both Goldmedal and a store brand of bleached all purpose flour in the instances where the cakes didn't work out.

My own guess is that cake flour is more forgiving of mistakes than bleached all purpose flour. But I would appreciate any thoughts you or your readers might have.

Best regards and many thanks

HDS

REPLY

Lori,

Go to this site http://www.indobase.com/recipes/category/cake-33.php and look under "Eggless". There are six recipes in this category.

Kathleen

REPLY

Hi Lori - try this substitution. Mix 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed with 3 tablespoons of water for each egg called for in the recipe. I saw a demonstration of this technique used in cookies - the results were very successful.

Patricia

REPLY

Rose,
I am getting more and more Indian weddings and they all request eggless cakes. My latest is a bride who wants an eggless red velvet. Can you give me some suggestions as to what I can use in substitute for the eggs? Also any other recipes for eggless cakes in general.
Thanks once again,
Lori Vreeke
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

michelle, the only recipes i worked out for large pans are the ones offered in the cake bible and in rose's heavenly cakes. the balance of ingredients in a recipe need to be taken into consideration and worked out with numerous testings. i did not yet do this for the white chocolate whisper cake. sounds like i should for the next book as it is a favorite.

REPLY

Michelle Thomsen
Michelle Thomsen
07/ 8/2010 11:40 PM

help! I have to make a wedding shower cake tomorrow and need advice. The cake will be 3 tiers each tier will be a torted 2" cake. the first will be 2 2" layers 16 heart shape whisper white chocolate with white ganache filling, the next will be 2 2" 12" lady baltimore with lemon curd and third will be 2 2" 8" all american butter. I have to bake each layer seperate because I do not have 2 of each pan. I was going to double the cake bible whisper white chocolate for each layer of the 16" but after reading the back of the book I realize based on the pan size I will have too much baking powder but if I use rose method it is more than double the recipe help. if I double the receipe I will use 2 tablespoons and 3 teaspoon but if I use the chart it is 14 teaspoon which equals 4 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons how can this be when we are suppose to decrease the amount the larger the pan.

REPLY

thank you lori for this excellent advice. i meant to caution rachel not to let buttercream sit at room temp for so long. ganache would be ok though.

REPLY

Rachel,
Your best bet is to store them in the refrigerator in boxes. When you remove them, it's best to leave them in the boxes as long as you can while they come to room temp. The condensation will not build up on the cake if they are boxed. Even if there is a bit of condensation on the cake, it will dry up before the wedding guests arrive.
Have Fun!
Lori V.

REPLY

Hi! I have your Cake Bible and am a big fan!
I have a question about cake storage - hoping you can help, I keep finding inconsistent answers everywhere.
I am making my sister's wedding cake: 3 tiers, chocolate layers with chocolate buttercream filling, covered with ivory fondant. I am also the maid of honour at the wedding so I will be preparing the cake on the thursday (wedding on saturday) - once it is covered with fondant on Friday...should I store it in the refrigerator or leave it out a room temperature until the wedding the next day? I thought it would be more fresh in the fridge, but I'm afraid of condensation droplets that may sit on the cake by being in the fridge. What do you recommend? Thanks so much!!

REPLY

Rose,
I love both your orange chiffon cake and genoise cake. Why is that I don't separate the eggs like the chiffon cake for the genoise? and why don't I add cornstarch to the chiffon cake but only to the genoise? many thanks.

REPLY

I love the tender, tight crumbs of the cake mix that just melts in your mouth without the chewy texture, but it doesn't taste good. Does anyone know how I can achieve that same texture from scratch? I have tried the chiffon cake, but while it was fluffy, airy and moist, the holes were big and it was elastic. In order to get that soft crumby texture, do I have to use butter? With the cake mix, oil was sufficed though. thanks for your advice.

REPLY

more fat=more tender--possibly dipping in the center. but for the buttercream it will emulsify better.

REPLY

They seemed to bake fine. What differerence have you noticed? What can I expect with the buttercream? Please prepare me now :)
Lori V.

REPLY

uh oh! my cakes don't perform the same with high butterfat butter. i hope the cakes came out well!

REPLY

Rose,
Thank you so much for the reply, I really appreciate your thoughts. I actually just purchased 3 cases of Plugra, Unsalted Butter and hopefully that should help. A local restaurant supply is finally carrying it. I just baked 8 pans of cakes this afternoon using it, so tomorrow when I tort and fill the cakes, I will check it out. Next week I need to make lots more buttercream so I will let you know how that works out.
Thank you so much for being there for us bakers!
Lori Vreeke
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

lori, butter can vary from season to season. i would try using the high butterfat butter which should help greatly! do let us know.

REPLY

Not Rose but just want to say that I empathize. Lori, you are such an experienced baker I would guess suppliers have reformulated one of your ingredients. On the off chance you're unconsciously doing something different, what about making the original 4-cup yield recipe following it word-for-word, step-by-step? Going completely back to basics has sometimes helped me in similarly mystifying circumstances.

Mary, no worries about the bp amounts Rose recommends. I assume you're talking about the white or yellow base cake? Multiply the base amount (1.5 tsp) by 2 for 2x6" and by 3.5 for 2x8" round cakes.

REPLY

Hi,
I have a question about the rose factor when calculating different size cakes. I am making a 6" 8" and 10" cake so it says to multiply 1 1/2tsp by 3.5 for the 6" and 8" cake. That seems like alot of baking powder. Or is it already figured out for me and I just add this amount to the base for each cake.

Thanks,
Thank you for all your replies

REPLY

Rose,
I have been making your Silk Meringue Buttercream for my wedding cakes for years and absolutely love it. Though lately I have been having a problem and can't seem to figure out what the problem is. Usually it comes out nice and stiff and thick but for the past dozen times, it wont thicken up. It has the consistency of a mousse or more like the mousseline. I haven't changed any of the ingredients and am using grade AA butter. It isn't the temperature and it doesn't matter how long I whip it up, it still stays thin.
PLEASE HELP! ANY SUGGESTIONS WHAT IT CAN BE?
Thanks,
Lori Vreeke

REPLY

Hi Rose, I took your suggested and asked the manufacturer why they said NOT to refrigerate their liquid lecithin. They took a long time to respond, but here is what they said:

Thank you for your inquiry. We recommend keeping the bottle of Liquid Lecithin tightly capped when not in use and storing it at room temperature. Liquid Lecithin may be refrigerated, but that will thicken the Lecithin and make it more difficult to work with. However, the bottle should not be stored by the stove/oven or in a kitchen that would get very warm during the summer months. Our Liquid Lecithin contains enough natural anti-oxidants that help prevent spoilage and help maintain freshness after the bottle is opened.

Furthermore, our lecithin is packed in dark amber-colored bottles which reduces its exposure to light. This also helps keep it fresh.

We hope this information is helpful. Your continued patronage of our products is appreciated.

REPLY

Dear Rose,
I am trying my hand at making some Babas, i found a recipe for Limoncello Babas with lemon cream, which seems to be a lemon pastry cream with whipped cream folded into it. i was curious if after splitting and soaking the babas could i pipe a lightened stabilized pastry cream in the babas and store them a few days before serving? Or would this compromise the dessert? Im trying to make them ahead as to cut down the steps on the day of serving. Or perhaps i could make the lightened lemon pastry cream and store it in a pastry bag till i need to fill the babas? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

peace and smiles sylvia

REPLY

Hi Zach,
Yes I guess it is an old recipe. I find that newer recipes call to add the baking soda to the dry though I made the recipe adding the baking soda to the dry ingredients and it turned out fine. I think you are right Zach, that in those days they presumed they had to add it to the liquid to activate it!

REPLY

oh-so glad to hear this. if there are any changes necessary for high humid conditions please do let me know so everyone can benefit.

REPLY

Dear Rose, thank you very much for your prompt and helpful advice. One of the heavenly bakers from Singapore (hot and humid) made the glaze successfully for the apricot roll so I suspect it should be the golden syrup. I will try again. Thanks again.

REPLY

i would recommend to make a small batch exactly as the recipe is written. it could conceivably be the golden syrup. if it seems too thin then, pour it at a lower temperature and it will be thicker. humidity may indeed be the culprit in which case you may need to reduce the water a bit. you'll need to experiment unless someone on the blog in a similar region can advise you.

REPLY

Dear Rose,

I made the chocolate passion cake in RHC today, and encountered a problem with the lacquer glaze. it does not seem thick enough to coat the sides. I had substituted golden syrup for corn syrup when making the glaze. But everything else was done to the letter, and I used a thermometer to check the temperature of the glaze. the top was very shiny and beautiful, but the sides just would not get covered, despite my pouring the glaze over 4 times.

Also, I left the cake to "set" and when I returned home from a dinner appointment, I was shocked to see that a crater-like pit the size of a coin had appeared on the surface. What could have caused this?

I live in the tropics and the weather is always hot and humid here, I don't know if this is a factor.

I am making this cake for a 90 person charity event next week so any pointers as to what I could be doing wrong would be much appreciated.

Thank you!

REPLY

just one clarification to what I said...this biscuit recipe I worked on called for adding the baking soda to the liquid early on in the process, thus obviously loosing some of its lift power before popped in the oven, rather than waiting to hit it with the liquid that goes into the flour mixture right at the last step before rolling them out. My assumption was it was just their normal habit to add baking soda directly to the liquid while baking because of the way they commonly used the product. I hope my point is clear; for some reason I'm having trouble expressing my exact point. :P

Zach

REPLY

In a biscuit recipe I had from the 1800's that I modernized, it called for adding the baking soda to the liquid. I often wondered why as well, and just assumed that they assumed in those days that the best way to activate baking soda was to add it to a liquid rather than the dry ingredients (a consequence of the habit of drinking bicarbinate of soda?? Not sure). Anyway, one of my changes was to add the baking soda to the dry ingredients as we normally do today. The biscuits turn out very good with this change. I didn't want any significant loss of the bubbles before they go into oven.

Mary, is this an old recipe?

Zach

REPLY

mary, i can't tell you why they add baking soda to the liquid but i can tell you what happens when you do: it starts to bubble and dissipate so it acts more to neutralize acidity but not to leaven the pudding.

yes you can use water instead of the stout but the stout sure gives it a fantastic flavor without being alcoholic as the alcohol cooks off.

REPLY

Hi Leah,

It is the Crisco, you can't use it anymore because the reformulated it. You need to use Spectrum brand.

REPLY

My question is about rolled fondant and what causes problems with the consistency.
I have made the recipe in the CB multiple times with wonderful results. This past week I had to make 25 lbs of fondant for a wedding cake and grooms cake. Right away, I noticed the fondant seemed crumbly when I started to knead it. When I rolled the fondant it was sticky and no amount of pwd sugar would fix it. When I tried to put it on the cake it tore and was impossible to smooth. The next day it was wet and sticky. When it finally dried the surface was fragile and cracked. I gave up on that batch and remade the fondant for the wedding cake. It was better but still not what I was used to previously.
I used the qty recipe which I had done in the past with sucess.
I did use a different brand of powdered sugar and a different type of glycerin.
Please help....don't really want to start using bought fondant.
Thanks Leah

REPLY


Hi Rose,
I have a question about sticky toffee pudding.
Why in some recipes does it ask to add the baking soda to the liquid? In heavenly cakes you use stout beer, can I substitue the beer for water?


