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Out-Cakes from Rose's Heavenly Cakes: Buttercream Process Shots

Jan 06, 2010 | From the kitchen of Rose

Mousseline Buttercream

Beaten Butter

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Stiffly Beaten Egg Whites

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Beating Sugar Syrup into the Stiffly Beaten Egg Whites

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Final Stage of Stiffly Beaten Egg Whites with Syrup

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Adding the Stiffly Beaten Egg Whites to The Butter

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Mixture Beginning to Curdle

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Mixture Curdling More

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After Further Beating Buttercream Almost Completely Smooth

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Perfectly Smooth Mousseline Buttercream

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Comments

Thanks Rose! It was perfect. I flavoured it with Strawberry Puree.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Silver
10/22/2010 09:57 AM

silver, in my new book (rose's heavenly cakes) as you can see above i add the whites to the butter and not the butter to the whites. also on page 147 for the vanilla mousseline i use no liqueur but use ony 6.5 ounces of butter instead of 8 ounces (for 2-1/2 egg whites) and for flavor 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. you can also flavor it with lemon curd or any of the other suggestions in either book!

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Hi Rose,

I am frosting a cake using your mousseline buttercream recipe. Can I omit or substitute the liqueur in the recipe with something else? It's for a child's birthday party.

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Neva, if you can pick up a copy of The Cake Bible, it has mousseline as well as all the information you need to bake and stack wedding cakes. Good luck!

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NEVA SWARTOUT
NEVA SWARTOUT
04/15/2010 05:52 PM

CAN SOMEONE PLEASE EMAIL ME THE RECIPE FOR MOUSSELINE BUTTERCREAM ICING? OR ANY OTHER RECIPES FOR BUTTERCREAM. I AM MAKING MY FIRS 3 TIERED WEDDING CAKE FOR A MAY WEDDING. THANKS

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Thanks Hector. I just bought some Kirkland unsalted butter yesterday. Can't wait to try it in my next batch of buttercream this weekend.

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S, as a matter of fact, I use Costco's Kirkland Signature brand uns butter. Didn't know any better till I met my hawaiian cows! I continue to use Cotsco's for mousseline because it performs for me and I have over 20 flavors developed with this mousseline. If I make a buttercream where I want a higher taste of butter, then I will look for my hawaiian cows, the same for any butter rich or butter centered cake like my great experience with Gateau Breton.

I like Rose's new method of mousseline, it is easier to teach and understand, now that thermometers are readilly available. But be aware often I meassure temperatures a few degrees cooler because in my hot weather a few minutes out of the fridge or wine cellar can be a fast rise of temps. But for the new methods of mousseline, if too cold, then the butter will turn into small pieces, not smooth, so often I blow torch my mizer bowl at this stage. Happy baking.

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Wow! Hector, your mousseline is dreamy and divinely smooth and creamy. What is the butter fat of the butter you use? I assume you use a local "natural" butter that may be hard to find in the continental states. I use similar technique of adding cool butter to warm meringue. I also whip thawed frozen egg whites for a better meringue. Any other suggestions you could add to get that smooth texture would be great.

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Felix Ferra
Felix Ferra
01/09/2010 01:12 AM

Following the Cake Bible instructions, I add the butter into the meringue, not the opposite. Could anyone tell if there is a significant difference?

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There is nothing better than buttercream. :-)

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What a teriffic "outcake"! Never again will I feel like I'm doing something wrong when my mousseline curdles. Thanks so much, Rose and Woody.

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Heavenly Buttercream! Oh I love that "stuff"! :)

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thx for reporting Woody. my usual room temps are in the mid 80s, and i add 65oF butter to my 100oF meringue and surround my mixer bowl with ice packs.

my finished mousseline consistency is dreamy perfect and i obviously get very smooth cakes in my 80s kitchen. when i work on my 70s or 60s kitchen, it is a total different story, and i can tell the mousseline has a coarser consistency which i dislike.

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Hector,
The room temperature of the condo was in the low 70sF.
I used Plugra high fat butter (per instructions from Rose). I made Rose-ally sure that the whipped butter and the meringue were both at 68-69 F. As far as the color, that could be from the overhead counter lighting or from the diet of the cows. The last process shot was taken immediately after I finished off the beating by hand whisking with the KitchenAid's whisk attachment. If I do not add any additional flavoring, I use a silicone spatula to fold and mix it a bit before spreading it on the cake.

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Too funny, Rose! The very first thing I noticed was the too masculine-looking thumb. I so love your blog and
"out cakes" was a stroke of genius!!

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What was the room temperature? My curdling stage is a lot more soupy and my finished mousseline a lot smoother.

also not as yellow! Could it be the butter fat content?

here it is, the color is pretty accurate, these pictures while adding the liqueur

http://www.myyellowkitchen.com/roselevy/MousselineButtercreamGrandMarnier.html

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It just makes me want to put my whole face in the bowl and mousseline and eat to the bottom. It is my favorite butter cream of all I've tried!

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by the way, if you're wondering what happened to my delicate little fingers! this demo is compliments of woody wolston!

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