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Heavenly Peach Galette

Jul 30, 2008 | From the kitchen of Rose

When this blog was in its infancy, one of my first postings titled “Surrogate Baker” reported the story of a dinner invitation from our then new friend Leon Axel who lives across the street and featured a fruit galette that required emergency shuttling back and forth to our oven. We have since gotten together for dinner many times but this week, when we carried this peach galette across the street to Leon’s, I was reminded of the first visit just short of three years ago.

Late in the evening there was an unexpected visit from Leon’s son Nathanial and his lovely girl friend who were returning from a concert nearby on Bleecker Street and hadn’t yet had dinner. So we started all over again with Leon’s fabulous ballontine of duck with cherry ginger chutney, a mixed greens salad from the local farmer’s market with herbs just snipped from his terrace garden, and then the galette.

As this is the height of an exceptionally fine peach season, and the galette turned out to be so special, I want to share this with you immediately. Luckily I had the foresight to take several step by step photos of the process which I think will be helpful and maybe even inspirational!


Perfectly Ripe Peaches


The Sliced Peaches


The Sliced Peaches Draining


The Reduced Syrup


Pouring the Syrup onto the Peaches


Getting out the Heavy Artillery for Rolling


Switching to My Longer Pasta Pin


The Pastry Draped Over the Pan


The Peach Mixture Nestled in the Pastry


The Pastry Draped Over the Peaches

I’ll admit that from beginning to end it took about 5 hours but I think they were 5 hours well spent. In fact, pot luck is really the way to go these days with no one having the time to make a full scale dinner except on very rare occasions. There was enough galette to serve 5 substantial slices plus slightly smaller ones for breakfast. Leon served a lovely and rare berry liqueur from Finland with the tart.


Double Click on the Photo to Enlarge It to See the Flaky Crust

When I was at the checkout counter the next day at Trader Joe’s, the cashier asked me if I smelled lychees. I quickly realized it had to be the peaches. After peeling and slicing 9 peaches, the intoxicating floral aroma had impregnated everything I was wearing. It couldn’t have remained in my hair as I had gone for my usual early morning swim. And what do you suppose I was thinking during that mile of laps? Hurrying home to eat that last piece of peach galette.

Oven Temperature: 400°F/200°C
Baking Time: 40 to 45 minutes

Perfect Peach Galette

This is my favorite peach pie transformed into a galette. I prefer it to a pie because the balance of fruit to pastry is truly perfection. It works for most fruit but especially well for peaches which, compared to nectarines and apples, are a little softer and don’t hold up as well in a thicker layer. The thin, buttery, flaky, crisp crust encasing the luscious peach slices is truly heavenly.

Serves: 8

INGREDIENTS

MEASUREMENTS

WEIGHT

 

volume

ounces

grams

flaky cream cheese pie
crust for a 2 crust
9-inch pie

 

see Note

 

22 ounces

 

624 grams

3 lbs. ripe peaches (about
9 medium) peeled, pitted and
sliced about 1/4 inch thick

6 1/2 cups

40 ounces

1134 grams

freshly squeezed
lemon juice

1 tablespoon

0.50 ounce

16 grams

sugar

2/3 cup

4.7 ounces

133 grams

salt

a pinch

.

.

cornstarch

4 teaspoons

.

13.5 grams

almond extract

1/2 teaspoon

.

.

butter, unsalted

2 tablespoons

1 ounce

28 grams

Place the sliced peaches in a large bowl and sprinkle them with the lemon juice. Sprinkle on the sugar and pinch of salt and toss them gently to mix evenly. Allow them to macerate for a minimum of 30 minutes and a maximum of 1 1/2 hours. Transfer the peaches to a colander suspended over a bowl to capture the liquid. The mixture will release at least 1 cup up to 1 1/3 cups of juice.

