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For a great tutorial, check out the Baking Bible Bake Along with ROSE'S ALPHA BAKERS. The link is on the left side of the blog. We will also be posting "OUT-BAKES" from the book, on this blog, including step-by step photos and other extras.

Ask Your Questions

Oct 2, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose

Please feel free to post comments here if you can't find another appropriate place. The other question entries became too long for some people's browsers to download.

You can access the old entries here, here and here if you want to refer to an earlier question.

Comments

Thank you very much, Woody. Yes, I have a new oven and baked them at 375. Should it be higher temperature. The recipe I have is very old, but I think the quantities are good and balanced. My "Bible" remains in a storage place - we have moved and keep boxes in storage, so the book is not handy at this time. I am now using the food processor to mix the flour and butter, maybe I over mixed it? I don't know...

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Christine Czarnecki
Christine Czarnecki in reply to comment from Hector
02/ 6/2012 05:51 PM

Of course not!

That said, certain people - and many professional chefs - are "supertasters." They can detect and discern flavors that many others cannot.

But anyone can cook and bake well. Just follow Rose's directions!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from martita l
02/ 6/2012 05:41 PM

Hi Martita,
Since you have made these many times without a problem in the past, may we ask has anything changed that you are aware of such as:
a new oven that maybe baking at the wrong temperature?
old baking powder that has lost its strength?
Do you have Rose's Pie & Pastry Bible to compare your recipe to her recipes?

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Hi Rose,
I love scones; Mom taught me how to make them when I was 8years old and that awoke my desire for baking.... However, I had made scones many times but lately I see that they do not rise as much as they should. What could be the reason.... My recipe calls for 1 lb. flour, 2 sticks butter, 4 tsp. baking powder, salt, 1/4 cup sugar, vanilla extract 2 eggs and just a bit of mmilk... Could you help please?

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Delbert, sounds like you have a very active starter. The more frequent you use/feed/rise your starter the speedier it gets. think about it as me paddling for 3 hours nonstop and needing to drink water and eat sugars via a hydration hose attached to my mouth.

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Christine, thank u and absolutely. I shall add that genetics is genetics and I respect that a WHOLE LOT. HOWEVER, I respect more the function of genotype and phenotype! If the ability of tasting certain flavors is strictly genetic, we don't want to say that only certain people can be chefs?

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Christine Czarnecki
Christine Czarnecki in reply to comment from Hector
02/ 6/2012 11:47 AM

Hector, it is not an imaginary problem, it is a genetic one.

Certain people have genes that allow them to taste particular substances that others cannot. A good example is sodium benzoate, a common preservative used in packaged baked goods and mixes to keep them from going rancid.

When I was in junior high school, as a science experiment, we were sent home with sodium benzoate taste strips and were told to test ourselves and our entire family. My mother and I could taste the bitter and distinctive taste, but my father and sister could not.

Not only can I taste sodium benzoate on a test strip, but I don't even have to taste a boxed cake mix or brownie mix to know that it is in there (and that the resultant baked goods are not made from scratch). I can smell the stuff and do not even need to take a bite.

It is not that I am trying to discriminate against the boxed stuff, it's just that I can smell and taste the difference. Many others who possess a different allele of this gene cannot taste the preservative in it and find those baked goods delicious. I can't help it and neither can they.

I did my master's work in molecular genetics, by the way.

I had previously tried other recipes for Red Velvet Cake, and had found the same thing - a bitter taste. So I eagerly awaited the release of Rose's Heavenly Cakes and tried hers. Rose's version is the most perfect of any RVC I have tried, but until I can find a way to color it without the liquid food coloring, I won't be making it.

But I will be staring at it and admiring it from afar!

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Delbert Maywald
Delbert Maywald
02/ 6/2012 11:10 AM

I have a question. I'm really getting into sour dough bread. My culture I made is what I refer to as "really hot" meaning that I can make a loaf of bread in usually 4 to 5 hours. Most recipes say that it should take much more. My culture is almost 13 months old. I have saved in the fridge and one on the counter for everyday use. I follow your steps in your book- the bread bible. Is there something not right about my starter? Thanks, Delbert Maywald

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Thank you christine! For sure I will let you all know from my results! God bless!

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Thank you Hector!! I do hope it can stick as well, as I intend to make it for my brother's bday. Will report backs on the results, for sure!

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Claudine, thx u. I don't plan to post it on my website YET. But all I can tell u it is a hybrid between RHC'S no bake cheesecake and the roses red velvet.

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Hector, do you have it on your site? It is indeed one of my favourite recipes from Rose's books and cheesecake is an all time favourite in my home ;) I can't imagine the combination! Please share!

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Christine, I am certain if u eat Rose's Red Velvet cake with ur eyes closed, u will drool with happiness! I love the taste so much that I have a cheesecake version with all the red velvet flavors and color.

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Christine Czarnecki
Christine Czarnecki in reply to comment from Hector
02/ 5/2012 11:37 PM

Indeed the food coloring does have a bitter taste, and some people can taste it very strongly.

I have made this beautiful cake at the request of my daughter's friend, and she was thrilled with it.

My neighbor, a baker of extraordinary skill, and I could both taste the bitterness of the food coloring and found it most distasteful. It has an acrid and chemical taste.

Alas, as lovely as this cake looks - and tastes to many people - I will never make it again with the food coloring.

I think the baby's mother is very wise to avoid such an obviously unnatural ingredient in her child's diet.

I also wish there were some other way to get that gorgeous red color....

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Agreed hector... it is addictive! Cakes, cake pops, cupcakes... it is my go to recipe! Thanks for your input!!

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Hi Alva!
I'm no Rose, Woody and Hector but i can tell you that I have made cake pops with the red velvet from RHC and the all american chocolate butter cake from the cake bible and they turned out perfectly firm. Never had it once fall off the stick while dipping and shaking the chocolate off. I used the mousseline buttercream from RHC and that icing makes the cake balls very firm within minutes of being in the freezer. Keep in mind i also dipped the tip of the sticks in a tiny amount of chocolate before sticking it in the cake balls and then the fridge or freezer. I have never tried with the lemon poppy seeds recipe so please post in the forum your results if it all works out and weather you used Roses mousseline buttercream or a different kind of icing. I tried with many icings and I truly believe thats the key in holding the pop ball together perfectly!

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Alva, give it a try and do report back. I think it will stick because of the generous amount of butter in this cake.

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Claudine, I think the cake will still taste great without the food coloring. It is one of my favorite butter cakes because it does contain some oil, which makes the cake more moist. Lacking the usual amount of butter does not compromise on taste thanks to the yummy tangy buttermilk.

I do believe the amount of red coloring on red velvet cake does add some flavor unique to this cake. It is rather addictive. A bit chemical, tart, bitter.

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Hi Rose, woody, Hector!

I love your lemon poppy seed from RHC I made recently. My question is, can I use this cake to crumble it and make ''cake pops''? I have the doubt if the can stay together into balls because of the poppy seeds...any suggestions? Help!

Alva

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Thanks Woody for the prompt response! I have indeed made the cake with pink before for a Christening and it turned out beautiful. Unfortunately, my sister refuses any colour be added to the mix... I want to make them happy ;) I will try with simply adding the water. Thank you so much!

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Thank you Sarah for the suggestion but i'm actually looking to simply remove the food colouring and sticking to the original colour before adding colour. Berries are not always introduce in a babies diet when they turn one and i do not want to change in any way the taste and texture of rose's recipe ;) I am wondering if Rose or Woody or anyone else out there ever tried this and if they replace the food colour by water or milk in order to maintain the liquid ratio...

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
02/ 5/2012 08:22 PM

Hi Claudine,
We have also made the cake without food coloring by replacing the red food coloring with the same amount of water. We can understand the reasoning on the food coloring although since the cake serves 8 to 10 people the amount of food coloring is very little. Alternatively, you could have a pink velvet cake by doing a half food coloring/half water for the food coloring.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sarah
02/ 5/2012 08:16 PM

Hi Sarah,
The complete recipe for the Deep Passion is in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. The undercoat frosting is a Deep Chocolate Ganache and the shiny top coat is the Dark Chocolate Lacquer Glaze. The chocolate twigs were attached with some dabs of the glaze onto their back sides. .

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Try using rasperry jam in the recipe, it gives it a reddish tinge and no food colouring!

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Hello, I would love to know what icing/ganache you used on your fabulous Deep chocolate passion wedding cake and how you got the peppermint sticks to stick.....Thankyou

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Hello Rose and Woody!
I am sketching a cake for my niece first birthday next week. My plan was to make your delicious red velvet cake as her birthday is the day before valentine's day and, well let's be honest, it's just simply delicious!!!!

Sadly, the mommy isn't at ease with giving all that red food colouring to her child. I know you can achieve somewhat of a red with beets but frankly, I'm not up for it!

My question goes has follow: Have you ever tried making the red velvet without the actual food colouring with a similar outcome? I love the taste of that cake and I am wondering if simply replacing the food colour with water or what ever you would suggest (for equal liquid content) would work?

Thanks again for your help, as always!
Claudine

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Briona
02/ 4/2012 10:04 AM

Hi Briona,
We recommend looking at the charts in the Wedding and Special Occasions section of The Cake Bible which gives formulas and ratios for making larger and smaller cakes. They may solve your problem with making a larger cake.
We also suggest posting the recipe on the Forums section by typing it out as a comment. Then other bakers may be able to help as well. You do not need to write out the entire recipe. A listing of the ingredients, pans and their preparation, and an outline of the recipe's instructions should give us enough information. Also, include what your results are when you try to make it larger, ex: dipping in the center, too short and dense, etc.

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Hi Rose, going back to my comment and your reply of 1-28-12, I have a copy here of this recipe from Gourmet, May 1999--it is called Aunti Rose's Plantation Papaya Cake -- then on pgs. 216-217. I would have to send this to you as I do not know how to do this online--not talented at these things.
Would that be okay and if so, where to? (unless in the next days, I can find a nighbor who cd do it).

Thanks so much, Briona

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Thank you, Woody, for your prompt reply. Artisan-baked Flatbread is not so much a bread as a very thin, crisp and crunchy cracker the size of a Graham. I'll have a go in the Forum. ;)

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Catherine
02/ 3/2012 12:56 PM

Hi Catherine,
If we do not have a recipe posted in the Categories for Bread, please post a request for a recipe on the Forums so that the baking community can give you some suggestions.
The Bread Bible will also give you guidelines for crafting a recipe from the chapter introductions. Comparing various recipes and their dough percentages.

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I am putting forth a request for an artisan-baked whole-grain flatbread cracker recipe; or, the how-to of crafting a recipe from an ingredient list. Any suggestions?

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Hello Hector,

The puree was in the freezer in an airtight container for almost three months; there was no shrimp or chicken taste! Lol.

David

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thank you so much for all the information. I will buy both books, Rose's books are the best books I had ever seen.

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thank you penelope--what a terrific idea! i often add corn syrup or cream of tartar or some sort of interfering agent especially when the caramel will be dipped in repeatedly which would cause it to form a sandy undesirably texture.

toffee is supposed to be crunchy rather than sticky and 'bendable.' you do want controlled crystallization in toffee so that it is crunchy but too much is not desirable. i suspect that adding a little corn syrup will hedge your bets and create the ideal consistency consistently!

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Penelope Strockbine
Penelope Strockbine
02/ 1/2012 04:21 PM

After reading the message about buttercrunch, I thought you might be interested in my experience. I had some difficulty with the recipe - the buttercrunch would crystalize very soon after it was made - after many problem-free years of making your recipe. My son suggested adding a different sugar to the mix, the thought being having sugars with two different crystal structures would retard crystallization. I took his advice and have added a tablespoon of corn syrup to the ingredients and haven't had a problem since. The toffee is delightfully crispy and stays that way for a several weeks. And you don't have to worry about the weather!

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Thank you so much, Rose. You are the grandest lady ever! Many hugs to you for your good wishes.

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Hi Ethel,
We also suggest looking at Rose's bio which you can see by clicking on "About"
on the top bar.

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lynn, the cake bible is going into it's 49th printing. the 34th printing has the revised ingredient and equipment section with suggestions as to how to increase batter intended for 1-1/2" high pans to 2" high. of course you can still use the book you have as it is and use the pans indicated. 1-1/2" pans are still available.

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ethel, i'd be honored for you to mention me in your book. and thank you for your most polite consideration so unlike certain sites now on the web that boast about the millions they're making from advertisers and using other people's recipes without permission!

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Looking at the errata for the Cake Bible and the complicated instructions for using 2" pans, I'm thinking I'll order the latest edition and donate my original copy to a book sale. My question is the Amazon site has the 8th edition. Will that have the new measurements/ instructions?
Thanks.

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We are in the midst of publishing our own cookbook and would like to mention by name some authors/books who inspired us and taught us. Can we do this with Rose and The Cake Bible? None of her recipes or content would be used. Can anyone suggest where to get this information?

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David, that is a great approach! of course, we are assuming you are keeping things airtight in the freezer. this is where many people disregard. if not, you pumpkin may taste like frozen chicken or shrimp right?

your approach is very similar to the Cordon Rose Strawberry Conserves or the Raspberry Sauce.

also, freezing/thawing (without actually discarding any liquid) has flavor intensity increases on most fresh fruit, rather than using fresh. for example passion fruit puree, or any fresh fruit puree in effect. even lemon juice. my reasoning is that freezing breaks plant cell walls, thus more of the contents is released.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
02/ 1/2012 09:33 AM

Hi David,
We thank you for your research and will make one this way to compare it with a non frozen puree cheesecake.

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Re: Pure Pumpkin Cheesecake.
Dear Rose,
I accidentally found a way to intensify the pumpkin flavor by freezing the pumpkin puree then thaw it out at room temperature (some of the water will seperate from the puree). Drain it through a strainer, but do not extract any liquid from the puree. The pumpkin puree will look very fibery and clump together like paper pulp. Weigh the pumpkin puree according to the recipe. The end result is a firmer and more pumpkinny flavor.
Oh, and you can refreeze the puree again if there is any left over.

David Chau

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Nidia
01/31/2012 12:35 PM

Hi Nidia,
We do not have any recommendations for converting a cake recipe into cupcakes, other than the couple that are in other sections of the book. We suggest that if you like a particular cake after you make it and you think you might like the recipe as cupcakes to try making them. However the leavening will likely need to be increased for recipes using baking powder or baking soda.
The Cake Bible does not have a section on cupcakes but gives guidelines for adapting some recipes on page 164.

Where Rose gave several frosting suggestions for a given cake in The Cake Bible, in Rose's Heavenly Cakes, Rose paired what she thought was the best frosting recipe to accompany the given cake recipe. In general, we would recommend a chocolate ganache for a dark chocolate flavored frosting and either the White Chocolate Buttercream or the Mousseline Buttercream for a non-dark chocolate flavored frosting, as you can add your favorite flavoring (which you will see that we use for several accompanying frosting recipes ).

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I saw your book heavenly cakes and look great; I will buy it next week. I would like to ask you which of the cakes recipes you recommend to make cupcakes, other than the one that show baby cakes. Your recipes look delicious. Is there a frosting that you can recommend that I can use with most of the recipes?
I cannot wait to have your book!!
Another question...does the Bible Cake book contents cupcakes recipes as well?
Look forward to hearing from you, thank you for your time. Best regards, Nidia Moreno

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Louis
01/31/2012 10:36 AM

hi Louis,
The baking powder is 2+1/3 teaspoons.
We generally weigh all ingredients, solids and liquids, except ingredients where it makes sense to use teaspoon or tablespoon increments such as: baking powder, salt, spices, vanilla, and extracts. Weighing is quicker and more accurate. Another advantage to weighing, is that you can add up all of a batter's weights prior to making the recipe. (Our books' pages are covered with written in weights and notes.) Then weigh your completed batter. Accounting for some loss, you will know if you remembered to use all of the ingredients. If you forgot a major ingredient, like sugar, (and I will admit I have) you will likely have to make a new batter. But you will have saved the baking time and disappointment of a failed cake.
If this is our first time with a new ratio of ingredients, especially for an event cake, we will do a practice test cake. Just to be sure, unless there is no time or we can easily conceal any imperfections with frosting. We made over 12 cakes, prior to making the Red Velvet cake for Marie Wolf's daughter's wedding to assure we could make the perfect cake. Since this cake can be refrigerated for up to 5 days and freezes well, you can make a test cake. If it is perfection, you have your cake. If not, but acceptable for some other occasion, you can freeze it.

