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Jul 1, 2012 | From the kitchen of Rose

Please feel free to post comments here if you can't find another appropriate place. The other question entries became too long for some people's browsers to download.

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Comments

Hi Peter,
Since I had not made this recipe before, I tested the recipe last night with wonderful results and confirmed with Rose from my testing photos I sent to her. I adjusted the heat to maintain a "moderate boil", which I kept the fudge mixture between 215˚F/102˚C and 220˚F/104˚C, using an instant-read thermometer to check the temperature. I also used a scale to check the mixture's weight occasionally until it was almost reduced down to two-thirds of a cup and 6.7 ounces/190 grams (two-thirds of the initial weight) before pouring it into a glass measure to check its volume. We recommend checking by weight as it is quicker and you do not need to pour the mixture back and forth between the pan and measuring cup. It did take me a few minutes longer than the stated times, but that will vary depending what one is using.

After cooling to around 120˚F/49˚C, the fudge was thick like an ice cream parlor's warm fudge. I refrigerated it overnight and it was not grainy.

We suspect that your moderate boil was at a higher temperature and that caused the fudge to break down. If you do run into a problem or think there is an error in a recipe, we always suggest that you look at the Book Errata/Corrections section to see if there are updated notes about the recipe.

Rose & Woody

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carla
05/ 3/2013 05:54 PM

Hi Carla,
We recommend that you keep some of the buttercream in reserve after you have done your first thin as possible crumb coating of buttercream and refrigerated the cakes to firm up the buttercream. Remove the cakes and either let the buttercream you coated them with warm up to room temperature or use a hot knife or metal spatula to smooth the buttercream surface as flat as possible. Use the reserved buttercream, allowed to warm up to room temperature, to fill in any places to achieve smooth sides and tops and slightly beveled edges of your thin layer of buttercream undercoating. Then refrigerate the cakes again to set the buttercream. You do not want it "wet" as the fondant may not adhere to it.
If you place the fondant covered cakes in airtight container(s) in the refrigerator, you should not get any condensation on them.
You have a busy day ahead of you. Enjoy creating a memorable experience.
Rose & Woody

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Peter Nosko
Peter Nosko
05/ 3/2013 03:35 PM

Hello again Rose. Sorry, I inadvertently posted this question on your Tira Misu Dessert page comments. Not sure how I did that.

I'm having lots of trouble making your simple Hot Fudge recipe (The Cake Bible, pg 88). I tried 3 times using the (gas) stove method. The first time, it was for a single recipe amount, and it nearly turned to chewy fudge. The last two times, I used 4oz chocolate and proportional amounts of other ingredients. It came out too thin, and gets grainy when refrigerated. There's a lot of action between 5 and 10 minutes of moderate boil. I am careful to not stir after boiling begins (just a few pans swirls). Is there a temperature I could hone in on or would you recommend the microwave and watching for the correct volume (probably sounds easier than doing). Thanks.

Also, I just discovered your product line and am waiting to receive your beater blade and caramel pot (which looks ideal for Hot Fudge recipe). All of them look like the design was so well though-out. I can't wait to start using them!

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Hi guys,
Firstly I just want to say a big thank you!!!!! I was having trouble with dry cakes but after watching your videos my cakes are now "dry free"
I do have one question though about neoclassic buttercream.... I've made my butter cakes and filled and crumb coated them, I put them in the fridge over nite so they settle and now I have to put fondant on, my question is do I have to wet the surface first? Part 2 of question is.... Because its a buttercream and the cakes are not to delivered till Saturday can I put them back in the fridge after fondant is done ?
Thanks in advance guys
Carla

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Andrea
05/ 1/2013 10:25 AM

Hi Andrea,
We ask have you had successful results with other butter cakes in The Cake Bible?
We are assuming that you are using the same brand of baking powder.
The measurement and weight is correct as stated. If you check virtually all of the recipes in the book, the weight for baking powder is rounded off to 5 grams/teaspoon. The weight for baking powder can vary depending on the brand, if it is stored airtight to avoid humidity, and how compacted it is from storing.
Unless you have a scale that weighs to the tenth of a gram, we recommend that use an accurate set of measuring spoons for measuring baking powder, baking soda, salt, and yeast. An economical and accurate scale that we use for weighing ingredients to the tenth of a gram is the My Weigh i201 scale.
We hope you will try making the torte again after you identify what caused your baking powder weight to be half that is stated.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,
I recently made Rose's Perfect All-American Chocolate Torte. I used the weighing scale but as i started to measure the baking powder (2 tsps/10 grams is required), 2 teaspoons isn't enough to reach 10 grams. It actually took 4 teaspoons to reach the desired weight and i think this might be too much. What should i follow?

Thanks you :)

REPLY

Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Babycakes
05/ 1/2013 01:35 AM

Hi Babycakes,
By what you are describing, we are under the impression that the recipe calls for a lower cacao percentage dark chocolate which you have been using before with great results.
If you have either The Cake Bible or Rose's Heavenly Cakes, the ingredient and understanding cakes sections discuss sugar and chocolate and their effects on cakes. Generally, a higher the percentage cacao dark chocolate will make a denser, firmer cake.
You also may want to contact the author for her/his opinion on what is the upper range of cacao percentage that you can use for the recipe. You may also want to see if the producer has a recipe to compare against the ones you have been using with good results, as well as bake the producer's recipe to see what you think of the results.
We ran into a similar problem when testing a sugar free product which the manufacturer stated it could be substituted on an equal measurement basis. It failed on two of Rose's proven recipes that I have baked for years.
Rose has 100s of baking recipes that use dark chocolate and only a few recipes that use a 85% cacao percentage which are frostings or glazes.
Rose & Woody

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HELP! I have a question about chocolate (not cocoa). I have a chocolate bundt cake recipe that calls for both cocoa powder and 3 oz dark chocolate that is melted in boiling water, cooled, then added to eggs, oil, milk (then dry ingredients incorporated into the wet). I have used this recipe regularly 100 times (as recently as last week) and it comes out perfectly (as a bundt or minis)...until tonight! I have been trying different types of chocolate (looking for an organic fair trade) and made one tonight with a new chocolate--My (minis) fell and just look funny (moist but too air-y?--should be dense). I did not do anything else differently (and I measure my dry ingredients on a gram scale)...la la la. Can different chocolates (this is allegedly a baking chocolate that is 85% cacao)make that much difference, or is my moon in klutz? Please advise--I was asked to bake something for the producer using their chocolate...and thought this no fail recipe would be great...but this will never do!

REPLY

kim, i don't understand what the problem is as you posted just fine on this site so all you have to do is put your questions here just as you did in the comment you just made!

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Kim Applegate
Kim Applegate
04/30/2013 03:30 AM

I am trying to register as a new user to the site, I am a new bread baker as well as a cake baker and have many questions , but it will not let me submit the text that says I am not a machine:( I have been baking from Rose's books for a couple of months and love them , but this is the 2nd time I have tried to register on the site. Is there a programming issue?

Thank you

Kim Applegate

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Hi Anita,
Congratulations on getting Rose's book. I am using it today for a frosting recipe.
We recommend that you use creme fraiche, either purchased or homemade as a direct substitution for sour cream by weight. Rose has a recipe on page 259. When I have made it, the creme fraiche usually takes closer to 24 hours before it is thick enough for cake batters.
Rose & Woody

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Anita kavalekar
Anita kavalekar
04/26/2013 06:07 PM

I have recently purchased The Cake Bible, and would soon be trying out some of the recipes. I am an avid baker and have always been successful trying out new recipes. But as most of the reviews suggest that your recipes dont take well to substitutions am a little wary.......I live in the UAE and Sour cream is not easily available so could you please give me a substitute for the same. Thank you.

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Hi Kathy,
We always recommend to that you get specific details from the client especially if there is some special meaning for the couple. Sometimes this requires making some samples for taste testing by the client.
If they like chocolate, then we would suggest the Deep Passion Wedding Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
If they prefer a summer time cake, then we would suggest the Golden Dream Wedding Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes with its lemon and almond flavors. In fact, I just baked the 6 and 9 inch layers for my T'ai Chi studio's special event tomorrow night.
Since this is your first wedding cake, we recommend that you review Rose's chapters on preparing wedding cakes and making decorations. Plan for extra time, incase something goes wrong and peace of mind.
Rose & Woody

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Kathy Pinkert
Kathy Pinkert
04/26/2013 01:27 PM

HI Rose,
I will be making my first wedding cake for 250 guests.The wedding will be in July.Do you have a favorite recipe for the cake/icing/filling?
Thanks so much!!

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Kathy Pinkert
Kathy Pinkert
04/26/2013 01:10 PM

HI Rose,
I will be making my first wedding cake for 250 guests.The wedding will be in July.Do you have a favorite recipe for the cake/icing/filling?
Thanks so much!!

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Rose et al.,
I do wonder sometimes how many of us are in the kitchen(& ovens) bc of JC? I watched her as a child on 'educational TV' and am still friends with Stephanie on FB. How she changed the world is rarely credited as it should be- some think it's not coincidence she shared the same initials with another pretty famous JC. Just saw the reference in "Dearie" to your first big deal in 1988 for TCB. Rose, your hours of work have benefited many a tastebud and I thank you.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Dale
04/25/2013 03:57 PM

Hi Dale,
We generally present these cakes, such as the Chocolate Oblivion in The Cake Bible or the Jancsi Torte in Rose's Heavenly Cakes, as single layer cakes due to their richness, with either just a light adornment or none. For a special occasion cake, Rose encases and layers the Chocolate Oblivion with fondant for her Art Deco Cake in The Cake Bible. If you would like to create a multi layer cake, we would suggest filling and frosting with a light buttercream or light whipped ganache so as not to compress the cake layers, such as the Featherbed Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
However, we recommend, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment with to your preference for adornments.
Rose & Woody

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Hi
How does a flourless or very small amountof flour chocolate cake recipe work for a layer cake?

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kdonner, first and foremost julia child. then paula peck, then maida heatter. i do hope you'll share the paper when it's finished!

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Rose,
I am a baking and pastry student studying at the Arts International Institute of Kansas City. I am doing a paper on you for a class and was wondering who were your early
influences in the baking and pastry field?
Thanks so much for taking the time to read and answer my question.

Kathy

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hi emily!

thought you might enjoy knowing that i worked in the good housekeeping kitchens 50 years ago! my mentor annie moore did all the holiday cookbooks. so hearing from you is like coming home again!

do let us know how your testing goes.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Emily
04/24/2013 04:52 PM

HI Emily,
We recommend an internal temperature read with an instant-read thermometer should be around 190˚F/88˚C for pumpkin bread and 196˚F/91˚C for vanilla pound cake. With both, a wooden skewer or toothpick should come out with just a few crumbs, then cooling on a wire rack for 10 minutes before unmolding and reinverting the loaf to cool top side up.
Also, since they are both very moist quick breads, it wouldn't hurt to bring them to 200˚F/93˚C.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

My name is Emily and I am a product analyst for kitchen appliances at Good Houseekeeping Research Institute. We are testing loaf pans in May and I was wondering what you recommend the internal temperature of a finished quick bread (specifically pumpkin bread) should be. I have heard 190-200 but was hoping for your expert advice. Also, the same question for vanilla pound cake.

Thanks,
Emily

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Bena
04/22/2013 03:44 PM

Hi Bena,

Syrup added to eggs for making a buttercream does not bring it to a sufficiently safe temperature. The only type of eggs recommended for use in buttercream for the very young, old, pregnant women, or those with immune impairment, are pasteurized eggs. we recommend Safest Choice Pasteurized eggs. Rose has several postings on this blog about their eggs including recipes. Here is a link to their website: www.safeeggs.com. If you are making an all egg white buttercream you can also use pasteurized egg whites.

Rose & Woody

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Hi! I made your Neoclassic Buttercream and I loved it! This will be my go to buttercream recipe from now on but I am wondering if the eggs will be a concern to pregnant women since they shouldn't eat raw eggs. Does the hot syrup bring it to safe temperature for the pregnant women? Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Judy Hager
04/19/2013 12:28 AM

Hi Judy,
To determine your batter amount, you need to calculate the volume.
For example: Area Volume Volume Percentage
10 x 2 inch pan 75 sq. inches 10-3/4 cups
7 x 2 inch pan 37.5 sq. inches 5-1/4 cups 48.83%
9 x 2 inch pan 63 sq. inches 8-2/3 cups
6 x 2 inch pan 28 sq. inches 3-3/4 cups 43.30%

We will say if it is as close as 48.83% to 50%, then make a half batter. Otherwise, you will need to do the math to have the smaller cheesecake be at the same height.
Rose's Heavenly Cakes has a listing of pans and volumes on page 470. There are several free programs on the web for calculating area, volume, and diameter.
The baking time will be shorter, although we have not made this cheesecake in smaller pans other than in a cupcake size. We would suggest to start checking the cake around 30 minutes to see if it looks likes the standard version you bake at 45 minutes. Once it looks correct, then leave it in the oven for 50 minutes and again check to see if it looks correct.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, Rose and Woody --
This is Judy, who kept pestering you with questions about sour cream substitutions a couple of weeks ago! I made a different recipe instead and was not impressed -- now I keep 3 cups of sour cream in my fridge at all times so I can always make yours! =-) Today's question: I want to make the Cordon Rose but don't need anywhere near the usual amount. If I have a springform that is half the area of the one I usually use, can I make half a batch? How does this affect baking time, if at all? Many thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Pearl
04/18/2013 01:46 PM

Hi Pearl,
The cake is a single layer of the German Chocolate Cake on page 137 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. The frosting is the Deep Chocolate Ganache on page 269 in The Cake Bible. We suggest that you also try the Creme Fraiche Ganache on page 108 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
This was Ben Fink's first video, which was included in a seminar on using video to promote one's books and business at the IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) annual conference, which we attended last week. (Posting to come next month).
You may also want to learn more about Ben Fink by reading Rose's posting Meet My Photographer Ben Fink and clicking on his website link.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody
Please could you tell me which chocolate cake it is and the topping that is on the video clip a moment with Rose by Ben Flink on the website, it looks lovely, I do have both Roses Books to refer to
Thankyou
Pearl

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Jennifer
04/16/2013 01:04 AM

Hi Jennifer,
You can convert any of Rose's recipes using two 9 x 1-1/2 in pans by two-thirds or 66% to make one 9 x 2 inch cake. We suggest that once you convert the recipe to the single 9 x 2 inch pan, you can then use the Rose factors chart to convert the recipe to other pan sizes. We recommend to make a single layer test cake to establish your baking powder level for a flat top and then use your findings in conjunction with the baking powder chart for white and yellow base formula cakes for your other pan sizes.
Enjoy making a memorable wedding cake.
Rose & Woody

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
04/15/2013 11:15 PM

Thank you Woody!
A little sharing on the results...
I did end up using the milk chocolate syrup with the cake and i have to say, I am sold! Absolutely delicious chocolate cake! The moisture of an oil cake but with the taste of a butter chocolaty cake. I'm so happy i tried it! It's perfect.
As for the cream cheese white chocolate icing... well i was once asked for a ricotta filling paired with a chocolate cake and never found one. I suggested a cream cheese one (not knowing at all what i was talking about!!!) and it ended up being a big hit! I now regularly get this combo order and love it myself! (although I wouldn't mind if Rose could add one of those ricotta filling to her next book!) Maybe we have just weird taste here in Montreal but its being requested! :D

I ended up following the recipe in the wedding section and used 10x 10 inches square pans to create this monster range rover. I am please to say that even with the heaviness of the cream cheese, the cake held up perfectly! I did, however, use the mousseline buttercream you suggested, as a crumb coat so i could create beautiful smooth lines under the fondant and shape the truck. Was i able to lift the cake myself? no. But it did hold up and thats all that mattered :)
Once again, thank you for your help!

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I will be making a wedding cake in September and would like to use the golden luxury cake from the Cake Bible. My question is how do I adjuar the recipe for various pan sizes? I'm not sure how to handle the baking powder for the larger pan sizes. I see the rose factor toward the end of the book for the base cake recipe but there is no base cake recipe for the golden luxury cake.

Thanks

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Hi Ian,
By splitting the cake, we meant baking it and cutting it into two layers.
You may want to just top the top of the cake with the whipped cream just before serving the cake and top the cream with some of the fruit.
You can make the cake and the filling the day before, but make the whipped cream shortly before depending upon how you are going to stabilize it or just lightly sweetening it.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody thank you for the response ,my other questions where is it possible to split the batter the orange chiffon cake between two 9 inch cake pans,and if so how long should I bake them for? Also would it be ok for me to assemble the cake Saturday night or would it be best to make the cream and and prepare the fruits and cake Saturday and assemble the cake on Sunday ,I won't be doing the basket weaving just gonna spread the whipped cream over the entire cake and put fruits on top,just hope the whip cream won't to much so that you won't be able to taste the cake and the Bostini''s filling.

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Hi Rosary,
Thank you for alerting us. The manufacturer has not had many returns due to production problems. We are sorry that you had a defective one.
I was a sales person in the audio and video field for over 25 years and always had to deal with needing to exchange the 3% on average damaged or defective products.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Audrey,
The Yellow Cake batter is the All Occasion cake's batter converted to a basic formula. We suggest using The Rose factors charts, the basic batter chart, and baking powder chart for increasing the batter to make your sheet cake.
Increasing the recipe using grabs for all ingredients except baking powder, salt, and vanilla which you use teaspoons will give you your best results.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Claudine,
We have not tried covering this cake with fondant, but we do not see a problem. We do question cream cheese paired with the chocolate cake. The White Chocolate Buttercream and flavored with vanilla or other flavoring maybe a good alternative.
Depending on your timeframe, you do not need to syrup the cake if baking the previous day to serving. Otherwise, syrup the cake with the Deep Passion's Milk Chocolate Syrup or another flavored syrup to compliment your buttercream.
This cake can compress with too thick of a frosting, so we suggest you make a s a test cake to test covering it with fondant. The shape of the land rover will help in supporting itself.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Anonymous,
We are in San Francisco at for the IACP conference.
Rose's Heavenly Cakes has a few recipes if you want to modify them for your idea. We have sponge cake recipes using a large basket weave pan and smaller shortcake pans. But if you are making a two layer cake, you could make the 0range Chiffon cake could be split and filled with the Bostini''s filling and fruit and topped with whip cream and fruit.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you very much for your reply. I was actually planning to frost the cupcakes and keep it in the chiller the previous day as on the morning of the event I just won't have any time. I can imagine that may not be ideal but will it work? Parizad

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Hi Ritu,
Yes. We suggest that you refrigerate the cake up to a few hours before serving. Anytime that a baker is making something in disadvantageous conditions, we recommend making a few small testing examples to experiment with in the setting to determine what will work the best for you.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Parizad,
We suggest that if you have only one wire rack that you bake only on the middle level. You can use a 12 cupcake pan, however Rose prefers 6 cupcake pans to assure even baking of all the cupcakes. If the batter is allowed to sit out ar room temerature for 20 minutes before baking, your cupcakes will be more domed. You can also refrigerate the remaining batter while the first batch is baking.
You can refrigerate the cupcakes for a few days and briefly heat them in the oven to freshen them.
The frostings can be made and refrigerated a few days in advanced. Let them come to room temperature and briefly beat them before frosting your cupcakes.
Rose & Woody

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier
04/11/2013 01:40 PM

Hi Rose and woody!
I am making the german chocolate cake from RHC and plan on filling the cake with your white chocolate cream cheese icing from the red velvet recipe and crumb coating it with mousseline buttercream before topping it with fondant. I need to make a range rover out of this cake.

First question: what syrup should i use to moisten the layers that will fit with this. Do i go with the white chocolate one from the same cake in wedding section or can a simple syrup be used to brush on to the layers?

Second question: will this cake be able to support the filling i am paring it with?
If not do you suggest another chocolate cake? (the front of the truck will have 4 layers but the middle and back will have 7 or 8 separated in the middle by a support board and straws.

Thanks for your advice in advance!

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Hi Rose and Woody,

My moms bday is coming and i wanted to make a fruit basket cake for her bday party,i looked online and asked her a little about it since she tried it once from publix and really like it.She said its two layer cake with a Boston cream like filling in the middle topped with fruit and another cake and something like a whipped cream covering the whole cake and then fruits on top,i did find a few ideas online but wanted too know if there's anything in the cake bible.also the party is on Sunday and i wanted to do something like a basket weave.i also wanted to know if its possible to bake the cake and assemble the cake on Saturday or how do i go about doing it,would appreciate any idea or inputs ,i don't have any problem piecing together different recipes i have both TCB AND RHC

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I'm planning to bake my first 18 x12 x 2" cake, and after reading many posts, the Cake Bible's tips and advice and perusing Heavenly Cakes, I'm still not sure whether I can use the "All-Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake" recipe for a cake this large.

I know I need to multiply the recipe approx. 3x's and that I should decrease the baking powder, but I'm not sure how much less I should use.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Would you suggest that the cake be kept in refrigeration at the venue,the temp would be around 32-34C

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Hi! Thank you very much for your wonderful books. I baked cupcakes for the first time and they turned out great.. I used the German chocolate cake recipe. I need to bake another batch of cupcakes in advance and will use the same receipe.

