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Buttercream Rules!

Mar 3, 2012 | From the kitchen of Rose

Isn't it grand! Thanks to the availability of Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs I can now say yes when people ask if it's safe to make a buttercream.

This week I presented my favorite yellow butter cake frosted with Neoclassic Buttercream at a press event for Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs.

IMG_1013.JPG

Classic buttercream is a silken smooth and buttery mixture made by beating a hot sugar syrup into egg yolks. Once the mixture is completely cool, softened butter is beaten in and then flavoring such as vanilla, liqueur, fruit purées, or chocolate.

The syrup needs to be 238˚F/114˚C in order to create the correct thickness of the egg yolks. This necessitates an accurate instant read thermometer. But many years ago, I discovered that there is a very easy way to produce a sugar syrup of the proper temperature and consistency without needing a thermometer! The technique is simply to use the correct proportion of granulated sugar to corn syrup. When brought to a full rolling boil the temperature is exactly 238˚F/114˚C!

There are only two problems I have encountered from readers and bloggers over the years:

1. If the syrup is not brought to a full rolling boil, which means the entire surface of the syrup is bubbling, it will not be hot enough to set the yolks.

2. If the egg yolk and syrup mixture has not cooled completely to the touch the butter, when added, will melt instead of emulsify into a smooth cream. Once this happens it is impossible to restore.

Here is the recipe and also the link to the video from my PBS show "Baking Magic with Rose."

Neoclassic Buttercream

Makes 4 cups/35 ounces/996 grams

>

INGREDIENTS

MEASURE

WEIGHT

volume

ounces

grams

6 large egg yolks, preferably Safest Choice Pasteurized

3.5 fluid ounces

4 ounces

112 grams

sugar

3/4 cup

5.2 ounces

150 grams

corn syrup

1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces)

5.7 ounces

164 grams

unsalted butter (65˚ to 75˚F/19˚C to 23˚C)

4 sticks

1 pound

454 grams

optional: liqueur or eau-de-vie of your choice

2 to 4 tablespoons

1 to 2 ounces

28 to 56 grams


Have ready a 2 cup or larger heatproof glass measure lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray near the range.

In a medium bowl, beat the yolks with an electric mixer until light in color. In a small saucepan (preferably with a nonstick lining) stir together the sugar and corn syrup with a silicone spatula until all the sugar is moistened. Heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup begins to boil around the edges. Stop stirring and continue cooking for a few minutes until the syrup comes to a full rolling boil. (The entire surface will be covered with large bubbles.) Immediately transfer the syrup to the glass measure to stop the cooking.

Beat the syrup into the yolks in a steady stream. Don't allow syrup to fall on the beaters or they will spin it onto the sides of the bowl. (If using a stand mixer, pour a small amount of syrup over the yolks with the mixer turned off. Immediately beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Stop the mixer and add a larger amount of syrup. Beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Continue with the remaining syrup. For the last addition, use a rubber scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the glass measure.) Continue beating for 5 minutes. Then allow it to cool completely. To speed cooling, place it in an ice-water water bath or the refrigerator, stirring occasionally.

When cool beat in the butter, by the tablespoon, on medium-high speed. The buttercream will not thicken until almost all of the butter has been added. Add the optional liqueur, and beat on low speed until it is incorporated.

Comments

Hi Jenika,
In our books, if we state "sugar" we mean standard granulated sugar. If a recipe has more than one type of sugar, like brown sugar and sugar, we will state "granulated sugar" for the sugar.
Since powdered sugar can add grittiness to frostings, we generally try to engineer the recipe with another ingredient. For example: Rose uses white chocolate to replace powdered sugar in her cream cheese frosting.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

This might be a dumb question but what kind of sugar do I use for the Neoclassic/regular buttercream recipe? I have only ever used powdered sugar in frosting recipes but after reading this recipes I wasn't sure what it call for.

