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Whipped Cream Cake

Jan 22, 2010 | From the kitchen of Rose



Maybe I should have called this cake "Where's the Butter?" because at first glance there appears to be no butter in it. In reality, the butterfat contained in the heavy cream is more than the butter usually added separately!

As this seems to be, perhaps, the most popular of all the cakes in my newest book Rose's Heavenly Cakes I've decided to list the recipe on this blog for easy access.

Whipped Cream Cake
Serves: 8 to 10
Baking Time: 25 to 35 minutes
This unusual old-time recipe was sent to me by chef Anthony Stella, a restaurateur in Delaware, who asked if I could perform a makeover on it. What intrigued both of us about the recipe was that at first glace it seemed to contain no butter or oil. But on closer analysis, I discovered that the butterfat contained in the cream was more than equal to the usual amount of butter added. My makeover involved a nip and tuck, decreasing the sugar and baking powder and increasing the salt to compensate for the saltiness previously provided by a higher amount of baking powder. I also increased the overall yield by one and a half times and baked the cake in a fluted tube pan to give it an attractive appearance and more center support. The result is a perfectly even and exceptionally moist and tender cake.

Batter Ingredients
Bleached Cake Flour or bleached all-purpose flour, sifted (2 1/4 cups cake flour or 2 cups all purpose--measured by sifting into the cup and leveling it off: 8 ounces/225 grams)
Baking powder (2 teaspoons)
Salt (3/4 teaspooon)
Heavy cream, cold (1-1/2 cups/12.3 ounces/348 grams)
3 large eggs, at room temperature (1/2 cup plus 1-1/2 tablespoons/5.3 ounces/150 grams)
Pure vanilla extract (1 teaspoon)
Superfine sugar (1 cup plus 2 tablespoons/8 ounces/225 grams)

Special Equipment
One 10-cup fluted metal tube pan, coated with baking spray with flour

Preheat the Oven
Twenty minutes or more before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 375°F/190°C (350°F/175°C if using a dark pan).

Mix the Dry Ingredients
In a medium bowl, whisk together the cake flour, baking powder, and salt and then sift them together to make the mixture easier to incorporate.

Mix the Liquid Ingredients
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk beater, whip the cream, starting on low speed, gradually raising the speed to medium-high as it thickens, until stiff peaks form when the beater is raised.

In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs and vanilla just until lightly combined. On medium-high speed, gradually beat the egg mixture into the whipped cream. The mixture will thicken into mayonnaise consistency (unless high-butterfat cream is used). Gradually beat in the sugar. It should take about 30 seconds to incorporate it. [Here's a slight change in how I now incorporate the flour thanks to both Marie Wolf and Hector Wong commenting on the difficulty with a rubber or silicone spatula] Detach the bowl and whisk beater from the stand.

Make the Batter
Add half the flour mixture to the cream mixture and, with the whisk attachment stir and fold in the flour until most of it disappears. Add the rest of the flour mixture and continue folding and mixing until all traces of flour have disappeared. Using a silicone spatula or spoon, scrape the batter into the prepared pan. Run a small metal spatula or dull knife blade through the batter to prevent large air bubbles, avoiding the bottom of the pan. Smooth the surface evenly with a small metal spatula.

Bake the Cake
Bake for 25 to 35 minutes, or until a wooden toothpick inserted between the tube and the side comes out completely clean and the cake springs back when pressed lightly in the center. The cake should start to shrink from the sides of the pan only after removal from the oven.

Cool and Unmold the Cake
Let the cake cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes. With a small metal spatula, loosen the top edges of the cake and invert the cake onto a wire rack that has been coated lightly with nonstick cooking spray. Cool completely. The cake requires no adornment, but I love to serve it with a light dusting of powdered sugar or a large dollop of lightly sweetened Whipped Cream (page 115).

Notes: Do not chill the bowl and beaters for the heavy cream because the eggs will not emulsify as readily if the whipped cream is too cold.

