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The Baking Bible

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For a great tutorial, check out the Baking Bible Bake Along with ROSE'S ALPHA BAKERS. The link is on the left side of the blog. We will also be posting "OUT-BAKES" from the book, on this blog, including step-by step photos and other extras.

Changes for The Cake Bible

Apr 11, 2010 | From the kitchen of Rose

The Cake BIble is soon going into its 49th printing. For those of you who have early editions, please note the following correction on the bottom of the chart on page 490:
the 13 x 9-inch rectangle should bake 35 to 45 minutes and the 18 x 12-inch rectangle should bake 40 to 50 minutes.

When the Cake Bible was published over 23 years ago, 2-inch high cake pans were almost impossible to find so several of the layer cakes were created for the then commonly available 1-1/2 inch high pans.

Now that the 1-1/2 inch high pans are harder to find than 2-inch high pans, in the newer printings of The Cake Bible, when using these 2 inch high pans I recommended either to do 2/3 the recipe for 1 layer or 1-1/3 times the recipe for 2 layers.

As higher pans require proportionately less leavening (leavening weakens structure) it is also advisable to decrease the baking powder by 1/8 teaspoon for 1 layer and 1/4 teaspoon for 2 layers.

The Golden Butter Cream Cake on page 34 has a better appearance if lowering the baking powder to 1-1/8 teaspoon instead of 1-1/4 teaspoon. It will prevent the slight dip in the center.

The Triple Layer Devil's Food Cake on page 62 was created for (3) 1-1/2 inch high pans and works best in that height pan. ( It is not enough batter for (3) 2-inch high pans so it will not bake well and it is too much batter for (2) 2-inch high pans. Woody and I have done upwards of 12 tests trying to adjust the batter and discovered in the process that even if filling the pans less full, the layers were still too low at the sides and too domed in the middle.) We have come up with two viable solutions if you only have 2 inch high pans:

Either make the Devil's Food Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes that was adapted for 2-inch high pans with the addition of bitter chocolate and creme fraiche, or make the original batter as follows:

Use a total of two whole eggs (3.5 ounces/100 grams/3 fluid ounces) and 4 egg yolks (2.5 ounces/73 grams/minimum 2 fluid ounces).
Add 1/2 teaspoon baking powder to the flour mixture.
Add 2 tablespoons/1 ounce/28 grams of canola or safflower oil with the butter.

Fill each pan a little under half full (28 ounces/800 grams each) and use the remaining 7 ounces/200 grams batter to make four cupcakes.

Bake the cakes at 350°F/175°C for 30 to 40 minutes and bake the cupcakes for 20 to 25 minutes.

The cakes will be just a little higher than 1-1/2 inches.

The following changes have been made in later printings.

Perfect All-American Chocolate Butter Cake page 54 change the unsalted butter to 1 cup/16 tablespoons (instead of 12 tablespoons)

Hot Fudge page 88: Keep the "moderate boil" between 215˚F/102˚C and 220˚F/104˚C, using an instant-read thermometer to check the temperature. You can use either volume or weight to determine when it is reduced to two-thirds (6.7 ounces/190 grams). Weight is preferable as to check the volume it is necessary to pour the mixture into a glass measure and then back into the pot several times until it reaches the correct volume (2/3 cup). It will take 20 to 30 minutes depending on the size and material of the saucepan


The Lemon Chiffon page 157 change the words baking powder to baking soda (as it is on the chart)

The Chocolate Chiffon Cake page 159: weight of the sguar is 350 grams (not ounces)

The Ethereal Pear Charlotte page 291:

To ensure that all of the gelatin dissolves and offers a firm texture to the Bavarian filling, it is best to soften it in 4 teaspoons of the reserved poaching syrup. Stir to moisten the gelatin and allow it to sit for a minimum of 5 minutes. (If longer cover it tightly with plastic wrap to prevent evaporation.) After stirring the poaching liquid into the egg yolk, stir in the gelatin mixture.

Three-Tier Chocolate Butter Wedding Cake pages 486 and 487

For the 6 and 9-inch layers, change the butter to 2 cups/16 ounces/454 grams

For the 12-inch layers, change the butter to 2-3/4 cups/18.6 ounces/530 grams

This will give the cake more moistness. (Note: with either amount of butter, this cakes domes about a half an inch so will need to be leveled using a long serrated knife.)