In a small saucepan (preferably lined with a nonstick surface) over medium high heat, boil down this liquid together with the butter to about 2/3 cup or until syrupy and lightly caramelized. The exact amount will depend on how much juice the peaches release which you will be reducing by about half. Swirl but do not stir it. (Alternatively, spray a 4-cup heatproof measure with nonstick vegetable spray, add the liquid and butter and boil it in the microwave, about 12 to 18 minutes on high—watch carefully as microwaves vary). Transfer the peaches to a bowl, pour the syrup over them, and toss gently. (Do not be concerned if the liquid hardens on contact with the peaches; it will dissolve during baking.) Add the cornstarch and almond extract and toss gently until all traces of it have disappeared.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator. If necessary, allow it to sit for about 10 minutes until it is soft enough to roll. On a well-floured pastry cloth roll the crust into a 24-inch diameter circle. Fold it in quarters and transfer it to a 14 to 16 inch pizza pan, allowing the border to overlap the pan. Scrape the peach mixture into the pastry and carefully drape the border over the fruit, allowing it to pleat as evenly as possible. It will leave a small area in the center exposed.

Cover the galette loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate it for one hour before baking to chill. This will maintain flakiness.

Preheat the oven to 400°/200°C. at least 20 minutes before baking time. Set the oven rack at lowest level and place a baking stone or baking sheet on it before preheating. Place a large piece of greased foil on top to catch any juices.

For a delightfully crunchy crust, spritz or brush the pastry all over with water and sprinkle with superfine sugar. Set the pan directly on the foil topped baking stone and bake 40-45 minutes the juices bubble thickly in the center opening and the peaches feel tender but not mushy when a cake tester or small sharp knife is inserted. Rotate the pan half way through the baking time. If it starts to over-brown, cover loosely with foil.

Cool the galette on a rack for about 3 hours until warm or room temperature before cutting. Pointers for Success:

  • The peaches should be ripe and yield slightly to pressure but firm enough to maintain their texture when baked. If squishy, they lose their character.
  • To peel peaches, bring a pot of water to a boil, add the peaches and turn off the heat. Allow them to sit for 1 minute. Drain at once and rinse with cold water or place in a bowl of ice water. If the peaches are ripe, the peels will slip off easily.
  • As you slice the peaches, toss them occasionally to coat with sugar mixture.
  • Be sure to put a sheet of foil under the pie pan as there is always a little spill over with this much fruit.
  • For a truly crisp bottom crust, this juicy galette works well baked directly on the floor of the oven for the first 30 minutes. Then raise it to a rack in the lower part of the oven.

Understanding Concentrating the peach juices before baking keeps the filling juicy and requires only a small amount of starch to bind it.

NOTE: For the pie crust, put favorite flaky & tender pie crust in the search box and increase the recipe by 1 1/2 times. Rolling a crust this large and this thin can be tricky. This is a great dough—strong enough to roll thin but tender when baked. Be sure to roll the crust in a cool area—no higher than 75/24°C and work quickly. Move it on the cloth occasionally to ensure that it isn’t sticking and add more flour if necessary.


Comments

Thank you, Rose! I just made this and it's fresh out of the oven...and it smells and looks amazing!! My dough may be a little too thick...but I can't wait to taste it!!

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Thank you, Rose! I just made this and it's fresh out of the oven...and it smells and looks amazing!! My dough may still be a little too thick, though...but I can't wait to try it!!

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Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe!! I used Julia Child's basic pie crust but your filling was SUPERB! I sold 2 galettes at the farmer's market and the next week people were begging me for more. I couldn't have done it without you! BTW, your directions were perfectly clear, a failing in many food blogs. Gratefully Yours, Rachel in Brookings, OR

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my labor day weekends are becoming l-a-b-o-r-d-a-y-s of heavy baking. this time of the year seems to be when fruits are on its prime and with the most variety, in hawaii. i am certain that a galette is the ultimate dessert to enjoy peaches, but i scraped the peach idea because no-one grows it in hawaii for the intention of sharing: the few neighbors with peach trees are most definitely the least friendly.