High-butterfat (40 percent) heavy cream produces a finer, more tender crumb. This cream is generally available only to bakeries and restaurants, but it is certainly worth asking your local baker to sell you a container.

Special Note: I'm sending this to Kate for Sugar High Friday #61!

Comments

Hi Woody,

I think that I may have the UK edition of TCB. I'm wondering, when Rose states double cream in a recipe, what fat percentage would that be? I can then decide which cream to buy myself. Thank you again for all your help.

Best,
Tonia

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
10/ 2/2013 11:17 PM

Hi Tonia,
We recommend to use your computer's search engine for "cream". Wikipedia has a charts for creams in various parts of the world. They show double cream having a fat content of 48%, which is much higher than the fat content range for heavy cream. Hopefully, you can find a lower fat content at your stores.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody,

What about double cream? I've been looking through TCB and am wondering as seeing as it's so old, when stating double cream does Rose mean heavy cream?

Thanks so much

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thank you so much luciane for this beautiful compliment. It comes at a time when Woody and I and the rest of the publishing team are deeply immersed i book production so it's a real shot in the arm to know that all our hard though enjoyable work is so appreciated.

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Luciane Oliveira
Luciane Oliveira
10/ 1/2013 05:27 PM

My son loves this cake. Actually it is the only one he likes and I have to bake one every week. I am a huge fan and I love your recipes. I am a professional baker who works from home and I use many of your recipes to create my cakes. Thank you so much for sharing all your knowledge and caring. I am looking forward to your next tip or recipe.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
10/ 1/2013 10:03 AM

Hi Tonia,
Quoting from "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" on Heavy Cream in the Ingredients chapter, "Heavy cream, also known as heavy whipping cream, contains 56.6 percent water and 36 to 40 percent fat (averaging 36 percent)."
We recommend you check the labels on the thickened cream containers to see if their fat content is within the above stated range.
Double cream has an average of 48 percent.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I'm wondering if by heavy cream you mean thickened cream or double cream? Double cream has a higher percentage of fat but seems awfully thick to put into this cake batter, any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Best wishes,

Tonia

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Hi Gail,
We only know that this is an early American recipe.
You may want to post your question on the Forums section as well.
Rose & Woody

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This whipped cream cake is the cake my grandmother always made when I was growing up. Unfortunately I never got the recipe before she passed. I have been dreaming about this cake for years and this recipe is exactly my grandmother's.

I made this twice since I discovered it and it took me back to my childhood. My family has heard me talking about this cake for so many years and they all love it as much as I do.


I am so thankful for the memories this cake has brought back and that my children can now continue the tradition of their great grandmother's delicious whipped cream cake.

Just curious about where the original recipe came from. Anyone know?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Melissa
05/ 2/2013 09:58 AM

Hi Melissa,
We suggest trying both the Vanilla Mousseline on page 147 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes or the White Chocolate-Vanilla Bean Buttercream on page 401. Both pipe well and are less intense in flavor than the Silk Meringue Buttercream. They also can be flavored with additional ingredients. Fondant may also be too overwhelming, but you may want to try it to compliment a wedding cake that is being covered with fondant.
Rose & Woody

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I'm really enjoying this cake. I used Snowville Creamery's Whipping Cream, which is a 38% butterfat, pasteurized (not ultra-pasteurized) cream that is available in my regular Kroger.

I saw the earlier comments about cupcakes being sharply domed with this recipe, so I reduced the baking temp to 325 F instead of 375 F, and was able to get perfectly flat tops. I was able to get 21 quarter-cup cupcakes from the recipe as is. A friend wants me to make cupcakes for her wedding reception, and this recipe will definitely be one of the ones I put out for her tasting.

Out of curiosity, what sort of wedding-appropriate topping would you suggest I pair with this for the tasting? I love the silk meringue buttercream from the Cake Bible, but I'm worried that it will overwhelm such a delicate cake if I pipe it on. Maybe just a thin coating of buttercream and some decorative fondant would be better?