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Hi Woody, one more question: Is it alright if i weigh all the ingredients except for the leavening and liquid ingredients (i.e. will be using measuring spoons and cups)? Many thanks.

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Hi Woody, thanks so much for your reply. Please forgive my stupidity, when you mentioned 2-1/3 teaspoons, do you mean 2 + 1/3 teaspoons, OR 2 x 1/3 teaspoons (i.e. 2/3 teaspoons)? I intend to try the Downy Yellow Butter Cake this weekend for my housewarming and would want the cake to come out perfect. Many thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Emily
01/30/2012 11:48 PM

Hi Emily,
We ask, are you using baking spray with flour for the cupcake liners as stated?
The coating the liners with baking spray with flour makes it easier to peel off the liners. You may want to use less or try some without any baking spray.

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Hi Rose, I used your recipe for Chocolate Cupcakes from Rose's Heavenly Cakes. The cupcake itself is very delicious and moist. My problem is that it easily separated from the cupcake liner. Is there any way to remedy this? Thanks!

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Hi Rose, I used your recipe for Chocolate Cupcakes from Rose's Heavenly Cakes. The cupcake itself is very delicious and moist. My problem is that it easily separated from the cupcake liner. Is there any way to remedy this? Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Louis
01/28/2012 09:53 PM

Hi Louis,
We recommend looking at the charts in the Wedding and Special Occasions Cake section where these recipe work with 9 x 2 inch pans. Your Downy Yellow Butter Cake should use 1 tablespoon plus 2-1/3 teaspoons if made with bleached cake flour with a 4 times batter of the yellow cake base.
You generally can increase all ingredients by their difference in volume of the pans to fill to the same height, except leavenings which usually require less.

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Hi Rose, you have mentioned in your Cake Bible that for your 2-layered cake recipes that use 9" by 1.5" cake pans, I need to increase recipes by 1 1/3 if 9" by 2" cake pans are used instead. But on page 450 of your Cake Bible, you also mentioned reducing the baking powder in the aforesaid situation. I am confused. Do you mean all the ingredients have to increase by 1 1/3 except baking powder? Taking your Downy Yellow Butter Cake as an example, your recipe calls for 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon of baking powder. If I'm using 9" by 2" cake pans for 2 layers, I have to reduce the aforesaid baking powder amount by 1/4 teaspoon (i.e. I only use 1 tablespoon + 3/4 teaspoon)? Thanks.

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briona, do post the recipe and i can see if it is similar to something in my repertoire. also other bloggers may want to try this challenge!

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This is really a question. First, I want to say The Cake Bible is great--I live in Germany, bought it in London and had to pay 50 Euros extra to return as I was then overweight with my big book! But this is a question about a cake in an old Gourmet magazine and I just cannot seem to make it any bigger than one flattish 9-inch cake. If I send you the recipe, would you be able to enlarge it?

Thank you so much.

Sincerely, Briona

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wendy--you are psychic! we are working on a pomegranate pie for the next book and it will indeed be spectacular. thank you for asking.

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Dear Rose -

I would like to make a pomegranate pie. (or a mostly pomegranate pie) I have both fresh arils and fresh squeezed juice to work with.

I have the Pie & Pastry Bible here in front of me to use as a helper...could you suggest an approach that would be both amazingly beautiful and tasty?

Thank you!

Wendy

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annne in nc
annne in nc in reply to comment from Hector
01/22/2012 10:38 PM

No more oil cakes for me! I've done carrot, German chocolate & almond shamans chiffon -- but that's just me! I know people who love all three of those cakes.

Agreed re applesauce -- especially since it only takes about 10 minutes to make homemade!!!

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Dear, some oil cakes are AWESOME!  such as the banana, the pumpkin, and the deep passion.  Omg!!!!!

And NO, I don't use the 70ish% oil for butter rule on anything.  Works for the banana cakes, but I don't think for other butter cakes.  I m sorry I know no more. something to do with the fibers on the bananas (or apple sauce) that may bind cake batter similarly to butter. And yuck.... Most common apple sauces are loaded with high fructose corn syrup...

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Hi, Hector!

I am a butter-only girl. I personally don't like oil cakes at all -- I find the flavor thin and the texture spongy. I wouldn't consider oil fundamental under any circumstanceds, myself. :) Although I can't see myself actually doing it, I think I would be more inclined to one of those applesauce/fruit puree substitutions before I'd use oil again.

However, lots of people prefer oil cakes even to butter both in flavor and texture (and, perhaps, to eliminate unwanted ingredients) -- and that's where my qeustion came from -- for those folks.

When you sub, do you do an equal amount of oil for butter? I noticed in Cordon Rose Bananan vs. Banana Refrigerator, that Rose subs oil at 76% of the weight of butter -- the cakes are otherwise identical. At the same time, on line it recommends a 7/8 (or 87%) substitution.

Thanks for any thoughts from your experience!!

--ak

p.s. I never have 1/2 slice. I always have a whacking big slice. But then, I just don't do it very often. :)

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Jesse, I wouldn't change a thing in this FABULOUS recipe.  It is an adorable ccnut cake.

If u dare (I would) want to create a new flavor, I would sub the ccnut milk with puréed pineapples, same grams, but replace some of the purée with oil to equal ccnut fat content.  Pineapple is sweeter than coconut, si reducing the amount with oil may be just sweet right.

Flavoring silk meringue buttercream with fresh pineapple purée (purée recipe from cake bible) is nice and I have done it in my Hawaii Way cake.

We may had just created a great pineapple cake!

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Sweet jesse
Sweet jesse in reply to comment from Hector
01/22/2012 08:48 PM

Southern Coconut Cake (Manhattan). Thanks!

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Jesse, which coconut cake recipe from RHC? I m curios to advice this as I have made plenty ingredient flavor substitutes when I baked every cake in this gorgeous book.

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Shi Hao. To reduce the sugar on the buttercream, I wouldn't! I would instead use a thinner amount when frosting the cake.

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Flour girl, Anne, Woody,

1- in my opinion, butter and oil are FUNDAMENTAL ingredients on a cake. I am not saying these ingredients are good for you or better on a cake. I am just saying that when u replace these with something else: the cake WILL NEVER be the same cake!!!!! The resulting cake can still be good, but won't be the same cake. Sometimes the resulting cake can be better or less better, most of the time is just a entirely different cake. The same goes with eggs.

2- I have been getting success making gluten free genoise and biscuit cakes. Also making butter free chocolate cakes. some good results replacing butter with oil. The only hint I can give u, when replacing butter with oil, is to change the mixing method too. All oil cakes I prefer to use the mixing method on RHC book as done for the pumpkin cake or the banana refrigerator cake. Oil works different with flour vs butter with flour.

3- to me, the BEST way to cut colesterol, calories, and fat, is to eat half a slice. That is a whoppig 50% reduction! Don't u agree?

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sweet jesse
sweet jesse
01/22/2012 07:21 PM

I recently made the coconut cake from RHC and I was wondering how easy it would be to add pineapple to the batter. I was thinking 8oz. crushed pineapple. Will I need to change anything? Do I need to drain it first? Is this something I wil just need to experiment with?
Thanks, as always, you guys are so awesome for answering all our questions!!!

Sweet Jesse

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Adrienne
01/22/2012 06:37 PM

Hi Adrienne,
The measurements in both volume and weight and the complete recipe are in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.

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Hi Rose,
I was watching your YouTube video on how to make lemon poppyseed bunt cake, but I need the measurements of flour, baking powder and salt. Could you please tell me these measurements. I don't have a scale to measure weight. I looked on your website, but could not find this recipe.
Thank you!

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Thanks, Woody! I, myself, do not like oil cakes at all -- I'll take the Cordon Rose as originally written over the Banana Refrigerator any day!!

In fact, even love Rose's butter cakes cold even more than at room temp!

I just noticed that that was the only difference between the two recipes and thought that might be a good basis for a discussion for that substitution (perhaps using a flavorful nut oil over a neutral oil) for those that prefer oil cakes.

Some people prefer that oil cake moistness -- personally, I don't like the texture at all -- but it would be nice if everyone could "have their cake" in any recipe simply but a good working substitution ratio!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Anne in NC
01/22/2012 04:30 PM

Hi Anne,
We generally go with butter in recipes as it gives the cake a better flavor. The main reason for offering the Banana Refrigerator Cake in RHC was that oil cakes can be served right out of the refrigerator as oil does not get hard like butter. The fibers in the banana do effect the ratio for butter versus oil.
For other recipes, you will have to experiment or you may want to check some of the sites, like Go Dairy Free, on Rose's Sites I Like.

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Hi, Woody,

As a follow-up to Flour Girl's question, I noticed that the only difference between the Cordon Rose Banana Cake and the Banana Refrigerator Cake is the swapping of oil for butter at about 76% by weight. Would you guess (not asking for a promise) that this be done successfully in any of Rose's butter cake recipes (adjusting the mixing/combining of ingredints, of course, to match that of Rose's oil cakes)? I.e., does this ratio sound right and is there any "magic" of butter over oil? I'm wondering, becuase the usual recommendation for this sub is 7/8, or 87% (rather than 76%).

Many thanks!

--ak

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Thanks for your reply Woody. Looks like I will be doing a lot of experimenting. Sounds like fun :)

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
01/22/2012 01:46 PM

hi Shi Hao,
You can experiment with adding more butter or other ingredients that will offset the sweetness like bittersweet chocolate or fruit purees.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Flour Girl
01/22/2012 01:43 PM

hi Flour Girl,
When we can offer an alternative ingredient substitution that will give the a similar taste and texture we will offer it as a variation. We do not have a chart of non-butter direct substitutions for replacing butter.
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in gluten free, lactose free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes as these are not our genre of baking. In both the Cake Bible and Rose’s Heavenly Cakes there are several flourless cakes. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.
Enjoy experimenting.

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Hi Rose

Is it possible for me to reduce the sugar for your neoclassic butter cream? Or is there anyway to reduce the sweetness?

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Hi Rose & Woody, I am an avid fan of your recipes. They have actually made me quite popular in my little circle. I recently learned I have to start baking some cholesterol free cakes. I am aware of the list you provide in TCB. I thank you for that. If I wanted to convert your other recipes, can I replace the butter with products like Benacol, Earth Balance or Canola oil? I purchased Ener-G Egg Replacer to replace the eggs. Thank you very much.

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thank you bob! do check out the fresh loaf blog where the cinnamon raisin version is posted with beautiful photos and many comments including the one i just made!

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Rose,
I just want to thank you for the soft bread recipe of yours that I found on Epicurious. Hey, anyone who has not tried this recipe, please do so; it is absolutely the most heavenly textured and tasting bread there can be! The recipe is also perfectly descriptive in its presentation. It is perfection in every way! We all love it!
Bob F.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Lydiaruth
01/21/2012 11:32 PM

Hi Lydiaruth,
The Bread Bible does not have a section for scaling recipes, but on page 584 Rose does give standard pan sizes and volumes. You can then adjust the ingredients for your size pan for the difference in the stated pan's volume and your pan's volume.

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I got The Bread Bible for Christmas. I have a large family and prefer to make loaves in 9 inch pans. But most of the recipes are for 8 inch loaves. Is there anywhere where these recipes have been scaled for the larger pan?

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Rose,

Thank you for your quick response...I did suspect that it was a temperature issue and you've confirmed it. I'll re-check my oven thermometer for accuracy.

best regards,
Sophia

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sophia, i just saw the photo in the forums and it actually looks very beautiful. i wouldn't worry about the small cracks in the meringue. i suspect the solution would be to bake it lower in the oven or possibly your oven heat might have been a little higher than you thought. the consistency is like a meringue on top of a lemon meringue pie.it doesn't need to brown--that was just an indicator of when to take it out of the oven! but different ovens bake differently. it sounds like yours set the top before the inside was thoroughly set.

the only way that any egg custard type of filling waters out or becomes runny on sitting is if the temperature was not high enough to destroy the enzyme that reverses the thickening process. i guess it's all about temperature! your work looks very professional so i suspect you know all this but i can't think of another reason this would happen other than the possibility that the thermometer is off.

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Good Morning Rose, Woody,

I made the Aurora Blood Orange tart yesterday and had less than stellar results...I hope you can help me determine why.

The chocolate meringue cracked within 13 minutes of baking, before it had begun to brown, and apart from the crispy outer shell, it seemed completely uncooked.

What should the consistency of this meringue be after baking and why would it have cracked? My oven temperature is correct and I don't believe I over beat my meringue.

Also, the blood orange curd, which was perfectly set after it was made, was runny after baking.

The tart tasted phenomenal but the appearance and texture were disappointing....I would appreciate your help in solving these problems before I attempt it again.

thank you
Sophia

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Monica, lamento confesar, que tengo que actualizar las erratas. la tabla de ingredientes para el Cuatro Cuartos Dorado de Buttercream, debe de decir solamente YEMAS 56 gramos, en vez de HUEVOS GRANDES (enteros) 150 gr.

me encanta este pastel!

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Hi Rose & Woody

Is it possible for me to reduce the sugar for your neoclassic butter cream? Or is there anyway to reduce the sweetness?

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Buenos días,
Ayer hice el pastel cuatro cuartos dorado de buttercream de la página 34 de la edición española de La biblia de los pasteles. Hoy he encontrado en su página oficial las erratas de esta edición pero sigo teniendo una duda.
Usted dice que hay que mezclar las yemas con la vainillina y dos cucharadas de nata.
Más abajo explica: "añadir la mezcla de huevos en tres veces". Las claras no se utilizan?
Ha quedado muy bueno de sabor pero no ha subido tal como indica. Ha quedado de 1,5 cm de altura.
Muchas gracias por estas recetas tan fantásticas. Saludos,

Mónica

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from erica
01/17/2012 05:32 PM

hi Erica,We recommend brioche which is used in the Caramelized Pineapple Pudding Cakes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
You can also use make the soft white bread for bread pudding.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
01/17/2012 09:35 AM

hi David,
Two brands that are commonly stocked on United States supermarket shelves are Goya and Aroy-D. We use both brands and have to use a food processor to combine the solid cream with the liquid cream.

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Hi Rose,

Would you be kind enough to give me the brand name(s) of the "Cream of Coconut" that you use in your coconut cheesecake? The stores where I am from carry only an East Indian brand of coconut solid that looks like a block of cream cheese.

Thanks Rose,

David

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Thanks for the reply, Woody. Another question, please: which of the breads from The Bread Bible would you most recommend for a bread pudding?
Best regards,
Erica

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from erica
01/15/2012 09:07 PM

Hi Erica,
Rose developed this recipe to use a food processor as the pumpkin mixture needs to be pureed and to mix the entire batter in one piece of equipment.

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Dear Rose,
Is it possible to make the pumpkin cheesecake that appears in "Heavenly Cakes" using a mixer rather than a food processor? If yes, then I would greatly appreciate your detailed guidance.
Many thanks,
Erica

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Adam
01/12/2012 11:57 PM

Hi Adam,
We have not tried making this recipe as burger buns.
You may want to try the Golden Burger Buns recipe which is posted on this website if you do a google search for "Golden Burger Buns"

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I enjoy the cracked wheat loaf from the Bread Bible very much. What modifications have to be made to this receipe to make high rising hamburger buns? The loaf receipe makes very thin ones.

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hi,
i would like to know how much baking powder i need for a cake of 510 gm of flour and how many eggs i need to use.
thank you.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jan
01/12/2012 11:23 AM

Hi Jan,
We suggest either a shortening and powdered sugar frosting or fondant. The first would be more traditional for you to make swirls or wavy patterns; the second would be more special occasion, which you could tint the fondant or add cut shapes of fondant for a theme.

