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Jun 1, 2015 | From the kitchen of Rose

Please feel free to post comments here if you can't find another appropriate place. The other question entries became too long for some people's browsers to download.

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Comments

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anne Dudte Johnson
07/18/2016 02:04 PM

thanks so much for the feedback Anne. i remember the days when my major goal in life was getting big holes in my bread. it seemed very Zen! i like the name Oscar for your starter.

photos can be posted only in the forums.

i'm so thrilled by your success!

REPLY

Dear Rose

I am over the moon to have received a personal response from you. I've been a virtual apprentice of yours for nearly 15 years now.

I took a picture of Oscar (a baked version of himself) but it seems this thread doesn't allow photos. With your advice, today Oscar has bigger holes than he's ever had before and my husband says this is my best sourdough yet. His flavor and texture are good. I'll play more around with an even wetter dough next weekend.

Many thanks again for your response. That just made my day!

Anne


REPLY

Hi Jiang,
We are glad that you tried the original recipe first.
One of Rose's goals with engineering recipes is to reduce the refined sugar and let the other ingredients contribute to the sweetness level and the taste of the baked item. So to reduce the sugar further may take extensive modifications.
We suggest that you only work on one variable at a time. If you want a taller cake, then you will likely need to adjust the leavening and possibly using a flower nail placed in the center of the pan to aid in a uniformly baked cake. Also, cake strips will help as well.
Enjoy experimenting.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang in reply to comment from Woody
07/16/2016 04:49 PM

Dear Woody,
Of course I baked the original cake batter, and it came out well. Then I also tried to reduced the sugar, increased the baking powder (the technique Rose introduced in "The Grand Marnier Cake"), the cake was still good. I did the same things with the "Buttermilk Country Cake" and it worked. The recipes worked for cupcakes and an 10-inch cake pan. Since I want the cake taller, I baked the "Buttermilk Country Cake" in a 8x2 inch square cake pan, and the cake was more compact. I baked the cake for quite a long time: more than an hour.

I have worked with many Rose's books for years, and I understand that I should follow the recipe strictfully. Because my friends want the cake a little bit less sweet, then I decided to adjust the amount of sugar like Rose did in "The Grand Marnier Cake". I hope that you don't get bothered with my question.

Thank you.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anne Dudte Johnson
07/16/2016 04:23 PM

Anne, there are two secrets to big holes. the first is a long slow rise which, if you are using sourdough starter i'm sure you are doing. but even more important than that, the dough needs to be so sticky you can't touch it without it sticking a little to your fingers.

REPLY

Anne Dudte Johnson
Anne Dudte Johnson
07/16/2016 05:22 AM

Dear Woody:

Your work and craft in the kitchen never fail to impress me. I am hoping you might help me with a problem I've literally been having for years, no matter how many different ways I try:

My sourdoughs never develop big holes. They only have a ton of small baby holes. The flavor is good but it really bugs me I can't get big holes. I've tried different flours, free rise or pan rises... I'm stumped.

Can you help?

Sincerely,

Anne

REPLY

Hi Polly,
We have seen that Nordic Ware is generally very accurate with what they state for their pans' capacities. You may want to check with them. However, we would suggest filling the pan up to 1 inch below its rim and make cupcakes with any of the leftover batter. We strongly recommend using Baker's Joy oil spray with flour for coating the pan for the best releasing of your cake.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Matt,
If you use a scale to weigh out your ingredients, you can can convert most any recipe to whatever quantity you desire.
We would suggest reducing the recipe to whole numbers, but for the tart dough we are dealing with 1 egg yolk. You may want to cut the recipe in half to weigh out a half egg yolk, use store bought clarified butter, and freeze the dough that you do not want to make into tartlets at this time. The ganache recipe is easy enough to reduce to how many you want to make.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Farfour,
Have you have tried various recipes from Rose's books for butter, oil, sponge, etc to compare them for tenderness and moistness versus bakery fare?

We believe a well engineered and tested recipe served within ints stated storage times should be moist and tender, thus no need for food additives. Some recipes such as our golden lemon almond butter cake is brushed with a lemon syrup to add moistness and flavor. The additives can also help to prolong shelf life.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Ni Terry,
thank you so much.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Jiang,
We ask if you had already tried the recipe with the original cake batter?

We always recommend, you should make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences.
Since you changed 3 variables, we can not tell you what went wrong.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

hI Laura,
We suggest in "The Cake Bible" that a sauce can accompany the ganache. But you could always try experimenting or just adding raspberry oil or essence.
Rose & Woody

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I love the pan and I am confused as to the cup amount and several recipes call for a 10 cup pan.I have one of the old bundt pans as a fall back if needed. Thanks

REPLY

Polly Meaut
Polly Meaut
07/15/2016 10:42 AM

I have a Nordic Ware Fleur de Lis bundt pan.On their site it says it is 10 cups. I poured water to measure and it is closer to 8 . If my recipes calls for a 10 cup pan this would be a mess. Is that correct?

REPLY

hi Rose, I am interested in trying to make the Chocolate Ganache Tartlets in your Baking Bible and have a question... if I want to reduce that for a quantity of 6 tartlets (vs the full 46), what is the best way to modify the portions?

Also, I see that your recipe calls for clarifying 11 tbs of butter and then using 1/2 cup of what's clarified in this recipe... would it work to just use clarified butter from the store to cut out an extra process?

REPLY

Dear Rose

I've noticed that many bakeries use cake gel (emulsifiers) to get a uniform tender crumb with extra moistness (specially with sponge cakes). what do you think of these food additives? and can we acheive the same result without them?

REPLY

I'm a terrible cook/baker who comes from a long line of terrible cooks/bakers who were professional women even back in the 1920s. They were too busy to learn how to cook - myself included. But somewhere along the way, someone gave me a copy of the Cake Bible; and while I can't seem to follow a recipe I can certainly follow a formula. I've had success after success with your "formulas". This afternoon I whipped up another White Velvet Butter Cake for tea time and my husband and I sat down and ate half of it in no time at all. I just wanted to say thank you for helping the non-intuitive cooks and bakers like myself. I so appreciate your work!