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Jyll, cake bible explains doming, has to do with the amount of baking powder (leavening and how strong is the cake structure). Hmm, u just inspired me to make a chocolate version of this cake!

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Thanks, Hector, for the useful and interesting information. I added some cocoa powder to the last spoons of batter and those resulting cupcakes domed even more! Because they became less wet?

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Thx for sharing Jyll. This cake works fine with lower % cream. It also works very well with home made higher fat cream (see cake bible old fashioned whipped cream).

My students baked it once on a silicone tube pan and it failed dense. Heat doesn't conduct fast enough for this cake when baked on silicone pans of this size (10-12 cups). A 6 cup or smaller silicone pan should work. Also a half recipe filling only partly your 10-12 cup silicone pan will work because heat will need to cover less mass thus will conduct timely.

Cupcakes work too, the tops dome beautifully.

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Hi, Rose and everyone who enjoys making Whipped Cream Cake. I'm living in Switzerland and the cream I bought was 35% fat. Didn't have a big Bundt pan, so I used my silicone loaf pan and a six-hole muffin tray (was worried the loaf pan would be too small). Baked the muffins for 22 minutes - perfect! Love the fluffy, tender texture, subtle flavour and the pale colour of the crumb. Thank you so much! (I baked the loaf for 38 minutes, haven't cut it yet.)

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Hi Rose and Woody! I am from Malaysia.
FYI I just bake this cake in a 9 inch spring foam cake pan. The cake took 30 minutes to bake. It turns out to be a bit short, but it raise evenly without any dome! FYI I use self raising flour as I don't have any baking powder left. The cake still turns out to be very nice and yummy. Thank you very much for your recipe. I still have some heavy cream in my fridge. I will try to bake it again and next time around will try to modify the recipe so that I can marble cake by adding some cocoa powder. Hope it will turns out good.
Thanks again!

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Hi Dora,
As a German in the US familiar with descriptions of grocery products in both countries: Use Schlagsahne, not Schmand. Saure Sahne and Schmand will not give you the right flavor profile, and will likely cause problems when you bake it - as you already described.
Silke

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Dora
06/20/2012 03:26 PM

Hi Dora,
You will pleased to know that the next book, The Baking Bible, will also include milliliter measurements for volume.
Rose & Woody

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I baked this delightful cake twice, the first time it was most likely slightly-under baked and when turning out the cake, it fell apart! But it tasted delicious despite the "fall-out" and I immediately baked a second one, which turned out fabulous!

I presently live in Germany (I come from SE Asia), and since the German dairy products differ from the US dairy products, given the fat % by Rose helps to determine which dairy product I ought to purchase - in this case, I refer to the sour cream in the recipes. I replaced the sour cream with Schmand (28% fat) and both cakes turned out delicious. The next time I bake this cake again, I shall try Saure Sahne which usually has 10-19% fat. Both Schmand and Saure Sahne aren't quite the same as sour cream though relatively similar.

Last but not least, I must say I am very pleased with Rose's details with both imperial and metric measurements as the Europeans, as well as I myself, use more metric (weight) than the volume. I certainly enjoy my copy of Rose's Heavenly Cakes and now await impatiently for The Cake Bible to arrive - yes, I am doing it backwards, I know!

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Hello,
I'm hoping someone can help me. About 45 years ago, there was a very popular bakery cake that my aunt used to duplicate. I think it was a yellow layer cake (3-5) maybe a cream between the layers, along with peaches. I also think the cake was covered in more cream, and the top was decorated with alternating peaches/marachino cherries around the perimeter of the cake. The best part was inbetween these pieces of fruit; extremely thin chocolate mints. They were my favorite part of the cake (I was a kid!) and I have never found them sold anywhere. I believe my aunt had gotten them at a bakery supply place.
Does anyone recognize this cake or have the recipe?
Thank-you!

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Maria, try the golden luxury butter cake from Cake Bible. Also, be sure to measure flour in grams when baking all butter cakes.