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Hi Jesse,
Please review the introductory chapters in Rose's books that give an explanation. For cake baking for most cakes, the lower oven rack placement allows the cake to bake in the middle of the oven.

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sweet jesse
sweet jesse
01/12/2012 10:47 AM

Hello! For some recipes you call for the rack to be placed in th bottom third of the oven. Why? Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Greg
01/12/2012 10:45 AM

Hi Greg,
Your proofer needs are on a semi commercial scale. We suggest to check with some used or wholesale to the public baking/kitchen supply warehouses;or build your own. You could try converting a used refrigerator, which would give you a sealed environment, with a controlled heating source and a humidity source. If a refrigerator is too big, you could always construct your own proofing box with styrofoam walls for insulation.
Our other thought is if you have a spare room or closet that you could place a humidifier and a heating source could become your proofing room or closet.

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Hello! Love this site and hope you can help. I am planning a tablescapes table for a church fundraiser and want to use a fake cake centerpiece. For the size we need, we've decided to use a large metal stockpot. What kind of "frosting", real or fake, will stick to this and last several days, preferably a week? Thanks so much!!

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I love to make real croissants; hand turning the plaque, cutting and shaping by hand. A long, long time in the kitchen, but the end product, well, heaven. The problem is during winter I have a hard time maintaining a proper temperature / humidity in my cold kitchen for proofing. The Taylor and Brod machine looks wonderful, but it's way too small. I proof three bake sheets at a time. Is there some way I can either buy at home baker prices a large enough proofer or convert my electric oven into a proofer where I can effectively control the temperature and humidity? The proofing temp is between 77-82F (butter melts at 84.5F), humidity is about 65%, a little lower than most yeast proofing, but by doing so I can get that shattering crunch of the outer layers. Any suggestions for making a good croissant proofing environment is greatly appreciated.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
01/11/2012 11:16 PM

Hi Claudine,
We suggest you could make the Lacquer Glaze, the Sticky Caramel, the Chocolate Glaze, or the Whipped Cream Cake, as well as freezing some ganache.

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Hi Rose and Woody! Happy New Year!
I need a suggestion please... I have purchased quite a bit of philly cream cheese and 35% cream during the holidays as there was a great sale and i was planning on making lots of cheese cakes with genache... Upon discovering your red velvet cake and mousseline buttercream, my family asked, asked, and asked again for that cake so I didn't get to make the anticipated recipes!
My question goes as follow; I know I can freeze cream cheese but would you also freeze cream? If not, besides making genache with it and freezing it, what would you suggest to make with the cream that can afterwards freeze well. I don't want it to spoil and I do have about a dozen half cartons in the fridge! Thanks for your input!!
Claudine

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Hi Dianne,
We are in production on The Baking Bible which is scheduled for release in 2015. There will be production updates as the time gets closer.

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dianne brown
dianne brown
01/11/2012 04:11 PM

Rose, I was told you have a new baking bible out. I can not find the correct title or where to purchase it. Tried Barnes and noble wit no luck. Please reply. thank you

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Hi Phyllis,
You are correct that the amount should be 3 cups.
The book was revised after 1998.
We apologize for the error. Production errors are always the nemesis of the author and the reader. Fortunately, the internet offers the ability for authors to include an Errata/CORRECTIONS section on their blogs.We always recommend to check Rose's correction section if you ever have a question on an ingredient's amount or instructions for a recipe. Here is the listed correction.


In the CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE on page 204 under "make the filling," it should read remaining 2 3/4 cups of milk.

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Phyllis Doherty
Phyllis Doherty
01/ 9/2012 01:48 PM

I made the Chocolate Cream Pie from the Pie and Pastry Bible pp 202-205. After reading the instructions for the filling several times I began by following the instructions on p 204 occasionally looking back at the ingredients on p 203. I put 1/4 C milk in with the eggs, cocoa, etc. then 3 3/4 C milk in the saucepan with sugar and salt. It never thickened and later, after I hoped it would then thicken and it didn't it ruined the crust. I read the list of ingredients again which says 3 C milk, not the 4 C specified in the instructions ( 1/4 C * 3 3/4 C). My book is a 1998 edition. Was either the ingredients list or the instructions changed in a later edition? Can I assume 3 C is the correct measurement?

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Hi Paul and Nina,
Rose is currently not teaching any classes as we are in production with the new book.
We suggest your daughter do both. Start with working in a bakery to see if this is something she really wants to pursue. The reasoning for attending a cooking school is for the knowledge and a degree to give her credibility whether she opens a bakery or works out of her home.
Which ever choice she makes, we recommend her to study and bake from Rose's books as her "bible books" are both recipe and text books for each genre of baking. Many schools and bakeries have her books on their shelves for referencing.

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Paul and NinaSchorran
Paul and NinaSchorran
01/ 8/2012 07:45 PM

I have a 20 year old daughter who is particularly interested in baking and pastries. Today we visited the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill in Philadelphia. Her goal is to have her own business; a bakery of her own or to work out of her home. She does not want to work in a fancy restaurant. In order for her to reach her goal would it be better for her to attend a cooking school or be an apprentice in a bakery. Do you teach? We love your cookbooks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
01/ 8/2012 01:57 PM

Hi Shi Hao,
We recommend that you check the Covering the Cake section in The Cake Bible or any layered cake's Compose a Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes which explains how to use parcment paper strips.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from MIchelle
01/ 8/2012 01:49 PM

Hi Michelle,
We would suggest checking with Nestle as the cocoa probably has lost some of its flavor and this is a food safety issue.

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Hi Rose and Woody...

I've been having this problem while frosting my cake with ganache and cream cheese frosting. I use a metal plate from a loose base cake tin to frost my cake. However, after frosting, whenever I try to transfer the cake from the plate to those cake boards/plates, some of the frosting will get stuck onto the metal plate causing it to be pulled off from the rest of the cake body. This results in an unsightly jagged edge at the base of the cake as the frosting 'tears' I think it's because the frosting may have set which makes if more 'brittle' I'm not sure either. But I've tried applying butter on the metal plate and the same problem occurs. Is there any way I can use to prevent the frosting from 'tearing?'

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T. sams, please read my posting on vanilla. i store my spent vanilla beans in sugar but only after rinsing them in water and drying them thoroughly to prevent risk of mold. when i remember, i use a small amount of the vanilla sugar as part of the sugar called for in the recipe.

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Hi Rose, is it safe to use Baking Cocoa by Nestle (200g) which has an expiry date Sept 2009. It was never opened before. Sealed in a tin (air-tight). I found 2 tins of it in my cupboard and thought of making something out of it rather than throw it away. Thank you for enlightening me.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from April
01/ 6/2012 05:23 PM

Hi April,
We have to say that what is on the store's shelf or website listings is the most current version. There is a new version which is in Spanish but only available in Europe. Where most authors only give recipes for 9" layer cakes, the Cake Bible's Wedding and Special Occasion Cake chapter has basic recipes for you to make 6" layer cakes.
Rose is currently not teaching classes.
We suggest with all of techniques given in the Cake Bible to practice on your own for awhile. We are not familiar with the classes you mentioned. You can always check their curriculum before signing up.

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Rose, I am a new baker or trying to bake. I have not yet invested in the Cake Bible as I saw that a new version is coming out and I want that one. So how do we know its the newest version when we go to the book store. Also..since you mention your new offices are in Hope NJ..I am in Nj too and boy what about some cake baking lessons. I keep trying and trying and keep failing and failing. I have MS and want to try to just bake 6" layer cakes for birthdays that taste awesome. THanks and hope to hear from you soon.
Do you recommend cake decorating classes that Michaels or AC moore offers in order to learn to decorate? many thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Erica
01/ 6/2012 12:13 PM

Hi Erica,
Our preference is cream cheese for its texture and flavor as we have tried recipes with cottage cheese and ricotta cheese. Cream cheese also works well for Rose's methodology of treating a cheesecake as a custard and baking it in a water bath.

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Dear Rose,
I recently made your Cordon Rose Cream Cheesecake au natural for my parents. They loved it, and my mom said that it reminded her of a cheesecake she had once tasted that had been made with cottage cheese. She wonders if you had ever tried making a cheesecake using cottage cheese and what you might have discovered.
Thanks for your insight.
Best regards--and Happy New Year!
Erica

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Hi Karin,
We always recommend contacting the author of a recipe if the recipe is not coming out as expected, especially if you had prior success.
As far as trying to save it by baking or freezing, we would say that not much can be done. I personally had a similar experience of making a pumpkin cheesecake (prior working with Rose days) and realized that I had forgotten to put in the sugar when I tasted the batter in the pan. Whisking it in failed to make it a Thanksgiving dessert. I ended up eating what I could bear and threw out most of it. But I learned a lesson.
We can only think that somehow it was underbaked. Although our baking times are longer than Martha's, we contend that Martha and her staff test a recipe several times before publishing or presenting it on one of her shows.

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Karin Baumgardner
Karin Baumgardner in reply to comment from Anonymous
01/ 3/2012 11:37 PM

OOps! The previous question was from Kuchenbaaker - that's me!

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Hi Rose and Woody! I have a question that was posted on another forum thread and Julie suggested I ask you for help to solve my problem.I made the Gingerbread Cheesecake from Martha Stewart’s website (sorry Rose :-() - 2 Lbs Creamcheese, 4 eggs,1 1/2 c sugar and 1/4 c light molasses in it. I did it on a pre-baked Gingerbread cookie crumb crust, and baked the cake in a water bath. Baked for 1 hour as directed at 325, and then as it looked pretty “jiggly” I left in the oven for another hour or so with door open 1/4 of the way to cool. It did fall in abit but evenly with only minimal cracking. Chilled covered overnight. Surrounded by mini-Gingerbread people just before serving. Upon serving I found it extremely soft and fluffy (beaten too much??) inside - almost impossible to slice, slumped on the plate, and not at all nice in texture (slimy). I am wondering if there is any way I can re-bake what is left and try to get it to firm up - it is really a frustrating result (last yr the first time I did it it turned out fine). Suggestions? Could I freeze it and then slice up and serve it partly frozen? It breaks my heart to waste 2 pound of Creamcheese! Any suggestions to save this?

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I would like to get your opinion on storing whole vanilla beans in sugar to flavor the sugar. I tried to find this addressed in the blog but didn't see it. Please forgive me if I wasn't thorough enough. Will storing the vanilla beans in the sugar enhance it? are there any health concerns to doing this like a bacteria building up or something like that? Thanks for your help.

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Thanks for the clarification Woody. Am specially grateful that our queries are addressed so promptly, because that prevents our enthusiasm from being dampened....

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Yeast Conversions

just figured out how to put a live link in the blog posting without going over the margin!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from wlchong
01/ 3/2012 12:09 PM

Hi Wlchong,
Generally, Rose will state a name brand in a recipe, because it is her preference for flavor, texture, or appearance. Please review the ingredient chapters for substitutions. If the flour bag does not state bleached or unbleached, it is likely unbleached. You can also contact the manufacturer or check their website.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Cheryljean
01/ 3/2012 11:58 AM

Hi Cheryljean,
You can either copy this link and put it in your browser.

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2011/04/yeast_conversion_1.html

In the future, you can do a search on the blog by writing the key words in the "google custom search" box to the right of Contact on the home page. You can then click on the postings that Rose has posted.
The Bread Bible also has the conversions listed.

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the bread I wish to make calls for one cake yeast it is 25g. how much dry yeast can I use instead?
Thank you for your help.
I think what I really wish to know is how do you know how to measure the cake yeast to equal one pk. of dry yeast. Thank you for your help.
Share:

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Hi Woody,
If I can't find King Arthur Flour in my country, Malaysia, may I use normal All Purpose Flour? And most of the all purpose flour that are found in the market do not state as Bleached or Unbleach. How could I differentiate them? Thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from conchita
01/ 3/2012 09:52 AM

Hi Conchita,
We included the powdered sugar substitution for the white chocolate as most cream cheese frostings use powdered sugar. Rose developed the white chocolate cream cheese frosting to give firmness, sweetness, flavor, and to eliminate the grittiness that powdered sugar can add to a cream cheese frosting.
The unheated powdered sugar and vanilla are processed in when the white chocolate would be added to the cream cheese mixture.

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Thanks Woody

Btw I plan to try out the Red Velvet Cake today but unable to obtain white choolate. It is stated in the book that we could replace the white chocolate with 115g powdered sugar (is snow sugar the same?) + 1/4 tsp vanilla extrct.. My question is: Do we need to heat the powdered sugar to a syrup or just add it into the food processor n pulse with the cream chesse, etc?? And if it is necessary to heat the powdered sugar, do we need to add any other liquid to heat it (like water?)...and how much?Sorry if this is a silly question, but it's my first time making any kind of frosting ...

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jessica
01/ 2/2012 01:44 PM

Hi Jessica,
We ask is the cheesecake going to be in a refrigerated display so it can hold up for 4 days?
If your problem seems to be cracks in the cheesecake, can the topping be something other than cream cheese?
We would recommend a lemon curd glaze that will give you pefectly flat topping, opaque enough to cover any cracks in the cheesecake, and can sit at room temperature for the 4 days. Some other suggestions would be to top the cake with a disc of thin rolled fondant which you could tint to match the cheesecakes coloration OR to liquify some creme fraiche and make a creme fraiche and cornstarch glaze. You could try 2 Tablespoons creme fraiche to 1-1/2 teaspoons cornstarch as that works as a glaze with lemon juice.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Conchita
01/ 2/2012 01:17 PM

Hi Conchita,
We would recommend a braided bread like the Challah as there are many impressive ways to braid challah.

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Hi Sharon,
It will store perfectly. We suggest to review the storage times in the intro chapter and related indexes. The cakes and frosting can also be frozen separately and assembled when needed.
Does this meet your criteria?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from T. Sams
01/ 2/2012 01:11 PM

Hi T.,
You may want to try the two brownie recipes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes which are chewy. The Barcelona which includes cream cheese and the addition of white chocolate in Rose's Fudgy Pudgy which adds to the chew because cocoa butter is solid at room temperature and even more so when chilled
Your question is too broad to simply state an ingredient or technique as any cookie or brownie recipe is dependent on the author's intent. Comparing the ingredients between recipes that you find are chewy to ones that are not may give you an answer. Also, many commercially produced baked goods will stay chewy from preservatives added to increase their shelf life.

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Sharon Dube
Sharon Dube
01/ 2/2012 09:57 AM

I was wondering how well the Southern (Manhattan) Coconut Cake freezes? I bake part time for a small family owned restaurant and I would love to be able to stock up some of the baked off cakes in the freezer. I am afraid it would dry it out. Once i put a cake in the case it needs to be moist and stay that way for a good 3-4 days if at all possible.

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Hi

I was hoping to make a decorative (edible) BREAD for my son's engagement event next month..The norm is, of course, to bake some beautifully decorated cakes, which I definitely plan to make from Rose's books (I've just received all the 4 books I recently ordered : The Bread/Cake/Pie&Pastry Bibles & the Heavenly Cakes - and I am so excited!) .. but I was thinking that it would be an interesting change to see a beautifully decorated Bread amongst the display! I would sincerely appreciate if you could give me a suitable bread recipe & decor techniques, or perhaps some ideas/tips, that could help me achieve this 'ambitious' task ...

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Charles E
01/ 1/2012 03:58 PM

Hi Charles,
The recipe is correct for the ingredients and the order of assembly. Most authors do not have the ability to control where page breaks occur that can put part of a recipe's ingredient chart on one page and its directions on the following page as in this case. Rose's dedication to giving an ingredient's weight in both grams and ounces along with the typically only given volume listing requires the ingredient's chart to span the entire width of the page versus many author's listing only volumes and getting by with a side bar listing of their ingredients. You may want to compare this to the Basic Soft White Sandwich. The cornmeal is in step 5, as a coating for the muffins' bottom surfaces.

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As I sit here waiting for the dough to rise, I noticed that the English Muffin recipe is confusing. Sorry you are not allowed to blame my old age, lol.On page 167 you have the Starter recipe, now turn to Page 168 and you have the Dough recipe which is a little confusing or maybe I have just read other books a little more organized. On page 168 the recipe reads like the starter recipe, the liquid is missing or I miss read. The Corn meal is hidden in the directions on page 169 on the third line. Anyway I put the Corn Meal in the Dough (lets see what happens), I've cut the disks for the Muffins using a coffee cup, hey I'm single so the portion control will not bother me.