REPLY

Hi TIna,
In "The Cake Bible" several of Rose's wedding cake recipes include the Neoclassic Buttercream as the frosting component. In a controlled temperature environment, both buttercreams hold up well. However, which buttercream works best for one becomes a matter of preference. We suggest making a small batch of each and run a test with them with conditions you may need to subject them.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

This buttercream is delicious! I've only made it as a cupcake frosting, but I would love to make it to frost a small wedding cake (6-8" 3-layered cake that'll sit on top of a macaron tower). Do you think this buttercream would hold its shape well enough, or should I use an Italian meringue buttercream?

Thank you!!

REPLY

Thanks!

REPLY

Hi Allen,
On the left side bar in the Featured Fans window below the Rose's Precasts window. Marie Wolf made it easy to find a recipe post. Just put it in the recipe title in the Search window. If you do not have a recipe title, you can search thru the months for their postings on the right side bar.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Thanks for your reply. I'm sorry I wasn't clear. You mentioned the Heavenly Cake Bake Along Blog. That's what I wanted to check out.

Allen

REPLY

Hi Allen,
Rose's above post links to the episode where she makes this buttercream is just above the recipe's ingredients chart.

"Here is the recipe and also the link to the video from my PBS show "Baking Magic with Rose.""

Rose has over 150 YouTube videos including her entire PBS series.
Rose & Woody


REPLY

What's the link for this blog?

Thanks!

REPLY

Hi Natasha,
We are sorry we somehow missed your question.
We hope that you did find a solution, either by making sure that you addressed Rose's two common problems, if needed, add more butter.
Also, we hope you watched Rose's Baking Magic episode for making the buttercream that is "linked" on the post.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Cassandra,
You can also see how the Heavenly Cake Bake along bloggers for "rose's Heavenly Cakes" fared on making this buttercream. Search for the Sicilian Pistachio Cake, which the neo-classic is its buttercream frosting. Many will give their step by step photos and commentary.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Cassandra,
We ask what brand of corn syrup are you using?
As I replied to Inchara, we have used Karo's light corn syrup and golden syrup for years. We do spray the Pyrex measuring cup with non-stick spray and pour the bubbling syrup as soon as the entire surface is covered with bubbles.
If you are making a a 4 cups or less amount of the buttercream, you can pour the bubbling corn syrup directly from the saucepan. You may have to reheat the remaining sugar syrup to you be able to scrape it out.
If you have a thermometer, what temperature are you heating the sugar syrup to?
Rose & Woody

REPLY

This happened to me as well. What am I doing wrong?

REPLY

Hi!
I just tried making this buttercream and it's fabulous! But I was wondering if you have any tips on how to stabilise the buttercream? I find it a bit too runny. How do you make it more thick?

Thank you!

REPLY

Hi smcj,
We have not tried adding cream cheese to this buttercream, since Rose has a very good one cream cheese recipe with the White Chocolate Cream Cheese Buttercream/Dreamy Creamy Buttercream. You could try making a small test batch of the Neo Classic and add small amounts of cream cheese to see if you like the results.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

I have been using this buttercream for over 15 years. It is always absolute perfection. This year I am making a carrot cake for easter and want to use this buttercream with cream cheese added. A little more sophisticated than regular cream cheese icing. Will this work? Before I go wasting 12 egg yolks and 2 pounds of butter! thanks so much!

REPLY

Hi Inchara,
That is most unusual, as we have used Karos light corn syrup and Lyles golden refiners syrup for over thirty years.
We ask what brand of corn or refiners syrup that you are using?
Have you tried taking a temperature reading of the bubbling syrup?
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi, I'm trying to make the neoclassic buttercream. Heated the corn syrup and sugar till large bubbles formed. However, on transferring this to a glass bowl, the syrup hardened within seconds and hence I'm unable to beat it into the egg yolks. Tried reheating the syrup and added the hot syrup to the egg yolks, but it hardened again within seconds. Any reasons as to why this is happening?