my definite surrogate choice is a tropical combination, in order of majority: white pineapple, fresh lichee, and fresh coconut. my panel of 6 people suggested a good tropical fruit combination, this is IT!!!! even people that dislike cooked pineapple will love this one. definitely, the white pineapple is the fruit of choice because it is completely non-acidic, but you could use maui gold pineapple and omit the lemon juice. i prefer fresh lichee or frozen fresh fruit, but never canned; in my opinion, canned lichee is still wonderful and great to eat chilled or in martinis, but the flavor is indeed very different to fresh or frozen fresh fruit. dried unsweetened coconut would work, too.

so you know, this galette (peach or not) is the ultimate dessert to show off your flaky pastry skills. enjoy:

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=5935&id=100000084691742&l=eb1b7763d3

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kim, it would freeze well unbaked. freezing baked pastry compromises the quality.

nectarines and peaches are perfectly exchangeable. blueberries are worth a try (the pie and pastry bible gives amounts of sugar and thickener for most fruits and you might want to cook the berries first so they are not too watery in the dough.) i don't like cooked raspberries--too seedy.

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Oh my... SO BEAUTIFUL!! I love how deconstructed (I guess) it looks. I'm not sure that's the right word, but it lacks formality, and that makes it somehow more appealing to me.

Do you have any thoughts about freezing this? I thought maybe I would make some smaller ones (you know... to help with the temptation of having a WHOLE DELICIOUS PIE around) and freeze them for later. I'm just back from the PYO orchard and I have quite a large surplus of juicy perfectly ripe peaches here.

Also... do you have any thoughts about nectarines (and or blueberries and or raspberries)? I think all these seasonal fruits might work together or separately in this dish.

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i like swirls in the dough. it means it will be flaky. kneading is only to bring it together and develop a tiny bit of elasticity so when you pull it it stretches a little. otherwise it will be too tender and not hold together.

as for the slightly under done interior, either you have to roll it thinner or bake it longer and tent the top to keep it from overbrowning. i'd go with the thinner rolling because it's nice to have a slightly firm texture in the peaches which might get softer with longer baking.

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I just finished licking the plate of my slightly warm slice of this glorious galette! Two questions: one pertaining to the pastry...I am always so scared to "knead" (Such an awful word when discussing pastry) for fear of overdoing it, but my dough disk holds together, with no cracks, but is streaky...is this normal? Or should I knead more. I have huge pastry flakes falling with every bite :) I have watched the video, but not sure if I should knead a little more. The second, the folds were a bit doughy, but the crust was very brown, any thoughts on eliminating this aside from thinner dough?

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Bill & Jeannie
Bill & Jeannie
08/ 2/2009 02:30 PM

We just returned from the Kneading Conference in Skowhegan Maine. It was mostly for WFO bakers, millers, and grain farmers. Even with the rainy weather it was Fantastic! Picked up lots of new skills and techniques. Too many to mention here. If you can go next year it is worth the trip.

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Deidre Samuels
Deidre Samuels
05/21/2009 05:53 PM

Rose,

I will be using fresh blueberries, strawberries and raspberries in the galette and will be making it a day ahead. Should I macerate the berries first so as to prevent a soggy crust?

Deidre

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smile!...i remember it well.

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Your recipe of Peach Galette is going to ruin my diet... Your pictures and explanation is wonderful...thanks

Andy
www.recipebuddys.com

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I just made a version with apples, but it was smaller around than this one. And I didn't weigh the apples, sorry. You can see it at http://bungalowbarbara.blogspot.com/2008/10/pink-apple-and-cranberry-galette.html

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Has anyone tried replacing the peaches with apples and if so, did you use the same amount of fruit (i.e., 40 oz. of apples)? Should I decrease the amount of cornstarch since peaches produce more juice than apples when cooked?

I would love to make this with apples from our garden and give out to my neighbours.