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Hi Rose & Woody,

I was wondering if this cake can be achieve using an 9x3 in cake pan instead? Also do you recommend using a metal flower pin in the middle to distribute the heat without leaving a hole like the bundt pan? I wanted to have a go- to cake for future birthday's and other life events. I'm currently on a quest for the perfect non-chocolate cake that have the same kinda of chiffon like lightness yet not too soft that it will collapse when i try to decorate with fondant or what not. So far i've bake over at least 10 different types of recipe, i found one that's pretty close. I have been chucking the rest or making cake pops out of them. I have a good feeling that this cake may be it. You see, there's this one bakery i used to work for in northern CA a long time ago. their cake was awesome but i really don't know the recipe so hence my current quest. Thanks in advance.

Your faithful fan ;0)

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Edmund, i can't tell by the link if it is dark or not. it looks "light" to me. dark means the inside teflon is black, deep black, not aluminum color, gold color, white, or light gray. dark also means the outside is deep black.

i will definitely check your oven temp with an oven dial thermometer. turning heating elements on or off at will doesn't necessarily mean oven temp is better.

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Hi Woody, thanks for the tips and advice. will try it out.

Hi Hector, I used a Nordicware Platinum Rose Bundt Pan (http://www.nordicware.com/store/products/detail/platinum-rose-bundt-pan/2218F1DA-7C89-102A-B382-0002B3267AD7). I considered it dark and used a 350°F/175°C temp based on the baking instructions.

One thing i forgot to mentioned was that after pre-heating, I switch the oven heating to the lower heating element. I had experienced my past cakes and breads being charred on top while still remaining uncooked inside.

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edmund, is your rose mould silicone?

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Edumd, the whipped cream cake is one of my faces! i love the fact that i don't need to wait for "butter" to soften before making a butter cake!

seams that your oven IS TOO HOT. do as Woody suggests. also, does your cake pan have a dark teflon coating or is it light colored? if it is dark (and dark outsides too), reduce the temperature -25 oF

the best (still not ideal) way to measure oven temperature with a hand held thermometer is to let the oven preheat, then crack open the door and clamp your thermometer just at the door (probe inside, thermometer held outside by your hand). do so at 2 or 3 heights of the oven, middle should be the closest to oven temp. do let it sit for 2 minutes? so the temperature evens out after you opened the oven door.

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Hi alexis, i have kept the whipped cream cake in the freezer for about 3 months, just fine. i do slice wrap it first in stretch-tite. freeze it. when hard frozen, i put it inside a foodsaver bag and vacuum it. it is frozen in my -20 oF chest freezer which does not have a automatic defrost, so the temperature IS CONTANT. i keep cakes like this for about 2 years!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Alexis
04/ 3/2012 11:02 AM

Hi Alexis,
Yes you can as this is considered a butter cake. We suggest that you can freeze it per the storage times on page 3 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and per the freezing instructions in the Special Effects and Techniques section on page 424.

REPLY

Is it possible to bake and freeze the whipped cream cake?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Edmund Foo
04/ 3/2012 10:15 AM

Hi Edmund,
We have a couple of suggestions for checking your oven's temperature. We have listed a couple of thermometers designed for ovens on page 474 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and a section on ovens on the next two pages.
Another test, is to make the All Occasion Downy Yellow Cake in The Cake Bible or Rose's Favorite Yellow Butter Cake posted on this blog. If you have good results with these within the time frames given then your oven is heating properly.
You may also experiment with positioning the cake pan on different places on your oven's rack. My oven's right side is slightly hotter than the left side.
Ovens not heating to the temperature indicated by the oven's temperature setting is one of the three main factors for a cake recipe to fail along with incorrect measuring and over beating the batter.