REPLY

Hi Lynne,
Our storage times for Mousseline are 2 days cool room temperature, 10 days refrigerated, 6 months frozen. We suggest store it airtight on a lower shelf in the refrigerator. Let it come to room temperature before re beating it.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Lynne Miller
Lynne Miller in reply to comment from Woody
09/ 7/2015 11:30 PM

Hi Woody, Thank you so much for the White White Chocolate Buttercream suggestion. I just got 'The Baking Bible' and made the buttercream and I believe I'm in love! It's amazing.

My question is what is the best way to store it? I would like to keep it for a week then transport it and rewhip it before frosting cakes.

Thanks again,
Lynne

REPLY

Allen Cohn
Allen Cohn in reply to comment from Woody
08/31/2015 06:14 PM

Thanks! I'll try it in that order next time.

Allen

REPLY

Hi Allen,
You are correct for the recipe in "The Cake Bible". We reversed the technique in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and "The Baking Bible". This was done to minimize the chance of the buttercream becoming curdled and unretrievable. On Rose's YouTube videos, she has a short demo on making it and adding strawberry butter.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Allen Cohn
Allen Cohn in reply to comment from Woody
08/31/2015 04:09 PM

Hi, Woody,

I get that the butter is creamed beforehand.

But the recipe as written says (p. 245) "Beat in the butter at medium speed 1 tablespoon at a time." This implies that the butter is added to the Italian meringue, instead of the meringue being added to the butter.

Am I mis-reading the recipe or have you changed the technique?

Thanks,
Allen

REPLY

Hi Allen,
Rose considers her Mousseline Buttercream to be more mousse like as a buttercream with less sugar to its Italian Buttercream cousin.
A key factor that we perfected, that I commented on before, is the reversing of the technique to add the Italian meringue to the lightly creamed butter and making sure that both the Italian meringue and the butter are within a few degrees of each other and below 70˚F.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Allen Cohn
Allen Cohn in reply to comment from Woody
08/31/2015 12:46 PM

My mistake...sorry!

(It's still kind of weird to me that you don't call it "Italian Buttercream" like most other folks.)

Thanks,
Allen

REPLY

Hi Allen,
The recipe in the posting is for the NeoClassic Buttercream on page 230 in "The Cake Bible". The Mousseline Buttercream on page 244, incorporates a Italian meringue with creamed butter.
As with many of our postings, questions on subjects and recipes not pertaining to the posting are presented.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Allen Cohn
Allen Cohn in reply to comment from Woody
08/31/2015 10:31 AM

Good morning, Woody,

Thank you for your answer, but it confuses me. This buttercream does not use egg whites as you wrote...it uses egg yolks.

Allen

REPLY

Hi Allen,
Rose's reasoning for titling this wonderful buttercream, "Mousseline Buttercream", is incorporating the butter with Italian meringue (beaten egg whites) and its mousse like quality.
If you are making the recipe, we revised the technique for making it in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and "The Baking Bible".
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Just curious...why do you call it "Mousseline"? I thought "Mousseline" typically referred to a sauce made of hollandaise sauce + whipped cream.

Do you call it that because the base is egg yolks (like hollendaise) instead of egg whites?

Thanks,
Allen

REPLY

Hi Lynne,
Yes. We recommend the Moussline as a good choice for your frosting. Another suggestion is the White White Chocolate Buttercream from "The Baking Bible".
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Lynne Miller
Lynne Miller
08/28/2015 09:36 PM

Thank you Rose for MANY years of 'The Cake Bible'. I bought mine back in 1988 and have LOVED it and recommended it to anyone who wants to bake truly luscious cakes.