Is there anyway one can rewrite the recipe and identify the stages and what goes in and doesn't go in, as it is written

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I am a real fan of extra, extra chewy cookies/brownies. Would you please tell me what the science/ingredient is that makes this happen in baking cookies and brownies? In particular, the Whole Foods Company used to sell (I can't find them in their bakery now though) a brownie that was about two inches thick and incredibly chewy. They had a plain version and a cream cheese. I have been trying to reproduce it and haven't been successful. Do you have a recipe suggestion for me?
Thank you!

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Hey Rose, Love your work and your books!!!
I was wondering if there is a way to stabilize a sour cream topping for a cheesecake without baking it? I need to put a topping because of some slight cracks, but I cannot re bake it and every recipie i find says it has to bake to set. Can I heat this on the stovetop then pour it on, or can I use some geletain and set it that way?
someone suggested i bake the topping then add it to the cake, but that seems like a tough task. What do you suggest- it needs to be on a cake that will display for up to 4 days.

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hi carol!

if you paste this link into your browser you'll see an excellent article explaining why the authentic shoofly pies don't have eggs.

http://lbaer.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/LBaer-EdibleChesapake-Shoofly-Summer-09.pdf

hope this helps to redeem yourself with the neighbors!

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Hello Rose and Woody,

I made the Shoofly Pie for neighbors from Pennsylvania; their favorite pie. Now, I had never tasted it before, nor made one, but it did not seem right. Now on consulting with neighbors, they asked if I put eggs in it. I said, "no, the recipe did not call for them." However, the Shoofly Pie is in the Custard Pies section. Now, on thinking it over, how can it rise up without eggs? Please help, as I would like to redeem myself with them. :)

Best regards,
Carol

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sue
12/28/2011 06:48 PM

Hi Sue,
There is a correction to this recipe. It should be 3 cups ingredients and "the remaining 2-3/4 cups" .
We always recommend to look at Rose's blogs Errata/Corrections category for a given book. You can copy, print, and place it in your book for future reference.

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I just made the chocolate cream pie from the Pie Bible. The list of ingredients calls for 3 cups of milk, but the body of the recipe calls for 1/4 cup of milk to be added to the cocoa mixture and "the remaining 3 3/4 cups" of milk to be heated to boiling. How much milk should be used in the recipe -- 3 ups of 4? Thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
12/28/2011 06:31 PM

Hi Tonia,
Since this recipe uses just the instant powder, we recommend trying to find another brand of espresso powder or use an instant coffee powder, although the coffee flavor will not be as intense.

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Hi Woody,

Thanks for that, the recipe Im referring to is the Swiss Italian meringues in Rose's Christmas Cookie Book. so what sort of coffee should I use with that to substitute the brand suggested in the recipe?

Thanks again,

Tonia

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
12/28/2011 06:07 PM

Hi Tonia,
If you are making the Coffee Chiffonlets in RHC, we suggest using either coffee extract or 2 tablespoons of espresso coffee. A recipe with "sugar" as an ingredient means granulated sugar. Casters is superfine granulated sugar.
A US cup is different in volume from a Imperial cup.
We recommend weighing your ingredients as a benefit is that you do not have to convert for cups.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
12/28/2011 05:53 PM

Hi mbobden,
We suggest you try a small batch and add extra cream until you reach the proper consistency that will adhere to the cake. You can use cupcakes or any cake scraps for the tests. when you arrive at the correct amount note it for the future chocoalte rolls you will make.
We assume you are weighing the ingredients as volume measuring can be inaccurate and the Rose's ganache proportions were based on weight measurements. We have found that they achieve the proper consistency for cling to the cake. There are many factors that may be affecting this for example if you are not covering the ganache after the first hour there will be some evaporation. don't give up. you can control the consistency.

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Hi Woody,

I'll review the recipe again. The recipe also calls for Medaglia d'Oro instant espresso powder. I live in Australia and from what I can gather, our stores here, even speciality ones, don't stock this brand. Could you suggest an alternative that might be more readily avaliable here?

I'm also wondering if when the ingredients list simply states sugar, does it mean caster or raw? Also, is a standard cup different in the US to Australia?

Thanks,

Tonia

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hi Maureen,
May we ask what flour you are using?
Made from scratch cakes will be more tender and softer than most cake mix cakes. If you are using bleached cake flour, we suggest substituting it with bleached all-purpose flour.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from mbobden
12/28/2011 05:05 PM

Hi mbobden,
We suggest you add another 2 ounces of cream. We assume you are weighing the ingredients as volume measuring can be inaccurate and the Rose's ganache proportions were based on weight measurements.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kre ward
12/28/2011 05:01 PM

Hi Kre ward,
You can replace the Dutch processed cocoa with the Hersheys on a 1:1 ratio, but we recommend replacing the baking powder with 3/4 teaspoon of baking soda. Please read the Triple Layer Devil's Food Cake's Understanding section. The Hersheys will give the cake a slight acidic taste and dull color if you use baking powder.

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Getting ready to make the Perfect All-American Choclate Butter Cake. Problem is that I cannot find Dutch processed cocoa where I live. I will be ordering some for later, but would like to know if/how I can substitute regular Hershey's cocoa for now.
Many thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/28/2011 01:32 AM

Hi Shi Hao,
Please review Rose's introduction pages to her chapters and the wedding cakes which have batters for 6, 9, 12, and 18x12 inch pans. In all cases the mixing time is the same. We just did testing for a new wedding cake recipe by making a batter for each size pan and the mixing time remained the same.
We cannot speak for other author's recipes, but Rose's mixing times remain the same unless specifically stated.
However, we suggest experimenting with the times if you want to see first hand what happens.

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Hi Woody :)

I consulted you with regards to the mixing time of batters a while ago. You mentioned that regardless of the alteration in the amount ingredients, mixing time generally remains the same unless we are baking in different size tins.

Hence that got me thinking, if we were to prepare only half the amount of batter, wouldn't the amount of proteins present in the flour be halved? And doesn't it mean mixing it for the same amount of time as the full recipe lead to more gluten formation proportionally? Or does the fat actually coats the protein particle to prevent further formation of gluten?

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Since finding this site, I have purchased Heavenly Cakes. I have been struggling for years trying to get my ganache to stick to the buche noel I make for christmas. I was happy to find rose's solution on "ganache proportions" so that the ganache doesn't pull away from the cake. However, I was still unsuccessful. I used 8oz 62% scharffen berger, 10 oz cream and 4T butter. My log looked gorgeous but alas, the darned frosting peeled off cleanly when I sliced the cake. I'm ready to switch to a plain old bundt cake for christmas, I'm so frustrated! I was thinking, would it help to brush on sugar syrup as a "glue" prior to frosting? I'm grasping...thank you for any suggestions.

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Hi Woody,

I'll review the recipe again. The recipe also calls for Medaglia d'Oro instant espresso powder. I live in Australia and from what I can gather, our stores here, even speciality ones, don't stock this brand. Could you suggest an alternative that might be more readily avaliable here?

I'm also wondering if when the ingredients list simply states sugar, does it mean caster or raw? Also, is a standard cup different in the US to Australia?

Thank you

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Hi Rose, I've baked lots of successful cakes from your latest book "Rose heavenly cakes". And I love all of them, the cakes are normally very tender and soft. But there's one small problem. They don't hold very well together especially after slicing. There's a lot of loose parts...wonder if it's normal. Is it because they are too soft to hold together? But they are not dry at all, just very tender. Wonder what has gone wrong. Deeply seeking your answers. Thank you,

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thank you grace! i can recommend jeffrey hammelman's pizza crust--please google his book as i can't remember the title. i haven't tried it for a deep dish but it is a more traditional pizza crust so i think it would lend itself perfectly to deep dish. please let me know what you think of it. i've tried many and aside from my own this is the one i like the best.

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Hi Rose,

I *love* your Perfect Pizza Dough recipe from the Bread Bible. My husband and I have tried many crusts and none compare to yours. Do you have a deep dish pizza crust recipe or a source that you'd recommend? I've tried several that I've found online and haven't found anything we like.

Thanks!
Grace

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Thanks very much Woody! That's a great suggestion to contact the King Arthur's help line--many thanks!

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The Cake Bible Indicates that one can assemble the Triple Chocolate Cake (page 201) a day ahead and refrigerate. I'm worried that if I do so, the chocolate band surrounding the cake will "bloom." Thoughts?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Anna Mays
12/26/2011 01:00 PM

Hi Anna,

Research indicates that the is substitute for 1 teaspoon bakers ammonia powder is 1 teaspoon baking powder. Two of the benefits of Baker's ammonia is that it will only activate with heat, not liquid, and can produce crisper cookies. The disadvantage is that it produces a horrible odor while baking.

We suggest you contact the King Arthur's help line as they sell baker's ammonia and will be able to tell you if the substitute for baking soda is the same as for baking powder. Enjoy experimenting.

Currently we do not have any posted or published recipes using bakers ammonia.

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Dear Rose,
I have recently been gifted a beautiful Springerle mold from House on the Hill, which has prompted me to read up on the traditions and history of Springerle. I am interested in recreating the most authentic Springerle recipe possible. In your Christmas Cookie book you offer a traditional Springerle recipe which uses baking soda as the leavening agent. I have a bottle of baker's ammonia and would like to try to use ammonia instead of baking soda, as I've been told only the ammonia can create the taste (and smell during baking!) of old.
I'm wondering if you might have a recipe that uses bakers ammonia? Or, would it be possible to use the Christmas Cookie book recipe and simply substitute 1 teaspoon of ammonia for the baking soda? Are they equal substitutes, or should other alterations be made?
Lastly, in your experience, can the differences between baking soda and baker's ammonia be detected in the final product?
Many thanks for your suggestions!

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Thank you, Woody. However, I am baking at a lower altitude than I was before. I am at 2900 feet now. I wasn't considered high altitude before either at around 3400-3500 ft.

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Hi Anand,
If you have Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we recommend to look at the Ganache section on pages 429-430. If using 64% cacao chocolate you will need more cream.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/24/2011 12:19 PM

Hi Shi Hao,
Your leavening can vary per an author's recipe. We recommend increasing the batter as long as it stays at the same filling level in the pan as the original. The leavening level will have to be your experimenting for each type of cake. We do this all the time with our testing, especially for wedding cakes using different sized pans.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Brenda
12/24/2011 12:13 PM

Hi Brenda,
We recommend getting Susan Purdy's book "Pie in the Sky." The UDSA has information on baking at higher altitudes as well.

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Hi Anand,
Rose's dark bittersweet ganaches recipes have been worked out to use 60% to 62%, although the 64% will work and slightly less sweet. We do not recommend using a lower percentage. The Midnight Ganache recipe makes 3 cups. You may want to make extra ganache from the Cake Bible, since any unused ganache can be frozen.

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Hi rose and woody.

I'm intending to bake my cakes in a 2.5 inch cake tin instead of a 2 inch cake tin. So other than increasing every other ingredient by 1/3, do I decrease the amount of leavening by 1/8tsp?

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Hi! I need baking help. I moved from MT in an area of 3500 feet altitude to Utah at 2900 ft. Climate here in Utah is hot and dry. Summers can be 105-110 degrees and 19% humidity. I love making pies; however, using my normal bake time and temp, I cannot get the fillings done. I put foil on the crust from the start and bake 15 minutes longer but the crust still gets too dark. I checked my oven temp and it is accurate. Fellow baker has same issue after moving here. Also, cookies turn out dry. I tried taking them out a minute or two earlier but the middle is too raw. This has happened with several of my old tried-and-true recipes. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Hi Jeanine,
If you have just combined the dry ingredients, we suggest to start over. Otherwise, depending on what recipe you are making, we think you will likely have a sunken center.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
12/24/2011 11:30 AM

Hi Claudine,
If you have Rose's Heavenly Cakes, please look at the Ganache section on pages 429-430. A gritty texture can indicate that it was stirred after it is lower than 85˚F at the beginning or if you try to whisk it after it has firmed up.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
12/24/2011 11:21 AM

Hi Tonia,
Please review the recipe. Baking times are correct and all of your questions are answered in the recipe. This recipe has not been revised or corrected, which would be posted on the website's errata/corrections section if needed.

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Jeanine Williamson
Jeanine Williamson
12/24/2011 09:57 AM

what happens to a cake if you add 1/2teaspoon more of baking soda then you are suppose to? I thought it was salt.
thx

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Anand Venigalla
Anand Venigalla
12/24/2011 09:23 AM

Hi Rose. I am planning to make a chocolate ganache frosting for a devil's food cake I will be making.
But I am using the recipe for Ganache from your Cake Bible instead of Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I have 64% Valrhona chocolate and your recipe calls for 1 2/3 cups heavy cream. How much cream would you use for 12 ounces of 54% chocolate? Will it be enough to frost your devil's food cake from Rose's Heavenly Cakes? Please answer both of these questions.

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Hi Woody,

I am cooking them for the suggested amount of time though? As directed in the cookbook. Also, what is the purpose of drying the meringues for 2 hours before baking?

Thanks,

Tonia

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hi Rose and Woody!
Can you tell me what would cause a chocolate genache to have a bit of a grainy texture? I've added a bit of bailey's to it in order to fill chocolates and although the taste is quite lovely, the texture isn't. Any clue?

Wishing you all a merry Christmas and a happy New Year!
thanks,
Claudine

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Yes--the oven floor providing there are no exposed heating elements. And of course not for the entire baking time!

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as far as soggy bottom crust do you really mean the floor of the oven not lowest shelf

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tonia
12/23/2011 11:17 AM

Hi Tonia,
We suggest to bake them longer. They should be chewy, not dry or raw inside.

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Thank you Woody.

Happy Holidays!

Sophia

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sophia
12/23/2011 09:44 AM

Hi Sophia,
We always recommend to go by weight if we give both a volume and weight measurement. This is a major difference between Rose's recipes and virtually everyone else in that she states weights. Baking is an art of accuracy and using weights generally guarantees success.

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Hi there,

I have now made Rose's Swiss Italian Meringues twice and have unfortunately failed on both counts!

My meringues come out almost raw inside and the 'batter' sinks to the bottom of the meringue whilst cooling and I am left with only the shells of the meringues (which taste lovely) but nevertheless I am still finding it hard to make them right!

Can someone please help me so I can work out where I'm going wrong!

Thanks in advance,

Tonia

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I have a question regarding the passion fruit curd (RHC). I made it for the first time a few weeks ago for the White Gold Passion Genoise,(the most delicious cake I have ever tasted!), using frozen passion fruit puree and weighing all ingredients. The curd turned out well and was delicious.

I made the curd again today, using the same brand of fruit puree but this time noticed that 100g of my puree was only ~6tbsp instead of 1/2 cup. I decided to use a 1/2 cup which weighed 132g.

Without a side by side comparison of the 2 batches, I couldn't say if there was a significant difference in consistency, flavour or finished volume. But for future batches, which measurement do you think I should use for the fruit puree....weight or volume?

Thank you
Sophia

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Speaking of making my triple chocolate cake - is there much difference between butcher's wax paper and coated freezer paper in regards to making the chocolate praline sheets?
Thank you!

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Hah! I briefly scanned my errata print out and found nothing. However, I scanned it SO briefly that I did not notice I was looking at the Pie and Pastry errata, not TCB one.
Thank you!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Paula
12/22/2011 12:58 AM

Hi Paula,
The Book Errata/Corrections section includes this revision:
The Golden Butter Cream Cake on page 34 has a better appearance if lowering the baking powder to 1-1/8 teaspoon instead of 1-1/4 teaspoon. It will prevent the slight dip in the center.
We always recommend that if a recipe is not coming out after a couple of tries to check the author's correction section to see if there is a correction.
We do not have a posting on the updated chocolate recommendations for the revised Cake Bible a few years back. However, Rose's Heavenly Cakes has this information as well.
Good luck on your Triple Chocolate Cake.

