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Happy National Peanut Butter Day!

Jan 24, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose

My Chocolate Peanut Butter Mousse Tart, from The Pie and Pastry Bible, was the recipe Food and Wine Magazine selected for their annual book The Best of The Best. It also happens to be my favorite recipe from the book.

Dear David Leite just posted the recipe on his blog to honor the peanut butter day (and me!). I hope you will try it and if not today, how about for Valentine's Day?! I once made it! in a heart-shaped fluted tart pan!

Comments

Thanks, Hector.

Chuck

REPLY

Chuck, I keep referring to the Bread Bible. I believe is 195oF

REPLY

Hector,

What is the internal temperature you want?

Chuck

REPLY

Chuck, i do that all the time and it works fine. yes, it will take several minutes longer to bake, same oven temperature. i can't tell you how much longer as i always go by internal temperature with a digital probe.

REPLY

Regarding the basic hearth bread, can I double the recipe and make one large round loaf? What about cooking time?

Thanks,

Chuck

REPLY

Hi Fran,
It is in the "Pie & Pastry Bible" pages 177-81.
We do not have this recipe posted on our blog.
Woody

REPLY

I want the recipe for Rose's Lemon meringue pie and I can't find it or just don't know how about going and looking for this recipe I'd appreciate it if you would copy it and send it to me thanks soooooooooooo much

REPLY

Hi Richard,
The test label card that I use for our cake tests has the following:
1. Test #: we have a numbering system for our testing
2. Name: name of the cake and what is being tested
3. Sides and Center: heights in inches after cooling
4. Top: description of top "sloped" "flat" or a height if it is higher than the center
5. Baking powder and baking soda: teaspoons used
6. Date: date of the test
7. Grams: grams of batter in the pan before baking

All the information on the test label is included on my test reports that I send to Rose and filed on my computer for us to reference. We use the information for deciding what needs to be changed for the next test of a cake and for writing the recipe. The label makes it easy for Rose to quickly see the dimensions of a given cake. I mark the grams of the batter to compare against the recipe's ingredients weights. In the "Power of Flour" tests, we wanted to make sure all the cakes had the same amount of batter in them.
As far as why did we use butter cakes. Rose's All-Occasion Downy Yellow cake is her standard testing cake. When we saw the testing results, we expanded it to whole egg and egg whites cakes. In the future,hopefully by the end of the year,we do plan on doing more testing which will include chocolate cakes.
I made the labels originally to be folded in half so that the label would hang on the ruler resting on top of the cake. Have fun coming up with your own design and information elements.
Enjoy, Woody

REPLY

I notice in your blog posts where you test the effects of various changes in cakes, you have a card listing the height and some other information. What does that card contain, and why is each element
important? I also notice that you use butter cakes as test cases - why butter instead of chocolate?

I recently got a flour mill and want to gather data about how the fresh flour compares to normal cake flour (as per your tests, I'm using 15% potato starch by weight in the flour).

REPLY

Sandy,
What are the dimensions of the pan and the manufacturer?
What cake recipe are you using?
At times with equipment and ingredients, we will start with a recipe from the manufacturer or checked their website for instructions or recipes to see how they think the equipment or ingredient will work.
Then we will see if it can work with a recipe that we want to make where it offers an advantage over a standard metal pan.
In Rose's Heavenly Cakes, pages 466-67, Rose has a section on silicone pans.

REPLY

Sandy, I second Hector's comment. But I wanted to prevent you from throwing away your silicone cake pans. You know what they're perfect for? The water bath for cheesecake! Instead of wrapping two layers of aluminum foil around your spring form pan, put your spring form pan inside the (tight fitting) silicone pan and then put it in the water bath. No more water in your cheesecake! I hope that helps :)

REPLY

sandy, silicone pans do not conduct heat fast enough for a standard layer cake. really small silicone pans such as cupcakes or financiers work better.

REPLY

Ho, ho, Rose! Now I know what I'm making for a work birthday in February, as someone else has claimed the cake spot! Thank you (and Leite!) so much for this!

Oh, man, can't wait to try it!

REPLY

Please help me to understand why when I bake a cake in a silicone pan the center does not bake. I have tried lowering the temperature and baking it longer. It was still not done.
I grease and flour the pan, put it on a disposable cookie sheet in the middle of the oven.
I am about to give up and throw the pans away.

REPLY

I appreciate the opportunity, Rose, as well as your confidence in my creativity :o) I’m actually allergic to most nuts, but I feel very lucky I can eat almonds and pistachios. Maybe I can play with those two nuts, if you’d like me to. Just let me know. Woody has my email address, if you’d like to send me specific instructions. Thanks again!

REPLY

I'm not sure why I have never tried this recipe...but it is now on the list.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Hanaa
01/24/2011 07:53 PM

as winner of state fairs i just know you'll create something really special! i've been thinking about this for several years as many people are allergic to peanut butter and praline paste is adored.

REPLY

That sounds wonderful. It would not only "up" the flavor but add a nice texture as well. I think it would be a great recipe for the next book! :o)

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Hanaa
01/24/2011 07:18 PM

hanaa--what a great idea! what about reworking this recipe using hazelnut or praline paste?! we can add it to the next book!

REPLY

What a gorgeous tart. Although I can't eat peanut butter (allergies), I made this for a holiday bake-off at work. You had to incorporate some kind of candy into your dish, so I added chopped up Reese's PB cups to the mousse and gently folded them in. Guess who won the bake-off? :o)

REPLY

peanut butter chocolate desserts are a popular offering where i live, but most complain that the flavors can be overpowering! peanut butter over chocolate and viceversa.

i am CERTAIN, that Rose's recipe is perfectly balanced. thx for retesting the recipe and what great photo Mr. Leite.

REPLY

Julie, you must try it. I've made it a million times, and it always goes in a flash. But since I'm here alone this week, I've been slowly savoring it for dessert, breakfast, a little mid-day meal...you get the idea.

David

REPLY

The slice on Leite's looks absolutely divine. I haven't tried this recipe yet, and look forward to doing it soon! Thanks for the update on the sugar amount.

REPLY

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