My question is I have a regular size oven. There is one wire rack, one tray and an aluminum tray at the bottom. Sometimes if i am running short of space in the oven i use the wire rack as the top shelf, the tray as the middle an the aluminum tray as the bottom. At a time only one muffin pan can fit per shelf.

Option 1 - Do you suggest I make one recipe of the batter and try to fit it in two 12 hole muffin trays one in the middle and one at the bottom? Do I need to switch midway between baking. I am afraid the cupcakes will collapse if I open the over door to do that.

Option 2 -or do u suggest I make half the batter at a time and just put one muffin pan in at a time as you suggested on the lower third of the oven. This is a little time consuming.

Option 3 - or do you suggest I make the whole recipe and let one tray bake and bake the remaining batter as the as the first batch is out? But I guess the second batch may not rise properly.

Also how many days in advance could I make these cupcakes and and refrigerate
Also how many days in advance could I make neoclassical butter cream and dreamy chocolate buttery cream and refrigerate ?

Thank you

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I posted this question to the discussion forum and they informed me that they also experienced similar results where the paper liner peels off the cupcakes when it begins to cool.

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I tried both methods. The first batch with baking spray and the second without thinking that the spray prevented the batter from sticking to the paper liners. In both instances, the paper liner comes off. I use a non stick Calphalon cupcake pan which produces very good results with any of the recipes I have used in the past. I love the texture and flavor of the Chocolate Butter cupcake recipe except for the problem I mentioned. I ended up removing the paper liners, frosted the cupcakes, and served it in new cupcake liners that have been inverted inside out for a different presentation. So I made a new batch using the German Chocolate cake and Devil's food cake batters for cupcakes and did not have any issues of the cake liners peeling off the cupcakes.

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Hi Jack,
During our testing we did not have your described problem when the liners were sprayed with Baker's Joy as stated in the preparation.
We ask:
1. Did you use baking spray with flour on your liners?
2. Have you baked other chocolate cupcake recipes, as chocolate recipes are known to stick to liners?
Rose & Woody

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I have tried baking RHC Chocolate Butter Cupcakes twice already and on both times, the cupcake liners always peel off the cupcakes. I let the cupcakes cool enough to handle and allow it to cool on cooling racks. I am beginning to speculate that it may be a recipe issue because I never have any problem with the liners literally falling off the cupcakes as it cools. I do not think it is condensation causing the problem because I take it out from the pans almost immediately. However, I notice that this is an oilier recipe evidenced by the greasy or wet appearance of the paper liners. I also do not think it is an issue of liner brands because I have been using the same liners for all my cupcake recipes, including ones from RHC, all the time without any problems. I appreciate any information you can share with me.
Thank you.

Thank you.

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I ordered the double boiler and it came with the handle broken. Amazon is replacing it but I just thought you might want to know, in case it's a common problem or defect.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from ritu
04/ 6/2013 12:41 AM

Hi Ritu,
We suggest you try experimenting with making test cakes with all granulated sugar to equal parts granulated sugar and light brown sugar to find which harmonizes the best with the rest of the cake to your expectations.
We have not tried making any of the layers in dome shaped pans. The request also means you are now likely making separate batters for all three layers, as the leavenings for the 6 and 9 are to create somewhat level tops. You may want to try using the 6 and 9 inch batter and fill the dome pan two-thirds full after filling the 9 inch layers and see what are the results. If the dome cake is level or domes, you are in good shape as you can always level the cake if it domes. If not, you will need to experiment with leavenings for the 9 inch layers and the dome pan batters.
The White Chocolate Buttercream can be piped for decorations. We suggest that you use it after you combine the base with the butter. You want to use straight white chocolate if you do not want your piping to be speckled and do not add the lemon zest, which can clump up in your piping tips.
Rose & Woody

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Hi I have come back with some more questions regarding The Wedding cake!! Would truly appreciate your help! Turbinado sugar is not available here,what can I substitute it with? Secondly, have been requested to give a "dome shape" to the top tier how do I adjust leavenings ? Lastly,is it possible to make piping decorations with the butter cream?

Thanks

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"I am having a hard time understanding the breakdown of ingredients for figuring ratios."

David:

It really depends on how accurate you want to be. Most recipes are pretty forgiving and if you pretend that butter is all fat, you won't go far astray.

Take it to heart that because people don't agree, it probably just doesn't matter that much.

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Thanks so much!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from ritu
04/ 3/2013 10:32 AM

Hi Ritu,

Yes. The wedding cake and the bundt cake are the same recipe, which the leavenings are different because of the bundt pan. The 400 grams per each 6 inch layer is individually 15% of the total batter for both 6 and 9 inch layers. If you are weighing, you can easily do the math then weigh out your ingredients, except the leavenings and salt. Do these per teaspoon measurements. You could add a 1/16 teaspoon of baking powder to reduce some of the doming as the 6 inch layers usually have a slight dome. 


Rose & Woody

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Please ignore my previous messgage. I meant to ask if Golden Almond cake is same as Golden Dream wedding cake ??

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Hi
Could you please advise how to scale down Golden Lemon Cake,to a small 6in cake for a sample
Regards

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Rhoda
03/30/2013 01:03 AM

Hi Rhoda,
We have good success with both butter and genoise for structure, although denser butter cakes, such as a pound cake or The Golden Almond Cake will have a firmer structure to minimize sinking. Also, the larger the cake layer, there is less structure which will be more prone to sinking at the center. If your largest cake layer is 12 inches, most of Rose's recipes will work for you.
You generally will refrigerate the cake before applying the fondant for a couples reasons other than providing a smooth surface. You refrigerate:
1. to keep the cake as fresh as possible before the event
2. as many fillings and frostings have a 1 day in room temperature health safety time frame
3. as the undercoating needs to be refrigerated to firm it up, before smoothing and shaping it to give your fondant the flattest surface
4. briefly refrigerate the undercoating again before applying the fondant

Depending on the day you apply the fondant and the filling's and frosting's time frames will determine if you need to refrigerate the completed cake before the event. How well you can control temperatures in your kitchen or work space in Borneo is another factor.
If you are looking for an understanding of crafting wedding and event cakes, recipes formulas for making different layer sizes for cake batters, and several recipes including fondant for a 3-tier wedding cake with a 12 inch base layer, we recommend you read The Cake Bible.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,
I really would like to know what is the best type of cake to bake so I can roll my fondant on top. I'm living in a tropical place, Borneo and confuse of which type of cake shud I use so my cake can hold the fondant without it sink. Butter, pound or sheet cake? Must I refrigerate it so I hav a smooth top? Will it sink later? Thanks in advance.

Best wishes,
Rhoda

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Judy Hager
03/28/2013 04:51 PM

Hi Judy,
For the creme fraiche, you need buttermilk.
We again suggest to simply buy the full-fat sour cream, you can use your fat free sour cream, but you are compromising the taste and texture of the cheesecake. We always recommend only experimenting if it is just to see what happens or if you are developing a new or alternative recipe or if you have no alternative because of the lack of time.
Rose & Woody

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I'm the one who wrote about not having enough sour cream for the Cordon Rose cheesecake. Got your reply about creme fraiche as a possible substitution, so I looked it up in the Cake Bible. I actually do have a cup a cream, but no buttermilk -- can I improvise with a small amount of lemon juice and the cream to make the creme freiche (obviously also adding the sugar before adding to the recipe)?

I also have fat free sour cream in addition to the 2 cups of full-fat --
Judy

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from David
03/28/2013 03:05 PM

Hi David,
To our knowledge, no one author has designed a ratios type chart for various ingredients. However, a reference book that can help you fill some of your spread sheet is The Composition of Foods: raw, processed, prepared from the United States Department of Agriculture. It has several tables which will break down a particular food for its composition, fatty acids, cholesterol content, etc.
Another book to look at that explains different ingredients and their chemistry is Harold Mc Gee's On Food and Cooking. In all of her bible books, Rose also gives chemistry of ingredients and understanding sections on how different cakes, pies, or breads are vary to others with substitutions.
For most of our new recipe development, we will analyze the ingredients and start changing one or two at a time. We then discuss the out come and retest if needed. Some of our recipes have taken over twenty tests to perfect them.
You have a interesting challenge for yourself.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Lielle
03/28/2013 02:42 PM

Hi Leille,
As we stated previously,we would think you can use heavy whipping cream. We also would think that the author of the recipe would give substitutions when specifying a unique ingredient as cream skimmed off of boiled butter. Please contact the author of the website recipe for her/his comments.
If you can not get an answer, why not try making the cake with heavy cream and then make another one with butter that you probably will need to whip to lighten it and see which you prefer.
As we are unfamiliar with this recipe, you may want to post it on the Forums section for other from the baking community to give their opinions.
Enjoy experimenting.
Rose & Woody

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I am having a hard time understanding the breakdown of ingredients for figuring ratios. For instance, Michael Ruhlman sometimes uses Fat and other times uses Butter but does not break the butter down into fat, liquid, and milk solids. Going by his book, butter seems to be considered all Fat when figuring ratios. In reading Shirley Corriher's book Bakewise, she breaks cream down into Fat and Liquid, but butter only shows the Fat content with no Liquid considered, and buttermilk and milk are just Liquid with no fat consideration. (Re: page 16 The Great American Pound Cake recipe and page 33 "The Math"). I have seen reference in recipes that say to take into consideration the liquid in butter when substituting for shortening. Can you straighten me out on this? I am trying to set up spread sheets that have ingredients taken into account the way they are supposed to be so that I do not have to do the math every time I want to create or try a new recipe, but nobody seems to agree on how to consider the ingredients. I appreciate any help I can get.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Judy Hager
03/28/2013 01:34 PM

Hi Judy,
Our thoughts that if you are making this for the weekend as part of a special meal that you should buy the extra sour cream before you start substituting different ingredients that will influence the taste and texture.
You could make a smaller cheesecake in proportion to the smaller amount of sour cream.
Possible subs are creme fraiche, which can be subbed in at the same weight, and full fat Greek style plain yogurt, which we do not have an exact substitution weight. The yogurt will affect taste and texture.
You can leave out the lemon juice and have a denser cake or replace it with water. The vanilla bean will just add more vanilla taste as well as its speckles.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody,

Further to your reply, this is the recipe what can I substitute for the cream or which cream can I use instead or can I use all butter.
This is from a website.
This Light Vanilla Sponge Cake is one of my favorites. This homemade sponge is so fresh & delicious.. I usually make this light sponge with cream. We buy Milk which is very good creamy milk. I skim out the cream after boiling & cooling the milk in the fridge. I store the cream everyday in the freezer & then use it to bake this wonderful vanilla sponge cake.
Enjoy this light, fluffy cake bursting with the sweet flavor of vanilla!! J

Ingredients :

250 gms. a.p. flour
250 gms. Butter/Cream
250 gms. Castor Sugar/Powdered Sugar
3 Large Eggs
1 tsp. Baking pwd.
1 med.sized Sour Lime
2 tbsps. Milk
1 tsp. Vanilla Essence

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Ack! Was going to make the Cordon Rose cheesecake but only have 2 c. of sour cream...and was thinking of flavoring with vanilla bean instead of lemon. Can I substitute for the sour cream? Leave out? What happens if I leave out the lemon juice? Thanks for your expert help!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Denise
03/27/2013 10:00 PM

Hi Denise,
Depending on the filling's storage times, you are likely to be storing it in the refrigerator after applying the fondant. If you apply the fondant in the morning of the event then you can keep the completed cake at a cool room temperature.
Rose has several raspberry fillings in The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes. Your undercoating for the fondant should be as thin as possible but providing a smooth surface for the fondant. The fondant should be rolled 1/4 inch in thickness for you to be able to form a smooth fondant surface. At this thickness, the undercoating will not show through the fondant.
After the finished cake has warmed up to room temperature, you can use a fondant smoother to give the fondant some sheen.
Rose & Woody

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I'm going to make a fondant cake with raspberry filling and I was wondering if I have to refrigerate the whole fondant cake b/c of filling ? Can someone give me a recipe for the rasberry filling ? Would the filling show on a thin white fondant ?

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Thank you Woody.

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Hi Lielle,
By what you have said and if you are storing it in the refrigerator, we would think tou are skimming off heavy cream. Further steps would be needed to turn what you are collecting to become butter.
We always recommend that you make the author's recipe exactly as it is written so that you can see and taste the author's intentions for the recipe and to establish a control. From your control cake, you can then try subbing ingredients or altering techniques. you may want to contact the author to see if she/he is using raw milk. Also since you are stating this is a sponge cake that suggests that it is cream is generally only clarified butter is used in a sponge cake.
If the "butter" component is cream, you want to try Rose's Whipped Cream Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes which is in the butter and oil cakes section.
Rose & Woody

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Good Morning, I have a sponge cake recipe using the cream collected from milk (milk which is boiled and the cream that collects on top, keep collecting for a few days till you have the required amount). Could you kindly let me know what I can subsitute for the cream is it butter or whipping cream.

Thank you,

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Hi Josette,
We would say about 6 medium beets, but have seen that the color from the beet juice is not as vibrant or bright as from red food coloring. We suggest to sub in the same volume of beet juice for the first cake and then you can experiment from there.
Technically, you do not need to add any food coloring to the cake for its flavor and texture, the coloring is just for appearance.
Rose & Woody

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Josette Mamo
Josette Mamo
03/25/2013 02:01 PM

So in the rose red velvet cake using beet juice, do you just add 2 tablespoons of the beet juice that comes out of roasting the beets, to the liquid ingredients?
What is the amount in weight of beets that you would need to roast please?

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Hi Josette,
1 & 2. We state on page 85 how to prepare beets to add their liquid as you would the red food coloring.
3 & 4. We generally do not test recipes with alternative ingredients to keep on file specific substitutions unless it is a common substitution. For example with this cake, we give the instructions for the beets. We have not researched using fructose as an alternative to give you a valid answer.
With any recipe, we always recommend making it according to the author's recipe to establish a control to see and taste the author's intentions for the recipe. However, we do understand that many bakers and bloggers have specific dietary needs.
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in sugar free, dairy free, gluten free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes or contact them for substitution recommendations as these are not our genre of baking. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.
Rose & Woody

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Josette Mamo
Josette Mamo
03/25/2013 11:47 AM

I just bought your book Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I would like to bake the Rose Red Velvet Cake using beets instead of red food colour.
1. To what and at what stage do you add the beets and how much?
2. Do you puree them first?
3. I should like to do this for a diabetic friend, who usually prefers fructose in his cakes, do I just use a third less fructose than sugar?
4. And do I need to decrease the liquids as well if I use fructose?

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Hi Rose/Woody,

I always get deep cracks on top of cakes such as Grand Marnier Chocolate Chips Cake. I use dark-colored Nordic Ware tube pan, and 325C oven temperature.

Can I bake it at 300C, or should I stay with 325C and cover the top 2/3 way during baking?

David Chau

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Michele
03/24/2013 04:06 PM

Hi Michelle,
We ask are you using either Soft-As-Silk or Swan's Down cake flour in which both are bleached cake flours?
We ask this as other brands and non-bleached cake flours can vary in weight. If the cake flour is not bleached, its performance will likely produce shorter and tougher texture cakes.
For all of Rose's books where the ingredient lists weight measurements, we have weighed that ingredient many times to establish an average weight. This has been done on Rose's Mettler PE 16 electronic laboratory scale and verified on both of our My Weigh KD-7000 and 8000 scales as well as by some of our test bakers. The weight charts on pages 439-432 are correct, in which sifted cake flour is listed as 100 grams/ 1 cup. If you do question the accuracy of any of Rose's recipe, please check the Errata/Corrections section to see if there have been changes to the recipe.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,

I make your cakes quite frequently and noticed that the weight conversion for some of your cakes may be inaccurate, or perhaps I'm just missing something. For example, the Cordon Rose banana cake in the Cake Bible calls for 2 cups of sifted cake flour, which in weight would equal 250 grams, but the recipe calls for 200 grams. Can you let me know if this is accurate?

Thanks,

Michele

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/22/2013 11:42 PM

Hi Vicki,
We suggest that a good rule of thumb (beside checking the butter's temperature at the center) is that if your thumb can leave slight squish mark that it is soft enough. A little melted butter (I sometimes have some on the bottom of the stick) should not cause a problem.
Happy baking and hopefully moving on to the Lemon poppyseed version.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Deborah,
We are unfamiliar with this recipe and assuming that this is a new recipe for you.
Rose always recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. We recommend that you contact the author for her/his suggestions.
Since you have had success with other sponge cakes, we are assuming that you are quickly, but gently, folding in the whites and the dry ingredients. Although Rose generally includes cream of tartar for beating egg whites especially if no sugar is included. However, the author's idea for stiff egg whites may not a need need the cream of tartar.
We also suggest that you can post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject.
You may also want to check Marcy Goldman's "Better Baking" website for ideas.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Julie
03/22/2013 11:13 PM

Hi Julie,
We recommend that you view Rose's You Tube on making this cake. You can either go on the YouTube website's with " Rose Levy Beranbaum you tube" and the search for Downy Yellow Butter Cake or click on Videos in the Categories and search for Downy Yellow Butter Cake to see the consistency of the batter. Many scratch cake batters are stiff or fluffy that you scrape into the pan and then level them. We have a feeling that you over beat the batter. The recipe also specifies 9 inch pans in which using 8 inch pans could have given you tougher crusts for the increase time frame needed to bake the inside of the taller cake.
Rose modified the recipe as we are always looking to improve recipes for both taste and texture. The blog recipe also bakes in a 2 inch high pan, which is most commonly used today. The baking soda is added to temper the acidity of the sour cream.
We also make a point which is on the blog recipe and also used in all of the recipes in The Cake Bible, that when we state "cake flour" we are specifying "bleached cake flour". Using unbleached cake flour can cause less height in these cakes and possible dipping in the center.
When it comes to any recipe from a credible author, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. On some testing occasions, I have thought that a new batter might not be quite right and checked with Rose, who then assured me that that it is correct.
Rose & Woody

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Deborah Idema
Deborah Idema
03/22/2013 07:18 PM

I have made my Passover cake 2x; it fell -- never had that happen with any cake.
Recipe calls for 6 eggs (separated) 1 cup sugar, little lemon juice 1/4 lbs nuts, finely ground, 1/2T cocal, 1/2T instant coffe, 1/4 c grated chocolate, 1/4 c cake meal,1/2T potato starch. Method is the usual (cream egg yolks and sugar, beat whites stiff, add whites and dry ingredients alternately. First time, I used walnuts - very moist and fell. Second time, used ground almonds, and added some cream of tartar to the whites -- looked right, but IT FELL again. Any thoughts? Would using a tube pan make a difference?

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Hello Rose, made your "all-occasion downy yellow cake" today for the first time. While mixing I noticed the batter to be quite stiff. Is that correct? Anyway, I increased the mixing speed and that loosened the batter a bit. The baked 8" cakes took 25 minutes to fully bake and the tops are hard, have fallen in the centre and 1 is cracked. Help please! P. S. I did test the PB beforehand. Also the recipe on your blog is different than the book in that it contains sour cream, less eggs and both baking powder and soda. Do you have a preference?

Many thanks, Julie

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Patrick
03/22/2013 03:37 PM

Hi Patrick,
Virtually all of Rose's cookbooks which include cake recipes have some recipes that use bar chocolate such as the Moist Chocolate Genoise in The Cake Bible. We generally use cocoa powder in cake batter recipes as it gives the cake a better chocolate flavor. We highly recommend that you use your chocolate for the frosting especially if making a ganache as you are generally incorporating only two ingredients~~your chocolate and heavy cream~and some vanilla to enhance the flavor. This way you are tasting your chocolate for what it is versus it being blended into the cake batter with other flavors.
You technically can substitute in your chocolate by converting the cocoa powder to using unsweetened chocolate and then reducing some of the sugar, but you may also need to adjust the leavening or other ingredients.
There are several recipes in the Categories section under Recipes
If you have a recipe using more than one pan, you simply just need to convert all of the ingredients for a single pan of the size. This is very easy to do with Rose's recipes as all of her recipes give both volume and weight per ingredient which with a scale makes this easy to do.
Rose & Woody

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Rose,

I have found this great chocolate "Cru Savage" and would like to use it in a cake. Can you recommend a recipe that uses bar or bit chocolate and not cocoa powder?

Also, as a single guy making a whole cake is tough for me to eat, do you have a recipe that would make just one 8" or 9" round or square pan cake??

Thanks for the help.
Patrick

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Hi Rose and Woody, thanks for your comments. Your suggestions on flour are well noted. I will check and pay attention to the flour I use next time. On butter, I'm guilty. As mentioned in my reply to Steve, my butter was too cold when I mixed it in. Will make sure temp is 19C before I cream next time. A question I have on butter - when I cut the butter into smaller pieces and leave it out to warm up, I poked a thermometer in to check the temperature, I noticed that while the reading in the centre was only about 15-16C, I noted however that the bottom of the butter seem to hv started to melt a little. Would that pose a problem in the creaming stage? Thanks.

P/s: I will not be experimenting and reporting back so soon as we are going away for 1 week for my children's school spring break. Writing to you at the airport now :) your new findings will novitiate me to try again when I get a chance. Thank you very much.