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Hi Rose and Hector,

I tried this recipe two times today using a rose mould and it turns out wonderfully. The texture is fine and light which is a contrast from the usual butter type cakes. However, the crust was overdone both times round. The first, I baked at 175 deg C for 25 min - the colour for the top and pattern side was a chocolate brown, the second 175 deg for 22 mins, the pattern side was chocolately brown and the top was a golden brown. I tested the cake when it was at a pale yellow gold color (approx 20mins) and it was still liquid inside when I inserted a toothpick.

I have a handheld food thermometer at home, can I use that to test the oven temperature? How should I go about doing that to get the best guage.

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Apologize - Family in the USA. Lesson learned -You should always proofread what you send on email!!

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I'm in Australia and have problems getting the same ingredients. I do not know if the flour is bleached or not. I baked this in the Bundt Heritage pan (present from fallibly i USA) and all I can say is that it looks like the Opera House! Thank you Rose and Hector for giving me all you words of wisdom. I won't taste it until tomorrow but if the batter and the crumbs are anything to go by I will be a star at work tomorrow. The presentation will get me there if nothing else.

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thanks so much for letting us all know! you're right--the tube pan is so forgiving even if there are differences in flour and leavening it seems to make everything turn out right!

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Hi, Rose, I just want to tell you that this whipped cream cake is fantastic!
I live in Germany and used Weizen Mehl (Type 405) and Schlagsahne.
I wondered if baking powder in Germany would work. I have heard that the German baking powder is different from the US baking powder, but turned out very nicely.
Fortunately I brought the Nordic Ware Heritage Pan with me when I moved here but I have no access to "Bakers Joy", so I coated it with butter and flour.

Love this cake. so easy to make. Tastes fantastic. tastes even better a day later.!

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Hi Rose, I just want to tell you that your whipped cream cake is really good. I tried making it today and it turned out almost perfect. My oven temperature was abit inaccurate so I sort of overbaked it but the cake still tasted great. It was tender and has a mild ice cream taste. I bought your Cake Bible recently and had tried your Chocolate Domingo cake. All my siblings, nieces and nephews were complimenting how delicious and "chocolatety" the cake was. I am going to buy your Rose's Heavenly Cakes. Thanks for sharing all these wonderful recipes.

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Alexandra S
Alexandra S
01/15/2012 09:37 PM

I have made today the Whipped Cream cake the first time. I had to cut the ingredients by 1/3 d/t poor planning my part. ...and i baked it in the daisy cake pan from nordicware ( i really wanted to try the pan out). The cake is amazon, fantastic, easy and gorgeous. I can see myself buying another one or two nordicwar pan and pairing the cake with some fresh strawberries etc.

i just had to share

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Hi: Mrs.Rose
I like your The Bread Bible book.I made some bread
from your book, the bread came perfect.Thanks.
Now, I will try to make whipping cream cake from your
recipe.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from SL
09/ 5/2011 06:15 PM

Hi SL,
We suggest you make one with the 35% fat whipping cream. You can then compare the results. The batter will typically fill a bundt pan to about 1-1/2 inches/ 3.5 cm from the rim.

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Hi Rose and Woody (and anybody else who can answer my query).

I'm from Malaysia and we get our cream from Australia. They do sell a 45% milkfat cream here but it cannot be whipped according to the manufacturer:
http://www.bullafoodservice.com.au/images/stories/cream/4030PureCream200ml/4030-4031PureCreamRV3.pdf

(I have tried whipping it before and it becomes grainy).

So when I made the recipe, I whipped it slightly where it was billowy but definitely not at stiff peaks. When I added the eggs it mixed really well having the texture and consistency of mayonnaise. But after I put the sugar it became this weird grainy thing (I used superfine sugar) and it looked like it had split and did not emulsify properly. Wish I took a picture of it to properly explain the texture =/

Anyway, I'm wondering if this was due to something else? (Maybe I put in the sugar too fast?) or was it because I couldn't whip my cream?

The cake turned out good though! Although it was severely stunted in height (It only managed to fill half of my 10 cup bundt pan).

Would you recommend using this same cream or downgrading it to a cream at 35% fat but can be whipped?

Thanks!