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
07/11/2016 10:05 AM

Dear Rose&Woody,
Today I baked the Pineapple Upside-down Cake, but I used the Buttermilk Country cake instead of the Golden Cake Recipe and decreased 60gr sugar, added more 1/2 teaspoon baking powder to compensate (just like the Grand Manier Cake). I baked the cake in 8x2 inch square pan. The resulting cake was compact, there were some holes on the top of the cake and there was a crack at the top center.

I wonder what did I do wrong?

Thank you.

REPLY

Laura Schneck
Laura Schneck
07/11/2016 08:05 AM

Hi Rose and Woody,

I am making petit fours and plan to use white chocolate ganache to coat them, instead of fondant. I thought it would be wonderful to add Rose's raspberry sauce to the ganache - for flavor and color. But am not sure if it will incorporate well (will it curdle? will it be too runny?), or what proportion to use.

As always, thanks so much for answering questions form the forum!!

Best,

Laura

REPLY

Hi Tonia,
We always state baking temperatures for a bottom heating oven on conventional/standard mode. Many manufacturers state to bake at 25 F less than the stated temperature when using convection mode.

We have several ovens.
Wolf gas oven--mostly breads
Gaggenau electric oven--cakes, pies, cookies, pizza, some breads
Panasonic microwave/convection oven--cakes, pies, cookies
Breville countertop oven--cakes, pies, cookies
Westinghouse electric oven--cakes, pies, cookies

Rose & Woody


REPLY

Dear Woody,

Thank you for your reply. I'm curious, in Rose's books, when she gives baking temperatures, is that for a fan forced or conventional oven? And if using a fan forced does that change the temperature you should set the temperature at? What brand of oven do you and Rose use? I know that the temperature inside my oven is accurate as I use a oven thermometer regularly, just to check the accuracy of the internal temperature.

I will give the Downy Yellow Cake a go, but would first like to know whether I should be setting the oven to conventional or convection.

Thank you very much

REPLY

Wow, thank you so much!

Here are my answers:

1. Bertazoni dual fuel-- induction burners and electric oven. Perhaps an unconventional choice but I was very eager for the responsiveness of induction burners as I cannot have gas.

2. Upper and lower, standard. There is a fan that runs continuously when the oven is on, even in standard mode. I do have convection bake available. Should I try that?

3. Yes! Cake Bible disciple.

4. Yes. I've moved racks and rotated pans, top to bottom and front to back. Yesterday, after I removed one cake layer, the top of the remaining one over browned in exactly two minutes, indicating to me that the oven is over-compensating for heat loss when the door is opened.

I have not tried over-baking as the bakes are uneven, top is too brown and bottoms underdone. Don't know how to control for this other than tin foiling the top.

Thank you for the temperature and stone suggestions. I have a terrific digital thermometer and will try this test with the butter cake.

Dia

REPLY

Hi Tonia,
We cannot give specific recommendations as we have no experience with the Miele ovens. Since many ovens are not accurate at heating tho the temperature that you set, we recommend obtaining an oven thermometer. Then using it to make a chart of the oven's temperatures at various settings.
Hopefully you will not get bored with it, but we recommend making the All-Occasion Downy Yellow cake as a test cake for you to find a solution. You may want to try different rack positions. Once you find good results for this cake, you can apply the results to virtually all of the layer butter cake recipes.
Then work on the crescents.
The next book is scheduled for release in fall of 2018.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Robert,
We suggest using a turbinado (raw) sugar and maple flavoring.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Sharon,
We highly recommend that you obtain 2 inch high pans. Using 3 inch high pans for recipes calling for 2 inch high pans will generally over brown the tops of cakes and reduce their heights. We do not give recipes for 3 inch high butter/oil layer cakes because the cakes will not be even in doneness, texture, and crumb throughout individual cake layers.
Rose & Woody

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Everything Woody has suggested has turned out well. Thank you. I read the questions & answers others ask & I feel my questions are trivial. But, I live in an area where really good quality ingredients need to be ordered so I add things like extracts, flavors espresso and liquor to make flavors pop a bit more in a cake. In that vein I have an ingredient question,
Is there anything I can substitute for maple sugar? Frankly too expensive for me and takes a while to get. Any suggestions would be helpful?
Thanks,
Robert

REPLY

I am charged with making my nephew's 3 tiered wedding cake. Because I flew across country for this "assignment" and was assured they had a complete set of equipment (I only came with my Cake Bible in hand). They didn't lie, however the cake pans are 3" high rather than the 2" high pans (6", 9". and 12")that I've used at my own kitchen to make more than 100 wedding cakes using Rose's recipe! Can I use the same amounts called for in Rose's white wedding cake recipe (gauged for 2" high pans) in the 3" high pans or is there a readily available conversion of her trusted recipe that I could adapt to the 3" high pans? I don't have the time to do test cakes and I hate to buy a whole new set of 2" high pans. Thank you.

REPLY

Tonia Maait
Tonia Maait
07/ 5/2016 08:50 AM

Dear Rose,

I've recently moved house and purchased the Miele H2661B oven. In my old apartment I had no choice but to use a fan forced oven, but with the option of a conventional heat setting, I'm wondering when is a good time to use that setting? As I've only really previously had experience with a fan forced oven, I'm unsure how to use a conventional oven setting. I tried to bake Rose's crescents from your christmas cookie book and on both fan forced and conventional settings, they came out very flat and a little over cooked. With this recipe, for example, which setting would be the best to achieve the desired results?

The settings in the booklet are as follows:

Conventional Heat - (Top heat/grill element and bottom heat element) For baking and roasting traditional recipes, preparing souffles amd cooking at low temperatures.

Fan plus - (Ring Heat Element and fan) Used for baking and roasting on different levels at the same time.

Intensive bake - (Ring Heat Element and fan and bottom heat element) For baking cakes, tarts, pies, quiches and pizza that require a crisper base or moist toppings. Intensive bake is not suitable for baking thin cookies as they will become too dark.