Thanks,
Mary

REPLY

Merve, regarding the flours:
If there are no details on leavening in the self-rising flours, you will either have to experiment or use the AP flour, with modifications. For sponge-type cakes you can substitute part of the AP flour with cornstarch or potato starch. For butter cakes, you will need a bleached or heat-treated flour, and then also the starch substitution. Here are some links explaining heat treatment and starch substitution:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2010/03/the_power_of_flour_part_one_of.html

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2010/03/addition_to_power_of_flour_pos.html

http://amerrierworld.wordpress.com/kate-flour/#comment-1158

As for the dairy, 34% cream should work for heavy cream, though 38-40% would be best. US-style whole milk yogurt can be substituted for sour cream, but not sure what the turkish style substitute is.

Good luck!

REPLY

Hi,

I have some ingredient problems. The flours I can find in Turkey are either self rising cake flours (protein :%5.4 but the amount of leavining content not specified on the package) or various kinds of all purpose flours with a different protein contents ranging from 9 to 12 percent. Most commenly 10.5%.
If I substitude the cake flours in your recipes with the mixture of self raising cake flour and all purpose flour of 10.5% protein content what should be the mixture ratio?
If the recipe calls for baking soda and/or baking powder; How can I adjust them to ballance the self rising cake flour's effect.

Another problem is with the cream; recipies with sour cream and heavy cream. Not many different kinds sold. There is the cream with 34% fat content and the clotted cream (which is wonderful made of water buffalo milk). So how can I make substitudes for sour cream, heavy cream and butter milk with addition of milk and lemon.

For butter milk people use Turkish Yogurt as a substitude which is the real thing, little sour and high in fat content, not runny but has a pudding like consistency. If one tried to make yogurt at home for ones kids at any time they would know. Different then what it is sold as yogurt in States. I am wondering if you can offer another substitude? Or is it okey to use Turkish Yogurt.

Thank you in advance. Cake Bible is the best think out there I have it since 1998. I have not got the new book yet but definitly will order after reading about the sicillian pistacio cake. It looks heavenly in pictures. After reading the recipe online I wonder if we can increase the pistacio content?

REPLY

lynn, you will need to experiment but i think it will work since the pan has a center tube to offer support. if there's more doming you will need to drop the baking powder a bit. also it will take longer to bake so the outside may become too brown. but it's well worth a try and pls do report back!

yes--it's fine to freeze the ganache but i would defrost it over-night in the frig, and then leave it in a warmish place--80-85˚F or at least over 70˚F for several hours to soften and then empty it into a bowl and give it a few short zaps in the microwave. don't overdo the microwave as it will curdle. thinning it is tricky bc stirring lightens the color and thickens it! you could try taking a small amount and heating it in the top of a double boiler until melted. then you could thin it.

REPLY

bill is correct sashi! essentially the higher the pan the proportionately less leavening but despite adjustments the texture in a three inch pan is seriously compromised.

REPLY

I'm not Rose (although I wish I was LOL)...but I believe she has said that the recipes don't work well in 3 " pans.

REPLY

Hello Rose. I purchased your book the Cake Bible.Your book refers to 1 1/2 inch cake pans and provides the adjustment for 2 inch pans. What if the pan you are using is 3 inches - how would you alter the recipe? How long would the baking time be?

REPLY

Have just made the devil's food cake from your latest cookbook and a ganache from a different recipe. They were FABULOUS, after years of struggling to get things right. (Followed your advice about using a scale and prime ingredients; I especially appreciate HOW EXACT your instructions are).

Two questions:1- I made the recipe in the Nordicware Platinum series traditional pan, which calls for 12-15 cups. It worked out fine, but considering how fast this cake is disappearing, I would like to try a larger recipe in the same pan. Can I just increase the measurements by 50% or do other adjustments need to be made?

2- I made more ganache than I needed and froze half (it is the one with Triple Sec and vanilla flavorings). Your video was a big inspiration and very helpful. Will this be fine to use, thawed, in 6 weeks time? Could I thin it a little so it drizzles more? How?

REPLY

I followed the instructions exactly as written in your cookbook. I don't have any additional information that I could describe.

REPLY

exactly how did you prepare the pan?

REPLY

Hello -
I recently made the Chocolate Layer Cake with Caramel Ganache from your latest cookbook and had a problem.

I made the cake exactly as stated. I even made cake strips with tinfoil and wet paper towels. The cake looked great coming out of the oven. After I cooled it I turned it out onto a rack and the sides just crumbled off. They didn't stick to the pan, they just crumbled off after the cake was turned out.

Can you advise me as to why this happened and what I can try next time? Thank you. Julie

REPLY

charles, you might want to call the company to find out why they say not to refrigerate. lecithin is extremely prone to rancidity. it needs to be kept cold or it will taste really bad.

REPLY

lecithin in the frig

My bottle says "Do NOT refrigerate."

REPLY

Thanks Matthew,

I thought so but I wondered too because sometimes lemon cakes have lemon juice in them.
I made the cake yesterday and it is very good,but very rich with all the butter,sour cream and almonds.

Take care,

Janina

REPLY

She is referring to the lemon syrup that you brush onto the finished cake.

REPLY

Hi,

I have a question about the golden lemon almond cake. In the introduction before the recipe begins Rose mentions that, "Creating this cake was a challenge. It required less leavening because more sugar was necessary to balance the lemon juice." What lemon juice is Rose referring to? The batter itself doesn't contain lemon juice? Am I missing something? Is the cake supposed to have lemon juice in it?

Thanks,

Janina

REPLY

It's not that they won't eat anything chocolate...but it is definitely not the preference. And certainly nothing as deeply chocolate as the oblivion...or a chocolate cake with chocolate frosting. They will eat a yellow cake with a chocolate buttercream...or All american chocolate cake with vanilla buttercream...but I LOVE REALLY CHOCOLATY THINGS.

REPLY

Oh Bill, I can't believe no one in your family likes chocolate. That's so sad :( Chocolate is one of the best flavours in the world!

So I guess you must jump at any chances you have to make a chocolate dessert. ie - like your clinics. No wonder I always see you on the show and tell forums with beautiful chocolate cakes. You probably feel deprived. Well I am sure your patients and co-workers appreciate the cakes that you make.

REPLY

Liza...Yum! My favorite desserts for sure! Especially the chocolate oblivion. No one in my family likes chocolate - Imagine...I could never get them to eat that...so I almost never get to make it.

Rose:
Sometimes when you have been "absent" from the forums, it sort of feels like the "kids have been left alone in the classroom while the teacher stepped out " LOL

REPLY

Well, not to worry you have some wonderful followers who are more than willing to give great advice and a helping hand on the forums. They are very generous in guiding us more novice bakers through the baking process. We all know you are very busy. But it is really nice to be able to chat with and get advice from the author of these wonderful books through this blog. :)

REPLY

liza, thank you so much for this report. it makes me so sad that i forget for weeks at a time about the forums. it's so hard keeping up with everything. so i really appreciate when someone, and it's usually hector, jogs my attention that i'm missing something wonderful!

REPLY

Hi Rose,

Since I don't see you to often on the forums I thought I would put my two cents here on the blog.
This past weekend I made your chocolate oblivion truffle cake with white chocolate curls on top, mini carrot cakes in the chicago metallic mini cheesecake pans, using your carrot cake and white chocolate cream cheese icing, and last but not least the cordon rose cheesecake. It was my son's confirmation and we had all the family over for dinner and dessert.

I have to tell you that everyone, including myself were so thrilled with the desserts. The textures and tastes were wonderful. I will never make another cream cheese icing again except yours. The carrot cake was super moist and flavourful. The taste of the cheesecake was heaven. ( but for some reason it wasn't as firm as what I thought it would be. ) The melt in your mouth texture of the chocolate oblivion truffle cake was pure heaven. Definitely for the chocolate lover.

Anyways, thank you for all of the hard work that went into your books. Every baker should have them.
I am looking forward to trying more of your recipes

REPLY

Julie...Rose...not really. I love the whole baking process...just gave me an excuse to bake. (I made 3 dozen...two dozen for the office...one dozen for us!

REPLY

julie, i was thinking the same thing!

REPLY

Bill, you are a prince among men to bail out your other half. I must make that frosting again soon!

REPLY

OK...not a question but a comment. My "other half" had a big fit at work and yelled at everyone (this was Friday). When I got home I was given the following request "Could you please bake 2 dozen red velvet cupcakes for me to bring to work on Monday to appologize?" I've actually been using a red velvet cupcake recipe for years...and for cup cakes I still use it...but I always use your white chocolate/cream cheese frosting on them. The Dean of that division at NYU exclaimed: This is the most delicious frosting I've ever tasted!" (and ordered three dozen cupcakes for thursday!)

REPLY

sherri, i would try 1/4 teaspoon lecithin:1 cup flour. make sure to store the lecithin in the frig or it will become rancid and bitter.

REPLY

Woody & Bill,

Thanks for your quick response and great information. I suspected that the small quantity of cocoa may have been the reason Dutch process was not specified, but I know Rose usually recommends it, so I thought it best to double check. In addition, my understanding is that the red color is greatly affected by the acidity of the batter.

I think I am going to double the cake and triple the frosting as you suggest.

Thanks again,
Pop

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Pop
02/ 2/2010 09:43 AM

Hi Pop,
Although we usually specify Dutch process cocoa, we did not here due to the small amount. If the cocoa has any lumps, do sift it before measuring.
Our general rule for cakes has been to have some doming on most single layer cakes and level cake layers for layer cakes. This cake does have a dome. So you may want to level at least the bottom layer.
Bill is correct on the frosting. You can either double the frosting recipe and have the beautiful red sides showing or triple it for frosting the sides with some leftover.
Hope your grandson has a wonderful birthday and enjoys your special cake for him.

REPLY

Good Morning Rose:
I don't remember where I made the previous post about the Midnight Ganache...so I'm continuing here...sorry if there is any confusion. I any event...I must have done something wrong, because the Ganache hadn't thickened. I was hoping against hope, that it just needed more time, so that when I got home, I was going to find a beautiful, thick rich frosting in that bowl, waiting to be spread on that yummy looking devil's food cake. Alas...I had a bowl of chocolate sauce. Taking your advice I took a whisk to that bowl. I whisked. I whisked and whisked and whisked. I whisked myself into a minor frenzy. My other half came into the kitchen and said...with that face that one makes when they think the person they are talking to is out of their mind..."WHAT ARE YOU DOING?" "Making frosting" I responded. Then I got the shrug, and the exit. It never thickened. I don't know what I did...but like I said, I made that ganache in the middle of the night...while on the phone to a friend in california, and well...I wasn't focused...and something went gravely wrong. I ended up making the milk chocolate buttercream from the cake bible...fast and easy and DELICIOUS, and frosted the devil's food with that (There's a picture on the forum). My instinct was to pour that bowl of ganache down the drain...as I would often do when frustrated. I had dribbled some on my foot...I reached down and wiped it off with my finger...and licked it. (Yes...that's disgusting...but it was the middle of the night...and I wasn't thinking clearly). It was soooo delicious I could never put it down the drain. PERFECT SAUCE FOR PROFITEROLES. So, into the ziplock bag, into the freezer, and the next time I make profiteroles...the sauce is there!

Thanks for your help, care, and wonderful recipes.

REPLY

I doubled this recipe for two 9" layers and it baked up perfectly. I used dutch processed cocoa. As far as the frosting goes...I don't have my book in front of me so I can't comment on the amount. I doubled the frosting recipe given for the red velvet cake...and I did not frost the sides of the cake, I just had a layer of frosting between the layers and a layer of frosting ont he top. I had a little more than I needed ... but not enough to frost the sides as well.

REPLY

My Grandson's favorite color is red, so I plan to make the Red Velvet Cake from RHC for his birthday. My questions are:

Is the cocoa used in this recipe regular or Dutch process? I don't see that specified in the recipe.