I will be making wedding cupcakes in a few weeks for my nephew. I would like to 'fill' them (various creme fillings). My big issue is the frosting. I would like to make the frosting ahead of time and bring it with me. I will have access to refrigeration and I can bring my mixer and a few other items, but space will be limited. The wedding will be in Arizona, outdoors and obviously quite warm outside. Is Mousseline Buttercream still the best choice, or do you have any other suggestions? I've had stabilized whipping cream hold up fairly well in the past, but that would require me to prepare the cream at the wedding.
Thank you, L

REPLY

Hi Lillana,
We have tested this several times and have not been satisfied with the results.
The buttercream has a slightly curdled appearance and the texture is off.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Liliana Negrea
Liliana Negrea
05/12/2015 09:23 AM

Hi and thank you for your recipes. Is it possible to use the same method for meringue? I mean to pour the same sugar-corn syrup mixture over whites, instead of yolks?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Cathy
10/27/2014 06:50 PM

Hi Cathy,
Those are items that we do not test or take readings. For the pH level, you could measure it by using pH instant test strips that one uses to checking swimming pools.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Do you happen to have PH and water activity values on the neo-classical and classic egg whit buttercreams? I'd like to use them in my home based bakery, but need to stay within my state's cottage food regs.
Thank you!

REPLY

No need to whip but wouldn't hurt as long as you bring it to room temperature.
Different shapes of pans require adjustment in leavening. Deeper pans need less.

REPLY

Hi Rose, my mum and I love your recipes. Just made the neo classic butter cream for the first time and it was fabulous! We need to refrigerate it to be used tomorrow for my friend's cake. Do I need to whip it again? Or just leave it at room temperature? Hope you see this soon :)

Also, we made your chocolate cup cake recipe in a giant cup cake pan. Do you know why the middle fell in after it rose up? We put the pan on the middle rack of the oven under a cookie sheet. Thank you so much!!! - D.

REPLY

thanks debbie! mousseline is my top favorite buttercream. so glad you like it.

REPLY

Thanks Rose & Woody - I was able to find pasteurized egg yolks after an extensive search, and just love the Neo-classic buttercream, but tried the Mousseline tonight because of the longer time frame. It was fantastic - another new favorite! I have been steering everyone I can in the direction of your blog and books. Thanks so much for always getting back to me so promptly... xo

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Debbie
05/30/2014 10:06 PM

Hi Debbie,
When we state storage times, we mean the timeframe from when the buttercream has cooled to room temperature for frosting the cake to the longest stated time for a particular environment. If health safety due to keeping the buttercream at room temperature for extended times is a concern, as we stated for andrea's question below, we recommend using pasteurized eggs.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from andrea
05/30/2014 09:51 PM

Hi andrea,
We recommend a thin layer of any of Rose's butter cream recipes depending on your shelf life needs, as we state up to 6 hours at room temperature for butter creams made with egg yolks and up to 2 days if made with egg whites. If you are planning on having the cakes and cupcakes standing at room temperature towards the upper end of the storage times, we recommend using pasteurized eggs for health safety. Although some will say that fondant will encase a buttercream to extend its shelf life, we advise to still stay within the stated storage time frames.

If you are looking for the longest shelf life and a flexible buttercream for adding flavorings, we recommend Rose's Mousseline Buttercream that is in both "The Cake Bible" and "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and included in our upcoming "The Baking Bible" book.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

In Rose's books, the storage at "room temperature" is listed at 6hrs. - does this mean that a cake covered in neo-classical buttercream can only stay at room temp. for that length of time, or does that refer to "working time"? I love this frosting, but wonder if it is good to use on a cake that will sit out for a extended period. Many thanks! D

REPLY

Can someone please help me with a recipe for vanilla/chocolate buttercream that I can use for both cakes and cupcakes under fondant???
Thank you!!

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Melinda
05/27/2014 07:12 PM

Hi Melinda,
The Neo-Classic Buttercream can be stored for 1 week refrigerated and up to 8 months frozen.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi I'm in the middle of making a batch, which seems to be really big, like it would cover two of my kids' bday cakes. I was wondering how long I can store unused frosting. Is there a way I can freeze it for up to a month?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Debbie
05/13/2014 09:00 PM

Hi Debbie,
Syrup added to eggs for making a buttercream does not bring it to a sufficiently safe temperature. The only type of eggs recommended for use in buttercream for the very young, seniors, pregnant women, or those with immune impairment, are pasteurized eggs. We recommend Safest Choice Pasteurized eggs which are pasteurized in the shell.
Rose has several postings on this blog about their eggs including recipes. Here is a link to their website: www.safeeggs.com. If you are making an all egg white buttercream you can also use pasteurized egg whites.