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wow, yummy now after I saw all the photos I got really hungry. Excellent, this looks absolutely phantastic. I think, I am going to bake it this weekend.

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I've made your pie crust many times now. When I first did it, I weighed the liquid in a seperate container and added it later to the crust--I always found that I needed a bit more. I later switched to weighing the liquid by pouring it the bowl with the crust and didn't need to add more--that little bit that clung to the seperate container made a difference when dealing with the small quantities necessary for pie crust.

I can attest though that it will roll out to that size--even further. I made this missing about 200g of crust unknowingly, and I still made it to 2 feet!

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for a while now i've been replacing all the water in the recipe with heavy cream. i don't know what brand flour you are using but possible it is higher in protein.if it doesn't hold together when rolling try adding a little heavy cream.

if there is a bitter aftertaste it is no doubt due to the baking powder--i only add bp to dough when it is rumford or a calcium based (not aluminum based) product.

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marc reynolds
marc reynolds
09/ 9/2008 04:13 PM

Rose & Hector: thank you, i used pastry flour and did measure with a scale very precisely. my scale is JADEVER and weighs in ounces, kilograms etc. i do not see cream, just cream cheese, in the recipe in your bible. are you suggesting adding cream or a bit more cream cheese. additionally, the finally dough baked out very flaky, but had a very slight bitter aftertaste. the pastry dough was about 10 months old, stored in an air tight container and a dark cool storage room. did you use a round slab on which to roll out the dough? i work on a marble type counter, which i cooled down with ice packs before rolling as it is across from big double ovens that were on for another project.

marc

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barbara, i love all your ideas! glad you're tailoring this recipe to your taste.

marc, hector's reply is on the mark--pastry cloth works best for this. but if it's not holding together my guess is that you are measuring not weighing and have more flour than i do. you might want to pinch some of the mixture and if it doesn't hold together add a little more cream. better still--use a scale. and i DO use pastry flour!

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marc, for some reason, and explained on PBB, Rose's flaky cream cheese crust rolls best on a floured cloth. Plastic works best with cookie crust types.

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marc reynolds
marc reynolds
09/ 6/2008 07:09 PM

I have been reading all the commenst to the peach gallete and have not seen so much interest in a recipes since the NY Times no knead bread.

I finally made the gallet using your original cream chease dough from the Pie Bible. I had difficuly rolling it out and could not get a large circle. Instead of a cloth base I used heavy weight very wide plastic wrap which I have used succesfully for pie crusts over the years.The dough did not hold together despite high humidity (hurricane).

But the tase! Oh my what wonderful taste.

Marc Reynolds

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Hi folks! I also made this recipe recently. I made a half-recipe, actually. That translates to making 3/4 of the recipe for "favorite flaky and tender pie crust," rolling it out a diameter of about 17 inches, filling the center 10 to 11 inches with a half-recipe of the peach filling, and going on from there.

I used the base from a 10-inch round springform pan as my baking pan and baked on a foil-protected baking stone. I took an idea from a different galette recipe and put a very thin layer of raspberry jam underneath the peach filling. It made for a lovely sort of Peach Melba effect.

It was delicious!

My husband and I were surprised to discover that we didn't like this as well as some other galettes because the pie crust was "too thin" for our tastes. We both just LOVE pie crust and Rose's recipe is superb -- we wanted a thicker layer in each bite! Next time, I am thinking of making a full recipe of the crust, rather than 3/4 of the recipe. When I roll it out, I'll make the center part thicker and taper out to very thin at the edges. (I think if the edges are too thick, you'd get a huge pile of folded dough in the center of the galette.) Just a suggestion for those of us who love, love, love pie crust!

On the other hand, we both thought the original amount of dough would be superb with a thinner layer of fruit, or just some really good jam or preserves. How about a thin layer of spiced apple butter topped with very, very thinly sliced apples? Between thin layers of that heavenly crust? Yum!

I'll be making various versions of this recipe again! Thanks for a great recipe, Rose!