I want to make two layers, so am I correct to just double the recipe?

Is the recipe for the same frosting listed later in the book in larger quantity enough for two layers?

REPLY

my name is zara, from nigeria. What flour do you use? i was using golden penny and i had the same problem, and i change back to Dangote n my cakes come out fine,so try dangote and see. Goodluck

REPLY

i'm sorry--i have no idea--i don't use cake mixes so i can't help here.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

Thanks for your reply. I live in Melbourne and looking at the American recipes that require one 2-layer cake mix. What does that mean if I use your pound cake recipe?

REPLY

Can soy lecithin be used as a "natural" sponge emulsifier and if so how much do you add? Is there a formula? I am trying to recreate the paper wrapped chiffon cakes you find in asian bakeries. They commonly use ovalette (an emulsifier) that cannot be found here, nor do I want to add any chemicals to my cakes. I have tried using cream of tartar with the egg whites and either baking powder of baking soda. It doesn't produce the results I am looking for.
If the lecithin is not the right thing, can someone suggest something else?
Thanks for your help

REPLY

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL

REPLY

Bill:
Hmmm, defrost and eat, well, it's a tough job, but I suppose someone has to...

REPLY

Julie:
Why is there so much cake in your freezer? Defrost it and eat!

REPLY

Bill, thanks for such a quick reply. I did read that with Wondra it fills the pan only half full instead of 2/3 full, but I didn't know if it necessarily followed that it also baked up shorter.

I did find the batter stiffer when folding with the Wondra, and faster to deflate.

Now, what to do with all that cake in my freezer?

REPLY

Yes...it bakes up shorter. Rose prefers the taste and texture...but it does bake up shorter. I haven't tried it, but I definitely remember reading something about the difference in height. You are not loosing your touch...your touch is in tact!

REPLY

Does the RHC genoise with Wondra bake up shorter than genoise with the flour/cornstarch mixture?

In my kitchen, using all the same ingredients and equipment, genoise with Wondra bakes up to 1 3/8" high, before trimming the crust, while genoise with cake flour/ cornstarch ends up 1 3/4" high before trimming the crusts. That's the four-egg version baked in a 9x2 round pan.

The flour/cornstarch versions were baked immediately after the wondra cakes, because I was afraid the shorter cakes would be too dense and unpleasant to eat. Before I start yet another genoise with flour and cornstarch, I thought I would check. Am I losing my touch?

REPLY

Thank you so much, Rose! I wasn't worried in the least. Have trusted your judgment for years and years. :) Just curious. I learn so much by following the evolution of your work with a given recipe.

I loved seeing how the GM cake itself sprang from experience with another cake. The country buttermilk? (Am at my brother's now and don't have TCB with me to double-check.) Then the GM bundt, and now the glorious GM wedding cake. Old friends are sometimes the dearest! You can really appreciate them in their new finery. :)

Ended up doing a much smaller version for my birthday. And GM only on the top tier, since my brother and the grandchildren don't have alcohol. But the GM cake was divine. Superlatives fail! I'll be posting about it on the forum.

Thank you again. No apologies necessary about "ignoring us", but so glad to know that your notification system is working again! You've spoiled us utterly. We miss you when you're not there/here!

REPLY

Another question please. How do I make the cake less dense and more fluffy? Or do you think this problem would be solved if the flour quality changes? Or should I increase the baking powder I use?

REPLY

Thabk you Rose. I've searched and read about the method of microwaving unbleached flours - 'kate flour'. I hope that's what you were referring to. Reducing the moisture content of the flours, and also adding cornstarch.
Here, the flour sold usually is without information on its proten content, and I can only assume it is unbleached. So maybe this method would greatly help me. Maybe the moisture content in the flour was high because it is stored in a freezer also.
This is a great site to ask you question since I have the Cake Bible. I just found it accidentally today!

REPLY

it's the flour. please do a search on this blog for flour and unbleached flour. i think it will help.

REPLY

Hi Rose, I hope this is the right place to ask a question. I live in Nigeria and recentlty started baking. Please can you tell me why the cakes I bake all have slides that slope inwards at the top? For instance, after baking, the top of an 8" cake now measures about 7" in diameter.

How can I make the cakes bake with straight sides? What am I not doing right?

REPLY

Carol, it took a lot of work to make the grand marnier cake, originally made in a 9-10 cup tube pan, work in 6, 9 and 12 inch layer cake pans! yes--the sour cream and baking powder were reduced. the tube pan has the center tube for support so it was necessary to increase the strength of the batter this way and even to use all purpose bleached flour. BUT because of the syrup it is every bit as tender. not to worry.

REPLY

Stephanie Owens Waterman
Stephanie Owens Waterman in reply to comment from Carol
01/24/2010 08:38 PM

Thank you so much Carol. Yes on the WVBC... I don't know where I think I heard/read the Heavenly Cake Strip thing.. Must have made it up!

I appreciate your response very much... cakes are in at 350!

:)

REPLY

Just follow the recipe as written, Stephanie. If Rose wanted you to preheat 25 degrees higher, she would have said so. Presume you're making the WVBC from pp 46-7 of The Cake Bible? What she says is "Preheat the oven to 350F".

You can take her at her word. :)

REPLY

Stephanie Waterman
Stephanie Waterman
01/24/2010 07:08 PM

Hi There,

I've been scouring your Blog, book & Forum because I think I've read about this before... after 45 minutes here I am :)

Re Heavenly Cake Strips (baking White Velvet Butter Cake tonight) - do I need to adjust the oven temp during preheat or otherwise? My (poor) memory is telling me that I need to preheat 25 degrees hotter and turn it down when the cakes (in their strips) go in...

Thank you for all you do!

Stephanie

REPLY

Really appreciated your answer to liztree below, Rose, about the new Grand Marnier cake. I, too, am having a birthday and will make 6"+9" tiers to share next week with family and friends to celebrate the day.

I learn so much from seeing how your work has evolved, so I couldn't resist looking back at TCB version of this recipe and comparing the two. Am curious about the changes you made - one in particular - and wondered if you would share your thinking.

It's the sour cream. I discovered that the batter for the top 2 tiers in RHC is 2.5 x the GM cake in TCB...except for the sour cream. You've cut that back a lot! Is the change related to the fact you now use a combination of yolk and whole egg? Or is it the switch from tube to cake pans?

Thanks for all you do.
Carol

REPLY

I made the All American Chocolate Torte today and I don't think it turned out quite the way it should have.
For one, the top crust cracked while baking(Despite my putting a baking sheet on top to prevent it from over-browning). And the cake rose very well while baking in the oven, but fell once it began to cool.

The result: a cracked crust, very dense crumb, dry edges and one depressed amateur baker
:(

All though the final height of the cake was the same as mentioned in the cake bible, but the texture left much to be desired. I don't think it was supposed to be like this.
What could have gone wrong. I was following the recipe exactly.

REPLY

You are so welcome. Glad we could be helpful

REPLY

Jheenie,

You can show us a photo under "Show and Tell" in the Forum. I'll look for it.

REPLY

Dear Rose, Kathleen & Bill,
Thank you all for your suggestions. I made the Downy Yellow Butter cake (i baked one cake at a time) and used a baking sheet to shied the top from over browning, opened the oven door after 2/3 of the baking time, without the cake getting affected, and it turned out just fine!!
I wish I could post a picture here to show you how well it turned out.
My friend's mom (for whose birthday this cake was being baked) just loved it.
I am so happy... :)
Thank you all once again!!

Jheenie

REPLY

Jheenie,

Another suggestion: if you can't find sour cream, yogurt often makes a good substitute in cake batters, (but not for sour cream gananche).

REPLY

Jheenie,

I used to have an oven that had heating elements in the top and bottom, like the one you have. I would put a baking sheet, like the kind you bake cookies on, on a top shelf over the cake or whatever I was baking. This would deflect heat from the top of the cake so it didn't over-brown.

REPLY

Thank You Rose!!! :)
I'm a great fan of yours....And like Liz mentioned below, i am also star struck that you replied to my post. I just love all your videos and your blog. My sister says i'm addicted.
I can't wait for my Cake Bible to arrive.
I will look forward to your post on using unbleached flour.
I don't have a fluted tube pan yet but I will get one shortly.
My biggest challenge here is finding the ingredients. Even the seemingly simple ones like double cream or sour cream are not readily available as they aren't commonly used in our cuisine. I'm sure there must be specialty shops stocking such items but i'm yet to locate a store close to where i live.
I'm still struggling to find heavy cream for the Ganache, i've only managed to find fresh cream which is rather runny. I don't know if it will work.

But i'm determined... hopefully I shall find what I'm looking for :)

Thank you again.. Rose, Bill :)

REPLY

Jheenie:
I would never open the oven door with a sponge type cake like a genoise...then you are looking at a fallen cake...trust me...it's happened!

REPLY

i would hedge my bets and make one layer at a time.

REPLY

Thanks for the suggestions Bill :)
I have always been very hesitant to open the oven while the cakes are baking, probably because my mom had drilled into my head when i was younger, that opening the oven door would result in a sunken cake.
I guess she said that more out of trying to teach me to be patient while baking (i was a very impatient kid, always wanting to peek into the oven to see if the cake was ready)

My oven is not very big. If I do place my cake tins, there will be a very large overlap, but i will try and do what you say, to the maximum extent possible.

And as for the questions on the flour... I really do wish i do get some answers :)

Thanks once again for your help... :)

REPLY

thank you bill for this excellent answer. i don't know about maida either but jheeni, you need to read about kate flour either in my new book or on the blog so you can see how to treat the maida flour if it turns out not to be bleached. also read my posting this coming saturday about a solution to using unbleached flour but you will need to have a fluted tube pan.

REPLY

Hi. I'm not Rose...but I think I know the answers to your questions. As far as switching the position of the pans...it is perfectly fine to open the oven and switch position of the pans for this sort of cake. I find it is best to do it when the cakes have baked for 2/3 the amount of time called for in the recipe, rather than at the half way point. If your oven is large enough to have the two pans not directly on top of each other...but positioning one pan slightly to the left and one pan slightly to the right...that would be ideal.

The protein content of the flour is very important to the result. Whether the flour is bleached or not is also important. I do not know anything about maida. Perhaps Rose will know and comment when she sees the posting...perhaps you can find some information on line regarding the flour.

Hope this has been helpful

REPLY

Dear Rose,
I'm a new member and i was directed here from the forums, to post my question(s).
I am planning to make your Downy Yellow Butter cake for a dear friend's mom's birthday which is next week. I don't have your Cake Bible (I've ordered a copy but it won't reach me in time for the birthday).

My problem is that i have an electric oven with heating coils on the top & bottom. The recipe calls for baking both the cakes simultaneously. But if i do that, the top cake tends to brown more than the bottom one. What can i do? I don't want to open the oven door while the cakes are baking, to switch positions of the top & bottom cakes, for the fear that it will affect the baking of the cakes and they might sink.

Can i halve the recipe and make one 9" cake at a time? Will that have any effect on the proportions?

Do you think covering the top cake with aluminum foil will help?

Is refrigerating the batter of second cake while the first is baking a viable option?

Secondly, I have another set of questions. I'm in India, and here we don't have many varieties of flour that are more common in US/Europe, maybe because most of our staple breads are unleavened and made of the regular milled flour called atta. It is high in bran and i don't use it for baking. What i use instead is a finer milled flour called maida. But there is no way for me to know whether the flour is bleached/ unbleached etc. I have no idea of the gluten content etc
How much will this affect my baking?