Rose & Woody

REPLY

Greetings - just bought three of Rose's books - Cake Bible, Heavenly Cakes & Pie/Pastry Bible. They are fantastic! I have been making the Neoclassical buttercream to rave reviews, but am not able to get pasteurized eggs or pasteurized egg yolks where I live. Question is - is this buttercream safe to use without pasteurized eggs, and should the same precautions be used re seniors/pregnant women/children, etc. as for any other product with raw eggs? Would sure hate to lose this recipe as part of my collection, but do not want to make anyone ill! xo

REPLY

It doesn't seem that anyone has pointed this out, but this entry is for "butte"cream - maybe your spell checker was in a frosting-induced coma that day?

REPLY

Hi Jose,
Yes. Most buttercreams and ganaches can be covered with fondant. Most bakers will:
> trim the cake layers to even the sides and top
> bevel corners and edges to be slightly rounded
> apply a crumb coating with the buttercream or a neutral glaze or jelly
> apply a very thin layer of the buttercream or ganache to create a smooth surface for the fondant
> refrigerate the cakes to set the frosting
> then apply the fondant
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Jose Zepeda
Jose Zepeda
10/ 9/2013 02:13 PM

Can it used to be covered with fondant?

REPLY

Hi Jose,
Egg whites can not be substituted for this buttercream. However, in "The Bible" and "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" we have one of our favorite butter creams~~"The Mousseline Buttercream". It is egg whites based, but uses a completely different technique for combining the egg whites, butter, and a sugar syrup before adding any flavorings.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Jose Zepeda
Jose Zepeda
10/ 2/2013 07:10 PM

Can you use egg whites instead of egg yolks?

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Liliana
06/15/2013 09:05 PM

Hi Lillanna,
The reason why glucose is not offered as a substitute for the corn syrup is it's much higher boiling point, which is roughly 300˚F/150˚C. Adding the water will lower the boiling point. Whether the amount of water you have calculated will work to lower the boiling temperature to around the same temperature as the corn syrup and have the same sweetness level will need your experimenting to see if the water and glucose mixture is a viable substitution.
You may want to see if you can purchase Lyle's Golden Syrup which can be substituted gram for gram. We add a couple of teaspoons of lemon juice to add a subtle hint of its flavor which is harmonious with the other flavors in the buttercream. The lemon juice also helps to minimize the chance of the golden syrup from crystalizing.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi! Will you please tell me if I may use glucose instead of corn syrup? In Europe there is no corn syrup to be found anywhere. Thank you very much

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from joanna
05/14/2013 01:16 AM

Hi Joanna,
We have added lemon flavor to the Neoclassic Buttercream with lemon curd and/or lemon oil. Lemon curd also acts as a stabilizer. If you want to try lemon oil, we recommend Boyajians lemon oil. We recommend that you add the lemon oil in small increments until you reach your desired results.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Thanks -- I really do not know -- in the Cake Bible ROse suggests replacing 1/4 cup water with fresh lemon juiceand then after adding the butter to add 1/4 tspoon of lemon extract. But the neoclassical recipe does not have water...so I am "stuck" wondering how to not ruin this neoclassic recipe and still get intense lemon flavor in the buttercream for my husbands birthday cake!

REPLY

Of all the buttercreams, this one should have the most fighting chance of holding together because of all the lecithin in the egg yolks.

But whether even with all that emulsifier will the water from the lemon juice will stay together with the fat in the butter? Only trial & error or our experts, Rose & Woody, will know.

REPLY

Hi Rose and Woody,

I am making Neoclassical Buttercream Frosting in Lemon! I would like to add fresh lemon juice and a bit of Lemon extract. Will the liquid from the lemon juice throw the consistency of the neoclassic frosting off? In other words...will it be too liquidy? Many thanks!