I mostly bake from your christmas cookie book, heavenly cakes and pie and pastry bible. If you could give me some pointers as to what you think would be the best settings for say, cookies and cakes, I would really appreciate it. Especially the ginger pennies and the crescents, as they are a firm favourite amongst our family and friends.

Thank you so much in advanced.

P.S. Do you have a date for the publication of the new 'Baking Basics' book? Also, will there by any chance be a recipe for fudge?

I look forward to your reply.

Best,
Tonia

REPLY

HI anne,
We suggest the White Chocolate Buttercream in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" & "The Baking Bible" for a frosting that can adorn all three distinctly flavored cakes. It holds up and pipes well as a wedding a wedding cake frosting. We have used it for both an under coat for glazing and top coat adorned with crystallized flowers.
Otherwise, we suggest using the White Chocolate Cream Cheese frosting for the carrot cake tier and other "white" buttercream or silk meringues flavored to accompany the chocolate and white velvet cake layers.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I am making a wedding cake for my parents' 50th anniversary party and I wanted to ask which frosting you thought would work best? I am making a three tier cake, one white velvet layer, a chocolate layer and a carrot layer. Do you think the White chocolate Cream cheese frosting would be the best for all three layers?
Thanks,
Anne

REPLY

Hi Dia,
We are assuming that you have tried "overbaking" as a solution.
Hopefully you will not get bored with it, but we recommend making the All-Occasion Downy Yellow cake as a test cake for you to find a solution. Once you find good results for this cake, you can apply the results to virtually all of the layer butter cake recipes.
We also think that you probably will have less of problem with bundt and tube pan cakes.

A couple of questions to help us.
1. What oven do you have?
2. Are you baking on standard (bottom elements), convection, or both bottom and upper elements?
3. Are you using cake strips?
4. Have you tried using a different rack position?

For testing cakes with the conventional tests for doneness, such as: a cake tester, the cake shrinking from the sides of the pan, cake springs back, we also will use an instant-read thermometer to check the temperature. Most cakes are done when the temperature is around 200F.

If your oven has enough height, what works wonderfully for bread baking and would also help make your oven bake more evenly for all baking, is to put an oven stone on the very top rack and another one on the bottom rack or floor of the oven. not only does it make heat distribution more even, when the oven door is opened, the heat always drops but with the heat retention of the stone it will regain the temperature much sooner.

Rose & Woody

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I am a Cake Bible devotee. I have a new oven with very uneven heat top to bottom. I am trying to get help from the manufacturer but am not optimistic. The problem is particularly evident with cakes, which appear to be done and test done by conventional methods, only to find they are underbaked on the underside when turned out of the pan. Is there a way to test better for this? Is there any remedy once the cakes have cooled? Very frustrating! Have never had this problem before.

REPLY

Ms. Beranbaum, Thank you for the kind words.
You are correct, pasteurized eggs are not allowed unless baked into the product. I will have Jake read you message well in advance of preparation.
Many thanks!
HM

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Dana
06/29/2016 04:47 PM

Dana, i would do a compromise between the two ie 250/9. the most important thing isi that the roll in butter square be a similar temperature to the dough. so let us know how it works out.

REPLY

During the summer I make Danish pastries and croissants to sell at our local farmers' market, based on the recipes in the Cake and Pastry Bible. For efficiency I like to make up several 5" squares of the roll-in fats and take them out of the fridge or freezer as I need them. The proportion of butter to flour for the two recipes is similar (255/8 grams for the croissants and 240/10 grams for the Danish). I'd like to be able to use my roll-in blocks interchangeably rather than mix, store and identify them separately for the croissants and Danish. Is this possible? If so, which of the two proportions would work best in both recipes? What effect do you think it would have? Can I make an adaptation to one of the dough recipes in order to make this work? Thanks. Dana

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Helen Marie Pell
06/23/2016 10:03 PM

Helen, i was so impressed when you wrote to me about your son making and winning a ribbon for the Scarlet Empress. so even if pasteurized egg whites are used it is not allowed? without the italian meringue it will be less airy but i think it will still be good. what i would do to maintain the balance of sweetness is add the sugar that is used for the italian meringue to the cream when whipping it. but i always always test a recipe before giving it out so really what he should do is make the filling to see if it is what he is hoping it to be. do let us know.

REPLY

I have been having a load of fun with your baking bible, but I have been having a lot of trouble with your deep chocolate passion cake. The cake just does not seem to be "deep" enough to split into two layers in order to layer it with your chocolate oblivion. I used a 9-inch pan, as the recipe indicates, and did not line the sides with butter or parchment, to avoid shrinkage. Is there something I am not doing? I've tried the recipe three times now. Each time is an improvement but still, no depth...

Thanks for your help!

REPLY

Helen Marie Pell
Helen Marie Pell
06/23/2016 07:48 PM

Ms. Beranbaum,
I can't thank you enough for The Cake Bible. Our son, Jake, won Gr. Champion with your Scarlet Empress recipe.
This is his last year in 4-H and he wants to out with a bang.
He is wanting to challenge himself by making the Apple Carmel Charlotte. He felt, this was the most technical recipe he could find.
His problem is with the Italian Meringue. Eggs and all milk products must be a baked part of the product.
Is there an acceptable substitute for the Italian Meringue? Or would it be better to just omit? I hate for him to alter the recipe at all, but the recipe as it stands would be disqualified.
Any suggestions will be appreciated.

Kind Regards,
Helen Marie Pell

REPLY

Hi Colleen,
We have engineered our cupcakes to have a flat to just slightly domed top for frosting it. For muffins, we generally engineer them to be domed. On page 294, in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" we comment that after you fill the cupcake liners that you can let them sit for 20 minutes to have more domed tops, as this weaken the baking powder. (You can also slightly reduce the baking powder.)
Rose & Woody

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I recently made the recipe for "yellow butter cupcakes" in Rose's Heavenly Cakes. They came out more on the flat side than doming up. All my ingredients were at room temp and I followed the recipe to the T. Any ideas on why this happened? Thank you!

REPLY

Thank you Woody & Lesley! I was all prepared to triple this recipe until I went online this morning & read in several places that it may not work. That's why I was so late with asking a question. But thank you guys for your rapid responses !!!!