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I wanted to post this question as a "reply" on an old blog post regarding the New Cake Book vs. The Cake Bible, but I wasn't able to. Someone had mentioned making the Golder Butter Cream Cake and having it fall after it comes out of the oven. Funny, I have made so many cakes from TCB without issue, but this happens EVERY time I make the Golden Butter Cream Cake. (It falls in the center. Alot. And has a rather coarse crumb.) I don't really care, because it's my favorite cake on the planet, and I just gobble up the layer unadorned. But I wonder... why? No problems with any other cake.

The New Cake Book blog post also leads me to ask: can we see the updated info on chocolate recommendations if we own the older version of TCB?

Looking forward to making the Triple Chocolate Cake for NYE!

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Dear Rose and Woody,
Thanks for your encouragement. I'll let you know how my experiments go. Best, Erica

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Dear Rose and Woody,

I made your Pear and almond paste cake in the Heavenly Rose cake book and it comes out perfectly. Now I want to change the recipe a bit and use apple,without the paste, and substitute the butter with oil. I tried it comes out good except that I realize that I cannot follow the same mixing process of dry ingredients first and then eggs next. The oil and the flour cannot combine well. Do you have a mixing process that I can use instead?

Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Erica
12/21/2011 10:33 AM

Hi Erica,
We think that is a great idea. Maybe trying both ways. Please tell us how they come out. Enjoy baking a new discovery.

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Dear Rose and Woody,

I made the German Chocolate cake featured in "Heavenly Cakes" for my parents' 47th anniversary. Thanks for helping to make our celebration so special and delicious!

I hope you do not mind my asking if the pecan/coconut filling might also be rolled into a brioche dough (plain or chocolate) and baked as a sweet roll. Do you have any thoughts on this?

Thanks also for your carrot bread advice from my previous question. Best, Erica

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Thanks again for all your help, Woody. I will read the article. The flour I am using is bleached all pourpose flour.

Blessings!
Alva

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Thank you Woody! s

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from suzanne
12/21/2011 01:48 AM

Hi Suzanne,
We believe that would be a wonderful combination as we just tried that combination for a pastry recipe.
Enjoy making a holiday treat for your family and guests.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from alva
12/21/2011 01:41 AM

Hi Alva,
We recommend looking at the comments on the "Pellets be Gone" posting for the Moist Chocolate Genoise as tips and recommendations given by us and bloggers may give you a clue to your dipping center.
We have only tested genoise recipes with bleached all-purpose flour, bleached cake flour, or a hybrid bleached all-purpose flour/cornstarch mixture. If you are using UNbleached all-purpose flour that could be a factor for the dipping.

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Hi Rose,

I have been asked to bring a buche de noel to Christmas. I want to do something more contemporary and am thinking of your Chocolate Apricot Roll with Lacquer Glaze (and if I can find red currants, draping it with those). However I loved the description of your flourless chocolate sponge used for a roll in The Cake Bible. Would it be a mistake (flavor, consistency or otherwise) to use that chocoalte sponge with the rest of your Apricot recipe? Any thoughts? I won't have time for a test run so would love your direction. Thank you! suzanne

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Hi woody:

I live in the Dominican Republic. I am using an all purpose flour; the bag says it has a protein content of 3.2% per each 1/4 cup serving. I am using the alternative Rose gives to turn this flour into ''cake flour'': use 1/3 cup AP flour plus 2 tablespoons cornstarch. Any clue??

Thanks again, Woody!

Alva

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linda--do not use botox in your bread!!! ok, seriously, sometimes starters will get old but if they are still performing in the same time frame it means they are still active. the only time i get wrinkled bread is when i haven't baked it quite long enough so on cooling the crust starts to shrivel. if the crust gets firm enough it will stay unwrinkled. you might try an extra 5 or 10 minutes. it won't hurt the bread as long as it doesn't burn. if this still doesn't work, then some chemical thing is at play but honestly i can't imagine what this would be or that this could be the case.

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Linda Daniel
Linda Daniel
12/20/2011 11:12 AM

I've been baking sourdough bread for years but for the last several months the loaves look wrinkled on top when I use my old starter.

However, I made a new starter per the Bread Bible and the loaves look fine.

Question: Why does my old starter make loaves that look like I do (wrinkled?)

Advice please!!!

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Hi Beverly,
May we ask which cakes from Rose's books are you having too soft and crumbly cakes?
We will also state that cakes made from scratch are generally tender and crumbly than cake mixes as they usually do not have added pudding, binders, or preservatives as ingredients.

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huston beverly jr
huston beverly jr
12/19/2011 10:41 AM

hello not sure did i posted right so i am sorry if this has been answer but everytime i bake a cake them come out perfect so soft and tender very moist but the problem is its too tender when you cut instead of getting a clean solid cut it tends to be crumbly very flaky what am im doing wrong i do used cake flour but should that matter

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from alva
12/19/2011 10:02 AM

Hi Alva,
We are confident you are following the steps in the recipe.
May we ask what brand and type of flour are you using?

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Thanks woody. But I first take out a cup of foam, and then incorporate the melted butter to it, and then fold in this mixture to the batter, as rose states in the book. Then i dont know what else to do...

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Hi Shi Hao

Great! I'll check them out...

Thanks for the info!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from alva
12/18/2011 07:28 PM

Hi Alva,
We think it is likely that you deflated the egg meringue or foam and butter mixture when folding them into the batter.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David Chau
12/18/2011 07:27 PM

Hi David,
We think the temperature of the caramel syrup did not reach 360F, deep amber.
An accurate instant-read thermometer is necessary to know when the temperature is reached unless you are frequently making caramel and can go by its color.
Once the cheesecake is glazed, we suggest not covering it tightly as moisture may thin the glaze when refrigerating.

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Hello Rose / Woody,

I made the caramel glaze for the "Pure Pumpkin Cheesecake". An hour after the cake has been sitting at room temperature, the glaze lost its firmness and became (the spiral pattern) watery. What did I do wrong?

David

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I Rose/Woody!

Merry christmas! I am very delight with RHC book! I made a lemon poppy seed cake, and it was a real hit!! So, anyway, I have made 3 times already the golden genoisse and it always sinks in the top, very deep, after is out of the oven. I am following the steps of the receipe to a t...but what can be the problem??

thanks in advance!
Alva

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carol macri
carol macri
12/18/2011 03:44 PM

WOW, you are quick to answer, thanks so much. May I also say, I made the bavarian cream three times and the third time I let the base sit at room temp, stirring every so often and it didn't harden and I had the smoothest bavarian cream.
Merry Christmas!!

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Hi Carol,
We appreciate that you tried Rose's Biscuit Roulade.
We suggest you can syrup as the roulade's recipe includes a syrup. If you already applied the syrup before freezing, then you can try brushing with a similar syrup that you used beforehand. But experiment on a small section to see if it effects the integrity.

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Carol Macri
Carol Macri
12/18/2011 02:23 PM

Hi, I asked about jaconde sponge and you kindly suggested biscuit roulade.
I made a chocolate pattern on parchment (hearts, santa's belt, stripes, dots)and put the biscuit roulade on top.
Then cut out rectangles and placed them inside small soufflé molds. Inside I put vanilla bavarian cream and froze 16 of them. I tested one yesterday and the roulade came away from the bavarian cream when defrosted (in the refrigerator) it is inside a piece of acrylic, and the roulade was dry. After defrosting, can I brush the outside with simple syrup without losing the integrity of the pattern or the cake. Or do you have another suggestion.
Thanks so much.
Carol

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from mbobden
12/18/2011 01:39 PM

Hi Mbobden,
We suggest you can search on this blog in two ways.
1. You can type a word or phrase in the "google custom search " box and if there is a related posting it will be shown as a title and relating to realbaking with Rose.
2. You can try the categories that relate to your topic. "Pistachios" you can try "Ingredients". This will bring up all posting that Rose has placed in that category.
Currently, there is not a posting on how to remove pistachio skins.
Rose does give details in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
Basically, you need to boil the shelled pistachios for a minute, drain and remove the peels, and allow them to dry on paper towels for about three hours.
You can also start a topic on the Forums if you want to have a discussion from other bloggers.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/18/2011 01:25 PM

Hi Shi,
The higher sides of your pans will reflect more heat inward over the top of the batter which can decrease the height of your cakes. We recommend that you try to purchase some 9 by 2 pans if you are baking from Rose's Heavenly Cakes. You may want to bake a cake from the Cake Bible which Rose gives height measurements to compare your results.
We also suggest putting another cake strip on the sides to cover the entire sides of the pan for recipes stating to use a cake strip.

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i am new to this site and am not clear as to how to search specific areas. can i search the "ask a question" section separate from "forum" or "blog"? i only see the one search window that says "google custom search" which results in forum threads rather than the "ask a question" responses. i want to know the best way to remove skins from pistachios before using in biscotti. thank you.

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Hey, Chonchita! I'm from Singapore too. You can actually get the Cake Bible from some of the branches of NLB. I got The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly cake from Amazon, and it's really worth the money

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Hi Rose

I live in Singapore and would like to know how I can get hold of your books e.g. The Cake Bible, The Bread Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes...?

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I live in Singapore and would like to know how I can get hold of your books e.g. The Cake Bible, The Bread Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes...?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from James
12/17/2011 12:41 PM

Hi James, if it is not a cheesecake, most cakes can be at room temperature for a day. your frosting may also limit the time frame if you made a buttercream or whipped cream.

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Yesterday I made a chocolate cake with canned cherry pie filling on top. Must it be kept refrigerated? And if I didn't, is it not still ok to serve today?

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I don't have a 9 by 2 inch pan at home. But I have a 9 by 2.5 inch instead. Can I use it to bake recipes which are meant for 9 by 2 inch pans? Or are there adjustments which have to be made? I have read the cake bible, but it only state the adjustments for cake pans of different diameter and not different height

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
12/15/2011 03:05 PM

Hi Claudine,
Oils, like lemon oil, can be added sparingly. Some oils at higher levels can add an aftertaste with the smell of turpentine. Their potency is equivalent to 10 times the same amount of zest. We suggest checking pages 455 and 456 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. Buttercreams are a good way taste their flavor enhancing, as you can always add a little, taste test, and adjust again.

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Hi! Can flavoured concentrated oils be used in rose's buttercreams and fillings without affecting them?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from erica
12/15/2011 12:07 PM

Hi Erica,
We are appreciative of your liking the Carrot Cake. The cocoa was added to buffer the sweetness level which is common with carrot cake recipes. If you think the Carrot Bread is too sweet, you could experiment with adding some cocoa. We would suggest a 1/2 teaspoon and then adjust from that point.

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Dear Rose,

Your carrot cake in Heavenly Cakes is the best I've ever tasted. What inspired you to add cocoa powder? This seems a stroke of genius! Also, would you recommend adding cocoa powder to your carrot bread recipe in the Bread Bible?

Thanks and best,
Erica

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Hi George,
We recommend to read the rising section in the first chapter of The Bread Bible. Most of Rose's recipes will allow the dough to rise in the refrigerator for an 8 hour or "overnight" time frame. Some recipes will even allow for up to 24 hours, which will be stated. You may want to check with the author of a recipe for the permitted refrigerator rising time.

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George Julian
George Julian
12/14/2011 09:58 AM

Can dough be held in the refrigerated after mixing and the bulk rise delayed? For how long? I would like to mix 5-6 loaves but bake them one at a time.
Thanks
George

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Hi Jan,
We would suggest trying one of The Bread Bible's cinnamon loaf bread recipes and adapt it to a round pan or try making the Monkey Bread recipe.

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Jan Coomler
Jan Coomler
12/13/2011 01:01 PM

I saw a cinnamon pull apart bread made with a round loaf of bread you can buy at the market. It looked like the bread was sliced crisscross into i" squares leaving the bottom in tact with cinnamon and a light sugary frosting poured all over...It looked absolutely scrumptous but I can't find the recipe anywhere...HELP!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
12/12/2011 12:22 PM

Hi Maggy,
We recommend to make one of Rose's syrupped cakes so you can see what texture she is achieving. The Lemon Poppyseed-Sour Cream Cake would be the closest bundt cake as it is based on the All Occasion Downy Cake. Then you can adapt it with rum. Many cakes add butter to the rum as a glaze because their flavors compliment each other. Hot buttered rum.
The next book will have a cake that we have rum as an optional syrup, which is scheduled to be available in 2015.

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Thank you Woody. I did do the all occasion downy cake as a bundt cake. I wanted to know is there a proper consistency for rum syrup to be in a rum cake. I noticed that wherever the syrup could penetrate, the cake taste wet as opposed to syrupy. i researched online and most of the rum cake calls for butter in the syrup. what is the rationale behind it? i will try the myers rum.

when will Rose make a rum cake?

Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from harryh
12/12/2011 01:12 AM

Hi harryh,
We do not have a recipe or a detailed description for this bread. Hopefully, a blogger may also respond or you may find something on a web search.

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I'm trying to find a recipe for Sissel bread. It's a type of light rye bread, very different from a Jewish Rye. Either a recipe or a detailed description would be great. Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
12/11/2011 10:24 PM

Hi Maggy,
For the rum to penetrate the cake you remove the top crust or poke it many times so you can brush straight rum onto the cake's top and then the bottom. However, this cake may not hold up well if you add a lot of rum to it. We suggest you may want to adapt the Lemon Poppyseed-Sour cream Cake on page 41, which is made in a bundt pan to be a rum cake by replacing the lemon syrup with a rum syrup.
On the Pastry Cream Sauce on page 353, is part of composing the cupcakes for the Bostini after the cakes are baked and cooled. If you were able to keep the sauce in a similiar thickness before adding the rum , your sauce will accent the rum in the cakes.
In baking, most alcohols like rum are not included in the batter as they will evaporate during the baking. Their intensity level is better controlled by adding them as a syrup or part of the cake's adornment.
We also suggest that you also might try using Myers rum as it is more intense.

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Hi Rose/Woody,

To add on to my comment below. I have tried to add on the pasty cream vanilla bean recipe you have in Roses heavenly cakes to the batter - I add rum to it- to bring the rum taste inside but it did not work and the pasty cream did not remain as layer but in baking, got mixed to the batter. I would love o have your expertise on that. Thanks

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Hi Rose/Woody.

So far this moth alone, I have tried 4 of Rose's cakes. My last one: the all occasion downy cake, I have tried as is. Love it. I am now trying it as a rum cake. But the rum is not penetrating the cake. I used the Grand Marnier syrup but replace the orange juice portion and the grand marnier by rum. It does not come out strong in rum at all. I am using a Caribbean rum aged 8 years. I must be doing something wrong. Do you have a technique for rum cake. I do not want fruits though. Thanks a lot.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Lene
12/11/2011 01:38 PM

Hi Lene,
We recommend freezing your pies and then baking as this will help prevent the bottom crust from getting soggy. The Pie & Pastry Bible's first chapter on making crust will give you all of the details. Additional time needs to be added. 25 to 35 minutes for 1 to 4 cups, and 35 to 45 for 4 to 8 cups of filling. Alternatively, you can brush the crust with egg white, but still take the risk of the crust getting soggy.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Charlotte
12/11/2011 01:01 PM

Hi Charlotte,
This blog is not designed for posting blogger's recipes. We do have a forums section if you want to make a general statement about baking without eggs and to start a discussion. There are several websites on Rose's SITES I LIKE that have an expertise in dietary special needs baking and cooking where you maybe able to post your recipes as this is not our genre.

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Happy Holidays Rose,

This season I have decided to bake. Anticipate bringing my apple pies to the office in the morning. Is it possible to keep prepared apple pies (with crust) in the evening; proceeding with baking off in the morning? I would prepare pies around 7 p.m., baking them off around 5 a.m. Any input would be sincerely appreciated. Thank you!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from narges
12/11/2011 01:41 AM

Hi narges,
If you type in "Pizza Praise" on the google search box, there is a recipe for a pizza crust by someone on the comments thread. We are not sure if this is the one you are mentioning as being on "your web-page".