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wonderful!!! i'm so pleased--now you have this wonderful dessert in your repertoire and we all learned something about cornstarch and the technique of reducing fruit juices not to mention crisper bottom crusts!

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Rose - I made the Peach Galette last night and it's heavenly! I love it! Aren't we lucky to have you around - for the recipes and as a resource when encountering baking problems. We loved it so much that over half of it is gone. Between my husband and I - we had it for dessert last night and breakfast this morning. Yummy.
Thanks again for the great recipe. Will bake it again today (peaches are on sale).

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Julie - my registration was finally activated. Thanks again for being there.

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that's not what i wrote. if you try to dissolve the cornstarch in the hot syrup you may overheat the cornstarch and it won't thicken. do try the recipe exactly as it's written and also for added insurance bake it for the first 20 min. or as i indicated earlier until the bottom is nicely browned.

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i know i didnt put the pie crust in the bottom of the oven.

OK i see where i goofed.
i reduced the juice/syrup to the 2/3 cup as per the recipe.

because of my fear of soggy crust - i didn't pour all of the 2/3 cup into the fruits as it seemed a lot.

but the key here is i dissolved the cornstarch into the syrup and then poured it into the fruits that were already spread out on the crust.

allright - i'll try again. i bought peaches this morning intending to do another test. this will be trial #3.

thanks/

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amy, you missed my answer which i posted on your question about adding starter to bread dough. here it is again:

t's impossible to know exactly what you did differently with the galette but it sounds like a combination of too much juice and not enough bottom heat. i don't know if you weighed the peaches or exactly how much water they released and how much you reduced it so you need to follow the instructions very carefully. reduce the juices til very syrupy as in the photo. but you should try baking on the floor of the oven--checking after 20 minutes to make sure the bottom crust doesn't burn and when it's nice and brown raise it to the next shelf.

all i can do is give very specific recipes and photos but i can't be there to know if you are following them to the letter. if you tell me your crust was ruined due to sogginess all i can assuming is that you are deviating from the recipe in some way but i can't know how. try making smaller versions as practice ones and i'm confident you'll work it out to your satisfaction.

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Matthew - when you suggested the egg white wash for the crust - does that apply to crust that's filled with fruits and is going back to the oven for further cooking?

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i don't. it might be in the peach pie in the pastry bible. where did you get the idea i did this for the galette? it's not necessary.

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Mary  Ann Buruchian
Mary Ann Buruchian
09/ 2/2008 08:20 PM

Where in your directions, do you talk about brushing crust with egg whites to prevent a soggy crust?

THIS IS MY FIRST COMMENT EVER. cOULD IT BE YOU JUST DO NOT HAVE AN ANSWER?

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Rose: Thought I'd re-post this as I didn't get any reply.

HELP! I made the peach galette thinking i followed the instructions really well. however, i still ended up with lots of juice thus ending up with a soggy crust.

i macerated the peaches for 45 min., drained the juice and created the syrup.

i didn't use all of the syrup in the recipe, however, afraid that I'd end up with a soggy crust.COULD THIS HAVE CAUSED THE PROBLEM?

i didn't do the egg white wash on this because i was baking the crust with the peaches as per recipe instruction.

WHAT AM I DOING WRONG?

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Mary  Ann Buruchian
Mary Ann Buruchian
09/ 2/2008 08:19 PM

Where in your directions, do you talk about brushing crust with egg whites to prevent a soggy crust?

THIS IS MY FIRST COMMENT EVER. cOULD IT BE YOU JUST DO NOT HAVE AN ANSWER?

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Mary  Ann Buruchian
Mary Ann Buruchian
09/ 2/2008 08:18 PM

Where in your directions, do you talk about brushing crust with egg whites to prevent a soggy crust?