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lesley wormald
lesley wormald in reply to comment from Woody
06/10/2016 01:56 PM

I can vouch for your white cake and its adaptability - I have made a 13 x 9, 14 x14 square and 12 x12 square all using the base cake formula as well as all sizes of round cake. The cake rises beautifully and cooks to perfection and is always moist - it is my go to for any vanilla cake as it also tastes delicious and is very easy to make. I now have a chart in my computer with the exact measurements for each size of cake as I use the recipe so frequently and it saves the calculations each time. Thanks again for all of your lovely recipes.
Lesley

REPLY

Hi Diane,
Although we always appreciate answering bloggers' questions on one of Rose's recipes, we recommend at least a 3 day lead time, incase our schedules do not permit us to adequately answer one's question. (We just did a 3 day photography with preparation shoot.)

We suggest that you use the WHITE BASE CAKE recipe for Base Formula for Butter Cakes on pages 491-496. Your 13 x 19 inch pan is slightly under a 9 times batter for the WHITE BASE CAKE recipe. You also may need to slightly increase the baking powder for Level 6 SHEET CAKES on page 492 due to your large pan.
We definitely recommend wrapping the sides of the pan with cake strips to help produce a uniformly baked cake.
Your baking time will likely be from 40-55 minutes. at 350 F.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Robert,
We suggest a few "transferring devices" that we use to place a second layer on top of a frosted topped first layer.
1. A 12" or larger bottom of a tart pan, preferably non-stick
2. A large cake lifter
3. A metal pizza paddle
4. Two long BBQ/grill spatulas

With all of these, we place the second layer so that it overhangs the "transfer device" a inch. Angle the cake about 30 degrees and position its bottom edge even with the top edge of the first layer. Carefully slide out the "transferring device" out in the opposite direction, as well as lowering it but not touching the frosting so that the cake gently drops into place. (The BBQ/grill spatulas can be lowered down and then pull out on either side of the cake.)
In most cases, you can still reposition the top layer if it slightly off center from the first.
Rose & Woody

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Rose, can I triple your White Velvet Cake recipe? I need it to fit a 13"x19" pan. And I'm doing this today! Help me :)

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I seem to be making a good many 12" 2 layer or more cakes lately. Could you tell me a good method of piling up the layers without breaking them. Seems as I get older I'm getting a bit clumsy. (69) Not an excuse but it's just happening. Any decent solutions? Thanks for any help anyone has can give me.

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No worries there ;-) When I'm making a new recipe, especially bread, I follow all ingredients and directions obsessively!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
06/ 3/2016 07:09 PM

yes--there may also be other flours but i'm talking about the base flour and i was alarmed that you are possibly replacing all-purpose with 00 flour. you'll be just fine if you use the flours specified.

REPLY

Okay. I'm totally confused now. In my book Brinna's Pugliese has pumpernickel flour in it and the second recipe for Pugliese has a/p and durum.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
06/ 3/2016 07:02 PM

Brinna used king arthur unbleached all-purpose flour for her pugliese which is great but not 00 flour. just wanted to be sure you are using a strong enough flour.

REPLY

I understand and I do. But the pugliese recipe in Bread Bible calls for both. 1/2 cup of a/p flour in the biga and 1/2 cup each a/p and durum in the dough.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
06/ 3/2016 06:55 PM

Patty, use Gold Medal or King Arthur bread flour, not 00 for bread--it is god for pasta and maybe pizza but not bread.

REPLY

Thank you. I'm probably letting it rise too much. I always use Gold Medal flour for my a/p flour and was able to find 00 farina flour at a specialty market. I'll adjust next time I make it.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
06/ 3/2016 05:53 PM

Patty, either you are letting the bread rise to much so it can't support itself and deflates OR your flour is not high enough in protein. if the latter, then use some vital wheat gluten.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mike
06/ 3/2016 03:17 PM

Mike, absolutely yes! recently i made pizza dough using more yeast and a same day bake and then one with an overnight rise and the bubbles were so much larger in the overnight one. flavor is always better.

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Rose and Woody,
Thanks for your prompt reply. One more question. As I read your text I've noticed that your Bulk and Final proofing times are usually much greater than in the text we used in my Artisan Bread class. (our text: How to Bake Bread [Kalanty} and Advanced Baking and Pastry [Susa]). Are you seeing much greater bread flavor and structure development with this longer times ? I greatly appreciate your time and comments.
V/r
Mike

REPLY

Hi Mike,
We will suggest to go by KitchenAid's recommendations as we do not have a Pro 700 series mixer.
Depending on your results, you can decide on mixing speed levels for future breads.
Rose & Woody

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Rose,
Hi, I just received your book "The Bread Bible"... good stuff. Although I am a physician I'm attending culinary school at night and just completed Artisan Breads.. I Loved it. I also just purchased a Kitchen Aid Pro 700 Series mixer. I noted in your text that the speeds for the 5qt for low and medium were 2 & 4 respectively. With the 700 series mixer the guidance from Kitchen aid is to do all bread mixing on speed #2 as the mixer was "Designed" for single speed mixing due to the advanced movement of the bread hook & motor speeds. Do you have any thoughts on this (ie: follow Kitchen aid recommendations or still do #2 & #4 for low and high) ? (I fear 700 series #4 will be to traumatic to the dough development)
Thanks, (sorry to be long)
V/r.... Mike

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
05/31/2016 07:24 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,
I have another question about the Pugliese in the Bread Bible. Not Brianna's, but the other one. I've made it twice now, and when I (very carefully) turn it out after the 2 hour rise and again when I take it out of the colander for the final rise, it deflates to practically flat. So I get a loaf that is tasty and has a nice chewy crust, but has very little height. What might I be doing wrong?

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
05/25/2016 08:32 PM

Hi Rose and Woody!
I'm planning on making the Quintessential Corn Muffins out of the Bread Bible soon and have a question for you. Have you ever substituted bacon fat for the butter? If so or not, would I use the same amount?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
05/21/2016 10:31 AM

june, i can't seem to find your second question here but the answer is yes--excellent thermometer for all purposes you mentioned.