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Hi, I'm from Denmark and very much allergic to eggs. I'm very dedicated in Baking without eggs. I have therefore just recently published an allergy Baking book called Scandinavian Baking without Eggs. This book is available on amazon and other stores in print and e-book. I would like to send the message that almost any cake and cookie can be made without eggs and by using ordinary Baking ingrediens.
My question is, if you will help me in spreading my message, perhaps I could post some of my baking recipes here?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Juexing
12/11/2011 01:13 AM

Hi Juexing,
All of the recipes in Rose's books that use white chocolate specify a white chocolate containing cocoa butter. Our preferred brands are ValhRona and Green & Black. If your brands have cocoa butter then it comes down to your taste preference.

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Hello,

actually I'm crazy about cooking at home, although I'm in love to
follow your recipes I can't buy your book 'cause I'm living in Iran. Would you
mind telling me how can I make "crust" (The bottom of the pizza) exactly like on your web-page?

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Hi Woody,
I plan to make a white chocolate cake and I have purchased a cooking white chocolate bar from the baking supplier here. Then I tasted a bit of it. The taste bad: just creamy, sweet and artificial vanilla aroma. Do you have any suggestion? Can I use those white chocolate bar, like Linkt or Carbury,rather than the cooking white chocolate bar? Please, the cake preparing to be sent in two days time. Thanks a lot.

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Hi Catherine,
Rose states in her books these critical factors. The sugar mixture neede to be accurately measured with an instant-read thermometer to determine the degree of the caramel's flavor. The correct amount of cream and butter will detrermine the texture and thickness.
We usually include cornsyrup in the caramel such as the Sticky Caramel in Rose's Heavenly Cakes, which helps to keep the sugar from crystallizing.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Maria
12/ 9/2011 12:00 AM

Hi Maria,
In Rose's Heavenly Cakes, Rose states on page 208 "Use a long serrated knife and your fingertips to remove the top crust." So it is alright for the top crust to be moist. With the crust removed, the syrup can be absorbed into the cake. We usually try to scrape off the crust with the knife as long as the scraping does not gouge out the cake.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Janis
12/ 8/2011 11:52 PM

Hi Janis,
If your instant-read thermometer is accurate, the temperature for the thickened curd will be just at 196˚F/91˚C. We go by when the curd pools slightly on the surface before settling.

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Hello!
I made a batch of lemon curd from Rose's book. It was delish, but I think I over cooked the mixture.
Anyway to know when the curd is thick enough and done using a thermometer ? I happened to have just seen the creme anglaise recipe where it says to follow a certain temp on the thermometer.Since both recipes use yolks, should I follow those temps ?
Appreciate your help! Janis N

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Hi Rose and Woody,
Today I made the Lemon Meringue cake (biscuit de savoie) from RHC book.
Everything went perfect, but I still have a question.
Right after I baked the 2 layers I noticed that the top crust of each cake was still moist when the entire cake was done ([erhaps even a bit overdone).
After they cooleed of for more than 3 hours I started brushing them with the lemon syrup. The problem I had was turning them upside down to brush the bottom part. Even after greasing the boards their tops got a bit sticky and I lost a bit of the top when turning them back up. Is this normal ? I mean the cake was very well done and baked...
Thank you!

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Catherine Gewertz
Catherine Gewertz
12/ 8/2011 05:17 PM

Hello, Rose,

Can you tell me how to influence the softness or firmness of homemade caramel? All the best googling I can come up with isn't producing a satisfying answer.

Typically I make it with a bare minimum of ingredients -- dissolving white sugar in water, then boiling until it turns deep amber and adding cream and perhaps a bit of butter, depending on the recipe.

Sometimes it turns out more "pourable" than other times. I need to know how to make sure it will hold its shape (but still be soft), so I get that soft firmness when I need it, and still know how to keep it "pourable" when I want it to be that way.

I never have used corn syrup, or brown sugar, or condensed milk or the other things I see flying around out there in caramel recipes... just water, sugar, cream and butter.

What insight can you offer me about the key controlling firmness? Is it the ingredients? Or perhaps the exact candy-thermometer reading to reach in the boiling? I quit relying on a thermometer when I read David Leibovitz & others advising people to judge by color.

Thank you in advance for any guidance!

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Donna Weinberg-Thomson
Donna Weinberg-Thomson in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
12/ 8/2011 03:20 PM

Woody,thank you so much for the info. I was going crazy trying to figure out what I did wrong. I am going to buy an instant read thermometer this weekend! I showed your answer to my husband so he can relax and know that I will not poison anybody with my baking. LOL

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Fatima
12/ 7/2011 11:17 PM

HI Fatima,
We ask which size cake did you make with which Rose factor level and baking powder level?
The 9 inch size cake would be a good test as you can cross reference it to Rose's Heavenly Cake's Chocolate Layer Cake on page 104.

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Hello
I tried making the chocolate(recipe at the end of TCB that can be changed to various sizes) cake but my cake didn't rise much and it was very very dense to the extent that cannot be consumed
Pls advise as I want to have a keeper chocolate cake recipe?
My bkpowder and soda were new.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Donna
12/ 7/2011 04:36 PM

Hi Donna,
Egg yolks based buttercream is a traditional, standard buttercream. For the NeoClassic buttercream it is absolutely necessary to have the entire surface of the syrup bubbling or it will not be hot enough to set the egg yolks.

Equally important to the consistency, the egg and sugar mixture must be a cool room temperature around 70˚F/21˚C or the mixture can melt and denature the butter so that it will never set up right afterwards even when chilled. This can take over an hour if you are not putting ice packs around the mixing bowl as the mixture is cooling down to add the butter.

If you do not have one, an instant-read thermometer is invaluable for checking temperatures for heating and cooling mixtures and another check for testing a baked recipe.

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I tried making your Neoclassical buttercream from your book "The Cake Bible" and it didn't become buttercream. Not sure why. Also, most importantly, my husband and I are curious about the recipe because it calls for egg yolks (which are not cooked) and we were wondering about the opportunity for salmonella to grow if the egg yolks are not cooked. Was it a misprint in the book? I've never seen a buttercream made with egg yolks before, but I have not done a lot of baking so maybe I missed something.

I hope someone has the answer!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/ 7/2011 10:57 AM

Hi Shi,
Any addition will affect the batter, just as we give the option to add raisins. The baking time will likely increase due to a now larger volume of batter. You will just need to experiment with adding the nuts taking the raisin's option as a starting point.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tina C
12/ 7/2011 10:51 AM

Hi Tina,
For your cookies, you can multiply all of the ingredients to your 15x times.
But for cakes, The Cake Bible covers changes in leavenings on pages 494-496 with formulas on the proceeding pages in the Wedding and Special Occasions Cake chapter.
The reason for the need to adjust for cakes is the compensating for the volume of the batter in relationship to the top surface area of the cake and the shape of the pan. Cookies are free form and generally you will making them all the same size. However, if you made them as bars or for example, as 12 inch in diameter cookies, then you would have to adjust your leavening.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
12/ 7/2011 10:36 AM

Hi Maggy,
You did not do anything wrong. The nuts are mainly for texture. The flavor of the almonds just comes through more with the lemon versus pecans. We are assuming you have made it with almonds before to know the difference in taste.

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Hi Rose and Woody

I would like to bake Rose's Carrot cake but would like to add pecans/walnuts into the batter so that the cake would have a bit of crunch. Would this affect the batter like the time it requires to bake other than the texture?

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oh goodness i feel so silly! It's right next to the recipe... and here i has looking for a chart with all the frostings... sorry about that! thank you so much! By the way i see that on this blog there are some corrections for recipes for different books. I just obtained a new copy of the cake bible... are the corrections already done in the newer books or do i need to look the recipes up on the site and make the appropriate changes?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
12/ 6/2011 05:42 PM

Hi Claudine,
The Cake Bible shows the storage times for the mousseline on page 245. You can freeze it for 8 months. The texture is more spongy than an egg yolk based buttercream. If you make it, make the version in Rose's Heavenly Cakes as we changed the assembly for the recipe. The Deep Chocolate Passion is moist and chocolaty. And it will stay fresh a long time because of the milk ganache syrup.

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Hi,

I'm trying to 15x my chocolate chip cookie recipe and was wondering if you 15x all the ingredients, including baking powder and baking soda.

I read somewhere that you explain in detail the increasing of recipes problem in your "Cake Bible" book. I recently got a copy and was wondering if someone can tell me what page number to look up.

Thanks much and Happy Holidays.
Tina

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Hi Rose! I'm not sure if my question got lost in the pile but everyone else seemed to have gotten an answer. If you can't it's fine, I just wanted to make sure... here's a copy of it, thank you! ;)
Hi Rose and Woody! I just made my first batch of buttercream mousseline, flavoured with kaluah and chocolate, very lovely! I long have been searching for a "real" buttercream as I am used to making the sugary stuff kids love (and i can't stand!). I have searched the blog but couldn't find an answer to this so maybe you can help? Can you freeze buttercream mousseline? Rose's book says you can freeze buttercream but it's unclear to me if this applies also to the mousseline. If so, how long? and what is the difference in texture or taste with the regular buttercream?
Also, would you be able to tell which of the chocolate cake in either the cake bible or RHC is the most moist and can stay fresh the longest? i would like to make a chocolate cake covered in fondant but ideally i would need 2 days before presentation to decorate.
Thanks again for your input!

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it is my great hope that the cake bible will be available as an e-book and i'm sure it will happen.

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Anand Venigalla
Anand Venigalla
12/ 6/2011 01:09 PM

Hi rose. I would like you to please consider releasing the Cake Bible for Kindle e-book format. That way anyone who has difficulty with keeping your Cake Bible on the counter might be able to use the kindle to read it more easily.

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Rose,

I LOVE the Bread Bible. I still make my own basic white bread recipe which uses milk instead of water and a handful of sugar for a bit of sweetness.

I have to say, though, that making Pita was the most fun I've had baking in ages! I've requested an electric griddle for Christmas so I can try English Muffins and Crumpets next.

Kamilla

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Thank you Woody.

Sophia

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Steph
12/ 5/2011 03:07 PM

Hi Steph,
Besides the gluten% you are also dealing with more aspects to flour than protein content and bleaching--there is also ash content which is the amount of the endosperm closer to the bran which also effects performance.
We suggest to make The All-Occasion Downy Yellow Cake as you compare your results with the Power of Flour article posted on the blog, which also includes whole egg and egg white comparisons. This may give you some clues.
You may want to try some recipes written for Chilean cakes to compare to your recipe and to Rose's.
Having not worked with this flour, we can only suggest leavening changes as we have shown in the Power of Flour. You may want to contact CF to ask their sales representative what you can do as well. I had this problem with some wholesale cake flour that worked for years. Then butter cakes form the last bag kept dipping. The sales rep explained that that bag was a winter wheat milled cake flour which required me to add some water to make it perform correctly.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sophia
12/ 5/2011 02:50 PM

Hi Sophia,
We tested this recipe several times before posting the article and confirming our testing with Matthew. The key for the flour and then the egg foam to integrate well is having the chocolate mixture around 100˚F. If the chocolate mixture is cooler, it can make the chocolate/flour/egg foam mixture to thick to integrate into the eggs. The eggs can definitely be heated above 80˚F to lukewarm to the touch, which should keep them warm for the egg foam.

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DH the ideal cake is in my newest book 'rose's heavenly cakes" and is used for the german chocolate cake. if you want to use a milk chocolate ganache glaze check out the wedding cake version. you will be amazed by this cake!!! i was! and it fills the bill for all your criteria.

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Dear Cake Guru ;)

I have and love the Cake Bible. I'm searching for that elusive perfect chocolate cake that I can pair with a chocolate mousse on top. Of course the problem is that the mousse needs to be refrigerated, and whilst I love butter-based cakes, they do not remain soft when refrigerated. I've searched the cakes in the Cake Bible, and they all suggest to be served room temperature or "slightly chilled"- none say refrigeration is fine. Any suggestions for what type of chocolate cake to make? I tried chocolate chiffon, but that was too eggy. I prefer the consistency of a light butter cake. I hope I'm not asking the impossible!

Many thanks

DH

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Hi George,
We recommend the standard round size pictured on page 577 in The Bread Bible. Rose gives her reasons for this shape and her suggestions on using the clay baking containers.

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Hi Woody!
I live in Chile...
Very anxious to hear back from you!!!
Many thanks!

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Hi Rose, Woody, I hope you can help me. I recently made the moist chocolate genoise for the first time using the "pellets be gone" method. I weighed my ingredients and used a new thermapen to monitor mixture temperatures. I simmered my chocolate mixture for 5 minutes after reaching the boiling point but had difficulty mixing in the flour. I also required twice as much egg foam to bring the mixture to the consistency shown in the blog photos. My timing was off so my whipped egg foam sat for ~10 min and had started to separate by the time it was needed. Also, my kitchen was quite cool at the time, ~60F. My genoise failed: the layers were only 1" in height with top and bottom crusts intact.

I made a second attempt later in the evening. By that time, my kitchen was ~70F.I paid more attention to the consistency of the chocolate and removed it from the heat before 5 minutes had elapsed. (I'm certain I overcooked my first batch). The flour mixed in more easily and only the specified amount of egg foam was required to bring the mixture to the correct consistency. I also timed the egg foam so it did not sit for any length of time. This genoise was a success.

Clearly, user error was involved in my first effort but my question is regarding the 1 variable that is (somewhat) beyond my control: the temperature of the kitchen. Should I have compensated for the cool temperature by heating my eggs to more than 80F and by adding the flour to the chocolate before it cooled to 100F? Did the room temperature affect the deterioration of the sitting egg foam? (I apologize for the length of this - I wanted to answer any questions you may have had in advance).

I would be grateful if you could shed some light on this.
Thank you

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Hi Rose and Woody! I just made my first batch of buttercream mousseline, flavoured with kaluah and chocolate, very lovely! I long have been searching for a "real" buttercream as I am used to making the sugary stuff kids love (and i can't stand!). I have searched the blog but couldn't find an answer to this so maybe you can help? Can you freeze buttercream mousseline? Rose's book says you can freeze buttercream but it's unclear to me if this applies also to the mousseline. If so, how long? and what is the difference in texture or taste with the regular buttercream?
Also, would you be able to tell which of the chocolate cake in either the cake bible or RHC is the most moist and can stay fresh the longest? i would like to make a chocolate cake covered in fondant but ideally i would need 2 days before presentation to decorate.
Thanks again for your input!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Steph
12/ 4/2011 01:02 AM

Hi Steph,
What country do you live in as there may be other bakers on the blog who have a similar problem?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/ 4/2011 12:54 AM

Hi SHi,
Please review the introduction chapters, understanding, and technique chapters. For home baking, generally the times for mixing do not change. Baking times will change for size of pan or multiple pans.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
12/ 4/2011 12:28 AM

Hi Shi,
It is the cake batter used in Rose's Heavenly Cakes for the German Chocolate and Ice Cream Sandwich cakes.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Susan
12/ 4/2011 12:25 AM

Hi Susan,
We are not familiar with this cookie.

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Hi rose, i love your book have leart so much from you. I am making a 3tier square cake using your receipe for white cake 3 tier, 6", 9", 12" want to convert it to square pans can you help me with this?, and doing your mousaline receipe, if i use raspberry sauce in the buttercream how long can cake be at room temp if being covered in fondant?
thanx so much!

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Your cookie book is no longer bound, as I have used it too often. I'm looking for a recipe for galette cookies that melt in your mouth. Wash my mouth out with soap,--- a la Harry and David's filled galette cookie.

Can you help?

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Oh yes, before I forget. May I know what is the chocolate cake that is featured in your video portrait? Is the recipe found in Heavenly Cakes or The Cake Bible?

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I was just wondering, does the mixing time of the batter have to go through a reduction proportional to the reduction of the amount of ingredients?

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Hi Woody,

I substituted the almond by pecan in the Golden Lemon Almond Cake. That was the only substitution. The cake has no taste. What do you think went wrong?