REPLY

either option is fine. if you do the first yes bake them cold from the frig and add a little extra time to the baking.

REPLY

Hi rose,

i will be baking a tiered cake that would require a 10 inch chocolate butter cake. however, my oven cannot accommodate 2 10 inch cake pans at the same time. should i:
a) refrigerate one of the pans (if so, do i bake the batter straight from the fridge or let it come to room temp before baking?) or
b) halve the recipe and bake each layer at a time?

thanks!

REPLY

liz, that's so sweet! yes i think you chose the simplest, most foolproof, and generous to boot solution.

you will enjoy knowing that the cake bible was born on 8-8-88 when i was 44! and it is now in its 44 printing! i like when numbers line up like that.

last night at 1 am--too tired to watch the rest of the dvd--i stayed up another 30 min. to work out the answer to your question. and i'm glad to know for future reference that the two 9 inch layers require 0.7 the recipe.

happy 44!

REPLY

Rose, You are simply genius! Yes! I will simply make all the cake and Freeze or give away some layers!!! Also, I feel star struck that you replied to me!!!!
Thank you!!
Liz Tree a fan of TCB and RHC

REPLY

liz, i would make the whole thing and give away the two 9 inch layers but if you really want to make only the 2 9 inch ones you have to multiply everything by 0.7
do this with care, double check your math, do the same for the syrup, and round off to the nearest whole number.

REPLY

I love the Grand Marnier Cake!! I want to make it for myself for my 44th birthday, next week. BUT I would like to make 2 9inch layers... not a whole wedding cake. How do I reduce the ingrediants!!!

Thank You and Thank You Rose for your inspiration and all you share!

REPLY

Hi all!

Last time I posted a question about subbing oil and regular sugar in my carrot cake. I tried clarified butter and rapadura sugar and it did not work out so well! I ended up with something akin to carrot brownies. They were tasty, but not cakey. So I baked up the original recipe and it was a success! I guess sometimes the real deal is the way to go : )

Now, I wonder if I can ask some questions about chocolate souffle. I see some recipes are simply chocolate, sugar, eggs and a dash of flour while others include milk. I understand that more flour equals a cakier texture, but what about the milk? Will it make the center more dense and gooey?

Also, most recipes are for individual ramekins, but I'm looking to make one large souffle for two people. Any thoughts/recipes for, say, a 20oz souffle dish?

Many thanks and Happy New Year!

REPLY

I meant the advantages of using silicone liners by themselves or cupcake wrappers in a pan.

Sounds like a lot of work to wrap all those cupcakes!

Thanks for your help so far,

REPLY

well said bill!

REPLY

I once made a carrot cake with clarified butter (there are posts about it somewhere on this website.) It worked just fine, but it did not improve the flavor of the cake (that actually shocked me) and yes, the cake was slightly less moist. I went back to oil. As far as health concerns...I'm sure none of it is good for us LOL and so, everything in moderation. Julia Child said: (and I'm paraphrasing...i don't know the exact quote) I'd rather eat a table spoon of potatoes Anna than a pound of baked potatoes.

REPLY

Rose thank you so much for your quick response! Great suggestion. I love clarified butter and ghee (I regularly make my own).

Good to know about the sugar. I will keep the amount as written.

Thanks again.

REPLY

ok i googled rapadura and i see it is a variety of organic unrefined sugar. should be fine to substitute.

REPLY

margie, i would try replacing the oil with clarified butter aka butter oil. i've never heard of rapadura sugar but i can tell you that if you decrease the sugar the cake will be less tender. do let us know how this worked out and what rapadura sugar is!

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I am getting ready to bake Dorie Greenspan's carrot cake from her book Baking: From My Home to Yours. It calls for 1 cup of canola oil as the fat. For health reasons, I'm not a huge fan of canola and would prefer to use butter. Will that result in a less moist cake? Should I use 1 cup of melted butter, or 8oz of butter and then melt, or not melt at all and beat with the sugar?

Also, I'd love to use rapadura sugar. Since it's got a richer flavor, what would happen if I reduced the sugar from 2 cups to, say, 1.5 cups?

Thanks so much! I appreciate your thoughts.

REPLY

dawn, you can use liners in silicone cups but the ideal thing is to bake directly in them. it offers just the right support to give a lovely rounded tops to the cupcakes. true you have to wrap them when unmolded but they you'd have to wrap them anyway to keep them from drying.

REPLY

I recently saw silicone cupcake molds for sale and am wondering what the advantages are. It seems to me like once you removed the molds, the cake base would dry out with no wrapper to protect it. Secondly, it seems like there'd be a lot more things to wash. Thoughts?

REPLY

I can't wait to hear the story of how you discovered this buttercream.

REPLY

big smile happening!

REPLY

Rose:
The cake was a huge hit and the buttercream was luxurious and delicious. Thanks! (Oh, and it held up perfectly all day!)

REPLY

It doesn't really work. The syrup/sugar combination boils at too low a temperature.

REPLY

Dear Rose: Iam not a professional, but I love to bake cakes. I have a question: Can I make Mousseline Buttercream in the same way that the Neoclassic Buttercream, disolve the sugar and the syrup, instead mix the water and sugar until the syrup reaches the temperature of 250 grades. I made the Neoclassic Buttercream version Chocolate and is so easy and it came so well. Would you pls. let me know if it can be done in that way. Thank Yvonne

REPLY

Kathleen and Annie,
I made the Almond Shamah Chiffon and the Chocolate Butter Cupcakes this weekend (both recipe from RHC) using Organic Unbleached All Purpose Flour and the results are so tender and moist. I could not tell the difference with cake flour (except of course I feel this is a healthier choice). I posted the pictures on these threads:
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/1523/
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/1398/P45/
Thank you both!

REPLY

Thanks...I actually can't wait. I love lemony things as well (My second favorite flavor next to chocolate). I will try to get pics to post.

REPLY

Bill - please take a picture so you can share. I would love to see it!

REPLY

assuming office isn't 85˚F or over it will be just fine! you'll love it.

REPLY

Good Morning Rose: No Rush to answer this one...but when you get a chance...
Haven't had much time to bake lately, but so far every recipe I've tried from "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" has been...well...Heavenly! Next week I have a B-day cake to make for a collegue turning 50 and she LOVES LEMON!. So...I figured I'd try Woody's lemon layer cake (Not sure if that was the exact name) from the new book. Will this buttercream hold up all day at room temperature like the mousseline? This will be for the clinic where the cake will be left on a table all day and people will pick...I would hate for it to be swimming in a puddle of lemon soup by noon.

REPLY

Annie - I love your comment "follow your heart and your cakes will rise." So nicely said and I think it's so true. I always think that food made with love taste better :). You and Kathleen are inspiring me to try Rose's cakes with the organic unbleached AP flour that I have. I will start immediately and will report results. Thanks!

REPLY

I have been baking Rose's cakes with unbleached organic flour for 5 years since moving back to the UK. I buy Shipton Mill Organic Standard flour in 16kg bags which is 10% protein. I understand from Melinda that they do a 9% Cake and Pastry flour (also unbleached organic) but found out they only sell it in 1.5kg bags or 25kg sacks. I frequently use the 12.5% substitution with corn flour (cornstarch) for genoise and biscuit.

The cakes do not rise quite as much - approx 1/4 inch less for a two inch cake - and are not quite as tender but are still very tender and scrumptious.

I personally am not prepared NOT to make Rose's cakes - they are the best. Nor do I have the time or energy to make Kate flour. Nor am I prepared to sacrifice the organic designation of the flour I use.

Jenn, I say follow your heart and your cakes will rise!

REPLY

I have only used unbleached white all-purpose flour and sifted whole wheat flour (sifted to remove the bran, which makes for a heavy cake). I have never used cake flour, yet my cakes are received with great compliments. They are extremely tender -- the most tender cakes I have ever baked and eaten.

REPLY

Kathleen, so you have use Unbleached All Purpose Flour with Rose's recipe? That is interesting that the result is tender even without cake flour. I have not dare trying with a different flour than prescribed.

REPLY

Maybe "organic" and "bleach" in the same product is an oxymoron?

I try to cook and bake organic whenever possible. I have decided that making a cake following Rose's method makes for such a tender cake anyway, even with non-bleached flour and even with sifted whole wheat flour. It is her method that results in a tender cake, regardless of whether the flour is bleached or not. No doubt the use of bleached flour would make for an even more tender cake, but my Rose cakes are so incredibly tender that I see no reason to use a flour bleached with chemicals.

Here is a link to an article about bleaching flour if anyone cares to read it.
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/03/26/The-Little-Known-Secrets-about-Bleached-Flour.aspx

Thank you, Rose, for sharing your cake making method with us.

REPLY

Liz, I try to eat 100% organic as well. Have been using the bleached cake flour which is not organic. There is no organic bleached flour. I will attempt (perhaps this coming weekend) to do Kate Flour.

REPLY

i don't think there is an organic flour that is bleached so if you want to use organic flour you will need to heat treat it--but kate flour in the search box.

REPLY

i have not tried using passion fruit but my guess is that if you use the same amount as the orange juice but NO SEEDS it should work.

check out napa valley puree as they have a frozen concentrated passion fruit juice so you can get more flavor without adding more liquid.

REPLY

Love and appreciate all you share!!!
ORGANIC. I am committed to using all organic in all my cooking and baking. What flour do you reccomend for baking your cakes???
Thank You
Liz Tree
Williams, Oregon

REPLY

Hi rose,

i'm from singapore and a huge fan of yours (i have ALL 3 of your books) and i have always looked to your books for ideas and proper technique. i have a question for you that has been causing me sleepless nights for weeks!

i made your orange glow chiffon cake but i replaced the OJ for and equal amount of passionfruit seeds and 2T of seeds. i halved the recipe and baked it in a 9inch aluminum angel cake tin.

after checking for doneness i pulled it out and inverted the cake over a bottle as per the recipe, but after being suspended for 10 minutes, the cake fell out!

i thought i might have under baked the cake so the next day i tried it again but this time baking it longer about 1hr 10 mins, again inverting the cake over a bottle, but the cake fell out again!

i have tried making other orange chiffon cake recipes ( i made a total of 5 cakes in 3 days) replacing the juice with passion fruit juice, but each time, the cake fell out, causing my heart to fall as well.

i did some research and found that it could be due to the batter having too much liquid. so i reduced the juice from 182gr to about 120gr without any seeds, and instead of an aluminum tin, i baked it in black, non stick angel food tin. and lo and behold, the cake stayed put while suspended.

so my question to you is,

-does the passion fruit juice have anything to do with the cake falling out or was it caused by the type of cake tin i used?
- after reducing the amount of passion fruit juice, i was disappointed to find that i could hardly taste it in the cake, unlike the others which fell out. how can i improve the flavor of my beloved passion fruit?!?!?!?

pleasssssssssssssssssssssssssssse give me some advice. it has been perplexing me for days and nights!!!!!


REPLY

Thank you, Rose. The cake is high in fat -- 8 oz. butter, 8.5 oz. sour cream, 7 oz. almond paste and four egg yolks. The percentage of fat, which comes to 24%, is 2% higher than your pound cakes. The sugar is also very high at 31%. Now I know by how much to reduce the fat and sugar.

Your chart on pg. 470 TCB helped me look at cake recipes in a different way and be able to adjust them.

I've owned TCB for almost 20 years, and I still keep finding gems, such as this chart, in it.

Thank you.

REPLY

kathleen when i formulate new recipes i take into account the fat in everything, the water in everything, and if i'm adding sweet ingredients such as white chocolate, the sugar as well.