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Hi Rose and Woody: I just finished baking three cakes for a dear friend's wedding. They were all Cake Bible recipes. I am hoping to get more details down soon. I wanted to let you know that I made a coconut version of mousseline buttercream. I couldn't make the Heavenly Cakes version of the silk meringue because the cakes needed to be at warm outdoor temperature for a couple of hours at the reception. After much experimentation, I settled on a combination of coconut butter and coconut cream in the recipe and the flavor was delicious! As usual, your recipes shone when it mattered most! Wishing you everything sweet--Michele in NC

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from June
05/20/2016 06:44 PM

hi June,

mercury thermometers are no longer considered safe in the kitchen so alas the cordon rose thermometer is no more. i do highly recommend the thermopen. click on "rose's family of products" on the left side of this blog and then on thermoworks.

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lesley wormald
lesley wormald
05/20/2016 06:39 PM

Hi Woody and Rose. Wondered what your thoughts are on using fresh fruit in a cake. I have been asked to make a vanilla cake with strawberry filling. Easy task if one is just doing a buttercream and serving on the same day but this is a fondant cake that I cannot refrigerate and it will be torted and layered 2 days ahead. I have been eyeing your Cordon Rose Strawberry Conserve as an alternate. Do you think this a better alternative? I do have a friend who used fresh strawberries in a cake and the strawberries started to ferment overnight blowing large air bubbles in her fondant.She had to strip off the fondant and relayer the cake.Just to confirm, you are adding 1 cup of strawberry preserve to one large scale recipe (8 cups) of the neoclassic buttercream. For the extra strawberry punch I can buy Arome Naturel from France - but do not have access to La Cuisine. Thanks so much

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I'm looking for a good thermometer and remember that you produced one some years ago. I read it in my very worn but wonderful cake bible. Are they still available for sale anywhere? Or do you know a reliable brand since the few I have are not very accurate.
Ant info is appreciated

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Hi Lynn,
We do not have a recipe for "pan greasing" in our books. Our preference for preparing a pan that needs a flour coating is Baker's Joy spray with flour. It has a neutral flavor and is widely available. We do keep a small zip lock bag in our refrigerated shortening can to make it easier to grease a pan before covering with parchment paper.
Rose & Woody

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Lynn Jepson
Lynn Jepson
05/19/2016 12:08 PM

Hi Rose!
I was wondering about a recipe for pan grease I am sure came from you and/or your Cake Bible book I have. It used 1 cup flour to 1 cup Crisco, I'm pretty sure, but I also saw one on the internet that included 1 cup veg oil. I am not able to get to my Cake Bible book, as I am RV'ing, but would love to make some as I travel, and do bake.
Thanks,
Lynn Jepson

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thank you Norma and best of luck with your cookbook!

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Norma Piermarini Marshall
Norma Piermarini Marshall
05/18/2016 11:52 AM

Hi Rose! I just ordered your new cookbook and look forward to reading it. You have been such a profound influence in my baking ... I am forever grateful.

Working on a cookbook of my own but will leave the scratch baking out since you've covered that pretty well...

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Thank you so much for the explanation Rose. You are right, I wasn't comparing the cakes carefully enough! I love your cookbooks so much. I've made many cakes out of the Cake Bible and look forward to baking out of Heavenly Cakes which I just received! Thank you so much for your wonderful explanations about how and why things work. I learn so much from reading your cookbooks and baking the different cakes. My family and friends enjoy the results!
Ms. BB

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Thanks Rose and Lesley for the comments. I may still try a recipe, but I will be prepared for the results!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ms. BB
05/16/2016 02:49 PM

mrs. BB, best to compare two of the same cakes from each book. in the cake bible, the white velvet cake for 30 grams of flour uses 3/4 teaspoon salt. in heavenly cakes 200 grams of flour use 1/2 teaspoon which is identical.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Lesley Wormald
05/15/2016 01:30 PM

thank you Lesley! i was so afraid when posting this that someone would rise up in indignation and was hoping everyone would realize that it's just my opinion and a matter of taste. possibly if someone grew up with this pastry they might feel different about it.

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I waited for your reply to Heather with interest Rose. I have just returned from the UK and my husband and I both ate at one of many lovely Gastro pubs that are now so prolific in the UK. We both ordered meat pie not realizing it came with a hot water crust. I knew what it was at once and therefore ate the crust with no expectations. My husband loved the filling but hated the pastry. The pastry was well done but you are right, It is like a fairly hard shell that doesn't soak up any of the juices of the pie and therefore somewhat tasteless.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Heather
05/15/2016 09:50 AM

Heather, raised meat pies do indeed require a stronger crust. i think originally the crust wasn't meant to be eaten but rather used as a decorative serving vehicle especially if transporting for workers' lunches. in any case, i have tasted pies made with the hot water crust and this type of firm crust is not to my taste so i never worked on a recipe for it.

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Hello :)
I was watching The Great British Baking Show (Season 1, episode 5 in the US) and one episode featured hot water crust pastry. Apparently it is favored for its strength in meat pies. Does anyone have any experience with this type of crust and do you, Rose, have an opinion/wisdom to share?
Thank you,
Heather

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Dear Rose and Woody,
I was reading Heavenly Cakes and noticed that in general, there is less salt used in the recipes than in my Cake Bible. I was wondering why?
Thank you so much,
Ms. BB

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Hi Jan,
We suggest that you contact wheat berry suppliers of which berry has a protein content of 12.7% once it is ground. We also recommend that you do have the King Arthur flour as well to use as a control flour, until you achieve results to your satisfaction from a ground wheat berry.
Rose & Woody

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Can anyone tell me if you are grinding your own flour which grain would you use to replace King Aurthers white bread flour. I know it has more protein and it gives the bread a chewy texture like ciabatta bread.
I just hate using store bought flour if I could grind my own to replace it.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
05/12/2016 06:17 PM

Patty, coarse pumpernickel is hard to find. i haven't tried bob's red mill pumpernickel meal but i suspect that would work very well. you would need to view both the dark rye and the meal to see which is coarser. the dark rye might offer more flavor though. i'm sure either one will be good. as for the biga, it will be more acidic but it will still work. just be sure to deflate it if necessary so that it doesn't stretch too much which would indeed weaken it.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from lenzaun
05/12/2016 06:13 PM

Lenore, i really don't think it makes any difference to the final taste of the bread--i've done it both ways. i used to allow the plastic bag to inflate but now i just leave a little of the zip seal part open so the gas can escape. no particular reason--just how i feel. so it's up to you.