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I saw your recipe today on Tasting Spoons blog and had to try it. I followed your directions on the crust and it turned out beautifully. I don't consider myself a pie crust baker, but this was easy and delicious. Thanks. Jan

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julie - thank you for coming to the rescue. i was able to get into the register section. supposedly my registration was accepted. however when i try to log in it's saying that my membership account has not been activated yet.

maybe somebody from Rose's office has to do something. i'll try it again on Tuesday and see if it works.

thanks again.

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Amy,

Try going to the forums section by clicking on "Forums" in the left sidebar. Then I think you'll be able to see the "register" over by the seal. For the forums you need to register, but not for the main blog.

Hope that helps,
Julie

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Rose - I must have registered some time ago and didnt remember. The word register is nowhere under the gold medal seal. The system gave me a user name and a new password. However, when I entered my user name and new password - this is what showed up:

The following errors were encountered

* Your membership account has not been activated yet.

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Oh sure... click on the word register just under the gold medal seal.

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Thanks, Patrincia. I clicked on the link and it's asking me to register and is indicating a register button on the upper right (Rose's intro). But, I cant find it anywhere. Can you guide me through?

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HELP! I made the peach galette thinking i followed the instructions really well. however, i still ended up with lots of juice thus ending up with a soggy crust.

i macerated the peaches for 45 min., drained the juice and created the syrup.

i didn't use all of the syrup however, afraid that I'd end up with a soggy crust.

i didn't do the egg white wash on this because i was baking the crust with the peaches as per recipe instruction.

what am i doing wrong?
the galette came out beautiful and i'd like to post it but don't know how. i'm so sad to have ruined a beautiful and tasty pie crust.

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yikes! apologies but maybe you created a new idea here! thank goodness you will be proofing these things in the book!!!

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Wow, that surprises me. I used the 400g amount to make mine--no wonder it seemed so incredibly thin when I rolled it out to 24''!

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the correct amount is 22 oz 624 grams. thanks for pointing out the error.

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What is the correct weight of the flaky cream cheese pie crust dough to be used in this peach galette: 22 oz OR 406 g? There seems to be a typo in the ingredient chart for the galette, as the two weight amounts (the imperial and the metric) given for the pie crust dough are obviously NOT equivalent. BTW, made this galette with fresh wild blueberries now in season. The pie dough is very easy to handle, roll out, and shape (no cracking), and the resulting baked crust/galette are excellent - just as flaky as on your photo and tender, yet pliable and sturdy enough to prevent any leakage of the juicy blueberry filling.

Thanks for yet another great recipe.

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my guess is about 1/16" thick but you will get the right thickness automatically by rolling it to the 24"!

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What is the thickness of the unbaked pastry when fully rolled out into a 24" diameter circle? It looks very thin, even slightly transparent on the photo. I assume no more than 1/8"-thick (perhaps even less - 1/16")? Thanks.

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Karen Broido
Karen Broido
08/15/2008 11:43 AM

Shoot! I have many other Pepin cookbooks but not this one! Would love to have the ballotine recipe though.

Karen

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Thanks Rose! By the way, your Peach Galette reminds me of my Pear and Cranberry Crostata. Love that rustic look!

Hector - thank you as well for the feedback. Guess I'm not making a Chocolate cake after all. I'm excited to try the Peach Pie again.

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Thank you! What a load off my mind.
Now that that is resolved, I will make a Peach Pie this weekend.

Just love peaches and ice cream!

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Salmonella dies at 165-175oF or so. The pie crust is baked at the 400s!!!!!

Try check the temperature of your hot out of the oven pie crust, it will be much higher than 165-175oF, and will the residual heat will be sufficient to COOK and kill your whites to over this temperature.

=)

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believe me it cooks enough to kill salmonella (the egg white wash)!

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I do it all the time, but I never serve to an at risk group. The egg layer is very thin, and dries hard and flaky from the heat of the crust. I don't know if it is enough to kill salmonella, but it seems like it would.

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Thanks for the info. I heard about the egg white wash. However, I was concerned about salmonella given that I wasn't going to re-bake the pie crust after I've layered the fresh peaches. I wanted the pie to look like Marie Callender's fresh peach pie. All they have is the crust, sliced peaches layered with a glaze. Then they serve it with whipped cream.