A Better Banana Cake For those of you like me, who love the flavor butter gives to the Cordon Rose Banana Cake on page 69, but also loves the moister texture of the banana cake in the new book Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we have worked out a perfect compromise: Use only 8 tablespoons/4 ounces/113 grams of butter and add 2 tablespoons/1 ounce/27 grams canola or safflower oil to the butter when mixing. The cake will also be about 1/8" higher than the original.

Comments

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Sherrie
10/11/2014 01:56 PM

Sherrie, if you multiply the recipe by 1-1/3 that is doubling it from decreasing it by 2/3 that is why you decrease the baking powder by double the amount (because you now have two layers). as for the wedding cakes, they were created for 2-inch high pans so they work as is. That is because you want them to be as level as possible so a little more baking powder would be used than when making them as a one layer cake where you want it to be slightly domed so you use the slightly lesser amount.

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Hi Bill,

I just saw your comment and I think there is more discussion on the forum -- I have had the very same thing happen to me -- sponge cake fall out of the pan. I've started taking temperatures of my finished cakes, and when my chiffons hit 203F, I've yet to have one fall out of the pan. I don't know the threshold (maybe 200F is ok, possibly 195F??) -- as I haven't tried to bake experimentally, but I've had success with 203F, so that is the temperature I bake chiffons/angels to.

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Hi! I was reading the errata re: conversion from 1.5" to 2" high pans. I assume that decreasing the baking powder by 1/8 tsp. applies to the scaled up recipe (ie: multiply ingredients by scale factor and then reduce bp by 1/8 tsp. rather than by reducing bp amount by 1/8 tsp. then scaling up)? Also, I assume the reduction in bp has been applied for the base formulas in the wedding cake section (since the recipes are for 2" high pans), or does this reduction need to apply there as well? Thank you!

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anonymous, i just now saw your posting. i'm so sorry this has happened. you are right that when the texture is bad the taste is also adversely affected. but the amount of baking powder is correct as listed and i have made this recipe many times. did you perhaps substitute any of the ingredients such as the flour? did you weigh or measure all of them carefully?

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tom, it should indeed be baking soda as lemon has a much higher acidity than orange or chocolate.

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Rose, I'm perplexed.

Revision above suggests that the

"The Lemon Chiffon page 157 change the words baking powder TO baking soda (as it is on the chart)."

Not sure what "as it is on the chart" refers to but my edition of The Cake Bible already asks for "baking soda" in the recipe, while the orange and chocolate chiffon cakes ask for "baking powder".

I'm wondering if leavening for Lemon Chiffon should actually be baking powder (just like the orange and chocolate) and if not, why does Lemon Chiffon use baking soda while the Chocolate and Orange Chiffons use baking powder?

Thanks!

Tom

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Is 5 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder correct for the cake in the chocolate covered strawberry cake? (I have the Kindle version) The centers completely sank in the middle and it tasted awful. That was sad because the filling and frosting were delicious!

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but of course--brother's are special!

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Brilliant. Thank you for all your help!

I'm a reasonably accomplished, trained baker...I've made hundreds of layer cakes...What is it about making my brother's wedding cake that has turned me into such a silly goose? It's just three layer cakes stacked one on top of the other, and yet somehow I am nervous!

(But you've made me feel much more calm. Thank you!)

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Absolutely yes and of course use unsweetened alkalized cocoa! A little
Kahlua or coffee exteact wouldn't hurt either--coffee does wonders for bringing out chocolate flavor.

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Ooo, over-sweetening was my worry, so I had begun to ponder adding a bit of rum, or framboise or something, but I like the idea of cocoa very much.

Would you at it while the sugar syrup is still warm to help it dissolve more easily?

And thank you for answering so quickly. Could you hear the rising panic in my voice?

At least there is no snowstorm planned for Sunday. (The story of the cake you made for your brother's wedding haunts me!)

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Marissa, how about making a sugar syrup adding cocoa to taste so you wouldn't be over sweetening the cake!

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Hello!
I am so glad I found this site, but wish I'd found it sooner, before I'd baked the 3 layers-worth of chocolate butter cakes for my brother's wedding this Sunday!

I've loved The Cake Bible since it first came out...which means I have the old version, with the old recipe for cake, which I was a little disappointed with when it came out dry...I thought it was something I'd done...now I know it really did want for more butter.

I am now in a small panic over whether I should bake more cakes using the new recipe (which honestly strikes me as cuckoo!), or just slather them in sugar syrup after splitting and pray everyone just enjoys the ganache filling and mousseline exterior and don't worry that the cake has the consistency of a Devil Dog...:-)

Can anyone out there offer advice and/or soothing words? Thank you!