REPLY

Dear Rose,

I am helping my sister determine the problem with a cake recipe -- it sinks in the center and burns on the exterior while the interior remains unbaked. To help unravel this, I am working out the percentage of major ingredients, following the format of the chart on page 470 of TCB.

When determining the percentage of fat, I will use the grams of fat in the butter and sour cream. Do I also use the grams of fat in the egg yolks and almond paste to determine the fat percentage of the recipe?

In your chart, eggs count as eggs, sour cream probably counts as liquid. The
question -- restated -- do I take into account the grams of fat from each one and add to the fat column?

Thank you.

REPLY

that sounds very french but they don't start expressing numbers with multiplication/addition until they get to 70!

REPLY

LOLOLOL...great story. My 50th isn't that many years off (much closer than I'm willing to admit...I remember celebrating my thirty-eleventh and thirty - twelfth birthdays...so you see how I can be about age...LOL). Since I invariably end up baking my own b-day cake...I'll be sure not to use all those candles!

REPLY

bill and everyone--you're going to love this: i once made mousseline frosted cake for an old friends 50th birthday and placed it on a "celebration plate" with 50 candles surrounding it. when i lit the candles the mousseline started melting so i raced with the cake to the table--not so fast that the candles would blow out--and told the surprised friend to blow them out quickly. most of the frosting, though soft was still firm but the part that had melted was beautifully emulsified and served as a lovely sauce. so have plates and spoons and you'll have no worries! not sure if i could repeat this if i planned it that way though!

REPLY

Question about mousseline. I've been making it for years...with no problems (Once I discovered that my thermometer was off by 5 degrees everything has been going swimmingly). I, for the first time, used the full 3 ounces of liquor...and the buttercream doesn't cling to the side of the bowl the way it did before I added it...and it seems softer (as would be expected). It still piped beautifully. Will it hold up as well at room temperature? I made a birthday cake for the hygienist at the clinic for tomorrow...and they typically leave the cake out on the table all day and people "pick". Will I have any problem?

REPLY

it has to be the temperature of the syrup. i know you bought a new thermometer but not all thermometers are accurate. i recommend the cdn or the thermapen.

REPLY

Thanks for the answer to my question about the dry cake. I have another question about the italian meringue cake. I used your recipe (and every other italian meringue recipe) and it's not smooth and creamy. Please help. I used to make this perfectly for 20 years and now I can't and I don't know what's wrong. I used your recipe and it was only smooth on the surface. Underneath it looked grainy and not smooth even though it wasn't grainy. Please Help!

REPLY

thank you so much for posting this fascinating study. yes it's all about ph and of course the liquid that you add also places a big part. in one of the cakes in my upcoming book--the devil's food cake--i use only baking soda but acidity to dissipate it comes from the brown sugar, liquid, and to a certain extent the bitter chocolate itself. there wasn't room in the headnote to explain it but i'm doing a "behind the scenes out takes" series which will mention that this is why the cake doesn't have the usual slightly soapy after taste coming from baking soda!

looking forward to the coffee curd--no rush.

REPLY

Dear Rose,

I thought you might be interested in this study on cocoa used in baking. Dietary flavonols are being researched, as they have such a positive impact on health.

"In a study published this month in the Journal of Food Science, scientists from The Hershey Company and Brunswick Laboratories (Norton, MA) showed that over 85% of the cocoa flavanols were preserved in recipes for chocolate frosting, hot cocoa drink and chocolate cookies. In chocolate cakes, antioxidant activity and cocoa flavanols could be largely retained by using a combination of baking powder and baking soda.

The scientists initially saw that 50 to 95% of the flavanols were lost in making chocolate cakes. After further investigation, they found that the use of baking soda in the chocolate cake recipe was associated with increased pH of the cake, darker color, and a loss of flavanols and antioxidant activity during the baking process. Use of only baking powder in the cake recipes allowed complete retention of the antioxidant activity and cocoa flavanols, but resulted in a flat cake. By partially substituting baking powder for the baking soda, the cake pH was moderated and almost all of the flavanols were retained while still resulting in a cake with acceptable color and height."

From http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/new-study-shows-cocoa-flavanols-can-be-preserved-during-cooking-and-baking-24052.html

It has been too hot to bake lately, but I will post the recipe for the coffee curd when I make it for a chocolate cake.

I see there is another Kathleen on the pie board. I'm the cake Kathleen, but your "Flaky and Tender Pie Crust" recipe may convert me. :)

REPLY

My most loved and used cookery books are also the most stained and dog-eared! If they are still pristine it means, either you don't fancy the recipes or they don't work out the first time you try them.

REPLY

kathleen--that's fascinating. do post the recipe when you do it.

REPLY

Thank you Rose. I was so focussed on buttercream frosting, that using lemon curd never occurred to me.

Your suggestion prompted me to read the lemon curd recipe in TCB, to find a note I added a while back about making a coffee version with espresso and Medaglia d'Oro espresso powder instead of lemon juice. I think I got this tip from a past post by Hector. This would make a great topping on a chocolate cake for a hot, summer day.

By the way, as I read through all the posts, whenever I see a tip, suggestion, different version of a TCB cake, I add it to the page of the original recipe.

My TCB is now stained and a little dog-eared, but I've had it since 1988 or '89. All those stains represent great cakes.

Thank you, Rose, for sharing your cake knowledge with us.

REPLY

kathleen, lemon curd studded with white chocolate chips.

REPLY

Thank you, Rose. I'll use a thermometer for making the buttercream at high altitude.

Another question -- what is your favorite frosting for when the weather is really hot and humid? For afternoon summer events, when the temp. is close to 90 degrees, is it possible to have a frosting that stays firm? Thank you.

REPLY

Veronica

Here are the directions on how to make your own chocolate cigarellos [like the ones that Zach refers to a few posts back]. I have not made them myself.

http://cakecentral.com/articles/133/how-to-make-chocolate-cigarellos-natis-way

REPLY

Zach Townsend
Zach Townsend
08/10/2009 11:17 PM

me too! Please report back and let us know.

REPLY

ahso! well i can't wait to hear if it works!

REPLY

Zach Townsend
Zach Townsend
08/10/2009 11:14 PM

My concern with the possibility of moisture impact on the meringue is just that the spray is warm and when it hits the meringue, I'm not sure if it would have an adverse impact or not. I've never sprayed meringue but if Nick suggested it, it's probably not an issue (but still, I'd do a test run).

Generally, items that are sprayed are frozen (such as mousses) so that the instant the spray hits the item it sets.

REPLY

thanks zach. i knew you'd know! but i don't understand the moisture problem because neither chocolate nor cocoa butter contains liquid in the form of water. i think the spray would be worth trying but if not, it's not hard to paint the back of meringue twigs with chocolate though i'll admit a bit time-consuming. but not nearly as bad as making all the chocolate quills for the pine cone!!!

REPLY

Zach Townsend
Zach Townsend
08/10/2009 10:57 PM

The general porportion for spray guns (electric) is 1:1, chocolate to cocoa butter (for example, 1 lb semi-sweet choc to 1 lb cocoa butter). You can add a little more chocolate but the more chocolate the more coarse the spray and the more difficult it could be to get out of the gun.

This seems risky on meringue as the moisture from the cake plus moisture from the spray - not too sure about that. I would definitely practice first.

You might be better off just making or buying chocolate cigarettes (rolled tempered chocolate shapes) or finding another creative and attractive gourmet cookie.

Good luck!

REPLY

Thank you so much Rose. I could see how that would work because the chocolate coating on the meringue sticks wouldn't be so thick apposed to being dipped the chocolate and therefore wouldn't make them too sickly sweet in combination with sweet cake and sweet buttercream. The customer tells me, don't make the icing too think, not too sweet, not too this or too that. I'm thinking "it's cake isn't it and a desert isn't it suppose to be sweet." I'm confident that once they taste it they will lick their fingers and come back for more.

REPLY

veronica, i was just speaking to nick malgieri and he suggested spraying the chocolate onto the meringue twigs! i never done this but he said all you need is a $30 spray gun and to thin the chocolate with cocoa butter. you may want to check out this possibility. i'll ask zach to chime in if he has any exact recipe.

REPLY

things boil at lower temperature at higher elevations which means they won't be as hot so yes--i would use a thermom.

REPLY

Rose,

I just made the Neoclassic Buttercream from TCB. It turned out beautifully. Next month I will be making it again for my sister's wedding at 7,000 feet elevation. Do I need to use a thermometer when bringing the corn syrup and sugar to a full boil (which I believe will take longer at that elevation)? Or is a full boil of the syrup the same temp., whether at sea level or 7,000 ft.? Thank you.

REPLY

do send the photo to my gmail address and i'll be sure to post it!

REPLY

Thank you so much. You have made my day. I will be able to make the meringue sticks in advance and then use them to finish decorating the cakes. It will be a 2 tier cake with the meringue stick's all around each of the cakes and then topped with strawberries and blueberries. This will be my first tiered cake. Thanks to the cake bible I feel prepared. I'd love to post a picture of the finished product.

Thank you again very much

REPLY

veronica, good idea about coating with chocolate, at least the part that will touch the buttercream. this will work. otherwise they will become droopy and soft.

REPLY

My question is about the meringue sticks used in the enchanted forest cake on pg 195 of the cake bible. I'm doing a cake for a friend and she wanted wafer sticks around the cake which will be frosted in buttercream. I can't get a hold of these wafer sticks and thought of the meringue sticks but it says not to place the sticks on the cake any more than 1 hour before serving. I have the have this cake reading a few hours before the party. Can a coat the meringue sticks in chocolate? Or tie a ribbon around the cake to hold them in place? There is just no way that I can finish the cake just before it's served. Thank you in advance for your help.
Veronica
Australia

REPLY

I had this problem with the chocolate mousseline once...and I solved it by not letting the chocolate cool all the way to room temperature. I add the chocolate when it is just a tiny bit tepid. I add it all at once and it has never melted the buttercream. I know this is a little risky...but sometimes you just gotta live on the edge.

REPLY

rozanne, that's an excellent practice in general when adding things. it goes in more evenly that way!

REPLY

Rozanne and Annie

Thanks for the input. Yes, Rozanne, I too have found that the chocolate problem does not happen all the time. I am determined to fix this problem. The next time I make it [shortly] I will take specific notes re the temp of the chocolate, mousseline and the exact cocoa % of my chocolate. I like both of your suggestions about incorporating the chocolate in with some of the mousseline at first. I will post back soon!

REPLY

Annie and Valerie, I have the same problem with the choc mousseline but not all the time. I have not been able to figure it out. Could it be the cocoa butter content???? Just guessing here. To prevent this from happening I mix a little buttercream into the chocolate first and then add that to the plain buttercream (just as you suggested Annie). It solved the problem for me.

REPLY

Valerie, I have had the exact same problem with the chocolate mousseline. In fact I posted a question on the forums but it wasn't resolved. I don't think it's the liqueur as I didn't add any. However, I do think it's the difference in temperature between the mousseline and the melted chocolate. I think it might be that the mousseline in the bowl is too cold and the chocolate sets on contact, thus causing the chocolate bits. Next time I make it, I will try Rose's suggestion of maintaining the mousseline at 70F. I also thought of removing a small portion of mixture from the bowl and mixing in the chocolate while stirring madly by hand to prevent it setting. Then adding the mixture back into the bowl and stirring in. Let us know if you try it before I do and I'll post back the next time I make this mousseline. Good luck, Valerie!

Annie

REPLY

Marija Cilia
Marija Cilia
08/ 1/2009 08:12 AM

Hello Rose this is Maria from I would like to know how to make Cake Flour as in Australia we have Selfraising.