REPLY

Hi Rose and Woody,
I thought I'd fluffed the Neo Classic half way through adding the butter! It was runny. Started adding the remaining butter a bit quicker and it firmed up nicely.
I left it to stand until completely cold and added the your lemon curd as suggested. Oh! and as for that lemon curd ... so tasty, the tartness perfect!
What a magnificent result! I can't believe I made something so delicious and delicate.
Thank you so much for great recipes.
cheers and happy baking!
Claude

REPLY

Hi Selena,
This recipe does not convert easily to egg whites.
We recommend that for an egg whites buttercream to make the Mousseline Buttercream in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. This recipe was revised from The Cake Bible's version and virtually will come out perfect every time. The Mousseline is made by combining a egg white Italian meringue into whipped butter. Like the Neo Classic Buttercream, it can be flavored with melted chocolate, extracts, and fruit purees or curds.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

selena batso
selena batso
07/13/2012 04:27 PM

Hi can you make this recipe only using egg whites? if so is there any other things i have to change in the recipe?

REPLY

Thank you Rose and Woody.
I'm doing it tonight ... keep your fingers and toes crossed! :o)
cheers and all the best
Claude

REPLY

Hi Claude,
If you have The Cake Bible, you may want to try making the Classic Buttercream which has water in which you can replace some of the water with lemon juice and lemon extract.
To the Neo Classic Buttercream, we recommend that you add Lemon Curd. We suggest from 6 tablespoons to 1/2 cup after you have completed making the buttercream.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Claude Vanstraelen
Claude Vanstraelen
07/11/2012 11:43 AM

Hi Rose, I have just made the White Velvet Butter Cake which I would like to ice with a Lemon Neo Classic Butter cream. As there is no water in Neo Classic can I add lemon juice? or wold you suggest in preference I make a lemon curd and add this to the cream? What should I do as I would like to make the Neo Classic in particular. And how much of which (juice/curd/zest) should I incorporate?
Look forward to hearing from you.
Thank you for your time.
Claude

REPLY

you're in for a real surprise when you see the posting on saturday morning!

REPLY

Cook's Illustrated did a test of pasteurized egg whites back in May, 2006. They found the whipping results varied considerably by brand, and most were terrible. Of the ones they tested, only the very expensive Eggology 100% Egg Whites performed acceptably for buttercream...though not as good as regular egg whites.

REPLY

mariel, a great solution will be posted this saturday morning on the blog!

REPLY

Have been using Pasturized eggs as Rose suggested, but find I cannot make whites whip up to make buttercream. What am I doing wrong? Since I bake for shut-ins, I love the idea of using these eggs.

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Allen Cohn
04/ 4/2012 01:50 AM

Hi Allen,
We will say that the buttercreams with yolks are more flavorful on their own and are usually denser. Virtually all buttercreams can incorporate a wide range of flavor enhancements from chocolate to passion fruit.

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Phoebe
04/ 4/2012 01:42 AM

Hi Phoebe,
We would say it is at the other end of the spectrum for buttercreams as this is yolk based and not whipped. It is also denser and more flavorful. We suggest that you make a small quantity of both to frost a cake so you can compare.

REPLY

Some butter creams use egg yolks...some egg whites...and some whole eggs. Can you suggest some rules of thumb on when each is most appropriate?

Thanks,
Allen

REPLY

This looks like a really great buttercream, is its texture and taste similar to swiss meringue buttercream? thank you for all your fabulous recipes!

REPLY

Awesome page, I was actually having a hard time looking for the perfect recipe for butter cream, thanks so much, I'm going to try this myself. I just hope I will get it right the first time, :)

REPLY

I think I will now give your recipe for mayonnaise a try! Yay, for safest choice pasteurized eggs!

REPLY

Do you mean Tate and Lyle's Syrup?

REPLY

Yes orin--refiners syrup also know as golden syrup is excellent.

REPLY

I would love to make this butter cream. but, is there any suitable substitute to the corn syrup?

Thank you, and as always i enjoy much from your blog.

REPLY

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