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Anand Venigalla
Anand Venigalla
08/16/2011 12:57 PM

Hi Rose, I think I may have found pasteurized (not ultra-pasteurized) 40% heavy cream that may be available to the consumer. It's Organic Valley Heavy Whipping Cream (Pasteurized).

Here is what the description read on the Organic Valley website:

Pasteurized, 16 oz
Dress up your desserts with the freshest, most heavenly organic whipping cream on earth. You'll be dazzled by its stellar performance in all of your favorite recipes! Our luscious organic cream is standardized to 40% butterfat.

Do you think that when they say, "It's standardized to 40% butterfat," is it really 40% in butterfat?


REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Fran
08/ 1/2011 12:59 PM

Hi Fran,
None of Rose's recipes specify using Self Rising Flour. Cake flour generally does not contain baking powder unless specified. Rose has researched and worked out her recipes for using bleached all-purpose flour as and alternate to cake flour when specified. However bleached all-purpose flour will not give as tender a crumb as cake flour.

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The recipe calls for two (2) teaspoons of baking powder. I thought cake flour contains baking powder already? I am surprised the same amount is used no matter if you used caked flour or all purpose flour?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from tammy
08/ 1/2011 11:58 AM

Hi Tammy,
Thank you for sending the pictures. The cake looks like you just did not bake it long enough. We give a 25 to 35 minute window for a baking time, which works for most ovens. The cake's crust does turn a deep golden brown.

You want to check your oven's temperature to make sure that a 375 degrees setting is 375 degrees temperature. All three ovens i have used over the last five years have been cooler from 5 to 10 degrees to any oven setting which I have to compensate with adjusting the oven to a higher temperature setting.

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Hi Rose and Woody,
i love your recipe and i followed your steps and try to bake it. however the cake structure doesn't look quite right in the middle can you take a look at 2 sample imges of my cake in below url and please tell me what may have gone wrong. thank you so much. http://liaodesign.shutterfly.com/pictures/12
http://liaodesign.shutterfly.com/pictures/13

thanks tammy

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Made this cake for the first time today with fantastic results! It is so re-assuring to check the website for additional insight after reading the recipe.

Fortunately, Trader Joes's carries +40% cream pints at a very reasonable price.

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thank you wooody,
and justs another question:
Does the cake work in a chocolate variation with cocoa powder inside?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from hartwig
07/ 9/2011 01:40 AM

Hi Hartwig,
We suggest serving any fruit as a compote or other side adornment as the cake is too fragile to support any fruit while baking.

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Hello, this cake is amazing, but does anybody knows if it can be baked with fruits like cherrys or blueberrys? If yes, do you mix them in the batter or do you put them on top before baking and they sink in?
Greetings from germany :-)

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For Mother's Day this year my treat was the time to make a cake, unmolested for once! I tried this one and even though SOMEONE played with the oven and turned off the timer it still tasted great. It was overdone but still moist and flavorful. Reminds me very much of a more finely textured version of my grandmother's pound cake. (3 sticks of butter, box of powdered sugar, 3 eggs, box of sifted flour, vanilla.)

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kim
02/28/2011 05:16 PM

Hi Kim,
What are the dimensions of the pan?
You will beable to multiply all of the ingredients by a factor depending on the volume of the pan, except the leavening. It will be increasing.
Enjoy, Woody

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Thank you Woody.
The height of the pan I am going to use is 2 inches.
I do not have Rose's cake bible.I have Rose's heavenly cakes.
I am a new baker,so I get a little comfused.I have seen a lot of cake recipes that just have to doble all ingredients including baking powder.What can happen if I doble all ingredients,including baking powder?
Sorry for all the questions.
Kim

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kim
02/28/2011 03:54 PM

Hi Kim,
What is the height of the pan?
Both cakes can be converted to sheet cakes which you may want to look at the wedding cake section and page 384 on extra sheet cakes.
If you have Rose's Cake Bible, you should look at the wedding section which explains leavening increases on page 490.
Enjoy, Woody