Enjoy Your recipes and Thank you

Cheers

Marija

REPLY

i would divide the mixture in half and try adding half the melted chocolate to it before adding the liqueur. if that solves the problem you know it's the liqueur. the only other possibility is that the mixture is too cold when adding the melted chocolate. try adding the chocolate when the mixture is at 70F. and do report back--i'm sure one or the other will work as i've never had this happen.

REPLY

I did not mean to post as "anonymous" on that last post, sorry

REPLY

Rose. You are truly a master.
I adore all of your recipes. My cake bible is "dog eared". So, a question for my master...I am having a problem making chocolate mousseline buttercream. Of course, I am wanting a smooth buttercream, no bits of chocolate in it. However, there are "bits" of chocolate in my buttercream. I melt the chocolate completely, let it cool to room temp and add it to room temp buttercream. The chocolate seems to seize on the sides of the bowl and there are pieces that block my piping tubes. I could cry. I do add about 60 ml of liquer blending it in completely and then I drizzle in the chocolate. Is the alcohol the problem? I am thinking the chocolate seizes when it hits the alcohol in the buttercream. Please help. What am I doing wrong? I need to have this solved before a wedding cake on August 8th. I am thinking of making your ganache and adding it to the buttercream to see if it works better. I am at a loss [not to mention wasting much chocolate]. I have lots of "chocolate chip" buttercream frozen for some other use. can't wait for you new book!!

REPLY

Excellent temp info Rose - thank you!

REPLY

Rose:
Thanks again for your quick response...as always. I need a new instant read thermometer anyway. The cake looked sooooo pretty, I was so disappointed...but like I said...they all ate it anyway! (I didn't...LOL)

REPLY

it sounds like it could be cast iron and therefore slow to heat and once hot over-browns the outside. next time use an instant thermom and be sure it registers 190 to 210˚F. slightly underdone chocolate can be yummy but i don't really care for slightly underdone yellow or white cake.

REPLY

Rose:
I've got a question regarding Bundt pans. I made your pound cake in a bundt pan two days ago to bring to the clinic. I have a bundt pan that was given to me some years ago. It is made out of quite a heavy metal and has an enamel finish. It isn't quite as heavy as a le crucet caserole, but it might well be cast iron...not sure. Anyway...I've finally got my oven calibrated properly, so I know I'm baking at 350 degrees. At exactly the time in the recipe, the top of the cake was a beautiful golden brown, the toothpick came out clean, and it was nice a springy. Took it out of the pan. Cooled for 10 minutes and inverted it. It looked gorgeous. Deep golden in color...perfect, "like from a magazine " (as my grandmother used to say). When we cut into it there was a part of the cake that wasn't quite baked through. (Mind you, 8 people consumed that entire cake...I think the recipe said serves 25...so they liked it)...but I was somewhat irritated by the fact that it wasn't quite done. Do you think that the enamel is getting too hot? Can't think of what else the problem might be. I don't do a lot of recipies in the bundt pan so I don't have a lot of experience with it. Thanks!

REPLY

Thanks, Rose..will try it out without any change to the leavening as I don't want a dome for this one.

REPLY

Thanks a lot..will try it out and put a post here:)

REPLY

The mom's name is Lola...and everyone in their neighborhood knows about Miss Lola and her cakes. She is fabulous!

REPLY

Oh Bill, That's so sweet!

REPLY

that's a beautiful story billy. by the way, i still remember my shock when i saw my recipe for checkerboard cake which i had published in cook's magazine appear on the back of the chicago metallics box years ago without credit! the president in those days was a mr. fear. clearly he had none!

since then the people from chicago metallics have become my friends. they make wonderful pans i must say. thought you'd all be amused by this story.

REPLY

Just a note on the Checkerboard fantasy cake. It is a cake that I do make from time to time, and it is always a hit, and so pretty when you slice it. I didn't have the pans for this cake. I have a patient in one of the city clinics that I work in. (It is in quite a rough and underserved neighborhood in NYC and the patients are really lovely and appreciative). This patient's mom is quite an adventursome baker and I always looked forward to visits with this lovely family. We would get the clinic visit done in 5 or 10 minutes and then Mom and I would talk for a 1/2 hour about baking while her son rolled his eyes (teenagers...LOL). Anyway, one of the things that Mom asked me one day was "do you make a checkerboard cake?" (She makes them often). I said..."nope, I never bought the pans". Anyway...fast forward about 2 years, and I was finishing my course of treatment on this boy. The day we removed the braces, mom presented me with a gift. (These people really don't have much, and purchasing a gift is a very big deal). I unwrapped the package and it was the Chicago Metallic checkerboard cake pans. I actually cried. (I'm a big sentimental baby). Since then I always think of them when I make the cake.

REPLY

that's great to know! you could try it without any change to the leavening and if you prefer more of a dome decrease it slightly for the next one.

REPLY

Yasmin - I can't answer your question exactly, bit I've done the Checkboard Fantasy cake as a marble cake using an 11x15x2 pan without making any adjustments to the recipe. It turned out very well.

REPLY

Hi Rose
I am very keen to try the Checkerboard Fantasy Cake as (you very rightly said) a party cake for my children. However, as I don't have the requisite pans, I thought I'd do it as a marble cake, in a 9x13 pan. As per my calculations,I think the batter would be the correct amount. The baking powder I feel would need to be decreased to 20gms (5tsps)(level 6),as you mentioned that the baking pwdr levels for this cake are higher to accomodate the shallow pans. Am I right in my thinking??
Thanks, Yasmin.

REPLY

Thanks again, Annie and Anon..the Chocolate Fudge cake baked up beautifully in a 9x13pan, no alterations needed except increasing the baking time to about 40 mins.
I wonder if anyone has any experience of baking any of the cakes in a loaf pan? Need to make that shape now..but don't want to do the Perfect Pound cake (done in a loaf pan in the TCB)as the higher butter content makes it hard even at room temperature (its winter here).

REPLY

Wow..thanks a lot..this is really helpful. I will get back to both Annie and you..hopefully with a picture of the Ipod !!

REPLY

Yasmin:
I've done the chocolate fudge cake in a 9x13...and it was perfect!

REPLY

Thanks a lot, Annie..I can go ahead with confidence now :)

REPLY

Yasmin, I wouldn't change the recipe at all. The volume of the 9x13 tin is approx the same as 2 times 9" round tins assuming you want the same height. The fudge cake recipe is for 2 by 9" tins.

Annie

REPLY

Hi..I always bake the Chocolate Fudge Cake as my childrens birthday cake, as it has a wonderful flavour, and holds up well to decorating and shaping. This year I need to do it in a 9x13 pan (Ipod cake!!).The conversion chart in the cake Bible talks about a Chocolate Butter cake, but my "guesstimate" is that the proportions of the Chocolate Fudge Cake would bake up well in a 9x13 as they are. Has anyone tried it? If so..any changes I need to make? I know Rose alwyas talks about decreasing the baking powder in larger cakes..but this wouldn't really be a larger cake..just a different size pan..would the same hold true? Any advice would be much appreciated :)

REPLY

Mmmm, the Golden Almond is one of my favorite cakes. Good call Matthew!

REPLY

Yeah that's what I'm thinking I did. I have a Hazelnut cake recipe in a German cookbook, but it calls for 8 eggs which is way too many for cholesterol purposes.

After re-reading the Golden Almond Cake recipe I realized that it matched my description to a T. Apparently Almonds or Hazelnuts are interchangeable.
Thanks for the prompt reply to my post.

REPLY

Sounds to me like you are referring to the Golden Almond Cake--perhaps you made it with hazelnuts once?

REPLY

Dear Rose,
Nearly 21 years ago my aunt gave me your book "The Cake Bible" for Christmas. I recall making a hazelnut cake from the book. One of the comments you wrote was that the cake didn't need frosting and that you liked it warm from the oven. Yesterday I poured through the book trying to find the recipe with out any luck.
Is it possible that someone can point me in the right direction? I'd really like to make the cake for friends this weekend 6/20/09.

REPLY

Thank you, Rose! I'll try smaller batches and beating them longer.

REPLY

weeping is usually caused by undissolved sugar. be sure to beat well and reach to the bottom of the bowl.

they should stay white--brown means the sugar is caramelizing resulting from too high a temp or too long baking.

for starters try a single batch as the larger batch not get adequate beating.

REPLY

I've got a question about the crisp French Meringue. I make 10" discs which I layer with whipped cream, strawberries, and chocolate. I have been practicing these meringues for about a year now, and I always have an issue with some of the sugar weeping out and crystallizing during the baking process. The meringues are still useable and tasty, but I wonder why they do this and if I can get them to stop weeping. I bake 3 10" discs at a time (double or triple TCB recipe, I think--15 oz egg whites). After much experimentation, to get them mostly dry all the way through I have settled on baking them at 200 degrees for 4.5 hours. I live in the Pacific Northwest, so it's not the dryest environment, but it's also not overly humid like the southern or eastern US, and the weeping happens no matter what time of year I bake them. They also turn a very light brown on the outside. Is that normal, or should they stay white? If you have any tips for me, I would appreciate it! Thanks!

REPLY

Hello to all you wonderful bakers!

I'm a newbie to posting but have spent much time reading on the blog and the forums. I grew up baking with my grandmother and always thought I knew what I was doing until I found "The Bible". This book is a permanent fixture on my kitchen island. However, there is few nagging questions I've not been able to figure out. It would be an honor to have the help of all the incredible minds here to find the answers.

1) In the "understanding" that follows Golden Almond Cake,(pg.37), it explains that the formula is the same as Sour Cream Butter Cake with a few exchanges and decreased leavening. Upon comparing, they each have the same amounts of baking powder and soda. How is this a decrease?

2) I came across a post in the forum by Rozanne that states she believes the AODYBC, pg39; WVBC, pg46; and PAACBC, pg54 follow the base formulas, pg491-93. I've studied and compared the formulas like an adolescent studying for an exam, and agree except in the case of PAACBC. The AODYBC and WVBC formulas use leavening amounts for a 9" pan just with a Rose factor of 3 because, if I'm correct, less batter is needed for 1.5" pans. PAACBC mirrors the chcolate base formula except for leavening. Everything is rose factor 3 except baking powder. If going by the base formula it should be 22g,(7.35x3). In talking about cocoa on pg474, it explains the toughening affect on structure so more BP is needed to compensate. This is evident in the base formula but not in PAACBC. What am I missing?

I'm sorry this post is so long but this priceless book has sparked the scientific side of the baker in me.

Thanks to all,
Regina

REPLY

Tom D'Erminio
Tom D'Erminio
03/ 4/2009 07:02 PM

Rose,
This is my question from the forum. It was suggested that I send it to your blog. So here goes...I now have the book in front of me, so perhaps I can clarify my dilemma. From TCB, I am referring to the cake recipe on page 39, All Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake for a 9” pan, which calls for 19.5 grams of baking powder. If you make the same 9” cake using the formula on page 492 with a rose factor of 4 for the 9” pan, the baking powder is 26.08 grams. I realize the other quantities of ingedients do not match the recipe on page 39 either, however, what I have noticed is that the crumb texture seems smoother and smaller. when using the lesser of the two amounts of baking powder. What am I missing?
This came to my attention as I am trying to make a cake that will be filled with a lemon curd/whipped cream filling along with fresh black and red raspberries, so the firmer smaller-crumb cake is a better match to hold up to the filling. Any ideas would be helpful. This will end up being a large cake, to serve 400 folks who like to eat cake, so it needs to hold its own when it gets to those large lower layers. Thanks for you advice!
Tom

REPLY

Amanda,
Figured I would answer your question since I do this on a weekly basis.
For a Saturday wedding, I bake the cakes late on Thursday, let cool to room temp., cover with plastic wrap and store in refrigerator overnight. Friday morning I tort, fill, cover with fondant and decorate the cakes. I put them in a large box, (generally the tiers are stacked) and store in the refrigerator for Saturday delivery. I always try to complete the cakes the day before, just in case of any problems.
Hope this helps,
Lori V.

