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For a great tutorial, check out the Baking Bible Bake Along with ROSE'S ALPHA BAKERS. The link is on the left side of the blog. We will also be posting "OUT-BAKES" from the book, on this blog, including step-by step photos and other extras.

The Power of Flour, Part Two of Two

Apr 24, 2010 | From the kitchen of Rose

The purpose of all these tests for Part 1 and Part 2 of "The Power of Flour" was to determine the optimum level of baking powder when using my two-stage method of mixing cakes to be baked in 9 by 2 inch high pans.

The 'control' cake for Part 1 was the "Downy All-Occasion Yellow Cake" from the Cake Bible which uses cake flour and all egg yolks, adapted from (2) 1-1/2 inch high pans to (1) 2 inch high pan.

The goal in Part 1 was to achieve the best texture and flavor if using bleached or unbleached all-purpose flour instead of cake flour.

In order to adjust for a higher 2-inch pan, we used 2/3 the batter that would be used for (2) 1-1/2 inch high pans and we decreased the baking powder from what would have been 2-5/8 teaspoons for 2/3 the batter to 2-1/2 teaspoons as higher pans need a stronger structure.

The goal in this Part 2 was to achieve a level cake layer for use as a two-layer cake, if replacing the egg yolks with either all egg whites or whole eggs. In order to accomplish this goal we needed to see what adjustments of baking powder--if any--are necessary when replacing the egg yolks with either egg whites or whole eggs.

Note: All Ingredients except for the baking powder and salt were weighed. (Eggs, and the yolks in proportion to the whites, vary widely from egg to egg so weighing is necessary for trust-worthy, consistent results.)

Type of Flour: Cake
Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 3 egg whites: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 3-1/4 teaspoons.

Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 2 whole eggs: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 3-1/2 teaspoons.

Type of Flour: Bleached All-purpose

Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 3 egg whites: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 3 teaspoons.

Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 2 whole eggs: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 3-1/4 teaspoons.

Type of Flour: Unbleached All-purpose
Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 3 egg whites: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 2-5/8 teaspoons.

Replacing the 4 egg yolks with 2 whole eggs: baking powder increased from 2-1/2 teaspoons to 3-1/2 teaspoons.

Notes:

We were surprised to find that though using all egg whites makes the structure stronger, using whole eggs makes it stronger still.

These results are predicated on weight of the major ingredients. If using volume for the eggs, be sure to measure them as the proportion of yolk to white varies from egg to egg.

If using egg whites that have been frozen, be sure to stir the thawed whites well with a fork to combine evenly.

A 2-inch high pan makes a very nice single layer cake. If making just one layer you may want to decrease the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon to give it a slight dome. If making a two layer cake everything should just be doubled.

Final Conclusions for Part 1 and Part 2:

Egg yolks give cake a fuller flavor, egg whites give cake a softer texture.

Egg whites will need more leavening than yolks (exact amount depending on the cake).

Whole eggs will need more leavening than whites (exact amount depending on the cake)

Cake flour and bleached all-purpose flour result in the best flavor and texture in cake.

If using unbleached all-purpose flour, the best flavor comes from replacing 15% of the flour with potato starch. The most level cake comes from using egg yolks or whole eggs.

E10 F SLICE SHOT cake flour 2.5 tsp powder 2 21 10.jpg

CAKE FLOUR WITH EGG YOLKS & 2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E11-M-SLICE-Cake-Flour-3.25-baking-powder.jpg

CAKE FLOUR WITH EGG WHITES & 3-1/4 teaspoons baking powder

E12-H-SLICE-Cake-flour-3.50-baking-powder.jpg

CAKE FLOUR WITH WHOLE EGGS & 3-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E10 E SLICE SHOT bleached 2.5 tsp 2 21 10.jpg

BLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH EGG YOLKS & 2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E11-J-SLICE-BLEACHED-3.00-baking-powder.jpg

BLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH EGG WHITES & 3 teaspoons baking powder

E12-F-SLICE-BLEACHED-3.25-baking-powder.jpg

BLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH WHOLE EGGS & 3-1/4 teaspoons baking powder

E10-N-SLICE-UNbleached-+-Potato-Starch-2.jpg

UNBLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR/15% POTATO STARCH WITH EGG YOLKS & 2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E10 D SLICE SHOT UNbleached 2.5 powder 2 21 10.jpg

UNBLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH EGG YOLKS & 2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E11-D-SLICE-UNbleached-2.62-baking-powder.jpg

UNBLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH EGG WHITES & 2-5/8 teaspoons baking powder

E12-G-SLICE-UNbleached-3.50-baking-powder.jpg

UNBLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR WITH WHOLE EGGS & 3-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

E12-SLICE-UNbleached-w-Potato-Starch 3.jpg

UNBLEACHED ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR/15% POTATO STARCH WITH WHOLE EGGS & 3-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

Comments

I am a tad confused. When you say you replace the 4 yolks with two whole eggs do you literally mean two whole eggs (~100g) or 75 g of egg( 2/3 of the weight of the original recipe) with the correct yolk/white ratio?


Thanks.

REPLY

I second this!

REPLY

I would encourage Rose to get an honorary PhD with a dissertation on flour for the perfect yellow cake. You have one for sifting already!

REPLY

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