Thanks
Maggy

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Dear Rose and Woody,
I have read all your books over and over and I still wonder how flour can have such an effect on cakes. I also read the power of the flour...
I live in a country where the AP flour is the only available one. Its gluten % is close to 8.5 - 9, meaning it would fit between cake flour and pastry flour. ALso, the flour only goes through a "soft" bleaching, only with peroxide benzoyl as chlorination is prohibitted.
SO here are my questions:

1) Given that I only have that flour available, what should I do to make the butter cake recipes to work well ? Is there anything I could do (I tried to make kate flour and didn't like the process as I bake more than 20 cakes a week) ? I just baked a peanut butter cake that turned out too dense and hard. The recipe asked for AP flour. So can I say my flour couldn't hold/absorb all the fat from the recipe ? Any tips on how to change the proportions of the ingredients, so recipes like these can work ?

2) Why is cake flour and all-purpose interchangeable when CF has a less gluten % than AP ? For instance, how can the fat be absorved the same way if their gluten % varies so much ? Wouldn't the structure of the cake be affected ? So why isn't my flour working too when it has a 8.5-9 gluten %. Shouldn't it hold well too ?

Thank you so much for your time! I'm going crazy here and totally miss the US! I can't move back as my life is now over here, but can you picture yourself living in a place where butter cakes don't exist ?! I'm desperate for yellow cake, red velvet !!!

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George Julian
George Julian
12/ 3/2011 04:21 AM

I am considering purchasing a clay baker, I have looked at La Cloche and Romertopf. What size will be most usfull ?
I am self taugh your book" The Bread Bible" was most usfill.
Thanks

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Hi Wales,
Please review the Ingredient chapters and the substitution pages in Rose's books. Turbinado is a granulated raw sugar.

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Hi Woody,
Thanks for your suggestion. In Malaysia, I couldn't find turbinado sugar. Can I substitute it with organic brown sugar? Or normal brown sugar? And lemon oil to substitute with lemon essence? Thanks again.

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Thanks Woody! I will look into the site you suggested. I just receive my copy of the cake bible, I'm so exited! Thanks for all your hard work and your prompt responses! happy holidays!

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Hi Carol,
You can freeze the cake if you are making it 1 week in advance. If it is made in a few days prior, you can just refrigerate the cakes and wrap them in plastice wrap and save the time for defrosting.
You may want to check Rose's Biscuit Roulade recipes in The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes.

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anand, woody has created a chocolate marble cheesecake for the upcoming book.

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Anand Venigalla
Anand Venigalla
12/ 1/2011 06:39 PM

Hi rose. Are you Going to make a chocolate cheesecake recipe? How do you make a chocolate cheesecake? There was no recipe for it in any of your books.

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Thanks, Woody! Best, Erica

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Carol Macri
Carol Macri
12/ 1/2011 04:09 PM

I am going to try to make joconde sponge for Christmas dessert.
Can I freeze the cake that I put in the molds (I have lined small containers with plastic and will put in acetate on the inside. I am away on the 24th and have to
make the filling on the 25th morning for evening presentation.
thoughts?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
12/ 1/2011 01:57 PM

Hi Claudine,
You may want try the No-Bake Cheesecake page 257 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes that use whipped cream cheese and Italian Meringue. Although it is not a cheesecake, TheLemon Canadian Crown (the following recipe) is very good especially for a small party. Also we recommend for Canadian bakers to view Marcy Goldman's Better Baking web site listed on Rose's Sites I Like.

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I will look for a copy of that book, thank you! I like using cream cheese also in my fillings, but I can't seem to find a recipe that turns it into a lighter, fluffier version... is there such a thing? When I use cream cheese, if the cake sits in the fridge overnight, I seems to "sink" into the cake and makes it more dense. I had a ricotta filling once at a party and it was more like a fluffy texture, almost like a mousse but with the taste of cheese, That's what I am looking for.
On a side note, I'm not sure if this is available in all areas, but we do now have a lactose free cream (35%) here now in Quebec, from Natrel. I used it for a chocolate genache and I also tried it as a stabilized whipped cream with roses suggestion of the gelatine addition and it worked very well!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
12/ 1/2011 11:32 AM

Hi Claudine,
Rose has a recipe in The Pie & Pastry Bible for Spanakopita page 380 that ricotta is an ingredient in the filling. We prefer the creaminess and taste of cream cheese for cheesecakes.
We have an article posting on lactose free milk substitutions for heavy cream in ganaches on the blog. We have not tested substituting almond milk in batters. If you are interested in using almond milk you may want to check some of the websites on Rose's Sites I Like.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Erica
12/ 1/2011 11:10 AM

Hi Erica,
We suggest that because pumpkin has a much higher water content and banana a higher fiber content to make the Pumpkin Cake in The Cake Bible and add dried cranberries.
If you are looking to experiment with substitutions you may want to buy a copy of the Composition of Foods published annually by the US Agriculture Department.

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Hi Anand,
If you have any concerns about a given product or ingredient used in one of Rose's or any author's recipes, you can always contact the manufacturer or research on the web for the products listed for the ingredient's container.

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Hi Rose and Woody! I currently own RHC...wonderful! Is there any other of Rose's book that would include a ricotta cheese filling? I am looking for a more tangy less sweet filling for a rich chocolate cake. Any suggestions? Also, do you know if almond milk can replace milk in cakes with similar results? I know all about roses technique for testing that you suggest, just wondering if that was already done or if you have any info on it. Thanks for all your help!

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Dear Rose,

Is it possible to substitute pumpkin for banana in your cranberry banana bread?

Thanks,
Erica

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Anand Venigalla
Anand Venigalla
12/ 1/2011 08:18 AM

Hi rose. I have a question about Baker's Joy, the spray you use to grease your parchment papers to make your layer cakes. Do they have anything artificial in them. Does it have any partially hydrogenated oils?

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Hi Wales,
We suggest the Golden Almond Lemon or the Lemon Poppyseed cake which are syrup soaked and travel well.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Laura
11/30/2011 11:12 PM

Hi Laura,
In Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we do have a banana refrigerator Cake, page 133 that is an oil instead of butter cake. We do not have viable lactose free substitute for the sour cream that results in the same texture and flavor
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in gluten free, lactose free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes as these are not our genre of baking. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
11/30/2011 10:56 PM

Hi Maggy,
Rose recommends that you do not substitute powdered sugar for granulated sugar as it does not have the crystalize structure to promote aeration of the cake batter resulting a dense texture. If another author includes it as an ingredient we always say to make the cake exactly as the author states to establish a reference point.
We have no powdered sugar as a component in of our recipes.

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Rose (etc.)
Rose (etc.)
11/30/2011 10:42 PM

Thanks, Woody....will do!

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Hi Rose,
We did suggest to try lowering the baking soda. When it comes to adjusting the leavening you virtually have to start form the original recipe and then adjust in small increments. Or adjust a 1/2 teaspoon and work either direction from there. If you have a chance, look at the Power of Flour blog posting. although it deals with cakes and only baking powder, its shows what just an eighth of a teaspoon baking powder can effect a cake. This took over 30 tests.
To not waste ingredients, just make a couple of cookie quantity from the recipe.

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Hi Rose/Woody,

Is it ok to use powdered sugar in a batter of a cake?

Thanks

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Thanks, Woody. The recipe is an anonymous one from the early days of the internet, so contacting the author is impossible. I wanted to make this as one of my holiday cookies, so did not want to waste time and ingredients experimenting. Since the pumpkin version (suggested by the original author) "failed" I'm trying to figure out a better leavening balance. Some sites say to use 2 tsp baking powder per cup of flour, but Shirley Corriher in "Cookwise" says 1 to 1 1/4. I thought Rose would be able to help.

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Hi Rose,
Rose recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. You may also want to experiment past what you think is the best results to fail the recipe so that you know the recipe's limits.
We always suggest to try and contact the author of a given recipe for her or his
recommendations.
Your reducing the baking soda a bit is a good idea to try.

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Oh, and it calls for the zest of half an orange---does that need to be neutralized, too? Thanks again!

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Rose (not THE Rose, just A Rose)
Rose (not THE Rose, just A Rose)
11/30/2011 05:14 PM

Hi Rose,

I've scoured all my baking books and the internet for info, but I'm still unsure. I want to make a cookie recipe that calls for 1 1/2 cups persimmon puree, sugar, two cups flour, 1 tsp baking powder and 1 tsp baking soda, but I want to sub a 15oz can of pumpkin puree instead. The recipe suggested pumpkin as a substitute for the persimmon, but when I tried that, the baking soda taste was unpleasant. Since persimmon is more acidic than pumpkin, I'm thinking I need to reduce the baking soda, or delete it entirely and add more baking powder. Most of the pumpkin recipes I looked at use both, but they also have other acidic ingredients like brown sugar. I'm thinking of using 2 or 2 1/2 tsp baking powder and omitting the soda, or 1 tsp baking powder and a 1/4 tsp of soda to neutralize the pumpkin. Am I on the right track? Please help, my hair is thin enough as it is! Thanks!!

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Hi Rose/woody:

I would like to make cupcakes with golden neoclassing buttercream...can it be colored with gel or any paste food coloring? Please help.

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Dear Rose & Woody:

I would like to make the Cordon Rose Banana cake for my son's upcoming 1st birthday. However he has a milk protein allergy -- so I can't use sour cream nor butter. Any advice in terms of substitutions so that it'll still be light?

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thanks chef zee--it's great for people to keep in mind the wonderful waterproofing qualities contributed by chocolate. and if one doesn't want the chocolate flavor, then white chocolate or just cocoa butter works perfectly.

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Hi Rose:
I just want to report, the trick of painting the insides of the cannoli s with chocolate worked beautifully. They were fine for about 12 hours and the chocolate flavor was a delicious addition.
Thanks for your interest. Ir's really a thrill to be communicating with you.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Akilah
11/28/2011 09:33 AM

Hi Akilah,
Are you baking from one of Rose's recipes?

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what causes sponge cake to bake with a grease line in it?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jen
11/27/2011 06:03 PM

Hi Jen,
"with the metal blades" means the sharp blades. The blunt blades are intended for bread dough recipes. We recommend try making a crust with each blade and see what you like after doing your experiment. We are happy that you have great results with the blunt blade.

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Hello!
Love your Pie and Pastry Bible!! I have a quick question. When making pie crust with a food processor you say use "with the metal blade" to process. My processor has two metal blades, one sharp and one blunt. I've always used the blunt blade because when I've used the hand method the beaters on my hand mixer are blunt, which results in fantastic crust. Is the blunt blade the correct blade or should I switch to the sharp blade?
Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from pamela joy
11/27/2011 04:14 PM

Hi Pamela,
Where an 8 x 2 pan has a 7 cup volume, a 9 x2 pan has a 8-2/3 cup volume. The difference is approximately 20%. Most recipes can have all their ingredients increased by 20%, except the leavening which generally needs to be decreased for larger pans. If you have a copy of Rose's The Cake Bible, we recommend to look at her master chart for her Rose Factor on page 490 and then bake some of the wedding cake base batters, pages 491 to 493, for a 8 inch and a 9 inch round cake layer. From experimenting with these proven recipes, you can adapt other recipes.

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Dear Woody and Rose,
I have an assortment of high quality cake pans. Alas, all of my 8-inch round cake pans are 3 inches high.Is there any way I can adapt recipes meant for 8"x2" round pans so that I can avoid the problems associated with a pan that's too deep? (I do own a couple of 9"x2" rounds.)
Many thanks for all the help you provide.
-Pamela

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Thank you Woody. Will let you know.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
11/27/2011 12:56 PM

Hi Maggy,
We recommend that you read The Power of Flour article on this blog which covers leavening adjustments and cake flour substitutions for a batter using a 9 by 2 round cake pan.
We suggest that you make one with the bleached flour per the recipe you just used with cake flour so that you can see and taste the difference.

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Hi Rose,
My All Occasion Downy Yellow Cake was a success as I said before. Unfortunately, I gave all of it away and now I have a crave for it. I do not have any more cake flour (swan is very hard to find where I live). I have all purpose bleached but do not have starch to mix with it as you recommend. If I were to use the all purpose how much should I decrease or increase the baking powder?

Thanks,
Maggy

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I'm so thrilled to hear that! Thanks, Rose!
Best,
Erica

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erica, you must be psychic--i'm planning a chocolate version for the next book!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Shi Hao
11/27/2011 09:22 AM

Hi Shi,
We would say its one's perception. As Rose states on page 442: "Yolks are more flavorful, result in a more golden crumb, and also cause the crust to brown more quickly. Cakes made with egg whites are softer but slightly stronger in structure.."

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waileongchong
waileongchong
11/27/2011 09:16 AM

Hi,
Any suggestion: I need to bake a cake, texture something like Chiffon Cake, and not that sweet and oily. Then, the cake may need about 6 days to arrive at my friend's hand. Before this, I was thinking of Swedish Pear and Almond Cake that I can use some almond liquer to substitute any liquid used, as this will reduce the feeling of oily of cake. But the most important thing is the texture. Really need assistant now. Thanks.

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Hi Rose!

I just attempted to bake your version of the Red Velvet Cake yesterday and really, it was amazing! So much better than the previous Red Velvet Cake which I had bake, below is the link to the picture of the cake which I took

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/392577_10150978032450224_811380223_22066838_306494320_n.jpg

Thanks Rose for coming up with such an amazing recipe. I have actually bought your Heavenly Cake book and have tried out other several recipes in your book. Till now, all of the recipes which I have tried out NEVER disappoint :) Thanks once again :)

Oh, just a question, are the cakes in your book which utilize only egg whites generally drier than cakes that utilize whole eggs or yolks?

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Dear Rose,
Just attempted your monkey bread today. Heaven! I wonder if you have a version that uses chocolate in some way. Would greatly appreciate any input you might be able to offer!
Thanks,
Erica

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Thanks so much!

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Hi Maggy,
If you want a richer taste, then we recommend making the Golden Luxury Butter Cake on page 48. Make sure your white chocolate contains cocoa butter.

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oops! I meant heavy cream.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
11/25/2011 04:00 PM

Hi Maggy,
We are curious to what you mean by heavy milk?
Is this half and half or heavy cream?

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Thank you Rose and Woody. Thanks to you my thanksgiving cake was perfect. I did the all occasion downy cake. One more question...if next time I substitute heavy milk instead of regular milk to produce a richer buttery flavour, what else should I change to balance the cake?

Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Mike
11/25/2011 02:05 PM

Hi Mike,
We suggest that any of your choices are fine. With less butterfat it will be less rich. Half and half is half whole milk half light cream.
Rose recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. You may also want to experiment past what you think is the best results to fail the recipe so that you know the recipe's limits.

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In the Banner Banana Cream Pie recipe for the pastry cream it says in a footnote: "Replace the half-and-half with half heavy cream and half milk".

Should that be whole milk or skim etc? Is "table cream" ok?

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Thank you for the info Woody. Can you freeze the stabilized whip creams for even a couple of days or should it not be frozen at all? If not, I may just wait to add whipped cream until it is ready to go out the door until there is a need for me to go further with preservatives and stabilizers. By the way, I am new to this blog and love it! Very informative. Thank you for all the great info!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kathy
11/24/2011 10:02 AM

Hi Kathy,
For commercial stabilizing the whip cream for health safety means you likely will need to add preservatives and stabilizers beyond the gelatin and cornstarch recipes that we offer to last the time frames you may require. For the sheet cakes the gelatin or white chocoate stabilized whip creams if the cakes are for refrigeration, selling, and consumption in a couple of days.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from alva
11/24/2011 09:57 AM

Hi fatima,
May we ask what you calculated for the baking powder, as the baking powder calculated separately on page 493 from the Rose Factor on page 490?
Have you made the 9 inch size, whether from these charts or Rose's Heavenly Cakes?
We have also modified the recipe in Rose's Heavenly Cakes by replacing some of the butter with oil.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kathy
11/24/2011 09:48 AM

Hi Alva,
No. You need special equipment that used is commercially.

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Hello Rose and woody!

Is there anyway I can pasteurize egg whites at home? Since I want to make royal Icing, but I am concern about bacteria risk.