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Hi Steve, thanks for your observation and suggestion. My butter was at about 16-17C when I creamed. Indonesia has very hot weather and my kitchen temperature was about 25-26C when I made this cake. So I thought with surrounding warmth and heat from beating, the butter would quickly warm up to 20C if not higher. Given my cake result, I was obviously wrong. A picture speaks a thousand words, thanks for pointing out the melting butter problem. I will let the butter warm up a bit more before mixing it in.
Cake was really yummy but as you can tell, I am obviously not happy with the marks. Thx again

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/22/2013 09:50 AM

Hi Vicki,
We again recommend that you contact Prima. If a flour is bleached, it usually will indicate that on the bag as here in the United States many flour mills make both bleached and unbleached flours.
As stated on page 24 of The Cake Bible for Highlights to Success, the butter needs to be softened at between 19˚and 22˚C. This includes most all ingredients unless stated otherwise in the recipe, except your milk, sour cream, and cream. They can be at room temperature or slightly below.
We also suggest that you look at our Power of Flour postings in which we experimented with making a basic butter cakes with either whole eggs,egg whites, or yolks using bleached cake flour, bleached all-purpose flour, unbleached all-purpose flour, and additions with cornstarch and potato starch, and with different levels of baking powder.
If you do not have bleached flour, try making and using "Kate's Flour" .
Rose & Woody

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Hi Vicki,

It looks like there might have been small chunks of butter that melted during baking and left small volds.

What temperature is the butter when you cream it? It should be somewhere around 20-22 C. If it's too cold it won't cream properly.

I'm sure Woody & Rose will have better advice. They are the experts; I'm just a hobbyist!

Good luck, and even with the marks, your cake looks fabulous. :-)

-Steve

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Hi Rose & Woody

I managed to post a photo of the pound cake on Forum under Cakes -Q&A for your easy reference. Thanks.

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Hi, I just posted a picture of the cake on Rose's facebook. Sorry, I wasn't sure how to post a pic on your website, so posted it on your Facebook page instead. I only read you forum tips after I posted.

I live in Indonesia. The flour I used is "Prima Cake Flour", manufactured in Singapore. I'm definitely not an expert in flour but this pack of flour looks white and fine. I understand bleached flour is allowed in countries like Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia...

Actually, I loved your recipe so much that I immediately told my sister in Brunei (a small country in this region) about it and she baked it using the same flour. She did not have any grease mark problem. So the problem seems to be me !!!

Thanks so much for your help and effort!!!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/22/2013 01:13 AM

Hi Vicki,
Our thoughts that your butter is fine.
But if you are in New Zealand, your cake flour may be the culprit. I looked at their website and did not see that their cake flour is bleached. Many flour brands associated with the British commonwealth do not permit bleaching of their flour.
You will need to contact them to determine this as the recipe is designed for bleached cake flour. We have seen that using unbleached cake or all-purpose flour can give the denser layer at the bottom of the cake.
SInce you may not beable to purchase bleached cake flour, you may want to look at Rose's posting on "Kate's Flour" which Kate Coldrick from England developed a "bleached" all purpose flour using her microwave. You can also get more details by looking at her linked blog, A Merrier World, under SItes I Like.
If you want to post a picture as Steve has suggested, we ask that you do that on the Forums section.
Rose & Woody

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Steve Cogorno
Steve Cogorno
03/22/2013 12:42 AM

Hi Vicki,

Do you have a photograph that you can post? I'm curious to see the problem. It might be easier to solve with a visual aid.

-Steve

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1. I'm using normal butter with 80% fat

2. The brand is Anchor, by New Zealand company

3. Cake flour is Prima brand, from Singapore.

I live in Indonesia and both Anchor and Prima are quality names used widely for baking in this region.

Thanks very much for helping me get to the bottom of this stubborn problem.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/22/2013 12:14 AM

Hi Vicki,
We asked this previously, so please state:
1. are you using high fat butter?
2. what brand of butter?
3. what brand of cake flour?

One of these maybe the culprit as your mixer and speed levels is fine.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose & Woody, thanks for your reply. I'm afraid I'm not really making any major progress. I just baked one following your suggestion of beating the butter for 15 seconds longer. I also made sure that I scraped the sides and sometimes to the bottom during the process to ensure even mixing. The batter looked paler and the consistency was a bit thicker compared to the previous one. In fact, it looked so much better that my hope for a perfect cake was raised! The finished product unfortunately still showed random greased marks although they appeared somewhat less than the previous cake. What would you suggest next? Increase mixing butter time by another 15 seconds? By the way, I'm using Kenwood stand mixer (Kenmix) with speed calibrated from 1 -6. For medium speed, I used speed 3 and beat for 1 min 15 seconds after the dry mixture had been moistened. No change in oven rack level and temperature.

I look forward to baking your signature lemon version after we have tackled this grease problem.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Lee
03/21/2013 05:00 PM

Hi Lee,
We suggest that in converting non sheet pan cakes from The Cake Bible that you will need to adjust the leavening(s) to obtain flat tops. You may want to try some of the sponge cakes like the Biscuit Roulade, page 142, since it is baked in a sheet pan. Since these are many times used for rolled cakes, thus layers of acake and filling, they are ideal for layering. Another idea is to convert the 9 inch layer cake recipes to 6 inch pans, which you will also need to adjust for leavening and can trim the top crust to level them. This would allow you to eliminate the cutting of the rings and have smoother sides and a stronger structure, but you may want the open texture sides for aesthetics.
Many combinations with ganaches and butter creams can be layered for assembly, refrigerated, and then thawed for serving at room temperature per the time frames stated with each recipe. Your ganaches will give you longer storing at room temperature time frames. If you are storing them for several hours, you may want to try wrapping the sides with parchment and securing the parchment with a paper clip at the top so you can carefully release the parchment without smearing the frosting onto the cake.
Have fun constructing.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose,

I am attracted to the aesthetic of these cakes, which are make by baking cake in a quarter sheet pan, cutting layers out with a cake ring, layering with components in a cake ring using food-safe acetate, and freezing to maintain the structure. My trouble is that I much prefer the components (cake, ganache, frosting) from your cookbooks to all others. Do you foresee any reasons (structural, etc.) why I shouldn't be able to appropriate your components, without alteration, in this fashion? (One issue that concerned me, left unanswered by the related cookbook, is whether such a cake could be stored at room temperature after thawing, without encountering structural problems. The default cake size is 6 inches.)

Many thanks,
Lee

PS: ("these cakes" should appear as a hyperlink in the comment, as I particularly did not want to searchably link to another author on your website. I apologize if my question is uncouth in this way, please delete it if you find it to be inappropriate).

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Hi M. R.,
We suggest a couple of possibilities. Most chocolate cake recipes that have coconut added as a filling or frosting, your German Chocolate style cakes, are butter or oil cakes. Most of these cake batters have enough structure to incorporate nuts or for your research~~coconut. So you could try folding some flaked or toasted coconut to the batter as the last step before filling the pan.
Another suggestion would be to substitute some or all of the water or other liquid with cream of coconut to add some coconut taste. However, you may have to experiment with your leavenings.
If you have either The Cake Bible or Rose's Heavenly Cakes, you may try replacing half of the sour cream for the Chocolate Domingo or the Bernachon Palet d'Or Gateau with the cream of coconut.
You could also try a combination of the flaked or toasted coconut and the cream of coconut.
If you do have Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we highly recommend the German Chocolate Cake as it is a hybrid chiffon cake, which is unique as a base for the coconut adornment.
Rose & Woody

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M.R. Sullivan
M.R. Sullivan
03/21/2013 12:50 PM

I have been looking for a chocolate/coconut cake for a long time. What I find are great choc. cakes w/coconut frosting or creme in the middle. What I haven't found is chocolate and coconut combined! I tasted a chocolate coconut cake many years ago -- all chocolate looking--with the surprise of coconut inside (and probably in the choc frosting, but not visible). Any suggestions?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Annie
03/21/2013 12:00 PM

Hi Annie,
We suggest if you do not have the time to purchase some more Poire William, that you can sub in:
1. 2 tablespoons of a neutral flavored brandy and 1 tablespoon of pear juice
2. 2 tablespoons pear juice and1 tablespoon of vanilla
3. 1 tablespoons of apricot or peach brandy and 2 tablespoon of pear juice

Enjoy experimenting
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/21/2013 11:53 AM

Hi Vicki,
From your comments, it sounds like you are getting better results. You are approaching solving your grease marks by adjusting one variable at time. We suggest try mixing in the butter for an additional 15 seconds and note the batter's appearance at this stage and after the final mixing so that you can note this for the next time to if you need to adjust again.
Sometimes over-beating is good in that you now know the limit to how long you can beat the batter. We had a similar situation with a chiffon cake for our new book where I thought I had gone as far as we could with the amount of baking powder, but our cake still had a slight dip in the center. Our thoughts were adding another 1/8 teaspoon would collapse the chiffon, but the reverse happened and we now had a slightly domed cake. The chiffon ended up taking over a dozen tests to refine it, but the results have made it one of best recipes.
Enjoy your persistence in making the Perfect Pound Cake, which the lemon version is Rose's signature cake.
Rose & Woody

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I am making the pear chiffon tart and am clear out of Poire William---what else can I use as a substitute with this recipe/
Thank you.

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Hi, Rose and Woody, today I baked your Perfect Pound Cake again. I baked it based on your suggestions, i.e. beat a little longer and placed the rack to 1 level below centre so that top of the cake was baked at about centre height of the oven. The temperature used was 175C. The grease marks are still there when I cut through the cake. Could it be that my butter / eggs were not properly incorporated in the batter? Would you suggest that I cream the butter longer? I was afraid of over-beating the butter mixture. Appreciate your advice. Thanks very much

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Hi again, just wanted to update you on the outcome of my pound cake. I just took it out of the oven a short while ago. It was baked at 162C, middle shelf for 58 minutes. The grease marks are gone and it tastes buttery; soft and crumbly again. The one with greased marks didn't taste as buttery and the texture was more compact in comparison

You were spot on that my earlier butter batter was under-beaten. I'd definitely try baking it at 1 rack level below middle @ 175C as suggested next time. The last time I tried 175C on middle shelf, the crust was too hard / brown.

Generally, what would be the key differences between a pound cake baked @ 162C and 175C ?

Thanks very much for taking time to solve our baking problems. Much appreciated!

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Hi, Woody & Rose, thanks so much for your prompt reply. Yes, you are very right, I regularly have these grease marks problem with butter / pound cakes. I played around a little with baking the same cake at varied oven temperatures and at around 160C, the grease marks seem to disappear to almost non existent. As I write, I'm baking one in the oven :) This time round, I did beat it slightly longer but I only read your reply after I have popped it into the oven. Therefore, I'm unable to adjust the position to one rack level down. Will give that a try next time. Thanks again.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Vicki
03/20/2013 01:14 AM

Hi Vicki,
It sounds like you have made this cake before and your problem was for these cakes.
Our thoughts are that maybe it needs longer beating--sounds like some of the butter dropped to the bottom.
Are you using a high fat butter?
The oven should be fine as long as you know that it is heating to the temperature that you are setting and you know if there are any cold spots.
You may want to try baking the cake with the oven rack lowered down one position to position the top of the cake at the middle of the oven.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, Rose, I baked your Perfect Pound Cake and loved the cake's buttery taste and texture. I like it so much that I baked this cake 3 times over the weekend. However, there was an imperfection on the cake that frustrates me. I noticed some random grease marks on the body of my butter cake slices. What do you think could have caused that? For your info, I'm using a gas oven that bakes with bottom fire only; and I baked on middle shelf. Thanks so much in advance for your advice.

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Hi Josette,
We have a substitution chart on page 460 in Rose's Heavenly Cakes, which lists 1 teaspoon citrus oil=1/3 cup (5-1/3 tablespoons) of citrus zest.
Other sources list: 1/8 tsp lemon oil = 1 tsp lemon extract
We suggest you substitute with either add another 2 table spoons of lemon zest, 1 tablespoon of lemon extract, or combination of 1 tablespoon of added lemon zest and 1-1/2 teaspoons of lemon extract.
Rose & Woody

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Josette Mamo
Josette Mamo
03/19/2013 03:32 PM

I need to make the Golden Lemon Almond Cake which calls for 3/8 tsp pure lemon oil, but in our country we do not readily find Pure Lemon Oil. What are the various substitutes for this? We can definitely find a lot of fresh lemons in my country.

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David, its a very good question. I think it is a matter of consistent results and recipe writing. If u want to achieve the same browning of the crust and rise then use the pan as the recipe recommends.

I prefer light colored cake pans because I dislike an overbrowned crust which is typical with the darker pan. But besides that, I find both pans fine to use.

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Hi Rose and Woody,

In your opinion, do the "white" aluminum pans give better result than the "dark" non-stick pans (25 degrees less in oven temperature is taken into consideration)?

David Chau

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Hi Patty,
We need to ask some questions. We are assuming that your finished bread is different than what is described or pictured as the final bread from the recipe.
Are you baking from Rose's Bread Bible?
What is the bread?
Is it a free form or loaf bread that the dent is not on purpose ex: a split-top loaf bread?
By your description is the dent on top of the bread?
Is this for just one recipe or a constant problem?
Rose & Woody

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Patty Carriere
Patty Carriere
03/17/2013 10:14 PM

I have a question, When I bake bread I go through all the things I need. I let my bread rise and it looks good after baking I end up with a dent in the bread what causes this?

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Hi RaeAnn,
We are assuming you mean the second coating, which next time, you could allow let it cool longer to become slightly firmer. Then apply just a little at a time. if it stiffens up, you can always briefly heat it in the microwave as we state in the recipe.
This frosting can be little messier than a buttercream or ganache if it has not firmed up enough. You may want to read what the Heavenly Cake Bake Along baker/bloggers experiences were with this cake as well other cakes in Rose's Heavenly Cake.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
03/16/2013 03:26 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

Oh my goodness! I just finished the Chocolate Covered Strawberry Cake. What a huge mess covering the cake with Miss Thompson's Chocolate Frosting! It looks amazing!! I'm not sure how it's going to taste, just yet. I didn't use the mousseline, as a beginning baker, the whole cake looked so involved that I needed to make it a little easier. One more question. Do you have a suggestion as to how to cover the cake keeping the frosting under control. That frosting was totally out of control, dripping all over the counter, the cook book, even on the cat!;-)
Thanks again for all your help,
RaeAnn

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Hi Steve,
We have not seen the same performance using King Arthur compared to bleached cake flour. The food chemistry for bleaching achieves the better results in cakes.
Our suggestion is to make a few cakes using each our so you see the differences. We did this while testing recipes for The Baking Bible we always made recipes with both flours if stated.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Carla,
If the bag does not state bleached it is likely unbleached flour which gives poor results when a recipe states bleached cake flour. Rose gives the science of bleaching in the ingredients chapters and understanding sections. We always recommend contacting a supplier or manufacturer for information regarding their product.
Our Power of Flour posting has pictures showing what happens with the different flours.
We do recommend pastry flour for pie crusts and pastries, unless the recipe specifically states a different flour.
Rise & Woody

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Steve Cogorno
Steve Cogorno
03/16/2013 12:05 PM

Hello Rose & Woody!

Most of my baking is bread, thought I do bake cakes a few times a year. My preference is to use King Arthur flours. I've always had superb results with King Arthur in breads.

For recipes that specify bleached cake flour, is the King Arthur Cake Flour "blend", which is unbleached, acceptable? The only bleached flour I've been able to find is Swans Down.

I'd prefer to go with King Arthur, but if you think it doesn't perform as well, I'll use the Swans Down.

Thanks!

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Hi again,
I live in Canada and I use Robin Hood cake and pastry flour but it doesn't say bleached or unbleached. I am a border town and do a lot of shopping in the states so if this is not what I should be using I can look for it there.
I'm excited to try another cake and will let you know how it goes.
Thanks again
Carla

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
03/16/2013 11:27 AM

Hi Rose & Woody,

Thank you for the video suggestions. It is always better to see how it's done,makes it less intimidating, I think. I will watch the video and then maybe I will have more confidence in making the mousseline.

RaeAnn

PS I did make the cake in 10" pans, adjusting the ingredients by 25%, and all turned out well, so far. The cakes look great!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carla
03/16/2013 11:03 AM

Hi Carla,
We have to ask, where do you live as some countries do not permit bleached cake flour. In all cases where we state cake flour we are using bleached cake flour. With King Arthur now producing a cake flour that uses unbleached flour, our next book will state that cake flour as bleached cake flour. If you cannot buy bleached cake flour locally, we suggest either buy it on the web or do a combination of bleached all-purpose flour and cornstarch as stated in The Cake Bible. Pastry flour or unbleached all-purpose will give you poor results.
You may want to read our Power of Flour postings on the blog in which we tested different flours and combinations of flours with cornstarch and potato starch.
You can use 9 x 2 inch pans, but your cakes may be slightly lower. You can also increase all of the ingredients for any of The Cake Bible's recipes using the 1-1/2 inch high pans by 33% for the proper level in a 2 inch high pan.
We suggest that you try the proper bleached cake flour or all-purpose flour substitution for a couple of The Cake Bible's recipes using taller 2 inch high pans.
Rose & Woody

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Hi again,
Yes my cakes always seem to be dry, I was just wondering if the flour I use is the problem. I do use cake flour but where I live I can't just buy cake flour, it's cake and pastry flour.... Would that make a difference?
Also I was looking at a reply you gave to another person and you were talking about cake pan sizes, I do use the size of pan that the recipe calls for with one exception, all I have is 2 inch tall pans, would that be the problem?
I'm stubborn and will not give up till I get it right !!
Thanks for helping me figure this out:-)
Carla

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Nancy
03/16/2013 09:44 AM

Hi Nancy,
We suggest that you contact General Mills. Since manufacturers of cake mixes generally do not use bleached cake flour due to its expense and that Betty Crocker is part of General Mills, the likely hood is the all-purpose flour is either Pillsbury or Gold Medal. For moistness many cake mixes include pudding, but also have commercial stabilizers and moistening agents that are unavailable to the home scratch baker.
If you are trying to achieve cake mix moistness in a scratch cake and want to understand the food science in baking cakes, we suggest that you read The Cake Bible. The book has sections for various types of cakes, frostings, techniques, wedding cakes, and charts for adjusting recipes for most sizes of cakes. Most recipes have an Understanding paragraph to relate the recipe to others. The book is written for you to make a cake recipe and gives suggestions for what fillings and frostings can go with it. The book was written over 20 years ago so many of the recipes are designed for 1-1/2 inch tall pans. Where today the standard is 2 inch tall pans. But you can always convert any of the the recipes for a 2 inch high pans The Cake Bible is used by many culinary schools, bakeries, and restaurants.
If you are trying to stay in the cake mix mode of understanding cakes, then you may want to look at the Cake Doctor's series of books.

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Hi, Rose
I have been searching online regarding the ingredients for Betty Crocker's super moist cake mix. What exactly ingredients that they included in their cake mix. I would like to use their recipe to start from scratch. What kind of flour did they use?

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Hi RaeAnn,
Yes, you can add the strawberry butter to the Neo-Classic Buttercream.
We do recommend that you make the Mousseline as it is lighter in texture and not as buttery in flavor. The key is to make sure the Italian meringue and the beaten butter are within a few degrees of each other and close to 70 degrees.
We do have a video of making the Strawberry Mousseline on YouTube:
GM cake dvd2 03 - Mousseline Buttercream.
Two other videos that are worth watching are the Spun Sugar:GM cake dvd2 09 - Spun Sugar, as we insisted on keeping the camera crew for this last video at General Mills and with glorious results.
and a Moment of Rose-by Ben FInk as it will you will see Rose's passion for baking and giving it to all of you.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
03/15/2013 11:50 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

I'm making the Chocolate Covered Strawberry Cake, but I'm intimidated by the stawberry mousseline filling. Can I make the Neo Classic Buttercream adding the strawberry butter instead?
RaeAnn

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carla
03/15/2013 11:27 PM

Hi Carla,
Have the recipes worked out in the past or you always getting dry and dense cakes?
Is this with all types of cakes: angel food, butter, oil, and chiffon cakes?
For recipes stating cake flour or using bleached all-purpose flour, we always use bleached cake flour for the best results. In many cases made from scratch butter and oil cakes can be slightly less moist than cake mixes as many cake mixes have pudding or other ingredients to produce moistness and allow for a longer shelf life in the stores. Certain cakes will definitely be denser, like the Grand Marnier in The Cake Bible or the Golden Lemon Almond in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.
We suggest a couple of cakes to try that are moist and airy are the German Chocolate Cake and the Orange Chiffon Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and the WHite Chocolate Whisper Cake in The Cake Bible.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks for replying so quickly, I have all of Rose's books and that's the recipes I am doing and still have that same problem. I will look for the videos and hopefully they will give me some insight as to what I'm doing wrong.
Thanks again, it really means a lot to me :-)
Carla

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston
03/15/2013 06:01 PM

Hi Carla,
We ask are you making recipes from one of Rose's books?
You may want to view some of Rose's videos on YouTube in which she gives tips for many of the cakes in her books. Just do a search for YouTube Rose Beranbaum to see a listing of the videos.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rosa,
I have been doing a lot of baking lately and follow recipes to a T but every cake I make it turns out dry and dense, I measure and weigh and do everything the way it tells me.
Please help because I love decorating and really don't want to use cake box mixes.
I will never give up but I am getting frustrated.
Thanks
Carla

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Rosary
03/15/2013 10:05 AM

hi Rosary,
Yes. Rose does have a video of making Perfect Flaky Pis Crust on YouTube titled:
01 Perfect Flaky Pie Crust Rose Levy Beranbaum·

There are several other YouTubes with pie recipes. The recipe for the cream cheese pie crust was revised in 2005 and posted as this article:
Rose's Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust

Rose & Woody

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Hi, Rose. It's Rosary.