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Hi Rose,
I would like to make the southern coconut cake or the white chocolate cake(page 91)from Rose's heavenly cakes.It would be possible to bake the cakes on a half sheet?If yes,how much baking powder do I need?
Thank you very much.
Kim

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ming
02/28/2011 01:11 AM

Hi Ming,
To answer your question we need some information.
What ingredients did you use?
Did you do anything different from the recipe's instructions?
Have you checked your oven for being accurate in temperatures? (as most ovens are off. I have had to make a chart for every oven I have used as they all have been lower in temperature than what the setting read.)
Baking time?
Any pictures?
We look forward to seeing what we can offer for advice.
Enjoy,Woody

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Hi rose,

do you know why my whipped cream cake has a crumbly texture?

Thanks - i love your book ;)

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Tiffany, I did so and was good. domes a little. same temp but much less time.

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Hi Rose,

Is it possible to use this recipe for cupcakes instead? I want to make this for a party, and for serving purposes, it would be easier to dish these out if they're already in individual portions. Do I still bake them at 375F? And for how long?

Thank you in advance!


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i love making it--it's magical!

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this cake was awesome!

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Thank you, Rose, for getting back to me. That was enlightening!

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ian, the weight is always the same! cake flour is lighter than all purpose so you need to use a greater volume to equal the same weight.

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Hi Rose,

Thank you for your recipe.
The recipe calls for 8 ounces of flour. Is that for the all purpose ( 2 cups) or for the cake flour (2+1/4 cups)?

Thank you!

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Diana, my experience as cupcakes has been pretty good and tasty, but i have a feeling doming and cracked tops will be characteristic.

http://myyellowkitchen.wordpress.com/2010/03/03/whipped-04-cream-cake-page-29-%E2%80%93-mini-pandoro-siliconetake/

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Will this recipe work well as cupcakes?

Thank you for your time in response,

Diana

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syb, i just LOVE knowing that my recipes work in locations far from where i live! thanks so much for telling us.

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Hey, this is from hong kong!
My family loves the whip cream cake. I've made 3 and never fail. I put raisin in once and still very nice!

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soo young, thank you for having the courage to communicate in a language that doesn't come as easily as your own. you certainly understand the wonderful language of cakes and sweet baking connection!

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hello~!!
Here is Korea. I'm Korean. (I'm poor at English..)
Ago 3 months, I bought your book "havenly cake".
I love that!!!!! (maybe fall in love..^^)

Yesterday, I baked "whipped cream cake".
good~ wonderful~~^&^

Today, I will bake "Whipped cream choco cake" for my co-worker'birthday.
Add the sweetened Whipped Cream~~.

Thank for your wonderful recipe.

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thx Kathleen. i would definitely do it as cupcakes if you don't mind the little crater, as i do adore my take:

http://myyellowkitchen.wordpress.com/2010/03/03/whipped-04-cream-cake-page-29-%E2%80%93-mini-pandoro-siliconetake/

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Hector, I know we all make typos in our forum posts, but I love your use of the word "tune" instead of "tube". I picture you whistling a tune as you bake your cakes. A happy baker in a happy kitchen... :)

I agree with Hector -- this is one of the most tender cakes I have ever baked. A tube pan is most recommended.

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Paula, this is a very tender cake and requires a center tune for support. I think the center will be sunken if baked on a layer pan. I've done cupcakes, and the logic is reverse, been tender and baked on a small and narrow pan, the centers bake heavilly domed like a crater.

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Can this be used for cupcakes or layer cakes?

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This cake is wonderful!! Thanks so much!

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when i line every shelf with tiles is because i want to bake on each shelf many cakes at the same time, if i only need to use one shelf, i only line the most top shelf and the bottom shelf or oven floor.

i make sure the side spacing between pans and between pan and oven walls is at least 2", but the space above the pans and the tile lined shelf above can be as minimum as 1/2". when i am using each oven shelf, each shelf lined with tiles, i keep convection turned on. all the tiles seem to lower the strength of the air circulation just right so to not affect cake baking negatively with convection.