Was I worrying for nothing?

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Thanks Amy! I know of three ways to prevent a soggy crust. When you remove it from the oven, brush it with an egg white. If you want an even firmer seal, brush it with white chocolate. Finally, you can suspend the peaches in a strainer, collect their juices, reduce it to a syrup, and use that as your glaze (perhaps in combination with the apricot jelly).

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Matthew - I envy you your peach galette. Looked really yummy, especially with my favorite vanilla ice cream.

All I want to know is, where's my piece?
Great job!@

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Rose - what a beautiful galette! My favorite fruit too.

I just made a fresh peach pie - what a bomb! The crust got really soggy. Any ideas on how to prevent a one crust pie (blind baked) from getting soggy after the freshly sliced peaches with a apricot glaze on top is layered on top of it?

Your peach galette will be on my list for the next dessert!

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Rose, I've been noticing you put cream everywhere. Is that because you are the creme of the crop?

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thanks jack! and just fyi, using cream is a great idea for smaller galettes because it browns faster--too brown for a larger one though.

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I really enjoyed this recipe. I like to make things in mini sizes--that way it's easier to give to my neighbors. I made several of these in small pans I have on hand. Each are about six inches round. They baked beautifully. I brushed a few teaspoons of heavy cream on top, then sprinkled on some raw sugar, which left a very nice caramelized effect. This was fun to make--and the neighbors enjoyed their "pan" desert this morning. I enjoy your blog. Jack


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3179/2746342897_e5a22558ef.jpg?v=0


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possibly, there's something about peaches and cream that is so glorious. but the galette with ice cream on the side....hmmmm....
the twice copy-edited manuscript just arrived--i'll be disappearing from view for the next few days--no baking for me! this morning i made a cherry claufouti but was disappointed because the sour cherries don't absorb any of the sugar from the cream mixture so they stand apart. that's what made me think of the peaches and cream tart.

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Would you recommend it over the galette? Decisions, decisions, what to make this weekend!

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for those of you who have the pie and pastry bible you MUST try the peaches and cream tart on page 266 but i highly recommend getting a 9 1/2 by 1 1/2 inch high tart pan--it's so much better than the 1 inch high version as the crust always sinks about 1/8 inch when prebaking and this gives you a little extra margin. get the gobel one--jb prince and la cuisine carry it. it's not quite 1 1/2 inches as it's metric sized but there's only one like that. the peaches are so amazing this time of year and there is NOTHING more delicious that the combination of peach juices, peaches and cream. if you replace the sour cream with crème fraîche all the better!

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Wow! Matthew. Rose is soooo right. It does look like hers. You did a wonderful job. Wish I could dig my fork into the computer screen for a piece........

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Thanks Rose, although I opted to leave off the sugar topping just as a matter of preference. I was just happy I was able to roll the crust out so thin without my pastry cloth (it is about 4 inches too small). It wasn't too hard, although I had forgotten how much easier a cloth makes rolling! I may try a half size this weekend so I can use the cloth.

Also, I think my peaches were a shade too ripe. I got 1 1/2 cups of juice. Luckily, I was watching and realized it was going to boil over in the microwave, so I transferred it to a larger container.

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it looks so much like mine i could have been fooled!

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A couple more:

Slice (I like how it looks like a folded handkerchief).

Slice with Philadelphia-style vanilla ice cream.

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I guess I wasn't the only one who spent my Sunday afternoon making this! It looked so delicious that I've been thinking about it every since you posted it.

This was my first time making a galette, and I think it is definitely the best way to eat cooked peaches, beating out both pie and cobbler. The ratio between crust and filing is "heavenly."

A few pictures:

Whole Galette

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I guess I wasn't the only one who spent my Sunday afternoon making this! It looked so delicious that I've been thinking about it every since you posted it.