REPLY

Hello- I'm new to the site but have your book. It is absolutely wonderful! I am making a wedding cake for a friend this coming weekend and I have a few questions. I am making the yellow buttercream cake with your white chocolate cream cheese frosting and am adding an additional layer of the strawberry puree (per bride's request). She wants a 3-tier non-stacked cake. Would you recommend baking the cakes, crumb coating and storing air-tight a couple days in advance? I planned on fondant rolling them the morining of. My main concern is how the cake/frosting will keep and that it doesn't dry out. Any thoughts on this?

REPLY

I agree with Patricia. I just made chocolate chip buttercream and it was difficult to work with. Fortunately I'm using it as the crumb coat only. I have to say, it is so delicious though.....

REPLY

Me too... don't think the buttercream would be very easy to work with if it has mini chips in it.

REPLY

I would think the chips in the cake!

REPLY

Hector & Samantha.
Thanks for your thoughts. I am going to go with a chocolate cake and the classic mocha espresso buttercream. The bride wants mini chips, do you think I should put them it in the buttercream or the cake or both???
Thanks,
Lori V.

REPLY

Lori, I love Hector's suggestion of a chocolate cake with coffee buttercream. If you want to put mini chips in the batter, the Domingo batter is the thickest. You could treat the chips like Rose does in the Golden Grand Marnier cake, coating them with coffee and then flour.

And for the buttercream, I think the tastiest in my opinion would be the coffee-caramel silk meringue, after that a mousseline with Kahlua liqueur- this option would be pretty sweet, sometimes I reduce the sugar added to the soft peak whites to help balance a very sweet liqueur.

Those are my votes!

REPLY

Lori, for mocha you mean chocolate and coffee together right? I would use a chocolate cake, and a coffee buttercream. Or a coffee cake, with a chocolate/coffee buttercream.

The easiest way to turn Rose's yellow cake into coffee is to bake it a few days ahead and then apply a coffee syrup. I make my coffee syrup by replacing the amount of liquor with same amount of espresso shots. You could also replace all the amount of water with brewed coffee.

REPLY

Samantha, this is a very good question. Rose Factor depends on the width of the pan, not on the amount of cups of batter. It is the surface area changes (width) that plays together with the amount of baking powder.

For a 11x15 pan, I would use level 5, because the longest width is close to 18.

Now, you will need to calculate on your own how many cups of batter you will need to fill the pan to about half full.

REPLY

I'm trying to use your Rose Factor chart to bake a sheet cake. I want to make your yellow cake in a 11 x 15 inch pan. According to the manufacturer this pan should use 13 cups. Since the chart uses batter weight instead of cups, I guess my question is how much does a cup of batter weigh, and/or which factor should I use? I was thinking factor 6, level 6, but any input would be appreciated.
Thanks!

REPLY

Rose,
I would like to create a mocha chip cake suitable for a wedding cake. I was thinking of using your mocha buttercream recipe but I wasnt sure what you would recommend for the cake. I am not a coffee drinker so I'm not sure what to pair it with. A couple of my thoughts were your yellow cake with mini chip in the dough and then maybe alternating layers using your chocolate cake with mini chips???
Any thoughts and suggestions are appreciated.
Lori V.

REPLY

Jeanette: thanks for the quick reply. That is not the same dish - Jewish pastries would not be made with Suet because that is not kosher. But they do sound familiar. I appreciate the response. Louise

REPLY

We have a ROly-Poly pudding here in the UK, but I didn't know it was a Jewish dish. The one I know of is made with a suet pastry, and it is rolled up , like you describe with a jam/jelly filling. It is then steamed to cook it. If you are interested I will look up the recipe and post it.

REPLY

i would use the 9 x 13 x 2 (15 cup pan) and multiply everything by 1.75.
do let us know--i'm sure it will be great!

REPLY

i've heard of roly poly--i think it's like rugelach but never had a specific recipe for it. have you tried googling?

REPLY

Louise Allen
Louise Allen
02/10/2009 10:42 PM

A friend is looking for recipe her mother used to make. It is a Jewish Eastern European pastry made with yeast named Roly Poly. I believe the pastry dough is spread on a jelly roll pan and then rolled up. Have you ever heard of this recipe? Does anyone have the recipe?

thank you,
Louise Allen

REPLY

Hi Rose,
I have been Baking from "The Cake Bible" since it came out and everyone in my family has their favorite cake from it. My daughter's favorite is the Chocolate Domingo Cake. I'm planning to make it for her 30th birthday party this week but I need to double the recipe. What would be the best pan to use - a Bundt pan or 13x9x2 pan? And would I need to make any adjustments to the recipe? I don't want to bake it in two pans because we feel this cake really doesn't need any frosting or indeed any extra embellishment other than a dusting of icing sugar. I can hardly wait for your new cake book as my favorite cake is the Chocolate Chiffon Cake and I would love to bake it in layers.

REPLY

Hi Jane - you can freeze your flour for a much longer shelf life. I vacuum seal my whole wheat flour - I think Rose mentions keeping it well over a year that way.

I haven't tried the Fat Daddio pans yet, but I'm very intrigued by the fact that they are dishwasher safe. However, I've read a few online reviews that stated cakes tend to bake faster in them compared to Magic Line pans. I don't know why this would happen, but I've read about it in a few different places. (I think the FD pans are made by someone who used to make ML pans). Anyway, you might want to google it.

REPLY

Hi...this is my first post...
I received the Cake Bible for Xmas..and have just made the White Butter Cake in a 9 x 13 x 3 pan...fat daddios...my oven is overly "hot" in spots,so I baked at 325 (which has worked in the past with several other recipes)..I rotated the pan after 20 minutes,as I assumed it would take a little longer to bake.
I followed the prep and mixing as exactly as I could...but I used a new type of flour(for me)..Meunerie Milanese (Organic) Farine a Patisseie....to my surprise it's light beige in colour with dark hard flecks...
Tha cake came out pretty even..between 1 1/4 and 1 1/2 inches high...but it is carmel in color...the sides are carmel...and I took it out of the oven at 36minutes...The tester came out clean in several spots.
It didn't sink,but was not sturdy or rigid at all...hard to move around..I want to use this to stack and carve a truck(which I've never done)...should it be firmer than this? I will try another time with regular (Robin Hood) cake -and-pastry flour...to see the difference..
I also read in the Cake Bible that whole wheat flour becomes rancid after 3 months...this worries me also ,because the organic flour looks a lot like whole wheat? Can you advise/help?
Thanks!

REPLY

Jeannette lives in the UK, so I'm not sure which they use there. In the US, the general recommendation for cooking with convection is to reduce the temp 25F, and to expect the final cooking time to be reduced by 20-25%.

REPLY

Sounds good, but in F or C?
Thanks!

REPLY

Lauren, I,too, have a fan oven, and in my book and in countless other recipes, I have been advised to lower the temp. by 20 deg. I always do this and also shorten the cooking time slightly and things are always fine! I can't be specific about the timing, it depends on what you are cooking but I usually set the timer at least 5mins. or so less and keep an eye on things.

REPLY

Hi, i bake in a fan-forced oven and would like to know how much lower my baking temp should be. Thank you :)

REPLY

Whenever I use my fancy pans by nordicware the outside of the cake with the design comes out hard....what could be the problem??? Could it be the spray I am using??? thanks.

REPLY

green & blacks is my fav.

REPLY

Rose,
I am all out of my 2 cases of Dutch Processed Cocoa and was just wondering if you could recommend a couple brands for me to purchase? I buy them by the case.
Thank you,
Lori V.

REPLY

i wish i could help but this has never happened to me. i'm wondering if it's slight underbaking. try taking the temperature with an instant read--it should resiter 190 to 210F.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I've just baked your white spice pound cake (in a loaf pan), it's turned out at the right height, is soft and melting in the mouth, but strangely it has remained gummy just under the split at the top of the cake and above the bottom crust. Do you know how i can correct this? I've weighed all of the ingredients and used bleached cake flour...

REPLY

Rose, so sorry, I just found the notes on freezing for La Creme au Beurre in "A Passion for Chocolate," so I'm set on that question (it can be frozen).

Thank you so much,
Julie

REPLY

sounds like you didn't use cake flour. it shouldn't be rubbery.
fine to use any filling as long as it is soft enough to spread easily, i.e. not chilled and too firm.
pastry cream can freeze for up to a month.

REPLY

Rose, more chocolate roll questions-

Which is the right chocolate roll to pair with silk meringue buttercream or pastry cream? Are the souffle/cloud rolls too delicate?

Also, I need a filling that will freeze, would the pastry cream from "Passion for Chocolate", with flour instead of cornstarch, maintain its consistency after freezing?

Thankyou!

REPLY

Hi Rose, I've attempted your Chocolate Cloud Roll and Cocoa Soufflé Roll, but upon cooling both collapsed... The Cocoa Soufflé roll was thin and chewy/rubbery, and the Chocolate Cloud Roll cracked as i was rolling it! I suspect over mixing for the Cocoa Soufflé Roll, but do you have any additional explanations?

REPLY

Great point about the variety of Kosher salt... there seems to be a difference between brands of Kosher salt as well. Cook's Illustrated magazine has mentioned this in many issues.

REPLY

i'm convinced that there are only three reasons people call for kosher salt in baking recipes:
1. it isn't iodized so doesn't give off flavors
2. they feel closer to God
3. they are keeping kosher (and that is the ONLY reason i see as valid)

the biggest problem about kosher salt is that it comes in two forms--flaked (which is fluffed up) and coarse granulated and if using flaked you need 1 3/4 times the volume of fine or coarse granulated salt.
in my opinion, the ideal salt to use is fine sea salt. if you weigh the salt it will all be interchangeable by weight but not by volume.

another thing is that people who call for kosher salt don't bother to mention which variety so it's best to compare their recipe to a similar one to see how much fine granulated sea salt or table salt is appropriate.

REPLY

Many recipes call for kosher salt. When used it does not go through a sieve well and does not distribute well through the cake. Is it fine kosher???? I even grind and do not feel you get the same result as table salt?? Thanks.

REPLY

i'm sorry to tell you that 3 inch deep cake pans absolutely don't work for my cake batters.

REPLY

Hi, my question is in regards to cake pan sizes; I've only been able to get my hands on 3 inch high tins (Australia), and was wondering how much extra batter (e.g. 2 times) i'd have to make to fill them appropriatley... assuming that the up-scale will work!

REPLY

I had a request for a cinnamon applesauce layer cake but I don't have a good recipe for an applesauce cake that I can stack. I was thinking of making a cinnamon buttercream to go along with the cake...any good recipe suggestions?

REPLY

Liz,
I just tried out this recipe http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Sams-Famous-Carrot-Cake/Detail.aspx last weekend for a couple of my cake consultations and both couples said it was the best carrot cake they have ever tasted. I did substitute cake flour for the AP flour and added a bit more, just so it would be a bit firmer and it turned out great! I also always soak and chop my raisins before I mix them into the batter. Flavor is best after a couple of days also.
Happy Baking,
Lori V.
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

Hi Everyone-

I'm looking for a recipe for Carrot Cake that calls for crushed pineapple. It makes such a yummy, moist cake! I need it for a wedding cake next month, so any help would be much appreciated!!