I've been making your pie crusts for 20 years. (wouldn't use any other.) But I'm still not sure how far to take the kneading process. Do you have a video of this?

Thanks.

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Hi Hector

Thanks for the response. Yes I did measure them by weight, bascically I measure almost everything by weight, even the liquid ingredients.

I guess I have to try the cake ont=e more time to be sure. Not sure what went wrong with the cake :(

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Judy Hager
03/14/2013 05:46 PM

Hi Judy,
We recommend a bittersweet chocolate with a cacao percentage range of 50 to 53% for the standard recipe. Extra bittersweet chocolate has a cacao percentage range of 60 to 52%, which you can substitute in at the same amount as the standard recipe.
For making seedless puree or sauce, you just need a strainer that has a mesh small enough to prevent the seeds from passing through it. This does take some time to do and is worth it if making the raspberry sauce or puree for itself or blended into a neutral flavored frosting like the Mousseline. For the oblivion and your kids, the jam should work just fine. You can also buy seedless raspberry puree from suppliers, like Perfect Puree from Napa Valley, on line and available in many markets. Most brands of chocolate, even Hersheys, now note the cacao percentage for their dark chocolates on the packaging.
Rose & Woody

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Hello! Have enjoyed experimenting with cakes from the Cake Bible, and am ready to try the "Chocolate Flame" version of the Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte. I have small kids (read "not much time or money to be luxurious and creative!") and no special berry strainer, so I'd like to use seedless raspberry jam. I could use some clarification on the instructions, which say, "you may also use 3/4 c. commercial seedless raspberry jam, but to cut the sweetness, use extra bittersweet chocolate for the cake." Do the extra apply to the degree of bittersweet-ness, or does it mean to add additional bittersweet chocolate to the recipe? If so, how much extra? Thanks so much --
Judy Hager

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Shawn, this is one of my favorite white cakes. Did u measure by weight? Specially eggs and flour.

Also, yes, don't use a taller pan, the xtra metal radiates excess heat that will affect rise. But I don't think this is as critical as measuring accurately for this cake, imo, genoise and biscuit cakes are easy to make but very exacting with ingredient measurements.

I've just made the bittersweet cocoa almond genoise and I needed to use 7.5 yolks and 5 whites instead of 6 of each. I always measure in grams, as nowadays digital scales are widely available and easy to use.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Gayleen
03/14/2013 01:37 PM

Hi Gayleen,
We always recommend weighing as it is the quickest and most accurate way of determining the correct amount of an ingredient. For sour cream, the weight of 8 fluid ounces is 8 ounces/227 grams. You could also measure out 1 cup.
Other advantages of weighing are that you:
do not need to measure out in one container and scrape into the main bowl, in which you will lose some of the ingredient in the measuring container.
can add up the weights on the recipe's chart and compare that total against the weight you have for what you just mixed. If you are short by a lot, you will know if you forgot adding an ingredient before you bake or finish making the recipe.
easily divide batters for filling multiple cake pans, cupcake molds
easily weigh out amounts for frostings, individual cookie pieces, and reducing syrups
will save a lot of time in both assembling a recipe and catching errors in assembly before you cannot correct them
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from silvia
03/14/2013 12:01 PM

Hi Silvia,
We always recommend to that you get specific details from the client especially when the requested dessert is unique or has some meaning to the recipients. Sometimes this requires making some samples for taste testing by the client.
We are assuming you have been requested to make both chocolate and lemon flavored cupcakes. Some suggestions for the chocolate cupcakes from Rose's Heavenly Cakes: Chocolate Butter Cupcakes, page 296 or the Designer Chocolate Baby Grands, page 303. For the lemon cupcakes, we suggest making cupcake versions of the Lemon Poppyseed-Sour Cream Cake. The Baby Grands are chiffon cakes which would give you combination of lemon in a butter based cake and a moist chocolate with a shiny chocolate glaze.
The Mousseline or White Chocolate Buttercream for should hold up in the outside temperature as long as they are not in direct sunlight and kept at room temperature shortly before they need to be displayed or served. If making the Baby Grands, you do not need to frost them although you may want to try piping a single small rose in the middle after the glaze has become tacky but not set.
Rose & Woody

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I have cream cheese in a 12oz. tub, how I measure 8 oz. for a recipe?

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Hi Rose, im making cupcakes for my friends bridal showe and she wants chocolate and lemon, which recipe is best? Also its for july and is outside, im thinking of using mouseline buttercream to ice and pipe roses, will it be stable enough?

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Hi Rose

I've tried to make your White Genoise from TCB but it turned out chewy like bread!

Now I know that it shouldn't turn out that way. But I am not really sure what went wrong with the mixing process.

I beat the whites till soft peak, beat in the sugar gradually till very stiff peaks. Beat in the water (I didn't do this gradually), then took about a cup of the mixture and mix it together with the beurre noisette. Then, I folded the flour into the remaining mixture till just combined and folded in the beurre noisette mixture.

The only reason that I could think of is that maybe I overmixed it while folding the flour, or could it be due to the fact that I am using a 6 by 2 inches pan instead of a 6 by 1.5 inches?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Kate
03/13/2013 07:40 PM

Hi Kate,
We suggest that most any non-loaf pan recipes can be converted to using bread pans, the key is knowing the cup capacity of the dough so that you choose the correct size loaf pan., which is more easily determined by the weight of the dough. For example: In The Bread Bible, the Basic Hearth Bread with 745 grams of dough on page 305 makes as a round loaf 7-1/2 inches by 4 inches high OR as a 9 by 4-1/2 by 4-1/2 inches loaf in a 10 by 5 inch loaf pan.
Another method is to check the volume of dough after the first rising, when it has doubled. The loaf pan should hold about 75% the volume of the risen loaf.
In The Bread Bible, the oven temperature is the same and baking time is similar.
You may want to look at the free form loaf recipes in The Bread Bible to see their gram weights and then compare them to recipes made in loaf pans to determine different pan sizes for different doughs.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Judie
03/13/2013 05:33 PM

Hi Jodie,
We have not used this product and their website does not state it being double acting, so we expect it is not. They have a contact phone number if you want to check and did not have any answers on their Q & A section.
Our testing and recommendations for baking powders to be used with Rose's recipes are Rumford and Argo, which is double acting and aluminum free.
Rose & Woody

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I have a question about sodium-free baking powder. I am able to purchase Hain's Featherweight and it does NOT say "double-acting." Before I launch into "trial and error mode" does anyone have insights about how this might affect the cake - or suggestions for adjustments?

Thank you

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Not sure if I'm doing this right,but I have a baking question.Can I change a recipe that makes two small round loaves into bread loaves made in a bread pan? And if so,do I change the oven temp any? The recipe says to bake at 4:50,would I lower that for two bread pans?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from MikePavlov
03/13/2013 11:16 AM

Hi Mike,
We always recommend to that you get specific details from the buyer especially when the requested dessert is unique or has some meaning to the recipients. Sometimes this requires making some samples for taste testing by the buyer.
For Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we had a similar situation. My T'ai Chi studio's head instructor's mother use to make a spice cake with peanut butter spread and apples on top and liked the idea, but felt the straight peanut butter was too overwhelming and the apples took away from the spice cake. We skipped the apples and replaced the white chocolate in the Dreamy Creamy Buttercream in Rose's Heavenly Cakes with peanut butter. He liked our adaptation.
Our suggestion for you to ask your client is if your idea of a peanut butter buttercream filling similar to the ours, with a White Chocolate Frosting for a yellow cake. Other cake choices might be the Spice cake or Karmel Cake from Rose's Heavenly Cakes. We also recommend that you suggest the client may want a second sheet cake with a non peanut butter frosting for those who are allergic to peanuts.
Rose & Woody

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I have been asked to make a wedding cake with the following parameters. Peanut butter cake with White Chocolate Frosting. I've tried the White Chocolate frosting from your book, but am having trouble coming up with a PB cake recipe. I am considering a Peanut Butter Filling/Icing with another cake. It's a July wedding so thee is time. Hope you can help.

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Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
Laurie Raz-Astrakhan in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
03/12/2013 10:12 PM

Thank you. Your answers were very helpful. I had checked the Errata/CORRECTIONS section, but it still made me nervous, so it is reassuring to know that the amount is truly correct. Since you wrote "you may add as much as 3 ounces," I assume that there is some flexibility up to that amount.

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Hi Laurie.
1. If you have any questions about correct information.We always recommend to check Rose's Errata/CORRECTIONS section on the blog. There are none for this recipe. You may add as much as 3 ounces of liqueur. The frosting will get thinner with the more liqueur you add.

2. We recommend to let the buttercream to warm up a bit to a cool room temperature or until the frosting is slightly soft but still keeping the crumbs fixed in place to avoid the final coat of buttercream from separating.
Rose & Woody

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Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
03/12/2013 04:40 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

2 questions here:

1. The recipe for Mousseline BC in TCB (page 244) calls for adding 3 oz of liqueur at the end. Is that correct or is it a misprint? It seems like a lot and I am afraid to put that much in, lest I ruin my BC.

2. After crumb-coating the cake with the MBC and chilling it, can I apply the final coat while the cake is cold (so as not to mush up the crumb-coat) or do I need to let it come to room temperature? Would there be any problems in adhesion or changes to the BC texture if the cake is cold?

Thank you!
Laurie

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Hi Virginia,
Rose has have never tried to shorten it with a pressure cook, which might work it but could cause them to disintegrate. Due to the time factor to make them and the availability of great products from around the world via the internet, we generally buy extraordinary varieties from France, Switzerland, and Italy. You may want to check ChefShop's website.
Rose & Woody

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Virginia Sybert
Virginia Sybert
03/12/2013 12:36 PM

A query re candied orange peels from A Passion for Chocolate - wish the quicker recipes gave as good a result but they don't, so a nine day odyssey it has always been. Wondered if it were possible to shorten processing time by using a pressure cooker; similar to the instructions you give for preparing stock (glace de volaille) in Rose's Celebrations. Or, perhaps in 24 years you have discovered a shortcut? As always, thank you for your help.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from RaeAnn
03/12/2013 09:39 AM

Hi RaeAnn,
As Hector commented you can simply use the same volume of batter and have shorter cakes. The difference in the volume is 20% more for making this cake in 10 inch pans. If you are weighing your ingredients, we suggest that you increase all ingredients except the baking powder by 20%. Since 20% gives you a baking powder level of 6-7/8 teaspoons, going with 6-3/4 teaspoons for the larger pans should give you flatter tops.
We suggest you increase the mousseline and the chocolate frosting recipes by 25% to be sure you have enough. Or, by the 1-1/2 times you mentioned if you want some thicker layers of frosting or want to store some for another time.
Rose & Woody

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier in reply to comment from Hector
03/12/2013 09:09 AM

thank you again! I will try both options and see which one i prefer! Merci beaucoup!!!

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RaeAnn, you provably won't need any conversion. The recipe is for two 9x2" cake pans plus 2 cupcakes. The volume difference between one 9x2" and one 10x2" cake pan is 2 cups! That means you are short 2 cups only since you have a second 10x2" pan. Your 10" take will be slightly less tall, which I think is fine for this cake.

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Try the Caramel Silk Meringue Buttercream if you like caramel to be frosting consistency. Add salt for a salted version.

I prefer caramel frosting with a crunch, so I make it by making caramel from plain sugar and water (1 cup sugar with 1/4 cup water), heated to 360-370oF. Then cooling it as sheets or strands or hair! See cake bible golden cage or rhc saint honore gateau.

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Hi Woody & Rose,
Now that I've decided to make the chocolate-covered strawberry cake, I need a little help converting the ingredients to make a 10" layer cake. Do I use the Rose Factor 5? Should I make 1&1/2 of the recipe for the buttercream and frosting?
Rae

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Thx hector for the suggestion! My caramel is more of a stiff caramel sauce or a soft caramel texture. Do I simply boil it to a specific tempature to get it harder or is there another recipe in one of roses book I can use? I fear my own recipe is too soft to chop as I can spoon it but I love it's taste!!

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Hi, Thanks for the suggestion. I was thinking the same thing. I'll try the CCS Cake. :)

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great suggestion hector!

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Claudine, your cake sounds so yummy, I am tempted to add: how about chopping the salted caramel til fairly fine and fold it with the buttercream filling. It will stick, still have a crunch, and slice beautifully.

Salted caramel cream puffs were a favorite of mine when I worked at a Japanese bakery. We broke the caramel sheets to about 3 inches big, then run it thru the food processor then fold it with the cream filling.

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier
03/11/2013 05:52 PM

Hi Rose and Woody! I have been using your delicious white velvet cake along with with your vanilla mousse line buttercream that i add homemade caramel too to make a delicious caramel cake. I also add a layer of that homemade salted caramel between 2 of the layers. My question follows: whats the best way to layer the caramel in for it to stick to the cake layers when you slice it. It tends to separate while transferring in plates. I have tried melting it a little so that its more "wet" and to have it even but that melts the icing dam around it. Too stiff and it separates from the cake layers when you slice. Any suggestions? I need to make a salted caramel wedding cake in April and although its absolutely delicious, I don't want the cake layers to separate!
Thank you for any advice!

Regards,

Claudine

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Diane
03/11/2013 05:43 PM

Hi Diane,
The steam prevents the crust from hardening to give it a chance to rise to its fullest. In The Bread Bible, Rose gives directions for producing steam by placing a sheetpan on the oven floor and tossing 1/2 cup of ice cubes onto the sheet after you set the pastry or bread on the rack. This is a safer method.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from RaeAnn
03/11/2013 05:35 PM

Hi RaeAnn,
We suggest the Chocolate Covered Strawberry Cake, on page 91, in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. It has a white chocolate enhanced white butter cake, layers of strawberry buttercream, and a rich chocolate frosting. This cake gives you a wonderful harmony of flavors. Our thoughts are that just a chocolate cake may overwhelm the strawberry.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, I'm planning on baking a cake for the office birthdays. The one requested is chocolate with strawberry. All I can think of is chocolate butter cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Do you have any other ideas?
Rae

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thank you for the sweet note robin!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from carole
03/10/2013 04:29 PM

Hi Carole,
We generally recommend to reduce the baking powder when increasing a batter to a larger pan to decrease the doming. However, many people like a slightly domed cupcake. Since the pound cake has a definite dome, you want to decrease the baking powder from 1-1/2 to 1-1/4 teaspoons.
In The Cake Bible, Rose converted this recipe to a 10-cup Bundt pan recipe for serving at weddings and special occasions on page 511.
Enjoy making this as a special cupcake. My daughter, as a child, always wanted me to make her a cheesecake for her birthdays, instead of a traditional cake.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you for the information.I buy very few cookbooks now, but if if find one recipe that I like I consider it worth whatever I paid for it.

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Hi, I had kept your recipe for the Perfect Pound Cake that was published in our local newspaper in November 2010. I plan to double it to make a giant cupcake, but I'm not sure how much baking power I should use. The recipe calls for 1-1/2 cups cake flour and 3/4 tsp. of baking powder. Also, it is ok to double all of the other ingredients.

Thank you so much. It's my great-niece's second birthday party, and I want to make a special cupcake for her.

Carole

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Hi Rose,
I’ve been enjoying your book, The Pie and Pastry Bible, but I do have one question. In the section on Danish Pastry, you say to bake the pastry in the oven with a pan filled with about an inch of boiling water. However, you do not explain why to do this. I would just love to understand the reasoning behind baking the pastry this way. I’m assuming it has to do with creating a nice humid environment for the yeast? If so, does this result in an even flakier pastry?

Thanks for taking the time to answer my question and for making me a better baker!
Diane

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Hi Kyle! Yes Bruce Healy's books are wonderful and I can't imagine why they are not still in print. Writing from MN where I'm
having dinner with Woody post the Chicago housewares show.

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Rose, Guess we crossed in cyberspace once more. Bonne année!

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Ellen, TCB was a diiferent publisher and copyright 1988. It's a testament to how great a book it is that it's sitill in print so be glad you didn't have to pay a king's ransom(like I did for Bruce Healy's Mastering the Art of French Pastry bc it was out of print). TCB is a treasure of a book and one I still go to for many formulas. Give it some time and you'll lgrow to appreciate the format.

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Ellen, the cake bible is going into its 50 printing and will be 25 years old this sept. don't judge a book by its paper! Seriously, publishing has evolved greatly over the past two decades. And all my books now have stitched bindings. Rose's Heavenly Cakes was my dream book. So glad you're enjoying it.

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I purchased Heavenly Cakes and have made Apple Caramel Charlotte, Chocolate Feather Bed, Lemon Canadian Crown and others. I was looking for elegant cakes and was not disappointed.They are were beautiful just like the pictures and guests thought they were delicious. I decided to buy The Cake Bible. The content is good however the ingredients are black print on grey and hard to read, the paper looks cheap in contrast with the quality of paper ,print and pictures in Heavenly Cakes??What happened?? Ordered from Jessica's Biscuit on line.

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Hi Rose,
just wanted to share with you how much I enjoy baking your cakes. I think you're amazing. Your recipes are brilliant and your work is truly inspiring.
thank you, thank you, thank you!
robin

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Hi Amyee,
We recommend The Cake Bible as it will give you an understanding on the relationship of ingredients, techniques for assembling, and the importance of weighing your ingredients. However, since you have a specific genre for diabetics, we suggest you investigate some of the sites under Sites I Like that address certain dietary subjects.
Good luck with your business .
Rose & Woody

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Hello my name is Aymee. I am a young diabetic and an entrepeneur. I know I may be too young to comment here, but I have an important question in realtion to my business. First off my business is called Treats 4 me, it's for diabetics. I am trying to figure out how to exactly make a cake from scratch. I've searched everywhere online, but I need some real answers. Can someone tell me the ingredients for making a cake from scratch?

Thank you for your time, Aymee

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Hi Josephine,
What you seem to be describing as I remember from going to the bakery as a kid was a "bun" about 3 inches round and 1 inch tall, almost like a tall English muffin in shape, with a soft crust. A small hole was on the side where a filling was squirted in by the baker.
Rose has several cream puff recipes and other pastries that may be of interest to you in The Pie and Pastry Bible. What you are describing sounds more like a filled doughnut.
Rose & Woody

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josephine mullane
josephine mullane
03/ 1/2013 08:53 AM

Hello:
I have been searching for years for a Cream Puff or Cream Bun recipe that is not made from choux pastry. I have tried a few of the recipes I found on the Internet but they resemble dinner rolls and not the soft, sweet buns that I remember from my youth that I could buy at our local bake shop. The Cream Puffs, as they were called, looked like a hamburger bun and they were soft and sweet, filled with whipped cream and dusted with icing sugar. To date, I cannot replicate these Cream Puffs. The result from the Cream Buns, or semla as some have suggested, still turn out like dinner rolls and not 'cakey'. If by any miracle you have a recipe or some suggestion as to how I can reproduce these Cream Puffs I would be eternally appreciative. I have your Cake Bible, which I love, and I receive your newsletters. I keep hoping for a clue to my quest for those Cream Puffs. Thank you kindly.

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Thank you, all, for your feedback and input. This forum is wonderful for learning from others. I will definitely look into getting either larger, studier foil or a silicone pan.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Parizad
02/28/2013 12:22 PM

Hi Parizad,
Depending on what is trying to be achieved in a cake recipe will determine what adjustments need to be made for converting the recipe for cupcakes. Also, what your preference is for a cupcake. Some people like domed cupcakes, others prefer a flatter top for holding the frosting. We generally strive for a just slightly domed cupcake for a good base for the frosting.
Where we try to achieve as close as possible flat top for a multiple layer cake to give even thicknesses of fillings, Rose prefers a slightly domed cake for a single layer cake.
For most multiple layer cakes, we slightly reduce the amount of leavening for cupcakes.
For single layer cakes, like the Sour Cream Cake, you can stay with the same amount of leavening or a slight increase.
Also, if two flours are stated, you may have to adjust more or less for one versus the other. We do not have leavening conversions on record for all of the layer cakes in our catalog of cake recipes. However, the cupcake recipes given in Rose's Heavenly Cakes will give you a several examples.
You will need to experiment with the leavening level to see what you desire. You may want to make reduced recipes while you are experimenting.