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Hi Rose,

Just got your The Cake Bible at an Estate Sales. Can't wait to try it out. Mint condition.

David Chau

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thank you christina--mystery solved! those are the recipes from my PBS series. i have no way of changing it. luckily most people don't weigh the smaller ingredients such as salt and leavening. and luckily it is correct in the book.

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I found it here on this blog--here is the URL:
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/recipes/RLB's%20White%20Velvet%20Cake.pdf

I posted this comment under The Cake Bible thread because I learned that the recipe originally came from there.

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christina, exactly where did you "find" the recipe for my white velvet layer cake. there is no pdf or e-book for the cake bible. i'm wondering if you found it on line somewhere?

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Thanks for your reply, I believe it's just the PDF version of the recipe you have here that has the error!

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christina, the salt is 3/4 teaspoon not 1/4 teaspoon!

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Christina L
Christina L
01/28/2013 05:18 PM

Hi Rose,

I recently found your recipe for White Velvet Cake and I noticed there was a big error in the weights of ingredients:

Namely, 1/4 teaspoon salt (I'm assuming fine sea salt) does NOT weight 5 grams, but closer to 1.5 g! Since I bake mainly by weight for all ingredients, I had to catch myself before dumping in way more salt than needed!

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Hi Rose,

First let me say how much I enjoy your books, especially the Cake Bible. It's given me a reputation for baking genius I wouldn't have gotten by myself! I'm baking almost weekly now with the requests I'm getting and I love it.

My question is: the recipe for the chocolate base cake in my book (p493) is the corrected one with the additional butter and decreased baking powder as I've seen in your comments here, although the master recipe is still wrong. I was comparing the base recipe with the All American Chocolate Butter cake, Nd it was identical except for the baking powder....the All American calls for only 20 g of baking powder for the calculation using the 9x2 in pans, but the base cake calls for 29-30 g, even though it is corrected for the additional butter. I'm really puzzled, can you explain why this is?

Thank you!

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i'm not sure either method is superior to the simple one described in the cake bible though.

I'm wanting liquid double cream, though, for another recipe. I'm told that mixer-type devices can't homogenize the butter enough to produce liquid cream. I just paid $7 for a small jar of double cream at a specialty store. Yikes!

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i'm not really worried about the water bc it gets bound up by the milk solids. but still it's good to have the accurate percentage.

it's been about 25 years since i tried the bel cream maker and it worked but then i got the kenwood mixer that had the same sort of attachment. i'm not sure either method is superior to the simple one described in the cake bible though.

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i calculated the cream: by simply doubling the amount of butterfat

Ah, I was trying to figure out where the calculation went awry; that would have worked if the butter didn't bring along that darned water!

BTW, I was considering the purchase of a Bel Cream Maker to make real cream using butter. Any experience with that?

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charles, i calculated the cream: by simply doubling the amount of butterfat and you're right--in revisiting it i see that the total butterfat is lower than 40% if the cream was 20%. the bigger problem is that it is virtually impossible to know the exact percentage of butterfat in the cream you purchase. so bottom line, if the cream behaves in a way that indicates it is lower in butterfat than desired, one can adjust the butterfat by adding butter the way i suggested.

thank you for this correction. i'll be changing it in the next printing!

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Rose:

I think the calculations for the Real Old Fashioned Whipped Cream in the Cake Bible are off, but maybe I'm missing something. If you start with 20% cream, I calculate you'll end up with 32% cream. If you start with 36% cream, you'll end up with 45%. Here's my calculation:

32% = 20% * (232/289) + 81% * (57/289)
45% = 36% * (232/289) + 81% * (57/289)

As a reality check, let's add up the butter fat in grams:

232 * .20 = 46.4
57 * .81 = 46.17
_____________
97.57

97.57/ 289 = 32%


I calculate that to get 289 g of 40% you need 194 grams of 20% cream and 95 grams of butter. Here's how I would calculate the result of that:

40% = 20% * (194/289) + 81% * (95/289)

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Question on the change for the Three-Tier Chocolate Butter Wedding Cake (12 in layers)

says to change to 2 3/4 cups butter (original says 1 3/4) or to 18.6 oz (original printed as 14 oz)
sooo... adding an entire extra cup butter is more than adding 2.6 ounces butter... which figure to use?

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thanks charles--believe it or not, in 22 years no one noticed this! or at least no one reported it. i've submitted it for correction.