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
05/12/2016 11:44 AM

I am going to be baking Brianna's Pugliese out of the Bread Bible this week and have a couple of questions. First, I was unable to find (locally) coarse pumpernickel flour. I did find dark rye flour. I'm not sure it will be coarse enough? I also saw Bob's Red Mill makes a pumpernickel meal. Would that be better in this recipe? Also, I make the biga on Monday and probably won't be able to make the bread until Friday or Saturday. Will this be too long and the biga will no longer work? Thank you in advance. You both have been very helpful and supportive.

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I've been baking bread for quite some time, and am a devotee of Rose's "The Bread Bible." I bake Hearth Breads, long rising, and have also blended elements of some of Rose's wonderful recipes into a few of my own. Her recipes and hints are exquisite.

Now for my question - when preparing the dough for rising, I use plastic wrap very firmly wrapped over a stainless steel bowl. It works fine. Once in a while, on a long rise, due to the CO2 production, the wrap expands and pushes it up until the wrap is quite tight. I don't think it's a question of too much yeast as I am quite conservative with the measurements.

Question: should I let some air out (to deflate) and then rewrap - or is it better to just leave it? How might the "deepening of flavor" be affected/retarded in either case? I am not concerned about any explosions:)

Thanks very much.
Lenore

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Hi Nuchi,
Are you using a scale?
We highly recommend that you look at the Heavenly Cakes Bake Along postings (left sidebar) to see how these home bakers baked this recipe and the rest of the recipes in RHC, except the wedding cakes. Virtually all have step-by-step photos as well as a weekly summary by Marie Wolf on how everyone did.

1. It sounds like you just clarified the butter to the clarified butter state with just whitish yellow milk solids. Rose, in many cases, will continue cooking the butter until the milk solids brown, which also taints the butter to a darker color.
We try to minimize deflating the egg foam, but at the same time, evenly incorporate the butter.

2. The amount of yolks is critical for the genoise batter to properly bake. In the USA, it is very common now days for large egg to over 50 grams, but have smaller egg yolks. You may want to consider separately measuring the yolks and white and then combining them. For the latest printing for "The Cake Bible" we suggest to add an extra yolk if one is having poor results.

3. We are not experienced with the Bosch mixer for cake batters. We recommend going by the guidelines we state.

4. The flour mixture should incorporate without too much effort. Rose likes to use a balloon whisk, I prefer a slotted skimmer.

5. We sugget baking at the 175 C stated temp, unless 160 C is your own adjustment due to how your oven heats.

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Hi Anne,
Depending on what you are trying achieve in a cake recipe will determine what adjustments need to be made for converting the recipe for cupcakes. Also, what your preference is for a cupcake. Some people like domed cupcakes, others prefer a flatter top for holding the frosting. We generally strive for a just slightly domed cupcake for a good base for the frosting.
For most multiple layer cakes recipes, like the White Velvet Butter Cake, we slightly reduce the amount of leavening for cupcake recipes, after you have doubled all of the ingredients.
For single layer cake recipes, like the Red Velvet, you can stay with the same amount of leavening or a slight increase.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anne Barth
05/ 8/2016 06:26 PM

Anne, yes, double the baking powder when doubling the recipe for the cupcakes. please note that the cupcakes in the second batch will probably be more domed as they will take longer to fill and if they don't all bake at the same time it would be a good idea to refrigerate those for the second batch as if they sit at room temperature the leavening will continue to activate which is what causes the doming.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Keaton S
05/ 8/2016 06:25 PM

hi Keaton,

baker's % is simply any ingredient added to bread divided by the total weight of the flour (including added wheat components such as bran or vital weight gluten). i encourage you to get a copy of my book "the bread bible" as you will find many formulas and recipes for different types of bread and it will give you a thorough understanding of all aspects of bread baking.

crème fraîche is made from heavy cream which has 36 to 40% butterfat. mascarpone is an italian cream cheese which has from 75 to 85% fat. each has a small amount of milk solids and the rest is water.

no need to apologize for being obsessed with bread baking--i can't think of a finer occupation. enjoy the journey!

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Hello all!
I should begin by telling you that I am only 19 and still learning how to bake bread! Summer just hit here in California and since school has ended I have been obsessively baking bread non stop! Hmmm, yes I know what you are thinking... "What 19 year old spends here time just baking bread?!" Well, this one!! Haha. I love it...

I had a couple questions about mascarpone and creme fraiche. I wanted to incorporate both ingredients (either together or separate) in a recipe for bread... I am not experienced enough to understand the "bakers percentage" and figuring out the fat content and ratio that would be required, so I am asking for help. I would love some input from anyone who has worked close with these ingredients or who has a great recipe that I would be able to follow. I would also greatly appreciate in other input or advice on what the "bakers percentage" is, so I can more confidently start switching ratios around with ingredients I use in baking my bread.

Thank you to who have read this comment. Have a great day baking, my friends!

Keaton

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Hello,
I am making cupcakes with the White Velvet Butter Cake recipe. If I double the recipe, does the amount of baking powder increase like the other ingredients?