You may also try with letting half of the cupcakes sit at room temperature for 20 minutes before baking for you see what are the results. You can adjust from the results.
If the cupcakes are slightly dry compared to the layer cake version, you could try reducing the butter a bit and adding more oil.
For your banana cake, we suggest the Cordon Rose Banana Cake on page 69. It does have sugar in it, but at a lower level than other cakes because of the bananas. We do not have any completed sugar less cakes in are our repertoire as sugar free baking is not part of our baking genre.
Any of the buttercream bases can be colored with blue food coloring. You should start just with a few drops and blend it in then add more if necessary. If you are looking for a non sugar frosting that will go well with the banana cake is the White Chocolate Cream Cheese Buttercream on page 237, which the white chocolate is used for sweetness.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, I have never baked before but need to start now as my 5 yr old would like me to bake cupcakes for her class for her birthday. I have borrowed a copy of the cake bible and tried your blueberry muffins and they are delicious however my daughter does not like fruits in her cupcakes and I am not sure what changes I need to make if I leave out the blueberries. Can I request you to guide me towards which recipes I could use to bake and frost mini cupcakes from the cake bible or from your website and what are the alterations I would need to make to convert from cake version to mini and medium sized cupcake / muffin version. I also want to bake a small cake for cutting. i also need to colour the frosting light blue. As it is for kids I would like to be be moist, light but still full of flavor and if possible I would like to use bananas for the sweetness instead of sugar. Also how much in advance could I make the cupcakes and Frosting. Thank you and have a great day :)!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Andrea
02/27/2013 11:24 PM

Hi Andrea,
All of Rose's egg yolk and egg white buttercreams heat the eggs in some manner, except the Classic Egg White and Chocolate Buttercream. For a great wedding cake buttercream we recommend the Mousseline Buttercream on page 514, in which the egg whites are heated when adding the sugar syrup. You can add virtually any flavoring to it including chocolate. If you have health safety concerns, we suggest using Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs.
Enjoy making a stunning wedding cake, which many wedding cake bakers have opened the pages of The Cake Bible to create their cakes.
Rose & Woody

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Hello,

I was recently gifted the cake bible and I have a question about the buttercreams. I have only made buttercream with eggs once and I the recipe said to heat the egg whites. I do not see any instructions to do that in these recipes so I am wondering if I.missed something somewhere or if that is unnecessary. I am slightly paranoid about making my first wedding cake for my brother in law and using raw eggs in my buttercream.

Thank you!

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Mari, i always wonder about the "water" on the cheesecake. if you are using foil, it needs to be heavy duty, and 2 sheets.

if the water is between the cake pan and the inner layer of foil, then it is liquid sipping off from the cheesecake batter, which is totally normal.

if there is water between the 2 sheets of foil, then it is water that sipped in from the water bath, also normal.

but like woody said, using a larger silicone pan instead of foil sheets, is much better.

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Hi Mari!

I bought a roll of extra large foil to use just for baking. It is large enough to completely wrap the springform pan with no seams. I roll the top edge of the inner layer of foil over the top edge of the outer layer. It seems to help keep the water out of the pan.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Terri
02/26/2013 04:57 PM

Hi Terri,
You are taking on a monumental task on top of all of the rest of the wedding planning. We hope you getting some assistance.
If you have The Pie & Pastry Bible, Rose gives instructions for making the pie crust and assembling the pies with unfrozen fruit.Then freezing them, unbaked. Her research has shown that the pie crusts stay crisper when baked from a frozen state. We have not used Instant Clear Jel but guess that it can have clumping problems with frozen fruit. We always recommend contacting the author or manufacturer on questions about a particular recipe or product.
If you need to use frozen fruit, you will compromise to a certain degree with thawing, adding the gel, and refreezing the fruit. We suggest you try making a pie with the frozen fruit and gel to see if the degree of compromise works for you.
Rose & Woody

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Woody,

Thank you for your response! The water - if I recall correctly - was on the clear side, if just a bit "filmy." Would that correspond to what Rose says about liquid leaching out from the cream cheese, eggs, or sour cream?

When I removed the foil, I saw there was some water between the pan and the aluminum foil. (I'm not sure if that answers your second question in your first sentence?) And no, I didn't use a crust.

Mari

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Mari
02/26/2013 03:18 PM

Hi Mari,
We ask what color was the "water" and was there any liquid on the pan when you removed the foil?
I have been amazed in the past that no matter how carefully I would wrap the double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to encase the springform pan that some water leaked past the foil to the pan and onto the bottom of the cake. Now, we both use a slightly larger silicone pan to stretch over the springform pan to prevent any water from leaking through.
If you did not use a crust, some liquid from the cream cheese, eggs, or sour cream may leach out for this recipe to have its creamy texture as mentioned on page 81. You may want to add a crust such as a thin layer of sponge cake or invert the cake and wipe off the moisture with a paper towel.
Rose & Woody

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Hi I have a dilemma. My daughter is getting married in June and I will be making pies for 300. I have made pies for years but usually only freeze crust then assemble pies. Can I use frozen fruit, mix it with sugar and instant clear jel (I use that instead of flour)put it in a pie crust and freeze until day before wedding? Doing this would save a lot of trouble because I could make pies little by little instead of in mass quantity on the day before. I have already tried out a small version of frozen blackberry and mixed with sugar/instant clear jel. I took that out of freezer last night to bake it for the test and although it was delicious there were little sugar cubes throughout the mini pie. I did mix the sugar & instant clear jel as instructed by manufacturer but still got those little tiny cubes throughout. Do you think this was because I mixed it with frozen fruit instead of thawing fruit? And...what if I thawed fruit first then mixed and froze again...can you do that without risk? Frozen fruit bags say do not refreeze. Your thoughts on best way to prepare would be awesome. Thank You!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from john
02/26/2013 12:20 PM

Hi John,
We are unfamiliar with this recipe.
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Billie
02/26/2013 12:10 PM

Hi Billie,
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject.
We do not have a semolina filone recipe unless you are making The Bread Bible's Semolina Torpedo, which uses a sponge, to beable to give you suggestions. You may also want to contact the author for his/her suggestions.
Rose & Woody

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hi sorry to disturb u but hav been given a recipe called holy island bread wonderd if u had cum across it the recipe is simple
31b of flour white nd brown
tbs of salt
tbs of black treakle
2 pkts of yeast
hav u herd of this and if so can u correct it if theres any mistakes please as i wud really luv to know
thank you

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Hello. On Sunday I baked the Rose Cordon Cheesecake. I followed the recipe to the T (including using cornstarch and wrapping the outside of the pan with foil). After cooling the cake and frigerating overnight, I took the cake out to have a piece. After I cut a small slice, there was a small amount of water left on the plate. I subsequently cut a larger slice and placed it in a separate plate to take to work, and again, there was water left on the plate. I'm wondering whether this is to be expected, and ifnot, what would you recommend I do differently, if anything?

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I am making the semolina filone. I am an experienced bread baker but I am having a lot of trouble with the dough. The poolish was very, very wet and the autolyzed dough extremely dry, so much so that I could not incorporate the poolish into the flour mixture in the stand mixer. Then, after I finally mostly broke up all the lumps by hand, it was all the consistency of lumpy pancake batter, again very wet. I had to add more than one additional cup of bread flour and knead by hand to get it to come together. I had weighed all the ingredients carefully. Any suggestions? Also, although this is called semolina filone, the ingredients call for durum flour. I did have the finer-ground durum so I used that. Did you mean the slightly coarser semolina that you would use for pasta dough? Was that the problem? Many thanks in advance for any help.

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Hi David, I do it all the time. Helps to refrigerate the chiffon overnight and use the buttercream at 80 oF (very soft spreadable). If your kitchen is cool (such as most air conditioned homes), lets say 70 oF, the buttercream will be much harder and not spread as easy thus compressing you chiffon. Microwave the buttercream 5 seconds and it will quickly reach 80.

I will never forget making cake bible's triple chocolate cake in Hilo on an early 65 of morning. What a pain it was. Ganache on genoise is a similar animal to buttercream on chiffon.

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we haven't tried it david, but i can't see why it wouldn't work as i've used bettercream with biscuits that have syrup.

on another note, a good friend just used this very cake to make french toast and reports it was fantastic!

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Hi Rose and Woody,
Can I use butter cream to fill and frost Orange-Glow Chiffon Layer Cake without weighing it down?
David

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Laura
02/21/2013 03:06 PM

Hi Laura,
We suggest replace your fudge idea with a fudgy brownie. Rose conceived this idea and perfected it in Rose's Heavenly Cakes with the Double Chocolate Whammy Groom's Cake. The cake is a chocolate cake baked in a bundt pan. A fudgy brownie is baked and then broken into pieces and added to the cake batter. The brownies become suspended in the batter upon baking.
Upon eating a slice, you get the fudgy, moist chocolate hit from the brownie along with the mellower chocolate cake's taste.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Rob
02/21/2013 02:46 PM

Hi Rob.
We have to say if you can only choose ONE book then it should be for the type of baking you most love to make, eat, and share with others.
If you are trying to decide between The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes for your first cake baking book, then we recommend The Cake Bible because of the way it is set up. The book has sections for various types of cakes, frostings, techniques, wedding cakes, and charts for adjusting recipes for most sizes of cakes. Most recipes have an Understanding paragraph to relate the recipe to others. The book is written for you to make a cake recipe and gives suggestions for what fillings and frostings can go with it. The book was written over 20 years ago so many of the recipes are designed for 1-1/2 inch tall pans. Where today the standard is 2 inch tall pans. But you can always the recipes for a 2 inch high pan. The Cake Bible is used by many culinary schools, bakeries, and restaurants.
Rose's Heavenly Cakes is written to have a cake recipe in its entirety with the all of the components of the recipe and their individual recipe. Where The Cake Bible has photographs of most of the cakes at the beginning of the book. Rose's Heavenly Cakes has a full page photograph of the cake with its recipe.
Rose & Woody

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If I can only buy ONE book by Rose, which one? :)

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How do you make bake stable fudge? I want to make a cake with fudge pieces in it but homemade fudge melts and forms a layer on the bottom. I know you can buy fudge that holds it's shape when baked from the supermarket, but I'd really like to make my own. Thanks!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from ellie
02/21/2013 09:28 AM

Hi Ellie,
In Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we have recipes for a Gateau Breton, on page 69, and Candied Lemon Roses, on page 432. The lemon roses are basically cooking the lemon peel in a sugar syrup, wrapping the peel to form a rose shape, and coating them with corn syrup. Good luck with your exam.
Rose & Woody

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hi i will be doing a exam on a gateau and i saw yor amazing rose made out of lemon peel how do you make it and whats the recipe i think it would look fab as a center peace on my gateau kneed to know asap thanks x

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Hi Susie,
If you have The Cake Bible, we recommend that you look at the Wedding and Special Occasions chapter. in which Rose gives formulas and calculations for butter cakes for: scaling up or down from a given cake pan size, baking time guidelines, servings, approximate batter weights, and baking powder adjustments. There are also base batter formulas for butter, genoise, and cheesecakes.
We have found that the formulas and calculations will give you a starting point for working out favorable results through testing. For our new book we had some cakes that only took one try and another fifteen tries to formulate the ingredients for the wedding cakes. Rose's next book will have a carrot wedding cake in it, but you may not want to wait for it to come out in 2015.
Rose & Woody

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Susie Hoglund
Susie Hoglund
02/20/2013 04:28 PM

Do you have any advice for making a large scale carrot cake? I have done many a butter cake, but this is my first request for carrot.
Much obliged,
Susie

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Miu
02/18/2013 03:46 PM

Hi Miu,
We checked and could not find a posting talking about French skillets. You may want to check the Forums as it possibly was discussed between bakers on one of the postings.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose,

Thank you for the great site and the amazing books. A few years ago you blogged about a brand of French skillets, I believe they may have been carbon steel. What was the brand?

I searched your entire site from 2005 to present and I could not find it unfortunatley.

Many thanks, Miu

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Hi Nazeeha,
We cannot speak for other recipes, however the Molten Chocolate Souffle and Lava Cakes in Rose's Heavenly Cakes are refrigerated until the cakes are completely cooled. Then they are briefly reheated in a microwave to liquify the ganache centers. They keep for 1 day covered in the refrigerator.
Rose & Woody

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NAZEEHA KHAN
NAZEEHA KHAN
02/17/2013 06:25 PM

I assume if a flourless chocolate cake is taken out of oven undone as lava cakes it would be retain its fluidity in the centre. Yes i did ask but they are reluctant to share their secret recipe,

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Hi Nazeeha,
We are sorry to say we are unfamiliar with making a lava cake where the ganache filling remains fluids after the lava cakes are refrigerated. An idea maybe that a non ganache chocolate mixture is injected into the middle of the cakes in the same manner as filling an eclair.
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject. We imagine you have already tried asking the staff at the bakeries.
Rose & Woody

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NAZEEHA KHAN
NAZEEHA KHAN
02/17/2013 05:11 PM

Hi there!
I am from PAKISTN here some bakers are making 6 inch round lava cakes and strangely unlike the lava cakes that are served hot to enjoy the oozing lava, these cakes are served cold and he lava remains runny and oozes out even if taken out of fridge. Kindly help me as to how could e make such a cake? do we need to modify the regular lava cake recipe or what?

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Hi Marianne,
If you are making the Perfect Pizza Dough on page 189 here are some answers to your questions.
>You are just coating the pizza dough with the olive oil that is in the cup with oil in it, then any remaining oil is brushed on the shaped pizza.
>The directions state 475˚F.
>There are two risings where the dough will double the first time and increase again after you shape the dough. We do not count the last step of letting it sit before baking as a "rising" although it will k=light and slightly puffy with air
We hope you have success with your next pizza. You may also want to try the recipe on Rose's posting, Casting Pizza on the Water.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ariel
02/16/2013 11:58 PM

Hi Ariel,
You can use the same gram weight for bleached all-purpose flour, however, the leavening may change. We have a posting on the blog, The Power of Flour, which shows results for different flours and adjusted levels of baking powder.
You can also make a "hybrid cake flour" with bleached all-purpose flour and potato or corn starch which is given in The Cake Bible and on the posting.
Bleached cake flour still out performs these flours for recipes stating to use bleached cake flour.
Have fun experimenting.
Rose & Woody

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Marianne Jaeger
Marianne Jaeger
02/16/2013 07:22 PM

Dear Rose, I just got "bread bible" I'm trying to make pizza dough. I tried 3 times can't seem to get it right. Do you put oil into dough? Do you bake it at 500. Do you let it rise 3 times? very confused on the directions. Can you tell I'm a newbee.

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Thank you for the quick reply! :) I did use the cake bible, and yes I used cake flour. I will try that tip for next time. I also wanted to ask, if I didn't have cake flour on hand, would I just use AP flour in the same weight in grams or would it be a different amount?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ariel
02/15/2013 11:51 PM

Hi Ariel,
We ask which book did you use for the recipe?
Did you use bleached cake flour, as other flours can cause a more crumbly texture?
Sometimes chocolate cakes using cocoa and boiling water can be crumbly if the cocoa mixture is not covered tightly after mixing to prevent evaporation. This added step was not included in The Cake Bible, which Rose then added this step to following books.
We commend you on purchasing a scale. You will be amazed how much quicker weighing is versus measuring. Plus, you have a check where you can see if your weighed batter or mixture is close to the combined weight of the ingredients on the chart.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose, I just made your chocolate fudge cake and the flavor was great (I made a dark chocolate ganache with it and it tasted delicious together) but I found it to be quite crumbly and not hold up too well. It would cut nicely, but when transferring to a plate and trying to eat it, it didn't have the moistness or sturdiness that I would have preferred in a chocolate cake, and it would actually fall apart . I had just gotten some aluminum wilton pans, two of your cake strips, and a food scale. I also use a kitchenaid stand mixer. I set out all the refrigerated items a few hours ahead to make them room temperature, and even used a stopwatch app on my phone to make sure I didn't under or overmix. Is this how the cake is supposed to be, or do you know why the cake would do this? Also, if you have any suggestions to make it more moist or denser/sturdy i would appreciate it.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Mugdha
02/15/2013 09:33 AM

hi Mughda,
By their composition, most fruit cakes are not fluffy. They are generally the opposite, very firm and dense. So we believe that if you followed the author's recipe that you made it correctly. We always recommend that if you are having trouble with a recipe to contact the author's web or blog site, although you cannot here as you some how cannot remember the site.
You may want to purchase or take out a baking book from the library which along with the recipes also explains the process and potential pitfalls of baking, such as The Cake Bible and from an author who has a web or blog site that you can then ask questions.
Another book would be Rose's Heavenly Cakes, because along with the book and this website you can also read what experiences the Heavenly Cake Bake Along bloggers, under Featured Fans on this blog, had in making the recipes. Their postings give their step-by-step process in making the recipes and many times with pictures. You can see their results for making fruit cakes as Rose's book includes a Fruitcake Wreath, which is a firm fruity and nutty fruit cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi dear,

I am a fresher to baking cakes and i tried my first fruit cake by reading some recipe on website I don't remember. The problem was the cake was not fluffy at all. Was it because I added eggs to the brown sugar in a separate bowl and mixed the flour in a separate bowl with salt and baking soda? Or should I had cooked the cake a little more. I cooked it for one hour at 150 degree C.

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HI Allie, I have a couple of ideas. Email me or provide me yours? kne5017894 at comcast dot net

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Allie B.
02/14/2013 11:33 PM

Hi Allie,
We are unfamiliar with this recipe. The closest recipe that we have is the Apple-Cinnamon Crumb Coffee Cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes that has sour cream in the cakes' batter and a layer of apples in the middle.
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Audrey,
If you have a copy of The Bread Bible, Rose gives her choices for bread pans. as she states, " loaf pans are a very personal choice. I value a heavy-weight pan that is nonstick, as most pans are today."
Rose's favorites are the Alfred line of clay pans and then metal pans by Chicago Metallic and All-Clad. All of these are not dimpled or corrugated.
We have not seen in sided by side tests that dimpling or corrugation create better browning.
Rose & Woody

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I am searching, apparently in vain, for a recipe that's close to my German great aunt's recipe for apple cake: it had a butter cookie-like crust, had sliced apples on top, but the unique thing was that over the apples there was a sour cream custard that baked with the whole thing. It was delicious. Alas, my great aunt died many years ago at the ripe old age of 95, but never showed me how she made this.

Many thanks!

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AUDREY THOMPSON
AUDREY THOMPSON
02/14/2013 03:14 PM

i am interested in purchasing new 8x4 bread pans...why would dimples, corrugation create better browning are they really necessary ?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from kyle
02/14/2013 10:05 AM

Hi Kyle,
We have found that a glass or metal pan work with only a slight difference in color.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from RaeAnn
02/14/2013 10:03 AM

Hi RaeAnn,
For health safety, we state that the Dreamy Creamy frosting can only be at room temperature for 1 day. We suggest that you can make the cake and the frosting the day before. Store the cake in an airtight container and refrigerate the frosting. You can then let the frosting warm up to room temperature for a few hours, beat it briefly with a handheld mixer, and frost your cake.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from KathyMc
02/14/2013 09:57 AM

Hi KathyMc,
We suggest that you ask the store's staff for contact information so that you can contact the manufacturer.
You can chemically test the cocoa for pH. My actual full time profession is that I am a on-site condominiums property manager which also has two swimming pools. I just tested both types of cocoa with a instant read pool & spa kit, which shows the Dutch processed alkalized cocoa being a "base" and the un-alakalized
being "acidic".
Rose & Woody

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I don't think there is really a scientific way you can test it. Theoretically you could test the pH, but I don't think it would give practical information. You'd need to have some sort of standard curve and controls to determine where the pH of natural and Dutch cocoas should be.

The brand I like is Drost, which is not too hard to find. Amazon sells it if you really can't find it. I also like callebaut.

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How do I see about getting a response from Woody on this question posed earlier this week, which is more of a "science" question than an opinion thing. Is there a different part of the blog on which I should've posed the question?:

Is there a way to determine if unsweetened cocoa is Dutch processed (alkalized) or just plain old acidic cocoa? In the way, say, baking powder can be tested to see if still has activation powers? I'm not sure what I got from my health food store labeled as Dutch processed, is actually that. The color is not what I recall.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carolyn
02/14/2013 08:44 AM

Hi Carolyn,
We suggest that you check some of your local bookstores to see if you can look at the Table of Contents.
The Table of Contents for any of Rose's books are not posted on the blog.
Rose & Woody

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RHC question, pg. 337, Dulce de Leche calls for one 9" pie plate- is it glass or metal? Glass worked, but I'm not sure if the color should have deepened more. No matter, it was/is delicious!

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Hi Rose & Woody,

I'm making Rose's Red Velvet Cake for Valentines Day. Since the frosting has cream cheese and sour cream, is it ok to frost and leave out over night in an airtight container? If I refridgerate it, will it get too hard?

Thanks,
RaeAnn

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Before I purchase a copy of The Bread Bible I would like an opportunity to look at the Table Of Contents to be sure that the book will match my needs. I have been unable to find this online at any of the book sites or elsewhere. Could you point me in the right direction? I have tried my local library but it is not available.
Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from miller
02/12/2013 01:09 AM

Hi miller,
We suggest the Deep Chocolate passion cake used for the German Chocolate cake as it has a wonderful chocolate taste and texture. We just demoed it with a couple of other cakes in Dallas at the Central market Cooking School.
Rose & Woody

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Is there a way to determine if unsweetened cocoa is Dutch processed (alkalized) or just plain old acidic cocoa? In the way, say, baking powder can be tested to see if still has activation powers? I'm not sure what I got from my health food store labeled as Dutch processed, is actually that. The color is not what I recall. Grazie.