Thank you!

REPLY

Thanks for your reply.

REPLY

yes! I've done bundt, cupcakes, sheets, and Elaine's 3 tier dessert cake.

REPLY

Please tell me if Rose's carrot cake can be baked in another type of pan other than the 6-cup savarin ring?
Thanks.

REPLY

Thanks so much, Rose. I will give the loose bottom pan a try!

REPLY

those are very good questions.

i like loose bottom pans better than spring forms because of the perfectly smooth and seamless sides.

i find that baker's joy coats all the nooks and crannies but sometimes there is too much in one spot in which case i brush it away and there is never a problem.

REPLY

Rose,

Please forgive me if you've answered these questions before, but I didn't see them anywhere:

1. Is there anything to recommend a cheesecake pan (like a tart pan w/ a removable bottom, but with tall sides) over a conventional springform pan for cheesecakes or coffee cakes?

2. When I use Baker's Joy in a Bundt pan, I never feel like I get it in all the nooks and crannies. Is it safe to spread the Baker's Joy out with a brush, or does that ruin its effect?

Thank you!

REPLY

yes--you can use this method of mixing with less sugar but less sugar also means less tender and more doming. you may need to increase the leavening or fat content to compensate. but it should be fun and interesting experimenting and creating cakes tailored exactly to your own taste as i have done!

REPLY

Hello, I'm new here and not the most experienced cake baker...more into breads. I like the cake bible recipes a lot and love the 2-stage method for its ease. From the book I understand it's suitable for high-ratio, e.g. lots of sugar cakes. But some of the recipes, e.g. the white spice pound cake are a bit sweet for our taste. Can I cut some of the sugar and still use the 2-stage method? THanks for your help!

REPLY

If you spray a metal nail (for making frosting flowers) with Pam and place in the center of your cake, it will bake the center so it shouldn't sink in the middle. If you baked it longer to make it solid your edges would dry out, but the nail helps the cake to bake evenly in center and edges.

REPLY

i suggest you post this question on the forums as you may get a response from some of the baker's out there who have used the red velvet cake as a wedding cake. i do have a recipe that will be in my upcoming book but it's only for 9 inch layers. by nature a red velvet cake is dense which is why it's called velvet. but it shouldn't be dry. you might consider using a simple syrup of sugar and water. put a search for this on the blog as there has been much discussion about syruping cakes.

REPLY

HI,
I've tried baking a red velvet cake from scratch 2 times already and both times they've come out dense. How can I make them more moist and spongy? I'm on the verge of baking my aunts wedding cake from a box! Am I over or under mixing? Is it the ingredients? Thanks!

REPLY

Thanks, Rose.....will keep up the hunt!!

REPLY

sorry yasmin, i have not experimented with eggless cakes. when going eggless i prefer pies.

REPLY

Rose, have you experimented with eggless cakes? I remember reading in an early post that you did not make eggless cakes, but was wondering if you have changed your mind? There seems to be so much more demand for them now....though I find generally they lack the texture and flavour.

REPLY

Seems to be working now :).

REPLY

that's very weird. i put my name in--let's hope it comes out pink as well. if not i'll alert my blog master! thanks.

REPLY

Rose - you're posting as "Anonymous".

REPLY

dave, i'm puzzled by your question. use the pans i specified in the recipe on page 507!

REPLY

Yeah :)... welcome back Rose!

REPLY

Rose,
Thank you!
Lori V.

REPLY

sorry, this IS rose! but so behind in the blog and just did a chat on the washington post site for 2 hours!

ok i freeze butter for a least a year but i have a good freezer that runs close to 0 degrees F and i put each pound of butter in freezer weight storage bags.

REPLY

Not Rose again but I too freeze my butter all the time - both salted and unsalted. When it is on sale I stock up big time.

REPLY

Sorry, not Rose here, but I stock up on butter and freeze it all the time. I've kept it frozen for up to 6 months.

REPLY

Rose,
Is it OK to freeze unsalted butter and how long can I freeze it for? I would like to start buying large quantities and wondering your thoughts.
Thank you,
Lori V.
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

Im interested in making your 3-Tier Wedding Cheesecake, and Im wondering about the correct pans to use. Should I use regular cheesecake pans, or should I just use a standard round cake pan?

REPLY

Hector,
I made three double batches of the Italian Meringue Buttercream this morning and it worked out great. It pretty much maxed out my mixers but I am going to make it like this from now on. It definitely saved me a lot of time.
Lori V.
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

that is a question I have asked myself plenty. I would worry the mixer's whip deflating/breaking your whites as the mixer is not designed to "fold."

REPLY

Hello, i was just wondering if, when making french meringue, one can beat the powdered sugar in while the mixer is still beating the egg whites, rather than having to fold it in at the end?

REPLY

awilda Garcia
awilda Garcia
07/ 5/2008 08:50 PM

hello, i tried to bake a chocolate cake. i used cake flour and added sour cream because i heard that it made it moist but it came out very dry. what did i do wrong?

REPLY

I have a question about using simple syrup to moisten a white or chocolate butter cake if the cake will be made several days in advance.
Actually it's questions. The first is how much syrup should be used for each tier - 12", 9", 6"? When does it get sprinkled on? How do I handle the cake after applying the syrup for taking it out of the pans and wrapping it?
Some advice would be appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
Ron Stijepic

REPLY

Thanks Hector,yes I do understand that yolks make a better cake which is why I guess I always end up using the yolks alone!! However, our eggs here down under have the exact measuremenst as what Rose mentions in the Cake Bible.....each yolk is 18gms and each white is 30 gms....which is why I wondered if the sustitution was made of using 3eggs instead of 6yolks it would work. In case you're wondering why I don't just try it instead of asking all these ques.....the party is tomorrow and I don't have time for a trial run!!
thanks again....
Yasmin.

REPLY

yasmin, it will work, but try and taste it. all yolk gives more golden butter cake, more delicious and finer melt in the mouth crumb.

be also aware that yolks are near 10 grams smaller than when Cake Bible was written 20 years ago. Whole eggs nowadays "are almost pure whites!" so try ading an extra yolk and take out some whites per each 8 eggs or measure separatelly by weight your yolks and your whites which is what I always do!

REPLY

lori, I don't see why not. for imbc which is similar, I always whip near to that amount. I can fit a 15.3 cup recipe on my soon to be little 6 qt mixer. there is no los of quality and you can always do the butter and/or crème anglaise incorporation by hand on as large volume as in a bathtub! the only care should be put on executing the meringue, not so much worry on the airiness, but more on the hot sugar incorporation.

REPLY

Rose,
I would like to know if the large recipe for Silk Meringue Buttercream (P.526)can be successfully doubled. I need to make 8 recipes over the next couple of weeks for all my wedding cakes and it would be so helpful if I could make 2 at a time.
Thank you,
Lori V.

REPLY

Hi Rose
Was just going through some unread parts of the Cake Bible, when on pg 456 I came across the fact the you can substitute one egg for 2 yolks or 1 1/2 egg whites. Does that mean I can make your recipe for the All occasion downy yellow cake with 3 eggs instead of 6 yolks? of course i do expect some changes in flavour and texture, but I do love that cake, would really find it easier to do with whole eggs once in a way when baking up large batches.
thanks.....:)
Yasmin

REPLY

What type of cocoa does the recipe specify? Maybe the problem lies in whether or not the cocoa is supposed to be dutch process or not?? Just a thought.
J

REPLY

Beth, what type of flour are you using?

REPLY

Beth Bilous
Beth Bilous
06/24/2008 07:41 PM

Well, I checked baking powder amount, and made sure I was using the correct pan size. My third attempt at this barefoot contessa beattys chocolate cake sunk again. Siggghh. Could I possibly add a little additional flour to counteract this problem? Oven temp seems to be fine. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks new found friends.

REPLY

Maybe there is too much baking powder which results in a sunken centre.

REPLY

under baked or too low oven temperature!

REPLY

Sounds like the cake isn't done baking. Are you using the same size pan that the recipe calls for?

REPLY

Beth Bilous
Beth Bilous
06/19/2008 06:30 PM

I have tried making Barefoot Contessa's Beattys Chocolate cake recipe twice. Its so darn good, but.... of the two times I've made it, it sinks in the middle. Please tell me why this is happening and what I can do to prevent this unsightly droop.

REPLY

Beth Bilous
Beth Bilous
06/19/2008 06:30 PM

I have tried making Barefoot Contessa's Beattys Chocolate cake recipe twice. Its so darn good, but.... of the two times I've made it, it sinks in the middle. Please tell me why this is happening and what I can do to prevent this unsightly droop.

REPLY

Just wanted to quickly share my Christmas in July, you may be interested seeing my new piping tip cleaning brush and well thought German disposable piping bags.

Posted and picture on the forum, scroll down until you see my name under hector:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/424/

REPLY

Rose:
Thanks again for your help. The whipped ganache, which never whipped as firmly as it usually does was perfect when I served the cake. I did get it to whip just stiff enough to stay between the layers. I frosted the cake and refrigerated it over night. Took the cake out a few hours before serving and Voila!...not runny at all.
Thanks...you are the best. (This was my father's first taste of Genoise. Wish I had a camera for the look on his face!). I actually never baked for him before. He's been living in Florida for years...and he never really comes to my apartment. We usually meet at my sisters...and we go out to eat...and well, it just never came to pass.

REPLY

I promise myself to load my suitcase with pistachio products next time I go to Italy!

REPLY

Hector,
Thanks for thinking of me. Yes, I spoke to Nancy also and got the same answer. I found another brand, also from Sicily you may want to check out from Zingermans.com I ordered a jar and I will let you know how it is.
Happy Baking,
Lori V.
Pastries By Vreeke

REPLY

Lorelei, I don't think there is an exact answer to cupcakes papers peeling away.

It depends on how much grease is in your cakes and/or how non-stick your cupcake papers are (some papers are very non-stick, some not). And also, if your cake recipe shrinks or not. I would test with different brands of cupcake papers, as none two brands are made the same.

REPLY

Lori, I've just spoke with Nancy from La Cuisine, she is so nice on the phone and so generous.

I also need to make a pistachio buttercream for my cousin's wedding in September. Nancy informed kindly that their Italian Organic Pistachio Cream has a long waiting list due to dock strikes in Europe due to rising fuel costs.

But their Pistachio Essence is in stock, and I am considering using it and do away with imported pistachio nuts. I THINK it will be great, if not even better, as La Cuisine's French essences are world class. I will be using this essence to make my own Pistasha liquor, too.

Good luck, and tell Nancy hello shall you call her on the phone. She is wonderful.

REPLY

Gordon, I feel this question is for me!

Make Rose's Biscuit de Savoie as is. Sugar is needed to give the cake the structure and "balance" the recipe has been designed for.

Make the syrup and use rum as the liquor. Add equal weight of syrup to the weight of your trimmed Biscuit de Savoie. IT IS super moist and perfectly sweet.

REPLY

Hi Rose; I am having difficulty with peeling cupcake papers on my vanilla cake recipe. I do use buttermilk for the great texture and tanginess it provides. The recipe also calls for cake flour, baking powder and baking soda. Do you have any suggestions as to why the papers peel off? Sometimes the papers start to peel away right after coming out of the oven as the cake shrinks a little, other times they peel a couple of hours later.

REPLY

EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Sign up for Rose's newsletter, a once-a-month mouthwatering treat!

DATE ARCHIVE

Featured on finecooking.com