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Hi Woody and Rose,
Thakn you for your reply.
Yesterday I tried white gold passion geniose from Rose hevenly cake. The cake come out very thin layer and at bottom is really herd - top part to the top was moist and soft what did I do wrong.
1. I made clarified butter but it s clear yellow liquid not dark brown like what rose use in genoise video and I used when it s still warm take a cup of egg mixture mixed with the butter and add back in main egg mixture.
2. Egg is use about 3 cz size here quite big about three of them almost 200 g.
3.I whisk the egg with stand mixer but take about 10 min to puff like ribbon stage I didint use kitchen aid mine is bosch . Do I whisk too long but 5 minni see it still not puff like 10 min.
4.after I that I sift the half of flour in and seem it difficult to mix til flour incoperate first time I see silicone spatula and volumn has gone a lot. second time I use skimmer slot as rose using seem do not lose the volumn like firdt time but still difficult to incorate flour in though later I change back to silicone spatula and I mix for a while to make sure all flour incorporates .
5. Second time I bake about 23 min at 160 c as my pan is dark. my cake is quite short. about 1/3 of two inch pan and bottom still hard, top half part is ok moist and soft. Same as my first attempt.
What did I do wrong can u suggest pls .
Thank you very much.

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HI Jiang,
We suggest "The Food Lab", "On Food and Cooking", and "Bakewise".
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaun
Rose Levy Beranbaun in reply to comment from Isaac
05/ 7/2016 02:19 PM

Isaac, if you don't have a hot kitchen it will be fine.

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Dear Rose,


Circumstances have suddenly demanded that my production of your Cake Bible's Cordon Rose Cheesecake be put on hold, and I had the cream cheese out at least 30 minutes still in their unopened wrappers, cool to the touch but squishy.

Is cream cheese still good to use if I had them out at least 30 minutes, still in the wrappers, put them back in the fridge, and then softened them again later?


Sincerely,

Isaac

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
05/ 5/2016 04:20 PM

Dear Rose&Woody,
I don't know, since when I was so interested in baking science. Although Rose's books contain a lot of scientific information, I still want to have more. Would you recommend me some of trustful books?

Thank you

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Hi Nuchi,
When we have added the softened gelatin to the hot 50 to 60 C, it incorporates without a thick layer at the top. If the gelatin seems too firm before you add it, you can heat it briefly to be more fluid. If the glaze seems too thick at 26 C, then warm it a bit to a higher temp.
You can always test pour some of the glaze onto foil to see if it is thin enough and add it back.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woodie ,

Last weekend i baked again for Bernachon Palet D or Gateau cake . this time i try my best to smooth the ganache and put the lacquer glaze on . As i just prepare the glaze on that day and i use it so i try to wait til temperature of lacquer glaze reach 26 C . Here in Thailand is too hot i wait for a while to cool down so while i was waiting ,there was some layer of thick gelatin form on the top . so i pour it through strain one more time before using it . As room Temperature actually is around 28-30 C so i put bowl of glaze in cold water so when temperature went down to 26 C ( take few min ) . i pour it over my cake which just bring out of the fridge . Seems the glaze is too thick and not move at all so i just offset spatula try to smooth it , so it doesn't look smooth as in picture .

what did i do wrong, temperature should be higher than this ? how to prevent the gel layer while waiting it to cool down ?

Thank you .

Nuchi

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Hi Tammie,
Food safety should always be a concern for foods that have a shelf life when at cool room temperature. In "The Cake Bible", the only buttercream that we state that can be at cool room temperature for 2 days is the Mousseline Buttercream, since it is egg white based. Otherwise, we recommend ganaches, which we state many can be out for 3 days.
Rose & Woody

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Hi , I have your Cake Bible and Heavenly cake books , I make cakes that can't be refrigerated once decorated can you please advise your best buttercream / filling that can stay 2-3 days at a cool room temp
Thanks so much

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Hi woody,
Thanks a lot I will try as your suggestion on weekend. Hope it come out better than first time.

Nuchi

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Hi Ms. BB,
We generally engineer layered cakes to have a flat top and single layer cakes to be slightly domed. In several cases, we have also increased the batter for a single layer cake to make a taller cake, as long as the ingredients worked out to be reasonable measurements.
For both of these cakes, we suggest just halving all of the ingredients including the leavening. If after making them, you prefer a more domed top, you can then adjust the leavening by slightly deceasing it.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Woody and Rose,
I would like to convert a 9" two layer cake to only make one layer. Is there a formula I can follow for the leavening? Should I keep it the same and only divide the other ingredients in half? (I'm going to be making the German chocolate cake out of HC and the Chocolate Fudge cake out of CB.)
Thank you so much, Ms. BB

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Hi nuchi,
Preparing a smooth ganache surface for applying the lacquer glaze can take awhile to do. We do our best to have a fairly smooth surface before refrigerating it, and reserve some of the ganache for touch ups. We will then heat up water to simmering in a pot tall enough so that we can heat two straight edge knives that are longer than the width of the cake. With the cake on a turntable or elevated stand, we will then alternate the heated, wrung out knives to smooth the top and sides and bevel the edge. This sometimes requires the cake to return to the refrigerator to reset the ganache.
Once the surface is smooth to your preference, the ganache needs to be cooled in the refrigerator so that the heated lacquer glaze does not melt it and cause ripples or depressions in it as the glaze is poured on top.
We never have checked the temperature of the refrigerated ganache for smoothing it. We just go by when it is set enough not to leave an impression.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Kathryn,
We do not recommend substituting arrowroot as a thickener for recipes that require long baking times like cheesecake. It can be substituted on a 1:1 ratio for glazes. Where cornstarch becomes activated after a cornstarch mixture reaches the boiling point, arrowroot will activate before the boiling point.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rosa,
We suggest just two flours for making the Angel Food cake, bleached cake flour
(8% protein) or General Mills' Wondra flour.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody

i have some question of Bernachon Palet D or Gateau cake from rose's heavenly cakes book .

it is difficult to smooth crème fraiche ganache so i did not use lacquer glaze on top this time . is there any way to smooth it nicely ? after i put some crème fraiche ganache on top of the cake and put in fridge for few hr . and try to smooth again but seem the ganache on the cake is more difficult to smooth when its cold .

i prepare ganache and put in fridge for few hrs before using . i took it out and wait for a while til its spreadable . is there any suitable temperature of ganache to use so it is easier to be smooth?

i try to search some of rose 'svideo , making magic tips but only found about lacquer glaze part . if there is any video from rose show how to smooth the ganache , pls advise .
thank you .