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Has the erroneous page reference been pointed out on the photo on page 12 for the Golden Genoise/Lemon Mousseline Buttercream? It says the page for the Mousseline is 249, but it's actually 245.

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mike, thanks for noticing. the mistake is that i left in to decrease the leavening when i decided not to.

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pam, i don't believe this is my recipe!

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I made the Old French Fig Cake yesterday, but the recipe does not have any 'wet' ingredient. What do you simmer the figs in and do you add this 'liquid' to the mixture? I added milk to moisten the mix as it says "POUR into prepared tin" but I am sure the finished cake is not what it should be. Taste is good but texture heavy. Can you help me please?

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Pam Hamilton
Pam Hamilton
10/ 7/2010 07:47 AM

Hi Rose,

I am making my first wedding cake this weekend and decided to use you Downy Yellow Butter cake. I baked a test cake last night to see how it tasted and baked up. The cake is absolutely delicious and moist but crumbly. What can i do to eliminate so many crumbs?

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Hi Rose,
In the explanation about the Golden Almond Cake in the Cake Bible, it says:
"The formula for this cake is the same as that for Sour Cream Butter Cake except that 1/3 cup flour is replaced by 1/3 cup finely grated almonds. The almonds add flavor and bulk but do not contribute structure so whole eggs are needed and ***leavening must be decreased***." (emphasis mine)

The leavening is the same (1/2 tsp each BS & BP) in the Sour Cream and Almond Cake recipes. Did you decide not to decrease the leavening? Or is there a typo in the ingredient listings?
(Love the book by the way)

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if you are using the higher amount of butter (16 oz./454 grams butter for the 6 & 9 inch two layers and 18.7 ounces/530 grams butter fo the two 12 inch layers)

because you are increasing the butter you will need to decrease the baking powder so here are the total amounts to use.

for the two 6 & 9" layers use 2 tablespoons + 2-1/4 teaspoon baking powder

for the two 12" layers use 1 tablespoon plus 3/4 teaspoon + 1/8 teaspoon.

oven thermometers are notoriously inaccurate. turn up your thermostat if the cakes are talking longer. cakes that bake too slowly have all sorts of problems with the texture.

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karen folkerts
karen folkerts
09/16/2010 11:00 AM

thanks so much for the reply. Regarding using less baking powder, is that per layer or per 2 layers of a given size? While I'm at it, I tested flavors for the yellow butter cake, using 6" layer. My oven temp (used a thermometer) said 350, but it took me 10 minutes longer to bake - almost 45 min and tasted a little like baking powder. (What should an instant-read thermometer in the cake itself read when it is done?)Also the sides were very crumbly on removal from the pan. Any ideas? Thanks SO much!

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karen, also, if you're making the 6 & 9 inch layers use the higher amount of butter.

for the baking powder, i would recommend decreasing it by 3/4 teaspoon for the 6 & 9 inch and for the 12 inch layers decrease it by 1 teaspoon. adding the extra butter will weaken the structure a bit so decreasing the leavening will keep it from dipping in the center.

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karen, originally i used the lower amount of butter but it is better and moister with the higher amount. i changed it on the base formula but forgot to change it on the master recipe. i will add it to the errata above. thank you.

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karen folkerts
karen folkerts
09/16/2010 10:27 AM

Help! I'm trying to plan a wedding cake and am frazzled.
I used your formula for the chocolate butter cake layer for 2 12" layers (7 times base factor) and come up with 7 x 75.67g = 529.69g of butter. In your recipe for 3-tier Chocolate Butter Cake on p486, you say 400g of butter for 2 12" layers although the other ingredients agree with the formula. What's right?

REPLY

metin, the rose factor was very carefully and painstackingly worked out. i'm completely confident that it is accurate and it has withstood the test of time. though i was reluctant to revisit it, i did so based on what you wrote and see no mention of adding 6 grams anywhere on that page. i therefore am advising you to do the math carefully and, if necessary, consult another person to check it as you don't want to make a mistake with such a big investment in time and ingredients.

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Metin Turgal
Metin Turgal
07/10/2010 04:08 AM

Hi Rose,
First of all, many thanks to providing us with such well written books.
I'll try to put it briefly; in Cake Bible page 495 , in bullet number 10 it is stated that there is 11 grams in the remaining batter. But I think with adding 6 grams baking powder we've made it level 2 instead of level 3. So there should be 13.04 grams and we should add 1.67 grams of baking powder to achieve the target amount. Please correct me if I miss something.