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Kim, the videos on RHC kindle are URL links to the videos hosted on YouTube. If it device plays YouTube and you are online,you will be fine.

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Question: Hello Rose, does your book Heavenly Cakes sold on Amazon have video segments in the kindle edition? I was about to order it and thought I saw a note where the videos will only work on an ipad or on the Kindle ipad app. Please advise. That notation is no longer on the Amazon website. Thanks. Kim

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For more than ten years, I had tried various recipes, from books to internet, with absolutely no satisfying results until two years ago when I bought Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I have never been so pleased to the results. In fact, I have never been asked to bake for a wedding until now. So thank you, Rose, for your thorough guidance.

David

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Suggestion requested!
Which chocolate cake would you suggest as a base for Cherries Jubilee? It's for a birthday, so we have to have a cake. One of the guests is lactose intolerant, so I'm looking at Chocolate German cake, Miette's Tomboy, Designer Chocolate Baby Grands or the Almond Shamah Chiffon? Any suggestions that I've missed would be great & I could stray from chocolate.

Your suggestions are deeply appreciated. Many thanks in advance.

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ariel, thank you for validating my work. woody and i have just gone through something like 8000 numbers on the chart to proof so this came at a much needed time. obviously you're a born baker as no matter how exacting a recipe one write it takes a reader who is willing to read and listen to achieve the hoped for results!

i know you will have much continued pleasure in your baking ventures.

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Hi Rose I dont have a question, but I just wanted to thank you for your wonderful recipes and helpful explanations. I am a pretty new baker and have been trying various cake recipes that I find online and from blogs. A few days ago I decided to check your book "The Cake Bible" out of the library (which I will DEFINITELY be buying) and baked up your white velvet cake and was absolutely FLOORED about how perfect it turned out. I had gotten used to the idea that cakes made from scratch were never as good as a box cake or what professional bakeries put out. I've never actually cared about getting some proper cake baking equipment until now, and your videos and of course your wonderful book have inspired me to be a better baker. i look forward to continue learning from you and trying many more of your recipes. you're a genius and thank god for you!! :)

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Orna, hope your pie came out wonderfully! One thing that can cause pie dough to be too crumbly/thirsty is using a flour with a higher protein content than is specified in the recipe. Flours with higher protein absorb more water. If it seems like that may have been a factor, you can try using Wondra (the instant flour in a canister) or a combination of cake flour and all-purpose flour (Rose explains how to do this in the Pie/Pastry Bible) to get the right strength. Hope that helps!

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So true. BECAUSE I've been baking for >30 years, I make mistakes. Paying less attention and the hubris of experience do me in every time. I can guarantee that 99/100, if a Rose recipe doesn't work it's because I goofed. Glad to hear that Woody has also forgotten the sugar! Best cooking class I ever took was when the chef burned the batter and said, "Sometimes you just have to start all over again". No I take that back, 999/1000, the error is mine.

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irene cheng
irene cheng
02/ 3/2013 02:02 PM

Thank you Rose and Woody,

Excellent explanation. Now I can continue baking my tarts, hehe.

Irene

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Hi Irene,
Weighing is simply setting the ingredient into the container on a scale. It does not matter what state it is in as weight is the same whether the ingredient is solid, chopped up, or sifted.
Weight for an ingredient can be different if you are measuring by volume. If you measure out 1 cup of bleached all purpose flour, then its weight will be different: 121 grams spooned into a cup, 114 grams sifted into the cup, and 142 grams dip and sweep into the cup. You can see by this example why it is easier to simply scoop the flour out of the bag into the bowl stationed on the scale.
If the flour needs to be sifted, as for a genoise, we will state to sift the flour onto parchment or over the mixture.
We generally weigh all ingredients, solids and liquids (except ingredients where it makes sense for small amounts to use teaspoon or tablespoon increments such as: baking powder, salt, spices, vanilla, and extracts). Weighing is quicker and more accurate. Another advantage to weighing, is that you can add up all of a batter's weights prior to making the recipe. (Our books' pages are covered with written in weights and notes.) Then weigh your completed batter. Accounting for some loss, you will know if you remembered to use all of the ingredients. If you forgot a major ingredient, like sugar, (and I will admit I have) you will likely have to make a new batter. But you will have saved the baking time and disappointment of a failed cake.
Rose & Woody

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irene cheng
irene cheng
02/ 3/2013 12:01 PM

Hi,

I weighed my 600 gms of flour after it has been sifted, meaning it is 600 gms of sifted flour instead of 600 gms flour.

My question is, if the weight is different, how do i remedy it, do i add more flour and if so, how much?

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Just because you've been cooking for 30 years doesn't mean you're an expert. I've found Rose's work to be a very helpful resource over the years.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from godfrey
02/ 2/2013 07:19 PM

Hi Godfrey,
We suggest that you take a look at the Heavenly Cake Bake Along bloggers who many baked their way thru the book and were quite thrilled by their results, incase you want to see how they faired with the recipes you tried.
If the book had so many flops, it is amazing that the IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) who have several testers testing several recipes from each nominated book and judged by an executive board awarded Rose's Heavenly Cakes "Book of the Year for 2010" in a field that included noted winners like Thomas Keller.
You may want to read our postings for the wonderful results achieved by the West Coast Bakers Dozen and the Napa Valley Baking Group.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Joyce crum
02/ 2/2013 07:07 PM

HI Joyce,
The recipes sue condensed tomato soup. When Rose originally made this cake for Campbell's kids fiftieth celebration, Campbells and other soup companies only made condensed tomato soup. The adding of "condensed" has already been given to the publisher for future printings.
Rose & Woody

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Worst 30+ $$$ spent on a cooking book. Tried 4 recipes by ms rose (followed to every detail) and they all were "flops" - and duh I have been cooking for over 30 years.

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I am making the chocolate tomato soup recipe. It says Campbell's soup. Is that the CONDENSED kind as that appears to be the only kind available in this area?

Love all your recipes. Thanks
Joyce

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Hi all,

This is my second time making the Apple Crumb Pie and though in the end the last turned out delish, the process was tough and now I find myself in the same situation.

The dough is very dry and crumbly. The first time I tried the ziplock bag technique and this time I just turned it out onto an un-floured board, and it seems even more dry and crumbly. It seems like there should be more liquid. I see that the recipe doesn't call for any water at all.

I was planning on serving this at our Super Bowl party on Sunday.

Please help!

Thank you in advance.

Orna

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Alejandra
01/31/2013 02:26 PM

Hi Alejandra,
We have tested and used this marzipan formula for many years without any problems. As its headnote states, "it is not as delicious to eat as Quintessential Marzipan, so it is best reserved for decorations."
You may want to try increasing the powdered sugar to firm it up.
We do not have another modeling formula at this time. For all of our testing, we measure by weighing except for amounts less than 2 tablespoons.
Rose & Woody

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Hi RaeAnn
The Master Chart, the subsequent formulas, and the information on how to use them is all shown and explained in the book. Enjoy trying out some of the recipes in both 9 and 12 inch cakes.
Rose & Woody

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Hello, I did the marzipan recipe pag 323 "the cake Bible"). It wasn't possible to do any figure, too loose. I did exactly the recipe. What happened? Do you have another recipe?. Also the flavor is not so good. I use to buy the marzipan for modeling and it taste good, of course not like the other marzipan?? Thanks
Alejandra

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
01/31/2013 12:37 AM

Hi Rose & Woody, Thanks for explaining the chart to me. How do I measure for a 12" butter cake?
RaeAnn

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Hi RaeAnn,
The Master Chart on page 490 is designed for 2 inch high pans and for 2 layers per tier for wedding and special occasion cakes. Also, the serving size per slice is smaller.
Most of the 2 layer cakes for butter cakes in the Butter Cakes chapter use 1-1/2 inch pans.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
01/30/2013 08:11 PM

Hi, Could you help me understand The Master Chart For Butter Cake in TCB? The pan sizes are listed along side the number of servings. As I read it, a 9" 2 layer cake would give 45 servings,but in the recipe for a butter cake using 9" pans it says the serving size is 12. Actually, I'd like to make a 12" round cake (one layer torted) to serve about 25 people. What Rose factor should I use?
RaeAnn

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier
01/29/2013 02:04 PM

Hi Rose and Woody!
I want to attempt to create a "little bonhomme" playing golf standing up on a cake swinging at a golf ball... It seems a lot of tutorials are using modelling chocolate to achieve this... Is there a recipe in the cake bible that would be sturdy enough to create figurines? And if so, would you suggests using some type of wiring inside to hold it up or would it dry hard enough by itself? I have about 10 days ahead of me.
Thanks for your help!!
Claudine

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Thanks Woody. I have The Cake Bible, so I will look it thru. I originally only made the sour cream change to the recipe, but found I could still taste the baking soda(which is only 1/4 tsp in a 12 cupcake recipe). I wondered if the texture was due to the fact that I took the baking soda out and upped the baking powder to 1 1/2 tsp(it was 3/4 tsp). Maybe I will just do some test runs and pull out The Cake Bible:)

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Crissy89
01/29/2013 12:02 AM

Hi Croissy89,
We are in a bind to help you because you have changed too many ingredients from the author's recipe that you are using.
Rose always recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences.
We will comment that if you are substituting in sour cream, baking soda is many times included in the leavenings to counteract the acidity of the sour cream. If the author included two flours, it maybe that the all purpose is to give some structure or the texture is the intent of the author.
In The Cake Bible, you will find many similar recipes where an ingredient or two are changed with an Understanding section for a given recipe with a summary of how it compares to another one or two cakes. Rose does a lot of your homework for you so you can see the interactions of the ingredients.
We recommend that you contact the author for her/his suggestions.
Rose & Woody

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james, i wrote wooden spoon because i have broken plastic spoons and spatulas stirring stiff doughs that also would bend the average metal spoon. if you have a sturdy metal spoon that will be just as good as a wooden one.

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Ive been using a recipe for a vanilla for awile now. Its an oil based cake that also uses heavy cream and buttermilk. Im not a big fan of buttermilk cakes, so Ive always subbed sour cream. In doing so I removed the baking soda and upped the baking powder(I dont like the baking soda taste). However(and it could just be me being nit-picky), Ive noticed that the cake is moist, but the texture seems to be a little mealy or grainy-but not dry. I hope that makes since. I was wondering what could be causing that. Im using a mix of 2 flours, regular AP and Swans Down cake flour. Thanks in advance for any insight!

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I have been making bread with a bread machine for several years. The machine broke a few years ago and I just kept on making my bread by hand instead of the machine. I also make pretty good cinnamon rolls from scratch. My daughter recently gave me a fine hardcover book titled 'The Bread Bible'.
I enjoyed the book, and have tried a few of the bread recipes with moderate success. However, I notice that several times she mentions "stir ingredients with a wooden spoon". I have never used a wooden spoon, and wonder why she states that in the book. Is there indeed some chemical reaction to flour and stainless steel spoons? Would I actually see improvements in my bread if I use a wooden spoon?
Thanks
James

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An add-on to the buttercream question thread:

1) Can a butter cream be flavored (e.g. chocolate, peppermint) a day or 2 after it's made as long as the temp is brought up to 70 before incorporating?
2) My egg yolk/sugar mix always loses about 30% volume when I start to beat the butter in, is this normal?
3) As I was just starting to beat in the sugar syrup, a neighbor dropped by and I forgot to add salt. As long as the grains are fine, should I add when the frosting is at 70 degrees just before I use it or just skip it this time? (the butter was unsalted).

Thanks a lot
Rob

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Angela Walton
Angela Walton
01/28/2013 06:45 AM

I think I read a comment recently that somebody had difficulty in buying Rose's silicone cake strips from amazon.com because they lived in the UK, I too live in the UK, I ordered some on 21 January via amazon.com and they arrived today, 28 January, so don't give up Brits!

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
01/27/2013 11:00 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,
Wow, I wasn't aware it needed to be so warm! There is no way mine was 75 degrees. Never the less, it tasted amazing! Thanks for the tip.
RaeAnn

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Hi RaeAnn,
We think your buttercream was too cold although defrosted. We recommend defrost the buttercream in the refrigerator and then set out to warm up to room temperature to check the temperature of the buttercream before briefly fluffing it with a whisk. The temperature should between 70˚and 75˚F.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Surya,
We do not give specific models as there are many good manufacturers which keep improving their ovens each year. Suggestions on what to look for is discussed in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and all of Rose's books. Also, what we have in our kitchens, being home bakers and designed for the home, may not be the size you need to bake several items at once. We suggest you check with restaurant supply stores and reps for a good commercial oven in your area which could be different from what is available in the United States.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
01/27/2013 06:36 PM

Hi woody, Thanks you for being so helpful with my previous questions. I'm new to baking and trying to figure it out. I decided to try freezing Rose's strawberry buttercream frosting. After defrosting, I used my kitchen aide mixer to 'fluff' it up, but instead of a smooth texture, it looked a little curdled. Was the butter to cold? Do you have a tip for defrosting buttercream?
RaeAnn

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Surya Lamba
Surya Lamba
01/27/2013 07:07 AM

Hi Ms Rose,

I am looking to start a Bakery Business in India. Initially I will be starting from home for all type of Cakes & Pastries . Would request you to advice me on getting an Oven which will help me to move ahead.

Regards

Surya

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Betty Jo
01/27/2013 12:28 AM

Hi Betty Jo,
When baking at home Rose likes to use long silicone oven mitts.
Which video did you see Rose with the oven mitts? We may not know where they came from as many times we use what the studio or event location provides.
Rose & Woody

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In a video, Rose is wearing cream colored oven mitts with dark piping around the edge and dark fabric covering the forearms. They look very protective. Do you know where they can be purchased? Thank you!

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Shelly Smith
Shelly Smith
01/26/2013 04:10 PM

Panetonne is my new favorite (YUM!). I've tried a recipe I found online (something I had all the ingredients for at home), but I would like to now give Rose's recipe in the Bread Bible a whirl. An ingredient in her recipe that I am not familiar with is the Chestnuts in Syrup. Is there a brand you would recommend? In my internet research I also discovered some recipes to do my own Chestnuts in Syrup - does Rose a have recipe for making these at home? Fresh homeade things seem to have the best flavor. For my last Panetonne I made my own candied lemon & orange peel - the flavor/texture was wonderful. Also, I'm not a huge raisin fan so I substituted Craisins instead - LOVED IT!!!
Thanks so much for all your assistance.
Shelly

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ian
01/25/2013 02:37 PM

Hi Ian,
The reason for the springform is accommodate the height of the cake which makes it easier to strew on the topping and the ease of unmolding it. As long as your 9 inch pan is 2-1/2 to 3 inches tall, you can use it. When you are ready to invert and unmold the cake, we suggest that you place a folded towel over the topping to fill the space up to the rim before placing a wire rack on top for inverting the cake. This will help keep most of the topping in place.
Rose & Woody

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Hi

Was looking to bake the Apple cinnamon crumb coffee cake but only have a 9" cheesecake pan,i was wondering if i can use that or if i have to get a spring form pan

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Catherine
01/25/2013 10:55 AM

Hi Catherine,
If you have The Cake Bible or Rose's Heavenly Cakes, we give bleached all-purpose flour as a substitute for bleached cake flour when it gives similar results. If you weigh your ingredients, which is the most reliable and accurate method for measuring out your ingredients, you simply replace the cake flour with the identical weight of bleached all-purpose flour. Depending on the recipe, you can generally use the same amount of leavening. However, we suggest you look at the Power of Flour postings on the this blog in which we tested butter cakes using different flours and adjusted leavenings in some cases.
There is not a general rule of thumb for reducing sugar from an author's recipe, because that is determined by the author's intent for a recipe or their style of baking. Also, just reducing the sugar will effect the structure and the texture which will necessitate adjusting other ingredients Rose's recipes use only as much sugar as needed to compliment the other ingredients. In most cases, the sugar amount is lower than you will find in a comparable recipe from another author.
The Cake Bible goes into great detail on how you can substitute ingredients for recipes by the recipes themselves. Virtually, each recipe has an Understanding section that compares it to similar recipes to show what alternations or substitutions were made for its intentions.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody, I have a question concerning flour. I do not like a cake that is light and airy, I prefer a heavier, denser cake because I think the later has more flavor and taste, a cake that will please my mouth, so to speak.

Whenever I make a cake with cake flour, it is light and airy. What I would like to know is, by how much can I substitute all-purpose flour for cake flour without ruining the cake, if it would be ruined? I do not want to make a cake that would be more like bread.

Also, sometimes a cake is too sweet. Is there a rule of thumb that can be followed for reducing the amount of sugar in a recipe without compromising the structure of the cake?


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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from ritu
01/24/2013 01:36 AM

Hi Ritu,
We suggest a liqueur in a recipe to give harmony or accentuating the other flavors. But if you do not want the alcohol, although pure vanilla extract also has alcohol, you can always substitute water.
Rose & Woody

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Hi RaeAnn,
We say that the baking powder for the 13 x 9 is written as being 1-1/4 per the base recipe (which is for a single 6 inch cake). You then need to multiply it by 3.5. The larger the cake, the less leavening you need per base. You also should consider that a 13 x 9 is basically the equivalent to two 9 inch cakes. One cake for 30 people will serve a little larger than 1 x 3 inch slices.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
01/23/2013 08:39 PM

Hi, I'm about try to bake my first cake larger than a 9" round. I'm baking the All Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake for about 30 people. I'm going to use a 9x13 pan. If I'm correct, I will use the Rose factor 3.5-4 multiplying the base ingredients by this number. The baking powder level is 6. The base recipe calls for 1T + 1 t. baking powder. Level 6 is 1 1/4 t. Is this correct? The baking power seems to be so much less than the base. I just want to make sure I'm doing the right thing.
Thank You,
RaeAnn

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Also please if you could advise if this can be made without Kalhua?

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Thanks for your reply!!
Will surely experiment with this!
Regards

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K - will give the original a whirl and find something similar that will work in chocolate.

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Thank you. In my second question I wasn't asking if the double batch would work in my 5 qt mixer, just whether doubling the recipe itself would cause a problem.

Laurie

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Hi Shelley,
The Hungarian Dobos Torte is designed this way for both its stunning contrast of colors between the cake, glaze, and frosting, and the harmony of the flavors.
This recipe was tailored to be in the same tradition as its Hungarian roots.
The cake recipe is a biscuit cake using powdered sugar. You could replace it with a chocolate biscuit or other chocolate sponge cake, but technically you are making new cake of your own.
Rose always suggest with any recipe to make at least one recipe exactly as the author envisioned recipe. With that recipe being your control, you can proceed to adapt it to your wishes. The only time we deviate from a recipe offered to us from another author or pastry chef, for the first test, is to make it in a size or servings for the home baker. Usually reducing, as for revising down a cookie dough from 12 dozen to 3 dozen cookies.
Please try the original and then explore to make your own creation.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Laurie,
We suggest that you use a 6-quart KA or other mixer from our experiences in making this buttercream for 11 or more cups. Although the 5-quart has a capacity of 20 cups when completely filled, the mixer's beater or whisk attachment will not properly mix a mixture if filled above the top of its blades or three-quarters up the tines of the whisk beater. In the upcoming book, will include a mousseline buttercream for a wedding cake, which we recommend to split the recipe into two batches if using a 5-quart mixer.
The 5-quart will work for the double batch on page 244.
However for any recipe, you knowing your equipment and previous experiences will allow you to decide what you are capable of doing.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Laurie,

Just based on the math, it seems like you could make the 11 cup recipe in the 5qt Kitchen Aid, because that should hold 20 cups.

Good luck!

-Steve

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Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
01/20/2013 05:24 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

I have 2 questions, both about Mousseline Buttercream:

1. Can the recipe which makes 11 cups to cover a 3-tier cake (page 514 in TCB) can be made in a 5-qt KA mixer?

2. Would it work to double the 4-1/2 cup recipe (page 244 in TCB)?

Thanks so much.

Laurie

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Shelly Smith
Shelly Smith
01/20/2013 03:03 PM

My book has finally arrived - Rose's Melting Pot. I've read the Dobos Torte recipe and I would like to make the cake portion chocolate. What do you recommend to achive this. I'd like an option for dark chocolate and if I were to decrease the amount of chocolate how would I balance the decrease depending on the medium (liquid or powder chocolate) and type of measure used (cup or ounce).
Thanks!