Please help!!
Alva

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hi
i made this chocolate cake from TCB (from the end pages) in two 10" pans.flollowed the recipe to T but it was very dense and hard.Please advise .
\It was the recipe that u can multiply with rose factors to get different sizes .
thanks

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I am starting a cheesecakes business and wondering what whipped cream recipe would hold up the best. Need a whipped cream that can be frozen with the cheesecake. Have had a bit of a problem with the whipped cream breaking down. Also would like a whipped cream frosting for a sheet cake. I have Rose's Cake Bible and have looked through the whipped cream recipes and am not sure which to use.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

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thank you mamkass, same to you. but i'm having second thoughts about putting a from the freezer ceramic pie plate into a hot oven. i've never done it myself so i would advise you to let it sit in the fridge first until it is no colder than refrigerator temperature. i don't want you to risk a disaster for your thanksgiving pie.
what i advise, if people are going to freeze a pie, is to line the pie plate first with plastic wrap or foil so that after the pie is frozen it can be lifted out of the plate and when ready to bake can be set back frozen into the room temperature pie plate. that, i can assure you, works perfectly plus you have the use of the pie plate either to mold other pies or to bake one that you don't plan to freeze.

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Thank you! Happy Thanksgiving.

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mamkass, the manufacturer told me that it can go from freezer to oven as long as it is placed on an oven rack and not on a solid surface such as a baking stone or preheated cookie sheet or oven bottom!

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I purchased your perfect pie ceramic baking pan from KAF. Can it go directly from freezer into hot oven?

Thx!

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frantic chef, it will be fine! the taste of white vinegar is pretty neutral.

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Frantic chef!!
Frantic chef!!
11/23/2011 10:56 AM

I mistakenly used white vinegar in place of cider vinegar when making the cream cheese pie crust? I don't have time to re-make it!! Should I just scrap the apple pie? Will this mistake ruin the taste of the pie??

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from mbobden
11/23/2011 10:17 AM

Hi mbobden,
We recommend to use the raw sliced almonds. You can blanch the sliced almonds which does not take too long to remove their skins.
OR after you toast them, you can place them into a coarse strainer and sift off some of their skins. you may want to toast a few more and reweigh before placing them in the food processor.
OR use them as is. The skins may add some bitterness.
The sliced almonds can end up becoming pasty when processing to fine.

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Rose, can you help me here. I am making the golden almond bundt cake now for thanksgiving tomorrow. I can't find blanched sliced almonds. Which substitute is best, 2 oz blanched slivered almonds (measures less than 2/3 cup) or 2oz raw sliced almonds? Thank you.

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Thanks Woody.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from maggy
11/22/2011 11:15 AM

Hi Maggy,
For syrupping, we recommend a basic syrup of: 3 tablespoons/37 grams sugar, 7 tablespoons of water/100 grams, and 1/2 to 1 tablespoon of rum. This is sufficient for syrupping two 6-cup bundt cakes.

As long as your mixing bowl can handle the quantity of batter, you can multiply the ingredients for a recipe, if the number of cakes you are making use the same volume pans. There is no need to adjust the ingredients.
The key here is when you are filling the pans. Alternate spoonfuls of batter between each pan, so that each pan receives batter from the top to the bottom of the mixing bowl. This avoids one pan possibly getting denser or unmixed batter that has settled to the mixing bowl's bottom.

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i would bake the pecan layer in the pie crust first, then add the pumpkin layer. in order not to overbake the crust border i would use a foil ring right from the start.

do let us know how it came out!

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I wanted to make a pumpkin pie with a pecan pie layer on the bottom instead of the top, Any suggestions?

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Hi Rose, I was the one who wanted to do the golden yellow cake but your suggestion was that it might become too dry. You suggested that I used the "golden lemon almond cake" or the "grand marnier cake". I found out that some of my recipients are allergic to almond or are not favorable to chocolate.

Can I used the All Occasion Yellow cake on page 40 of the Cake Bible. I tried it this weekend and it was excellent. I used (two) 6 cups bundt cake pans instead, reduced the oven temperature to 325 and add 5 more minutes to the cooking time.

Since I am going to ship them far can I use a rhum syrup to help keep it moist? How much syrup can be too much? Can I also double or triple the recipe without adjusting the ingredients?

Thanks
Maggy

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kat
11/21/2011 04:53 PM

Hi, Kat
We are unfamiliar with the brand, but they should be fine.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Pat
11/21/2011 02:53 PM

Hi Pat,
Please check The Pie & Pastry's storing and reheating section. Generally, a frozen pie is baked from the frozen state.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jess S.
11/21/2011 02:51 PM

Hi Jess,
Although the Cornucopia pan is classified William Sonoma as a bundt pan, it does not have a open center as the NordicWare pans used for bundt style cakes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. The batter has been engineered for a 10-cup bundt pan. You would first have to determine the volume in your pan and then modify through experimenting for adjusting the baking powder. We do not recommend a glaze as the cake is syrupped.

Rose's favorite pie crust is the Flaky Cream Cheese. The Pie & Pastry Bible has the whole wheat version on page 32.

Turning a cake batter into a cupcake batter generally requires adjusting the leavening, which in most cases is to slightly increase it. You can also try having the cupcakes sit out for 20 minutes before baking them.

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I just saw Ardeche Marrons Chestnuts from France on sale. Is this a good product to use for chestnut puree and other Cake Bible chestnut recipes?

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I have a frozen, two crusted fruit pie in a glass pie pan. How would you suggest I bake this. I did look over your comments but I wonder if it would be best to put it in the refrigerator overnight and than bake it. If I do that, how long should I bake it.
Thank you.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Phyllis
11/21/2011 11:22 AM

Hi Phyllis,
For inverting and reinverting cakes for cooling, we recommend sandwiching the cake between two wire racks that have been lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray. If the cake's top is below the rim of the pan by more than a 1/2 inch, you can also place a folded towel to fill the void between the cake and the wire rack.
Once the cake is cooled with the topside up as we generally state, you can always invert it back onto a wire rack and then reinvert onto a serving plate.
For moving the cake from a board or cake rack, you can use two large "grill"spatulas or a cake lifter.

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Hello,
I apologize for the volume of questions I've been asking today, but I really appreciate the help:
I wanted to ask about Pie crusts: for an apple pie, would you reccomend the pastry flour pie crust or the flaky cream cheese crust? And would I be able to use a whole wheat pastry flour in the cream cheese pie crust if that is the better choice.
Also, I made roses red velvet cake. Instead of using a cake pan, I made 8 cupcakes, however they were quite dense. Do you have any suggestions for why this occurred. The recipe was followed to a T.

Thank you ever so much for your responses.

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Thank you so much for your reply Woody and thanks for the advice on filling the pans with the batter. I'm a novice baker and I've had a lot of frustrations and disappointments on my previous bakings, but ever since I bought RHC and TCB and frequent visits on this website my bakings had improved. Now I couldnt stop baking wanting to try Rose's cake recipes. This site is very helpful especially for bakers like me. Thanks Rose and Woody and to all the other fellow bloggers who had helped me, god bless:))))

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Hello.
I have a cornucopia pan from William Sonoma http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/fall/cornucopia-bundt-pan-from-williamssonoma-128995 and I was wondering if the lemon poppyseed cake in roses heavenly cakes is a good idea for this pan due to the interesting shape. Also, what growing or. Glaze would you recommend if I do use this cake. Thank you as always for your help.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Omorfi
11/21/2011 10:09 AM

Hi Omarfi,
As long as your mixing bowl can handle the quantity of batter, you can multiply the ingredients for a recipe, if the number of cakes you are making use the same volume pans. There is no need to adjust the ingredients.
The key here is when you are filling the pans. Alternate spoonfuls of batter between each pan, so that each pan receives batter from the top to the bottom of the mixing bowl. This avoids one pan possibly getting denser or unmixed batter that has settled to the mixing bowl's bottom.

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Dear Rose/Woody,

Is it okay to double the recipe of double chocolate valentine in RHC to make 2 9 inch layer cake? What will happen to the cake's consistency? Do I need to adjust any of the ingredients? I'm using 2 9 inch springform pan. Looking forward for your reply:))

Many thanks

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I had to click on unsubscribe because I was getting every entry of this thread on my email. I didn't know what else to do.

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Great thanks. Next time I'll do that. I made only one cake layer.

The next problem came when I needed to *reinvert* the cake. Wow. Any suggestions for how to do that elegantly? I've made and flipped many of a frittata but that's not a cake. The cake broke up a lot on the reinvert. Covered it with ganache but there are flaws.

Then moving it from the board and rack (sounds punitive) to the serving platter was the next moment of shudder. So what's the best way to move a cake?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Arlene
11/20/2011 01:31 AM

Hi Arlene,
We are assuming that this is not one of Rose's recipes as the recipe in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and Roses's Celebrations use milk. We always recommend to try to contact the author for their reasoning for ingredients and techniques in a given recipe. The hot water will activate the baking soda which will likely result in a denser cake.

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Thanks Christine. The pans I have are professional and really good ones. I never thought that the size was wrong until I started reading about using 9-inch pans. It's a rare day that I bake a cake so *regularly used* simply doesn't apply to my world.

Maybe you never move but I've moved a lot and the idea that once I buy something I'll never have to buy it again is far from my reality.

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Hi Kamala,
You have a few options:
1. Can make the recipe as stated. It just will not be as good as if you made it in the 1-1/2 inch tall pans.
2. You can go to the wedding chapter and make the batter for a 9 x 2 inch pan by using the charts and the base recipe.
3. We have a blog article, The Power of Flour which we give the leavening adjustment for converting the recipe and show results for other cakes and types of flour.

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phyllis, i agree with christine but should you want to use your 10" pans you will need to multiply everything by 1-1/4 (1.25). then you probably should drop the leaving by say 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon as larger pans require proportionately less leavening.

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Christine Czarnecki
Christine Czarnecki in reply to comment from Phyllis
11/19/2011 01:48 PM

Phyllis, I will let Rose answer the question about how to resize your existing 10" cake pans. I replaced my old, thin ones at Sur La Table with terrific, reasonably priced ones by Magic Line. They are straight sided, shiny aluminum and heavy enough to not bend or deform. They are reasonably priced (and you could look for them on the internet and probably get them for even less).

I bought three of the 8" size and two of the 9" size. I will never have to buy cake pans again, and my grandchildren won't either.

Baking is an exact science, and I think for something as regularly used as cake pans, buying a few good ones in the correct size is a lifetime investment and will pay off as such.

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I clicked on 'ask a question' and it took me here to make a comment. I don't have a comment; I have a question. I have very good quality cake pans at the wrong size. That question is: I only have 2 10"cake pans and all the recipes call for 9" cake pans. How can I alter the recipe without having to run out and get some 9" pans. I needed to know this yesterday. I don't want those dark colored pans I can buy at the supermarket. Help!!!

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I"m making gingerbread (the bread, not the cookie), and it combines hot water with baking soda. I'm wondering what is the purpose of this?

Thank you!

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Kamala THaler
Kamala THaler
11/19/2011 10:08 AM

Hello:
I am going to be baking the all occasion downy yellow cake. I tried to buy the exact same cake pan but could only find 9inch by 2inches.
In the side it says that if i make a one layer to do 2/3 receipts or two layers 1 1/3 so is that mean,
1 1/3 ofveach ingriedent ex. 16 egg yolks; 22/3 cup milk.

or is it that i make the receipt exactly NDD THEN JUTS Pour 11/3 in teh pan.
please Help.
thanks
kamala

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Debbie
11/18/2011 06:48 PM

Hi Debbie,
Rose always recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. We suggest that you try to contact the author of the recipe to see hers or his recommendations.
Rose has an excellent recipe for pumpkin pie in The Pie & Pastry Bible and as a blog posting as The Great Pumpkin Pie. You many want to compare the recipes to see if anything might help you. Rose's does dip a bit from the edge and then is level across the top.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from alva
11/18/2011 06:37 PM

Hi Alva,
The stated ingredient is: sweetened coconut flakes. You can use fresh, unsweetened coconut per however you prepare it to substitute for sweetened commercial flakes or use unsweetened if you like the flavor.

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I have a great pecan pie recipe that is very good, the only problem is that it falls in the center with higher sides. The taste is great, but appearance is lacking a little, any suggestions?

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Hi Rose/Woody!

I want to bake tomorrow from RHC book the coconut cake on page 21, heavenly seduction cake, so my question is, can I use freshly grated coconut, since I live in an island, and we do not have dried commercial ones?

Thank you a lot!
Alva

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Thanks for your prompt response Woody! I didn't think I could put the cardboard in the oven this way, great news! This will work great I am sure! I do not have Rose's cake bible as baking is something new to me and RHC is the first book I bought! I am truly satisfied with it and thinking now I probably should get the cake bible! I was thinking of putting oreo cookie crumbs as base to go with the bailey's cheesecake. I will try the alterations, thanks so much!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Claudine
11/18/2011 12:01 PM

Hi Claudine,
For a transferring the cheesecake.
you can cover a cardboard disc with aluminum foil that will snuggly fit on top of the springform pan bottom and against the sides. The extra space from the disc will not require modifying the recipe.
This technique wil allow you to remove the sides, transfer the disc and cheesecake off the springform bottom, and allow for easy slicing as the disc does not have a lip.

For making a Bailey's cheesecake:
you will notice that most of the cheesecake recipes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes are adaptations of her Cordon Rose Cheesecake from The Cake Bible. The Cranberry Crown Cheesecake can easily be altered by eliminating the lemon juice and substituting Bailey's. However, you will need to experiment for how much Bailey's to use for the recipe and what crust you think will go with the Bailey's.

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Hi Rose/Woody! I am planning on baking Rose's pure pumpkin cheesecake for a birthday tonight. When I usually make a cheesecake, I bake it in a spring foam pan witch the cake stays on the base when serving. If I am bringing the cake there and not willing to ask for the bottom of the pan back, is there a way the cake can be transferred to a disposable cake circle? I have never attempted to move it from its original base and I don't want to destroy it! Also, Is there any cheesecake is RHC that could be altered easily into a Bailey's cheesecake? By the way, thanks for all your hard work, you guys are truly unbelievable! I always know where to look for answered and I can always find on this page! Kuddos!

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Hi Jessica,
We recommend that you review the Ingredients section discussing flour. If you do not have access to bleached flour, you can make "Kate's flour" on page 438. You can also add potato starch or cornstarch to unbleached flour which we show the results in our Power of Flour blog article.

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Also, I have a question I have pastry flour, can I use that in leiu of cake flour? Thanks!

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Hi Rose,

I'm planning on making your red velvet cake recipe, but i do not have any bleached flour anywhere to be found! Can i used the unbleached flour? Will it make a big difference? It is going to be a birthday cake for a dear friend of mine, and I want it to be perfect!

Thanks!

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I do have it also. I will try that one as well. Thanks

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maggy, if you have rose's heavenly cakes, try the golden lemon almond cake on page 37. it's my new fav and is ideal for shipping as well!

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Thanks a lot. Will switch to the Grand Marnier Cake.

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maggy, i don't think the golden butter cream cake is the best choice for shipping as it will get dry. i'd choose something with a syrup such as the grand marnier cake. in any case, if you were to vacuum it, it would compress it to a pancake! vacuum sealing isn't good for delicate airy items. when i got mine i tried vacuuming an english muffin and it lost every nook and cranny before i could stop it!

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Hi Rose,

The cake bible book is fabulous. It makes me want to bake again "without frustrations". I plan to bake the Golden Butter Cream for a few relatives out of town and mailed them. 1. Could you please tell me whether I can triple the recipe? 2. Can I bake it as a bundt cake? 3.I am also looking for a vacuum sealer and the correct bag to pack the bag since I will mail them all the way to Florida. Can you please recommend a product. I check with "foodsaver.com" they do not have a bag that can accommodate an 8 inch bundt cake.

Thank you and Happy Thanksgiving!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Anonymous
11/17/2011 11:22 AM

Hi Anonymous,
Rose recommends in The Pie & Pastry Bible for her pie recipes to bake the pie from its frozen state. Begin at 425˚F for 10 minutes. Lower the oven temperature to 400˚F and bake an additional 25 to 35 minutes from the specified baking times.

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I have a cooked frozen black berry pie. Can it be thawed and prepared to be eaten?

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