Metin

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Rose-

About 10 months ago I asked a question about using different kinds of cheese in your cheesecake wedding cake and I wanted you to know that my father and I decided on good ol' fashioned Philadelphia Cream Cheese. The wedding is next month and I promise to let you know how it turns out!

My question pertains, however, to another of your wedding cakes. I have agreed to make a chocolate wedding cake for a friend's wedding this summer. As I was writing down my father's meticulous notes from his 1988 copy of The Cake Bible into my copy purchased for my birthday last year we noticed some recipe discrepancies and wanted your advice:

On page 493 your Chocolate Base Cake wedding cake proportion lists 56.75 grams of unsalted butter in my father's edition. In mine you recommend 75.67. However, it is in my father's edition that the math on the grams note at the end of the recipe adds up correctly (almost): 390 grams. In my edition it lists that the total batter weight should be 390 grams but it is really more like 412. How much butter should one use in proportion to the flour and eggs?

On a related note if one used more butter would it offset the amount the cake layer rises? We find that when we use my father's cookbook's direction we usually have to cut off the top of the cake to level it. (And we use the wet fabric strips to prevent too much rising.)

REPLY

Hi Gaara,

See the bottom of this thread where Rose explains how to tell which edition you have:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2007/07/errata_for_all_my_cookbooks.html

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Hi Rose,

You mentioned that there are newer printings of The Cake Bible that address the use of 2-inch high pans. My question is: how to identify that a copy of the book is one of these newer printings? I want to order a copy online but the only information available is it's published date: September 1988.

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Rose, I'm making your brother's wedding cake for an upcoming event. The recipe for the Ivoire buttercream calls for 3 pounds white chocolate or 1 kg. 1 kg is 2.2 pounds. Which should I use, 3 lbs or 1kg?

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Rose...thanks so much for the fast reply...and yes...the little bugger will be eaten any way he he he! I think it might have been ever so slightly under baked...the skewer did come out clean...but it felt a little moister than i would have expected...I'm guessing that that was the problem. Thanks sooooo much and happy July 4th!

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i think the bottle was not high enough so the steam caused it to fall out. i really can't think of another reason since you already obviated the draft theory. (cute about the avoiding being eaten!).

an underbaked cake also will fall out. did a wooden skewer come out clean?

make it again soon just to give yourself confidence that this won't happen again!

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With all this talk of the Lemon Chiffon, and I've never made it, I decided to give it a whirl last night. Everything went along just fine, took it out of the oven, it looked beautiful, high, light, golden, just beautiful. I Inverted the pan over my trusty bottle of Woostershire sauce that I always use for such purposes and headed off into the other room to make a phone call. Fast forward about 20 minutes...and I hear...CLUMP. I knew before I even went to see what happend. The cake fell out of the pan! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH! I put the pieces on a cooling rack, on their sides, to maintain as much height as possible. Since I was only baking the cake for us at home, the esthetics weren't as important as for guests. I'll say this...the cake is absolutely delicious. I'm just curious as to why a cake in a tube pan will suddenly do a suicide dive out of the pan...is it to avoid the fate of being eaten? I've been baking cakes in tube pans for about 30 years...this has only happened three times. I'm just not sure why...the room wasn't drafty, it was pretty much a steady 72 degrees, I was careful and cautious while inverting it but the little guy just couldn't hold on!

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I think you want to say Lemon Glow Chiffon cake up there, not Orange Glow (page number is good). :0)

Thanks again! I'm putting lemon curd whipped cream on top. Should be heavenly.

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i'm SO glad! now it will be perfect. and i made the change on the errata. imagine having an errata page for the errata!
thanks!

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Phew! You caught me just in time. Thanks so much!

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if you haven't already done it--it's baking soda for the lemon chiffon! i'm sure it will be fine in any case as it's not heavily dependent on leavening!

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I'm slightly confused about the posted errata for Orange Glow Chiffon. The Orange Glow chiffon cake actually does say 2 tsp of baking powder in both chart and text. The Lemon Glow Chiffon (which I'm baking right this minute) says 1/2 tsp of baking *soda* in the chart and baking *powder* in the text. I'm going to cross my fingers and add 1/2 tsp of baking powder (since the orange cake took baking powder - though much more), and hope for the best!

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Julie Goldberg
Julie Goldberg
10/16/2007 06:06 PM

Well, I have tiny hands, but a big 12-cup KitchenAid food processor!
While there is no such thing as a dumb question, there is such a thing as a dumb idea, and putting 3X the double crust recipe in my food processor was certainly up there! I should have done the math with the flour, butter and cream cheese first to see if it would all fit.