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Thank You

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from SallyLunn
01/19/2013 01:08 AM

Hi Sally,
We suggest that you make one or two in the pan that has worked for you so that you can present the recipe as it was written. A bundt cake of this size should serve 14 to 16 people considering this is a charity event with other foods being offered.
Since this is a butter cake, it should beable to be frozen and thawed. This involves tightly wrapping the completely cooled cakes in plastic wrap and then with a double layer of heavy duty aluminum foil. Thaw the cakes in the refrigerator for one day. The day of the event, you can briefly heat them in the oven to freshen them.
If you are using loaf pans, we suggest that use 9 x5 inch light colored metal pans which have a 7 cup capacity. Avoid glass pans as they can easily over bake a cake batter. Try making a single batter and seeing if it will fill two of the loaf pans at least half full. Most butter cakes, and we do not see any difference in this one, can easily be multiplied. From your testing with the two pans, you can adjust the amount of batter for making further loaves.
Figure that a loaf pan will serve 10 to 12 people.
Making a combination of bundt and loaf pans will be your safest way. You can also bake a couple of bundts at the same time; and the same with the loaf pans.
Your baking times per loaf pan will be less as referenced by Hector. Baking multiple bundts and loafs will slightly increase the baking times.
You may want to see if you can borrow some bundt pans as many people have these in their kitchens. Enjoy experimenting this weekend.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from ritu
01/19/2013 12:39 AM

Hi Ritu,
The Black Chocolate Party Cake can be made as a 9 inch layer cake with adaptation.
The following are some guidelines and starting points for you to convert a bundt cake recipe to a layer cake recipe.
We have generally found that the amounts needed for the ingredients to fill a 10-cup bundt mold to the proper height (usually 1/2 to an 1 inch below the rim) is around 33% more in ingredients than what you need for a single 9 inch layer cake, except the leavening(s).
The leavenings will need to be lowered less than 33%. This is due to the bundt pan’s wall providing extra support for bundt cakes, necessitating the leavening(s) are slightly higher to level the cake.
The oven temperature and rack placement can remain the same.
The baking time will decrease due to the lower volume in batter by 20 to 30%.
You can also double your converted ingredient and leavening(s) amounts to make a two layer cake to serve more people. However, you may need to increase the leavening(s) to produce flat layer tops for filling and frosting.
We do not have converted recipes for all of our bundt cakes. You will need to experiment with the amounts and leavenings. The batter should fill the pan from a half to two-thirds full. Enjoy exploring.
Rose & Woody

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Hello
My question is regarding Dark Chocolate Party Cake,if a regular pan can be used in stead of a bundt pan?Please adv.

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Sally, I have the answer, this is what Rose would do: kick u really hard to wake you up, I don't think a miracle could possibly answer your question!

1- I am assuming this is a type of butter cake using baking powder and eggs aren't whipped into a meringue, if yes and the original recipe uses a tube pan, then a loaf pan should work. See actual width of a tube pan is about 5 inches which is the same for a loaf!

2- regarding how much batter to make and how long to bake, the only way to tell is to do a test run. Make one recipe and see how it turns out. Oven temperature should be unchanged, but time will probably be less. I bake till internal temp is 195-205 oF

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Hello, Rose!
Let me begin by saying that I enjoy baking, but don't have time to bake very often, so I seriously lack experience.
In the past, I have successfully made Maida Heatter's East 62nd Street Lemon Cake. All those who have tasted it have enjoyed it, so I have been asked to bake enough cakes for at least 120 people, at a charity event! After agreeing to bake the cakes, I began to wonder how I could accomplish such a feat. Now that baking time is almost upon us, panic is beginning to creep in. Instead of just wondering "What would Rose do?", I decided to try to find out.
The event will be held the evening of Friday, January 25th, and the cakes will be needed by late Friday afternoon.

Here are some of the problems, to which I have no solutions:
1.) There are only two tube pans I can use. One is a loose-bottomed angel food cake pan, and the other is a beautiful Kaiser Kuglhuph pan; both are 9-1/2" in diameter.
2.) Being fairly new to the area, I don't know anyone very well, and will do everything on my own. My husband will be able to help, but only evenings.
3.) We will be out of town Wednesday through Friday afternoon.
4.) The only solution I have been able to come up with is to bake the cake in loaf pans, and do several at once. Our oven is very small, and has no glass in the door. (Not very conducive to good cake baking.) Knowing how long to bake multiple (4 or 6) loaves, or even 2 loaves, is a mystery to me, as is which size loaf pans would be best, also how and when they should be rotated during baking.
5.) To save time, I thought I could make batter for the individual ring cakes, over and over. As batter for each cake was made, thought I could pour it into 2 glass loaf pans, then cover, and refrigerate them. The many covered loaf pans could be filled and stacked in the fridge Saturday and Sunday, be baked Monday and Tuesday, then frozen or refrigerated. When we return Friday, we would move them to the place where the dinner is being held.
6.) Today, while wondering how many loaf pans to buy, in order to have 120 slices, I remembered reading that unlike cookie batter, cake batter must be baked right away, especially if it contains acid, which this batter does. Besides, I know nothing about freezing or thawing cakes.
So, I'm back to square one. The plan was to buy all ingredients tomorrow, and make batters Saturday.
7.) Making batter for all cakes in as few batches as possible would be very helpful, but I've heard that it can't be even doubled successfully.

I still want to bake the cakes, but don't know how. Unfortunately, another cake can't be substituted. My recipe for Maida Heatter's cake has been printed in a community cookbook, which we are hoping to sell at Friday's event. A few other contributers to that cookbook will also be preparing their recipes for the public to sample, and I was asked to make the lemon cake.

This is quite a dilemma, and any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you very much.

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amanda, gum paste is called gum paste bc it contains gum tragacanth. it results in the thinnest finest texture so pastillage would not be as fine.

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Is gum paste the same as pastillage? I was thumbing through my copy of the Cake Bible today and saw the recipe for pastillage. I am in a gum paste class now and rather than pay for premade gum paste, wondered if I could just follow the pastillage recipe in Rose's book. Please let me know. Thank you.

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier in reply to comment from Woody Wolston
01/15/2013 08:20 AM

Thank you Woody! I had not seen any recipe of that kind in the 2 books and just wanted to check with you to make sure i didn't miss something. They are a lot of recipes out there... i just love Rose's the best. Her recipes are always on point. I will do some testing with egg replacers and see what i can come up with as this order is only for April. Thanks for your assistance!!!

Claudine

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Hi Claudine,
We do not have any eggless cakes in these books to offer for a wedding cake.
We do understand that many bakers and bloggers have specific dietary needs.
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in sugar free, dairy free, gluten free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes or contact them for substitution recommendations as these are not our genre of baking. Rose has several listed linked sites including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.
Rose & Woody

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Claudine Mercier
Claudine Mercier
01/14/2013 09:08 PM

Hi Rose and Woody! Happy New Year!!!!
Do you have any eggless recipe in RHC or the CB to suggest that i could use for a wedding cake? If so, what eggless icing and fillings would you pair with it?

thank you for your help!

Claudine

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Radhicka
01/14/2013 12:33 PM

Hi Radhicka,
We are assuming you meant if Rose is teaching baking classes.

Rose is currently not teaching baking classes as a curriculum. We do give demonstrations and single event baking classes to culinary schools and organizations a couple of times a year. Upcoming events are usually posted on the blog and are publicized by the sponsoring organization or school. We will be doing an event in at the Central Market in Dallas in early February. We also did a baking class at the Leeward Culinary School in Hawaii last month, which we will be posting about it next month.
Rose also has over a hundred demonstration videos and her television series, Baking Magic, on YouTube.
Rose & Woody

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Hi
I would like to know if rose takes any classes for baking.
If yes then if i can get the details.
Thanks

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Catherine
01/14/2013 10:08 AM

Hi Catherine,
We are sorry that you are receiving reply triggered emails from the Ask Your Questions. This was likely from you making a comment and checking the boxes:
"Remember me next time? and/or Let me know if someone makes a comment?" These features are to let you know if someone replied to your comment by email versus you needing to check the blog.
To stop the auto-replies you need to do the following:
1. go onto the Ask Your Questions
2. make a comment
(a simple comment like "thank you")
3. make sure that the "Remember me next time?" and " Let me know if someone makes a comment? " are UNCHECKED

This should stop the auto-replies.
Thank you for participating on Rose's blog.

Woody~Rose's business manager and collaborator

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Rose/Hector - for the past 2 weeks I have been receiving messages from you that answer questions asked by people I do not know. I did not ask the questions but am receiving the responses. this morning, I had 7 emails from you. Are you send out messages that you think might be of interest to all of your followers or is there some problem in regards to my account?

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Hello Celsiuss, the photos of cake bible in Spanish are on http://www.facebook.com/bibliadelospasteles

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Hi RaeAnn,
We recommend to follow the manufacturer's instructions, which in the past has stated to wring out the excess water. The baking time may slightly increase due to the strips. We suggest to confirm that a cake is done with an accurate instant-read thermometer as well as a cake tester.
Rose has her own cake strip made from silicone, which if you have a copy of Rose's Heavenly Cakes, you can see the strips on page 204. They are available at several retailers and on the web from Harold Imports. These strips have many advantages over the conventional fabric cake strip, they: do not need soaking, do not need straps or pins to secure them, and can be cleaned in the dishwasher or with soft scrub. We use Rose's Silicone Cake Strips for all testing where we state to encircle a cake pan with cake strips.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Diane
01/13/2013 06:42 PM

Hi Diane,
The stated sugar is the sugar that gives the recipe its best texture and flavor for the intention of the recipe. If another similar ingredient, in this case~sugar, can be substituted, it will be included on the ingredient chart. (This is done many times with a couple of choices for flours.) Sometimes a different ingredient maybe included in making a variation to the recipe.
Rose always recommends, you should always make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. You may also want to experiment past what you think is the best results to fail the recipe so that you know the recipe's limits , and contact the author for her/his advise.
Some suggestions for sugar are: turbinado (preferably Sugar in the Raw) and food processed to fine, granulated maple sugar, and a combination of mostly sugar with some brown sugar.
Rose & Woody

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RaeAnn Harrington
RaeAnn Harrington
01/13/2013 06:37 PM

Hi, I recently purchased cake strips and have used them twice. Both times the cake turns out nice and even on top but a bit crumbly almost underdone around the sides. Are the strips too wet? I do run my fingers up and down to get out the excess water.
RaeAnn

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Hi,
I buy recently The Bible Cake in the spanish version and i cant find the photos of the original recipes, or at least one example of each one for make it in the best way.

Tnx for your help

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Hi,
I have a question about Rose's Maple Walnut Sable Cookies. The cookie part of the recipe calls for 3/4c up sugar. I have made them with great success using granulated sugar. However, since the recipe does not specify a particular sugar, I was wondering if the cookies could be made using maple sugar, brown sugar, confectioners sugar, or a combination of sugars. If so, what sugar or combination of sugars would Rose suggest.
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question.
Sincerely,
Diane

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Dee
01/12/2013 11:33 AM

Hi Dee,
We are not dieticians and suggest that you may want to check with a hospital's nutritionist's staff for recommendations. We would think the low sodium breads we suggested may work in that he would only be eating a slice or two per day.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Linda,
We understand you not being pleased with the binding as it is a glued binding and a major reason why Rose insisted that with her following publishers including her latest that her books have a stitched binding. Both of ours have been in pieces for several years. The Cake Bible's publisher is William Morrow which you can contact, although we cannot say if they will do anything considering The Cake Bible is over 24 years old and in its 48th printing with a glued binding. I recently 3-holed punched mine and put it into a 3-ring binder.
I do have a second copy, which I use only for referencing and showing others.
Rose & Woody

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Woody,
On the label of most packaged foods is "Nutrition facts." It lists the Fat, Cholestrol, Sodium, etc. in grams and after that the percentage of Daily Value (DV). On a can of Campbell's healthy request chicken noodle soup the sodium content is 410mg and 17% of the DV. That is the percentage I am refering to. This percantage needs to be 5% or lower. Most breads I have found are much more then that. Any type of bread would be great, but I know he would like something like rye, pumpernickle, or wheatbread.

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Linda Rivera
Linda Rivera
01/11/2013 08:49 PM

Help! Being an avid fan and baker I use my cookbooks daily. My copy of The Cake Bible has fallen apart fast. It's given up the ghost. The pages are separating from the binding resulting in a backless book with pages cascading every whichway. It seems to be a problem with the glue and the way the book is bound. This is the only book in my collection that is behaving this way, so there isn't a gremlin in my bookcase. Can you please put me in contact with the publisher or someone who can assist me? I'm reluctant to just purchase another copy without reassurance that the same thing won't happen again - I want my cookbooks to last.

Thank you so much!
Linda

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Hi Dorie,
Organic Pumpernickel dark rye meal is coarser and will give a coarser texture that might be nice. The caramel powder is just for color so fine to omit.
King Arthur has caramel powder on their website.
Rose & Woody

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Dorie Rogers
Dorie Rogers
01/11/2013 03:33 AM

Dear Woody,
I have a question about Pumpernickel bread. Rose explains Pumpernicle is coarsly ground Rye. I found Organic Pumpernickel dark rye meal and organic dark rye flour (Bob's Red Mill). I cannot find Caramel Powder locally, Wegmans has everything they don't carry it. Since Caramel Powder adds the dark coloring would the Dark Rye flour work, and omit the caramel powder? I am not trying to deviate from Rose's recipe, and stay within my budget. Would using the meal work? I need your guidance!
Thankyou, Dorie
,,

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Dee
01/10/2013 02:32 PM

Hi Dee,
We need more details as to what you mean by 5% of the total daily requirement.
Are you saying the amount of salt in the bread needs to be lower than the 5% of salt for all of the food in a given day as this can then be a large variable?
Are you asking just for yeast breads or can this include quick breads and scones which in many cases will have a lower Baker's Percentage?
Do you have a specific Baker's Percentage number for the salt?

Do you have a copy of The Bread Bible as that has yeast bread recipes for Tuscan Low-Salt Bread pg 351 with a Baker's Percentage of 1% and Mushroom Bread pg 389 at 1.3%?
Rose & Woody

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Do you have a recipe for a very low sodium bread. My father-in-law is on a strict diet and I have not found a bread that he can have. It must be under 5% of the total daily requirement. He can't have seeds because of his teeth. If you have one or know where I can find a recipe please let me know. Thank You, Dee

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Hi Brad,
We do not have a recipe for "Salt Sticks". We can refer you to a wonderful book on Jewish that came out last year.
It is "Inside the Jewish Bakery: Recipes and Memories from the Golden Age of Jewish Baking",
by Stanley Ginsberg and Norman Berg

You may want to check Marcy Goldman's blog site, Better Baking.
Rose & Woody

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Brad Taicher
Brad Taicher
01/ 7/2013 02:11 PM

I grew up eating at Jewish delicatessens in New York City and South Florida. At brunch, my family all converged simultaneously on the basket of bread brought to our table when we arrived. Our collective favorite was the "salt stick," a sort of straightened rolled crescent made of rye dough and caraways with course salt on top. I've been trying to find a recipe, but couldn't find one in the bread bible or on the blog. Do you have a recipe here that I am unable to find?

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Yes, I have a wild yeast starter that I have been feeding for a month now. Thanks for pointing out the referencing pages in the bread bible. That is a great help!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carmen
01/ 4/2013 10:45 PM

Hi Carmen,
We are assuming you have a wild yeast starter that you are regularly feeding.
We suggest you compare the "Levy's" Real Jewish Rye Bread on page 324 with the Sourdough Rye on page 451 to see the differences in the ingredients with the different yeasts. Also pages 439 to 440 gives instructions on replacing commercial starters with sour dough starters.
Rose & Woody

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I have been baking bread with Rose's Bread Bible for 5 years and love all the recipes. Recently, I have been experimenting on baking with wild yeast without addition of any instant/dry packaged yeast. I have tried baking the ciabatta and pugliese, and I'm still getting a hang of adjusting the recipes to create the same texture and crumb as the original recipes. Do you have any tips/conversion method for your bread recipes when making bread with wild yeast only?

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Shelly, Here's a small addition that will make it work better for the challenging top layer that has the caramel: (Make 1 layer at least 84 grams/2.9 oz. to use for the top. This will be thicker than the rest of the layers.)

I'm so glad it's the Dobos you are making--it is one of the world's greatest most magnificent desserts.

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Fabulous!!! Thanks so much - I'm off to order my cookbook. Thanks again for all your help! :)

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Hi Shelly,
Rose has a recipe for the Hungarian Dobos Torte on page 256 in Rose's Melting Pot. The book is still available through Amazon and linked under Rose's Cookbooks at the top of the blog.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you for your help. After much discussion and research, I now know what I am looking for is a recipe for a Dobosh or Dobos 7-layer cake/torte. I'd like to do an all-chocolate (I understand the cake is a thin chiffon - does Rose have a recipe for this?)and maybe add Amaretto to my chocolate buttercream (when you add a liquid to a buttercream like this, do you need to back-off a liquid elsewhere? I know just enough about cooking/baking to be dangerous :)) Again, thank you so much for your help and patience with my research.

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Hi Aerin,
We always recommend to check Rose's Book Errata/Correction section if you ever have a question on an ingredient's amount or instructions for a recipe. There are some corrections relating to the templates and construction. The recipe is correct as many have made this recipe without any problems. This recipe does not need as much moisture as for the Gingerbread People recipe.
We ask are you measuring by weight in grams as that is the most accurate method for measuring out your ingredients?
Are you using bleached all-purpose flour such as Gold Medal?
Have you had the same problem with both methods of mixing?

Once mixed, we suggest try kneading the dough in the plastic wrap until you can then press and form it into a disc.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Olga,
Harold Imports will be making Rose's silicone bowl available in April.
Rose & Woody

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Aerin Bryant
Aerin Bryant
01/ 4/2013 12:11 PM

I am looking for advice on making Rose's gingerbread Notre Dame cathedral. I have made the dough up several times with the food processor method (checking measurements) and found the dough to be crumbly and unworkable. Something is not right. What am I missing? I noticed the gingerbread men recipe in the beginning of the book included an egg in the mixture. Any advice (other than to tell me I'm insane) would be appreciated.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Olga
01/ 3/2013 03:03 PM

Hi Olga,
The silicone mold we used for the La Bombe was discontinued by LeKue, USA. Harold Imports will soon be distributing a silicone mold under Rose's line of products in a rose color. Contact them for details.
The glass bowl works just as well for molding and freezing the mousse. The silicone mold can make it easier for unmolding.
Rose & Woody

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Lidia Bastianich has a recipe for Sacher Tort. I recommend it.

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/sacher-torte

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Sorry, my book only has till page 498, and the recipie is in page 285, Zach's La Bomba is the exact cakes name, it mentiones a 6 cup silicone Bombe mold but I cannot find them?
Thanks

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HI
Where con I buy the Silicon mold for la Bombe Cake from Roses heavenly cakes? Pls advise
Thanks & rgds
Olga

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Just saw the answer in the recipe -step 4. Sorry to bother you.

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yes, please refer to step 4 on page 518 where i wrote "...allow to rise a second time...OR REFRIGERATE OVER NIGHT."

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I have just placed the sponge for Challah bread (Bread Bible) in the refrigerator where it will remain for about 20 hours. On Page 521 of the Bread Bible, It says for maximum flavor development, the dough can be wrapped loosely and refrigerated overnight. Is this after the first rise???

Thank you

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Hi Shelly,
Since we so not have a recipe for the Sacher Torte you mentioned in your email, I simply googled and looked at the Wikipedia and the Original Sacher Torte.Sounds like your friend's description is for something different.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you! I will give it a try. My friend was saying that she remembered it being in a loaf shape and sliced many times with a filling between each layer. Is this the same thing or something different - I know this is rather a vague question. Appreciate your help.
Shelly

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Tom
01/ 1/2013 03:27 PM

Hi Tom,
We are not considering at this time. Marilyn and Tanya Linton published a book on ice cream a few years ago titled~~"The Ice Cream Bible".
Our current book that we are working on, The Baking Bible, will be out in the fall of 2015.
Rose & Woody

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I was wondering if Rose has ever considered doing an Ice Cream Bible. All of her cakes have such wonderful and complex flavors and I think it would be neat to have that distilled into the form of ice cream. There are also multiple components that add flavor to ice creams (sauces, toppings, etc.) which lend themselves to endless variations. Add on regional variations of ice cream and similar frozen desserts (gelati, semifreddi, etc.) and you have yourself a Bible! Imagine fruit cake ice cream with toasted nuts and a rum sauce :).

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Hi Debra,
We made baby cheesecakes using this recipe in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. You should still use a waterbath. The baking time will be from 25 to 35 minutes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Shelly,
We ask you have tried the recipe noted in Wikipedia, which also talks about the Original at the Hotel Sacher Torte?
If you are making it from recipes from The Cake Bible, the cake is basically a chocolate chiffon, an apricot glaze, and coated with a chocolate glaze.
The distinctive flavor you remember could easily be from the cocoa used in the cake and the chocolate used for the glaze.
Rose & Woody

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Debra Merlino
Debra Merlino
12/31/2012 11:06 PM

I would like to bake Rose's Cordon Bleu Cheesecake in a mini cheesecake pan (12 mini cups). Is there something I have to do to adjust the recipe?

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Shelly Smith
Shelly Smith
12/31/2012 01:40 PM

I have a friend who is retiring soon and was reminiscing about having a "Sacher Torte" from Vienna, and I would like to make this as a surprise for her retirement party. I have your Cake Bible - do you have a recipe in there for this or in your new book? If not, could you direct me to a recipe that would just "roll her socks up and down"? I would like to get as close to the original from Vienna (this is where she had hers) as possible. I've read many recipes and reviews of recipes - and frankly they just add more confusion and insecurity than anything else. Thanks for any help you can give.