This was my first time making a galette, and I think it is definitely the best way to eat cooked peaches, beating out both pie and cobbler. The ratio between crust and filing is "heavenly."

A few pictures:

Whole Galette

Slice (I like how it looks like a folded handkerchief).

Slice with Philadelphia-style vanilla ice cream.

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Wow, perfect is right! We made this today and while it does take the better part of the afternoon to make, it is SO WORTH IT!

Thanks for sharing this lovely recipe with us, Rose. It's such a wonderful way to present those fabulous summer peaches!

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This was absolutely scrum-my! The pastry itself was worth the discovery and the balance of flaky/sweet/fruit was just perfect. 4 thumbs-up from this household. BTW, I use a large silpat to roll pastry on and find it is flexible enough to help fold/maneuver the dough into the pan or onto the foil for transfer to the oven surface. I have also seen a screen-like mat at Target that is made for the bottom of the oven for cleaning ease that I think would also work in the same manner.
Kyle

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Leon Axel shares that the ballotine recipe came from Jacques Pepin;s The Art of Cooking, Vol. 2, p 38; the cherry chutney recipe is with it.

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Andi Fishman
Andi Fishman
08/ 3/2008 12:13 PM

Rose,theis looks delish...yummmm
I use my grandmothers rolling pin.
It has NO handles..and thin and long.....Yours looks like it has some kind of cloth around it.
I love my tools too........and it feels like my grandmother is next to me,when I use it to bake....
Happy summer days.....
Andi in Vegas.
Sadly no peaches...

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excellent suggestion barbara!

hector, i'm not in ny but my pasta pin as you can see is wider than the board which is almost 24 inches and the other huge rolling pin you can guestimate from it lying on the board. i've had it for many years so don't know where it's available anymore but it's good to keep in mind that the heavier and larger the pin the less pressure YOU need to exert and the faster the pastry gets rolled!

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That is so lovely! Hey folks, you could always make several smaller galettes if you have trouble rolling the dough out that large.

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Hi Rose,

This looks stunning, and especially your photos of the process. It is my dream to be able to go camping and be able to produce some amazing fresh fruit dessert over the campfire. We are headed to Rocky Mountain Natl. Park, and I am in charge of the food.
I don't think I can do this there, but will certainly try when back in my own kitchen!

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leon said it was from a jacque pépin book so you'll need to google or check his books!

re the pastry board, sadly it is no longer being produced.

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Karen Broido
Karen Broido
08/ 1/2008 02:32 PM

I'd also love the Duck Ballontine recipe, if possible!

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I'd like to know about that pastry board too... so far I've only been able to find a 19" diameter board w/cloth cover.

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I am in awe. Only the person who wrote the pastry recipe can roll it to 24" diameter!!!!!!

What is the length of your rolling pin, and the diameter of your pastry board? Did you make your pastry board yourself?

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marc reynolds
marc reynolds
08/ 1/2008 01:05 PM

I would like the Duck Ballontine recipe, is it available?

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it's so interesting you should mention the pastry's ressemblance to fine fabric because when i wrote the pastry bible, amanda hesser reviewed it for the new york times and mentioned that it was like fine bedding or sheets that softened by many washings!

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Thank you for this recipe! I can hardly wait to try it! Looks so good!

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Great pictures Rose! The pastry dough looks like a piece of silk draped over the pan. Sarah is so right.

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The galette looks delicious and the pie dough draped over the pan is simply beautiful. It looks more like a fine piece of fabric than a creation of flour and cream cheese. Yum!

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What a great way to eat fruits! And really, pies on its purest form.

And, as you know, I have the same copper pizza pan!

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I love the idea of forming this galette on a pizza pan! We have the most amazing peaches available at our area farm stands - I'm going to rush out to get some... can't wait to make this!

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I love the idea of forming this galette on a pizza pan! We have the most amazing peaches available at our area farm stands - I'm going to rush out to get some... can't wait to make this!

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