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Hector,
When you fully lined all the shelves did you leave some space on the sides to help air circulation? And I assume you place the cake pans directly on the tiles to cook the cake.

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Made le succes yesterday at friends house, spent 7 hours in great company with friends there. The first thing I did was turn on the oven and had to set the dial to 320oF instead of 350oF, glad I brought my little oven thermometer. I also lined many quarry tiles, indeed as many as 18 tiles, on every oven shelf. Cake baked beautifully even and at the exact time as indicated on the book. Was a bit of a workout carrying all those tiles though...

Oven was gas, and we preheated for 3 hours!

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Yep . . . always check the oven temperature. Our stove is the standard housing developer "go cheap and get the cheapest electric stove possible" issue and temperature is always at least 15 degrees below where it should be. We always use the oven temperature.

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To insure cake success, I'm using all the fail-safe tools:

Oven thermometer. I have a very good stove, a Bosch, but still verify the temperature setting with an additional thermometer.

Instant-read thermometer. This lets me know that all the ingredients are at the proper temp. Butter between 65-75 deg. F, all other ingreds. at cool room temp. I put ingreds. back in the fridge if they are too warm.

Digital kitchen scale. I weigh everything but salt, baking powder, baking soda and vanilla.

Fresh baking powder.

Maybe try it the next time in one pan? Using two smaller pans shouldn't make a difference, but it always helps to follow a recipe exactly.

This is such a great cake, that I hope you try it again. Good luck and let us know if you do.

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Pls check oven temp and also cake temp with an instant read digital thermometer. Mines took the same time to bake as written on the book, longer or shorter usually means the oven is too cold or too hot respectivelly. You can't tell this cake is done by the color of the top crust because it tends to always be very pale. When overbaked, this cake tends to shrink.

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just had a spectacular failure with the whipped cream cake. i have checked and double checked the ingredients/method/oven temp (my usual gaggenau oven). i baked in 2 5c kugelhof pans (old faithfuls). they rose up nicely but never browned. finally after about 30 minutes, they collapsed. i let them bake an additional 10 or so min (hoping for a miracle). then i removed them from oven. still very pale. let rest for about 10 min then attempted tp remove from pans. one ok but very tender. the 2nd completely fell apart. delicious crumbs. does not taste raw. any ideas?

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We really loved this cake! Served it on day 1 with a little raspberry puree and meyer lemon curd; day 2 with just a simple sprinkling of powdered sugar - both were excellent!


http://butteryum.blogspot.com/2010/01/whipped-cream-cake.html

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Thanks, Hector. If it works just as well, I will continue using it instead of a balloon whisk. I like multi-tasking implements -- tools that do more jobs than they were built to do. Plus I have such a small kitchen, I hardly have room for anything else!

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As written on the book, using a spatula works. It is just easier if you use the mixer's whisk, detached, or a giant ballon whisk.

Using the mixer's whisk, detached, is recommended throught the book. Works just as good as a giant ballon whisk, but if you do this often, I am certain, you will go get one!

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I have meant to ask before if the detached whisk would be a good substitute for a balloon whisk, which I do not own. After reading Hector's note, I think the answer is yes. Hector, do you agree that whenever a recipe calls for folding in flour with a balloon whisk, the detached standing mixer whisk would work just as well?

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And we wonder why Hector tells his kids...read the whole recipe "before" anything else! LOL

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Well, thanks Hector...a day late and a dollar short, though. I used a spatula and did observe the batter's resistance to smoothing out nicely. I'm off to check the book; how could I have missed this? Scary.

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Oh! I didn't even notice that, Hector. I saw the phrase "fold in" and immediately went for my favorite silicone spatula. Funny!

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do note that this recipe indicates using the mixer's whisk attachment, but NOT operated by the mixer. fold by hand with the whisk instead of a spatula. more on this later.

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