It wasn't a disaster, though. Once I saw that it wasn't all going to fit, I just processed it in batches, and it came out fine. Made your wonderful pumpkin pie with one of the crusts (my daughter's favorite), and now have five single crusts frozen, just waiting for the next inspiration (or possibly Thanksgiving).

Thanks as usual for your terrific books, lively blog, and good advice.

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julie, if you have HUGE hands or else a very large mixer you can certainly make all the crust at once. also do a search for pies and freezing as i know we've discussed various tips on this!

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Agreed - photos are inspirational!

By the way, my sister doesn't want to know anything about a recipe if a photo of the finished product isn't included.

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Rose:
I'm thrilled that you are looking to photograph almost every cake in the new book. I don't know exactly why, but the photos in cook books really do entice me to try recipies! I've been cooking and baking for more than 20 years...and I think I can read a recipie and know if I want to try it...but the pics are often the reason.

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Julie Goldberg
Julie Goldberg
10/13/2007 06:46 PM

As a librarian, I believe there are no stupid questions, and I'm hoping you think so, too!

My question is about making several pies at once. I want to prepare several apple pies ahead of time and freeze them, and I'll be using your wonderful Flaky Cream Cheese Pie Crust recipe again (which completely wowed all my relatives at Thanksgiving last year!)

The question is: can I just multiply the crust recipe, maybe by three or five, and mix it all up at once, then divide it into the correct number of freezer bags? Will that work, or am I courting disaster? Are there any alterations I should make in the recipe if I plan to do it this way?

Thank you!

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such a sweet note! i once signed a book to a baker with the following admonition: whoever steals this book will never bake a good cake again! he told me years later that it worked bc bakers are a supertitious lot! anyway, not returning a book IS a form a stealing.
by the way, what you wrote about making ever cake pictured validates my conviction to have almost every cake photographed for the upcoming cake book!

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westly pink
westly pink
10/12/2007 04:57 PM

Dearest rose
I have loaned out the cake bible 6 times
never got them back
so i am asking santa budda and maybe even mohammed and heck why not ask the tooth fairy maybe one of them has a copy for me
and it is not for loan.lol
I tell every baker i meet about you
your book is the finest piece of work yet
your were brilliant putting metric and the neanderthol imperial system on all recipes
to me you are the modern day julia childs
and she is iconic in her own right
Every time i think of getting back into the trade i know the only way would be
they let me use your recipes
by the way i have done every cake in the pics in the book except maybe two
they are all so easy.
I will look for your pie book
i have the bernachuan book as well
it scares me how big will i get
if i make them too.
take care thanks for the art

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bravo and thanks!

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I have just found your website, I have been using your cookbooks for years. Just yesterday I made the Kugelhopf in the Bread Bible ---substituing sauted honey crisp apples for the almond paste and deleting the chocolate and adding cinnamon for a more "fall-like" bread. It was amazing!! Thanks so much for all of your fabulous recipes---once you "get" bread you can do just about anything!!

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i'm not familiar with this technique so i suggest you check out some of the wilton or other cake decorating books.

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YEMISI AOFOLAJU
YEMISI AOFOLAJU
10/ 5/2007 02:39 PM

I'm just getting in touch with your site for the first time.I believe with what I have seen so far I will go places with your teachings.
I'm a Nigerian also trying my hands on some cakes which I will love to improve on .I also believe that I will be able to tap from your wealth of experience.
Now a problem at hand, I have to make an engagement cake for my junior sister. She has asked me to make her a traveling box.I don't know tho how to get that shape decorated .I will appreciate i you can send me the step by step procedure using fondant.
Thanks
Expecting to hearing from you.Yemisi

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Nancy Montgomery
Nancy Montgomery
10/ 4/2007 08:30 PM

Dear Rose,

I have ordered three copies of Humble Pie that you wrote about recently. I loved the book because it talks about how a family used pie to start a tradition. I believe in traditions and think food is such a positive way for families to creati e a lasting memory.

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Thanks, as always! I use this pear mousse as a wedding cake filling in the fall (esp. with your almond cake - DELISH!), so I'll try out the new method soon.

Happy fall to you!

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it will dissolve--no need to melt it.

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Hi Rose,

Would you then melt the gelatin/poaching liquid mixture before adding it to the egg yolk/poaching liquid combo? Or will it dissolve well without pre-melting? Hope this makes sense....

Jen N

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