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Hi Trish,
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject, as we do not have a recipe.
You may want to look at Kate Coldrick's A Merrier World blog site under Sites I like and also post your question there. You may also want to check Nick Malgieri’s website as well.
Rose & Woody

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Trish Young
Trish Young
12/28/2012 09:14 AM

I am looking for a recipe for an Italian sweet Panzarotti with a sweet ricotta/cinnamon filling. I have tried a couple of recipes with varying success. The dough causes me the most problems. I have tried a pasta type dough with eggs, sugar and oil, but was a bit tough.
A cafe in Sydney called Rosini's makes the best ones I have tried, but as I now live in the UK it is a bit far to get them!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Laura
12/27/2012 04:04 PM

HI Laura,
We advise that you read the section on Pastry Flour on page 7. You should see if your flour is close to the recommended protein percentage of 9.2. If not we suggest you try using King Arthur's pastry flour or make your own as shown.
Each recipe will specify whether the bottom crust is prebaked before filling or baked along with the filling. In general, if a pie is filled and then covered with a lattice or top crust, the bottom crust is not prebaked.
Rose & Woody

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Boy, do I need help! I made the cherry pie and it turned out awful! I'm wondering about the pastry flour. The only thing I could find around here was Arrowhead Mills Organic Pastry Flour. I noticed from the get go that it looked wheatie. This flour didn't behave at all as to what I expected. There is no way this would have come together in a bag. I tried. Finally I just dumped it out and brought it together with my hands. It was very stiff. When I rolled it out, I had to use all of my muscles. But yet, I had to refrigerate it in the middle of rolling because it got sticky. Either it was stiff and cracking or soft like it was going to melt. No middle ground. Needless to say, it was very dark when baked and unpleasant to taste, although it was tender. It was a huge bomb. So, in the future, which would be better..using just Wondra or making my own pastry flour? Do you have any experience using the Arrowhead Mills? BTW, I have years of experience with shortening crusts, so I know it is not me.

Also, since I knew this was a bomb, after three hours I cut into it and it was very runny. Somewhere on your site or in the bible, I read where it was okay to use 1 cut of sugar instead of 1/4 if you like it sweeter. Is that why it was runny? How can I fix that? I'd like to try again.

Oh, somewhere in the Pie and Pastry Bible, it says to prebake the bottom crust for a cherry pie but it doesn't say to on pages 94-95. Would it be better to do that?

Also, I made Woody's Luxury Lemon Cake. The batter was thicker than expected but gorgeous! The cakes came out golden and beautiful like your pictures, although I may have overbaked them just a tad as they had just started leaving the sides of the pan when I took them out of the oven. I haven't assembled them yet so can't give you a report on it. However, my lemon rose is stunning! First time for that.

Thanks for all your help!

Sincerely,

Laura

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Sara
12/26/2012 09:13 PM

Hi Sara,
We are sorry that the manufacturer changed the pie plate's design and took off the pie crust recipe and took out the recipe booklet a few years ago. The recipe is here on the blog and here is the link: Rose's Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust. The recipes which were on the recipe booklet are in The Pie & Pastry Bible. There are also several recipes on this blog under Recipes>Pies. The pie plate is a product of Harold Imports which has control of packaging, design, and marketing. We are looking to see if Harold Imports will post the recipes on their website.
Rose & Woody

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Had a question - I received one of your Perfect Pie Plates for a gift yesterday, woo hoo, and you state on the box that it is "designed with my favorite pie crust recipe on the pie plate." Nowhere on this plate is there a recipe. The box also states that "Rose's Favorite Pie Recipes included" There were absolutely no recipes included. While I love the plate, I want what is advertised. What is my next step? How do you rectify this? Thanks so much, looking forward to start baking!!

Sara

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Mo
12/23/2012 06:49 PM

Hi Mo,
We recommend baking the Cheddar Crust as is described for the Chicken Pot Pies on page 323 in the Pie & Pastry Bible for your beef "potpies". This technique is also done for the Steak & Kidney Pies on the following pages.
Rose & Woody

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Hello! I have used The Pie and Pastry Bible for years to make pies at Thanksgiving and Christmas. Recently, I've discovered and fallen in love with the recipes for savory dishes, such as Chicken Potpies, Spicy Spinach Quiche, and (oh my gosh!) Meatloaf wrapped in Flaky Cheddar Cheese Crust.

The cheese crust is so amazingly good that I'd like to use it in conjunction with a great recipe I just tried and loved for Yankee pot roast with vegetables. I'd like to make individual beef and veggie potpies topped with the cheddar crust.

Could you tell me what kind of adjustments, if any, I would have to make for the crust if I'm using it in this way as opposed to wrapping it around a meatloaf? Would I cut out and pre-bake the crusts, then do the final baking on top of the filled bowls of beef, gravy, & veggies, just as in the chicken potpie recipe?

Thanks so much for both the amazing book, and this wonderful forum!

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Thanks. My friend, who also has a copy of the Christmas Cookie Book, just sent it to me so I am good to go. It really is a great recipe along with many others in the book. This is a very well used cookie book at my house!! Happy Holidays!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Diana
12/21/2012 03:06 PM

Hi Diana,
Over the years, many bloggers have asked for recipes to be available on the blog or upon request. We get hundreds of requests each year. Having recipes on a blog is a practice done by many blog sites as the owners of these sites are typically backed by advertisers, presenting versions of recipes from cookbook authors (many times without the author's or publisher's permission), and/or linking products to websites for commissioned sales.
Rose is a writer by occupation, in which she writes cookbooks, articles for magazines and newspapers, and postings for websites. These are sources for finding Rose’s recipes. Although, we do have several recipes in the Recipe Section.
The blog is here to connect a worldwide baking community for helping each other to solve baking questions and discovering new ideas. We hope hope that you may beable to find your boxed up book or at the library or a similar recipe as we have established a policy on posting and emailing recipes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody- Can you get me the recipe? I don't know what that other person was talking about but the recipe is fantastic. I have used it for years. As I mentioned my copy of the book got boxed up by movers and is temporarily misplaced. Can you email it to me? Or post it? Thanks. Diana

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Orna
12/21/2012 11:17 AM

Hi Orna,
In the Equipment section of Rose's Heavenly Cakes, light colored pans are the recommended pans for cake baking. All of our testing is done with light colored pans unless a recipe is designed for a specifically different colored pan or type of pan. Lighter colored pans in most cases allows the center of the batter to bake through before the batter along the sides and bottom over bakes. The general rule is lowering the specified baking temperature by 25˚F/15˚C for darker colored pans.
We suggest that you contact Calphalon directly or check their website for recipes to see what they recommend.
Your equipment and you and whatever you are making ultimately should become a union in which you determine what works best and becomes your signature. You may find that for your oven that a certain pan works best at a certain temperature and that you prefer to use Calphalon pans at the stated temperature because you like the results.
I had a aluminum skillet for over 40 years that used to be my aunt's. It was slightly warped, a pain to clean, its bottom would get blackened at times, but I made crepes for my daughter for years and years. I used it because I knew how it worked and my daughter's joy of eating consistently delicious crepes each morning whether looking out the window at green grass and butterflies or at the snowy covered lawn and birds at the bird feeder. That pan is now my daughter's.
As we always recommend~~ experiment~~try different batters at different temperatures using your pan and maybe a light colored pan and see what works for you.
Rose & Woody

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Sorry Hector - was replying to Woody's response so didn't think it was necessary to give the details.
Rose's Sticky Toffee pudding!

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Orna, what cake are you trying to bake, what recipe, which book? Just blindly guessing my general recommendation is baking at the temperature the recipe says, then towards the last 1/3 to 1/4 baking time, reduce the temperature if the cake seams to be overthrowing.

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Hi Barbara,
If there seems to be an error in one of Rose's recipes, we always recommend to look at the Book Errata/Corrections section on the blog. There are no corrections or updates for this recipe. You may have seen in that the goal for any recipe is for the best combination of flavor and texture. Since Rose bases most of her measurements by grams and ounces, the volume measurement can breakdown into cups, tablespoons, and even teaspoons. You may want to try the recipe again, which you could always try a half or quarter recipe and making sure that you are using the exact same ingredients and weighing them for the most accurate measurement.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you Woody! One more question: I'm not sure if you would consider my Calphalon pan "dark". Next to my light Chicago Metallic sheet pan it definitely looks considerably darker. I posted the question in Norene Gilletz's Facebook group and got mixed responses. Please help! Don't know whether to bake at 300 or 350. Would be happy to send you a pic of the two pans side by side. Thanks!

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Barbara Smith
Barbara Smith
12/20/2012 11:55 PM

I made the melting moments from your Christmas cookbook. The recipe called for 3/4 cup flour plus 1 tablespoon and 1 cup cornstarch. I thought that was odd but that's what I did. The cookies fell apart - all of them - after so much time making the crescents! There was no way to coat them with powered sugar and dipping in chocolate, not even - a few survived and I drizzled with chocolate as picking them up was out of the question. Even after cooling in the fridge, the cookies refused to hold together. The texture was very strange - nearly made me gag it was so - I don't even know how to describe it - kind of gummy, icky. Very disappointed. I've looked at other recipes for melting moments and the flour to cornstarch ratio is not as your recipe shows - the flour is always more than the cornstarch. Could this have been an error in the printing???

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Find my yellow kitchen on Facebook for more recent updates, including the gluten free examples.

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Choy, this is a VERY good question. Cheesecake is considerable a dairy perishable item and "must be" refrigerate at all times. i do see this happening all the time: you can leave it out for 2 hours and no more, and after this exposure, it should all be eaten or discarded (left over perishables, sitting out for longer than 2 hours, should not be saved).

if the cheesecake is frosted with buttercream, it could keep for maybe 1 hour longer, as the buttercream will insulate it a little.

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My family loves the Cordon Rose Cheesecake and this week I was requested to bring one to a family friend's party. I'm concerned about how long it can sit out of the refrigerator without worrying about food safety. I normally let it sit in the oven after baking for about an hour and another hour or two out of the oven to cool down. How about after it has already been refrigerated?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Diana
12/20/2012 12:47 AM

Hi Diana,
The Christmas Cookies Book is not online, as it was published before e-books were being offered. If you need it for tomorrow, you may want to check your local library, if you do not want to search for it.
Rose does post recipes at times in the recipes section.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Laura
12/20/2012 12:35 AM

Hi Laura,
We suggest that you can either remove the extra amounts using a scale or raise the other filling amounts by the same percentage as the extra cherries.
Rose & Woody

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Hello again.

I am going to make the Cherry Lattice Pie from the Pie and Pastry Bible. On page 95 under variations, it says that the jars of Fruit Perfect Cherries are 13.5 oz each. I received mine and they are 140 oz/397g each. That means there would be 1 oz more of the cherries and juice. Are there any adjustments that would need to be made with the rest of the ingredients? Thanks so much!

Laura

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My Rose Levy Christmas Cookie book that I have been using for many many years got misplaced in some box or other when movers packed it up. It's here somewhere so I don't really need another copy. I am, however, desparate for her Melting Moments recipe as I want to bake these cookies tomorrow. Is there anywhere online I can get her recipe??? Please help. Thanks much.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from MJR
12/19/2012 04:07 PM

Hi MJR,
Although the accompanying picture shows the lemon cookies looking as rounded domes, the cookies should be flatter. If you form the dough with floured hands the finished cookies will usually come out taller and domed. Also stylists will style the made item to what they think is correct. We have a recipe in Rose's Heavenly Cakes which was revised after the styling photography.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Orna
12/19/2012 03:22 PM

Hi Orna,
Please review the chapter's introduction on storage times. You should beable to do as you plan.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose, Woody and Hector,

I am making Rose's Sticky Toffee Pudding for shabbat dinner this Friday.
Can it be made the day before, reinverted onto the baking sheet and kept overnight in the refrigerator—covered with plastic wrap? And then just make the sauce while I reheat it?

Thanks!

Orna

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John, my fruit farmer authority is celiac, my partner has wheat allergies, and myself "I" have IBS at times when large amounts of wheat are eaten!

Answering to your question, there is NO magic conversion for baked goods to become gluten free. There are many gluten free websites out there and most rely on a gluten free "flour" mix containing rice, potato, and corn starches plus xanthan gum and additional sugars and fat. I am personally against this mix because it isn't healthier, don't u think?

Gluten is needed for most all cakes, however there are several cakes where gluten isn't the main need. Gluten comes from wheat (flour). I started my wheat and gluten free experiments with the cakes that don't need "that much gluten" and then progress to the cakes "where gluten is a must." Gluten is formed by friction between wheat flour and liquid: beating.

For true sponge cakes, where flour is folded and not beated, thus gluten formation isn't a big part of structure, such as genoise and biscuit, I am using corn starch instead of flour. Substitution with equal weights. I love the results.

For chiffon cakes, where flour is beated but the cake structure depends highly on egg beating into foam formation, the corn starch substitution may work, too.

For butter cakes, such as yellow cake, where beating flour and gluten formation is essential. corn starch works but it changes the texture a whole lot as well as drying out the cake. The result is similar in texture to corn bread! I like to reduce the corn starch by 20% and it helps, not perfect.

For butter with oil cakes, such as red velvet, or for all oil cakes, the corn starch substitution works as well as above.

I haven't tried rice nor potato starches but I am thinking I will, specially for the butter cakes such as yellow cake.

I want to make clear that wheat and gluten ARE NOT POISON! unless u are celiac and diagnosed genetically (you are born with celiac genes) I see NO reason to avoid wheat and gluten.

I also want to make clear that allergies to wheat or gluten are most always "cured" or preventable if you live a healthy lifestyle as well as practicing eating moderation. I am almost certain people nowadays just need to eat less and most definitely smaller portions of bread, pasta, pastries, and cakes!

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hi Rose,
i have tried to make yor recipe for lemon poppyseed balls from your cookie book several times. Each time, the balls turn flat! Was there a typo in the book, or am I doing something wrong? Any suggestions?

Thanks,
MJR

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Hi Woody - I checked out Fran's website and it is more vegan than gluten-free. Hector's site wasn't productive either. Oh well - thanks for responding so quickly. I'll keep on researching. Thanks.

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Laura
12/18/2012 06:50 PM

Hi Laura,
Neither of us has sold our baked goods as a business. However, the rule of many restaurants is to charge 4x the ingredients and your hourly rate for any item.
For your pie, it sounds like you want the pie covered but not airtight. A solution maybe a cake carrier with venting on it's sides. The venting could be done by drilling holes or larger holes or slots that are covered with screening. The pie cover could be made out of wood with the screening on the sides.
Rose, Hector, & Woody

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Hello Rose, Woody, and Hector.

I've been asked to make 4 doz Christmas cookies and don't know what to charge. What is the rule of thumb? Also, what would the rule be for cakes or pies (for future reference)?

Also, my family has a simple raspberry pie they like me to make. My problem is knowing what to do with it when I get to my sister's house. She has no cool place to store it, so I've had to leave it outside (Ann Arbor, MI). If I put it in a container with a hard plastic lid on it, condensation occurs on the lid and drips down onto the crust making it wet. The crust is just flour, corn oil, salt, and milk, so it is a very crumbly crust. Just touching it makes it fall apart. They are crazy about the pie and so I am trying to hand this down to my adult niece who can't cook or bake, so I can move on to bigger and better things like Rose's heavenly sweets. Any idea on how to protect this pie from snow or rain in Michigan?

Thanks all and enjoy your visit!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Ian
12/18/2012 03:18 PM

Hi Ian,
Yes, you can use the pear licquer, although it will not be as intense in flavor. Fruit eau-de-vies, aromas, and oils are usually available on line.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose was thinking about making your gingery chiffon pear tart and one of the ingredients i cant find its "Poire William EAU-DE-VIE" I live in NYC and have no idea where to look i check in my local liquor store and they had "Belle de Brillet, Pear Liqueur" it said its made from Poire William pears wasn't sure if it ok to use it

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from John
12/17/2012 10:34 PM

Hi John,
Rose has several recipes in her books, however gluten free baking is not our genre. We recommend that you visit Fran Costigan's and other sites under Sites I Like and Hector Wong's My Yellow Kitchen.
Rose & Woody

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Hi - I have a fairly high level of baking skill (being a baker's son) who makes his living as a mathematician. Our family is facing a new challenge and I'm wondering if anyone can help. My son was just diagnosed with celiac disease and is now on a gluten-free diet. I am really looking for a way to convert all of our family recipes so that we all can enjoy them. Does anyone know a good source for the technical aspects of gluten-free baking? Thanks in advance.

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In the spirit of Rose who always encourages experimentation, I am mixing left over pecan pie filling (don't ask) with beaten egg whites to make a pecan pie soufflé (TM). :)

We'll see what happens!

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Carla
12/16/2012 12:55 PM

Hi Carla,
We suggest that you try plastic wrap as that is what we use for the Pecan Pralines in Rose's Christmas Cookies. You may also try seeing if one of your candy shops will sell you some candy wrappers in bulk.
Have you tried making the caramel in smaller batches or cooked at a faster rate as cooking caramel at a slower rate can cause the stickiness?
Rose & Woody

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Hi Randal,
1. We think it could be your brand of brown sugar, as we are assuming that you are consistent in dissolving all sugar granules, that the pot has been thoroughly cleaned, and bringing the mixture to the correct temperature. Are you using Billingstons?
2. have you tried a more in tense food color?
Rose & Woody

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Hi Laurie,
We always recommend experimenting. We do not see any problems other tha the marzipan may soften under the buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from shaheda
12/16/2012 11:50 AM

Hi Sheheda,
We recommend that you contact Stevia as they have recipes on their website, as I had problems when substituting it in few of Rose's recipes. We also suggest looking at several of the websites under Sites I Like as sugar free baking is not our genre of baking.
Rose & Woody

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Every year I make caramels & when I wrap them they seem to stick to my waxed paper. I have tried parchment but that seems a little too stiff & the caramels seem to stick to that also. I Can't seem to find out where the candy wraps can purchased, as that seems to be the answer. All I can find on line is foil wraps. Could it be that I'm not bringing my candy up to the right candy ball stage of 248 degrees, which could possibly be why my candy is slightly sticky? Any suggestions/answers for me?

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Dear Rose,

I have been asked to bake a healthy delicous cake !
Using stevia instead of sugar and wholewheat flour- I tried and made an awful cake.

Do you have any ideas on a sugar free healthy cake recipe. If so can you share this with me?

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Randal Tajer
Randal Tajer
12/16/2012 05:04 AM

Hi,

We are in full Christmas baking mode. Two questions:
1. My buttercrunch toffee is inconsistent. Some batches turn crumbly after mixing in vanilla and baking soda. Today I had two batches come out perfectly, and then 3 and 4 broke. My theory: the kitchen heated up and the extra warmth/humidity in the room from all the cleaning of the pans and utensils made it too warm/moist. We also live in London where it is generally mild and damp. Does this make sense?
2. We cannot get consistent colour on our cornflake Christmas wreaths. Maybe it is the marshmallows here, but as the green colour dries, it becomes translucent and the cornflake bleeds through, like when you paint over a dark colour room with a lighter one. Any thoughts?

Every year we make 10 - 12 of Rose's cookies in large volumes (e.g., 10-12 batches of the toffee!)

thanks

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Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
Laurie Raz-Astrakhan
12/15/2012 05:56 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

For Christmas I'd like to make your White Chocolate Whisper Cake (TCB) with lemon buttercream, as recommended. But I'm thinking about making a disk of pistachio marzipan (which I love!) to put between the crumb coat and the buttercream on top of the cake (something like the Pistachio and Rose Wedding Cake), . Do you think that would be a good combination? Is there anything I need to be aware of?

Thank you!
Laurie

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Hi Elaine,
We recommend not to be too concerned with the time frame. The guides to use are the temperature, the curd turning opaque, and the curd thickening where you can see it on the spatula. Do avoid having the mixture coming to a boil as the curd can easily burn on the pot's bottom. Do strain the curd incase any of the egg has curdled.
In several cases, it seems to take longer for my curd or ganache to thicken or meringue mixture to cool than Rose's. If one time is given, it is to give a starting point for when to check the mixture for it to change or cool.
Rose & Woody

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Elaine Barone
Elaine Barone
12/14/2012 11:08 PM

I have been making your excellent Ultimate Lemon Bars for the last few years and each time I have the same problem. It seems to take a long time (almost 30 minutes) for the lemon curd to reach 196 degrees. I also keep having to remove the pan from the heat to keep it from boiling, it does bubble a fair amount. I am afraid that I am overcooking the curd because it certainly takes quite a bit longer than the recipe indicates to reach the correct temperature. Any suggestions?

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Woody Wolston
Woody Wolston in reply to comment from Mark
12/14/2012 11:06 PM

Hi Mark,
If the cocoa mixture is covered tightly with plastic wrap, the mixture should be fluid like a pancake batter. However, we just demoed this cake in which Hector did all of the mis en place for the event and the cocoa mixture was prepped the night before. Although it was thicker it incorporated beautifully. The came cane out perfectly.
enjoy one of the highlights in Rose Heavenly Cakes.
Rose & Woody

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