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Hi Rose and Woody,
Can arrowroot be substituted successfully for corn starch in my Cordon Rose Cream Cheesecake?

Every time I bake the All Occasion Downy Yellow Cake I remember that it is my favorite, so delicious.
Thanks,
Kathryn

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Thank you so much for your reply. I'm so glad I threw the unopened boxes out! I hope you have a great weekend! Kathleen

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Hello Woody again , I'm not sure what kind of flour can I use instead of white flour 0%???

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Oh ok Woody, I understand and thank you for getting back to me, have a nice weekend...😆

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HI Rosa,
The cake needs to be made in the Angel Food pan with a center tube and 4 inches high. Not only for baking the angel food cake, which will bake to the rim, but for assembling the cake and layers of filling.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose and Woody ,I would like to know if it's possible to use a 10 inch round pan by 3 inch high for the lemon icebox cake in the baking Bible , please let me know if it's possible thank you so much..Rosa

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Hi Ms.BB,
We suggest that you make a single layer of the German Chocolate Cake on page 137, which is the same cake as the Deep Chocolate Passion for you to compare its texture and taste to the others. We also making a small batch of the Milk Chocolate Syrup and brushing some on half of the cake as well for tasting the cake that is syrup.
We revised the All-American Chocolate Cake in The Cake Bible to the Chocolate Layer Cake on page 104 to now have oil as well as butter to make it less crumbly.
If after trying these two cakes, you still prefer the Chocolate Fudge Cake, you can convert its recipe by dividing all of the ingredients by 3 to make a 100 gram flour Base Formula and then apply the Rose Factor for an 18 x 12 inch cake. Then adjust the leavening by increasing to produce a flat top as shown on page 493 of The Cake Bible. Unfortunately, you will have to experiment on the ratio of baking powder and baking soda as we have never made the cake as a sheet cake.
For events requiring a 18 x 12 sheet cake, we have made the Deep Chocolate Passion and frosted it with ganaches and/or the White Chocolate Vanilla Bean Buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose and Woody, I love my first edition of The Cake Bible which I've faithfully used for decades. It taught me how to make cakes and contained answers to my many questions! I just purchased Heavenly Cakes. I'm making a 12'" x 18" chocolate Bar Mitzvah cake for a neighbor's son next month. I'm trying to decide between the Chocolate Butter Cake in CB and Deep Chocolate Passion in the newest book! I would like to frost it with White Chocolate Vanilla Bean Buttercream and fill it with Milk Chocolate Ganache. Which cake do you suggest I bake and should I use the Milk Chocolate syrup on either of those two cakes or only if I bake the Deep Chocolate Passion? I also was interested in baking the Chocolate Fudge Cake in CB for the 12" x 18" size, but wasn't sure how to do the conversion for the baking soda and powder. If I double the recipe, it didn't seem like it would be quite enough as it is for 2 9" rounds not 2 12" rounds.
Thank you so much,
Ms. BB

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from collyp
04/18/2016 11:49 PM

collyp, I would certainly try the cornstarch or powdered sugar in a small place but if that doesn't work try doing a very subtle decoration like embroidery with royal icing to hide the stain. Do let us know how it worked.

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I have put a satin ribbon on a wedding cake and I have noticed the ribbon is picking up something from the fondant and is staining it. I cannot take it off as it runs underneath the flowers any suggestions. Should I try and rub some icing sugar or cornflour into the ribbon?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Jason Casey
04/17/2016 10:28 AM

Jason, but "baking bread in heat waves" in the search box above and you will see how i bake no knead bread on my gas Weber grill using indirect heat (high/off/off/high). it may also give you an idea how you could adapt it to the big green egg. neighbors of mine in the past reported baking pie in their egg with great success.

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Hi Jason,
We have not. However, Big Green Egg's own website and forums has a lot of information. Several YouTubes in the web as well.
We bake all of our breads in standard ovens.
Rose & Woody

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Jason Casey
Jason Casey
04/16/2016 06:01 PM

Hi Rose,

I was wondering if you ever used a Big Green Egg to bake bread? If so do you have any tips and tricks to share?

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Chef Romines
Chef Romines
04/16/2016 09:23 AM

Good morning, I am wanting to bake a 1/2 sheet vanilla, strawberry swirl cake. I have a recipe for both a vanilla and strawberry cake. I just want to know if it will be enough batter to make a 1/2 sheet?
Thank you for your time
Chef Romines

Note from Rose & Woody: please post the recipe on the forums

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Hi Kathleen,
We say it all depends how you store it. Rose is very serious about storage of everything. All dark chocolates are stored in airtight containers, some even vacuum sealed in her wine cellar. White and milk chocolates are vacuum sealed and stored in the freezer. Everything is dated. Many chocolates give a 1 year expiration date on their labels', we have used chocolates as old as 7 years old with only a slight loss of flavor.
So it depends on how far you want to go to preserve your chocolate stocks.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,

While going through my pantry, I came across 2 unopened boxes of Baker's Unsweetened Chocolate with an expiration date of 2011! I did throw them out, but it did get me to thinking about how long after the expiration date you could use it... one year?

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Rose & Woody,
Oh I'd rather the cake like style. That's great,thank you. If I am successful with Rose's recipe perhaps I'll try to make a vanilla/classic recipe one day.
Thank you again.
Tricia

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Perfect! Thank you so much!!

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Hi Valerie,
A couple of ways you can convert this batter. It is basically a 3X recipe of the Basic White Cake Formula batter with ingredients adapted because of the white chocolate. So you could scale the White Whisper Cake down to make a base batter formula by dividing everything by 3, except the leavening. The leavening you will have to experiment for the right amount.
The area for the 11 x 15 is 165 square inches and roughly 22.5 cups. This puts this pan virtually in the middle for batters made for a 13 x 9 (3.5-4 Rose factor) and 18 x 12 (7-8 Rose factor) cakes. So I would say the 11 x 15 is a 6 Rose factor. (This makes it virtually a double batter of the White Whisper recipe in the book, except for the baking powder. Would try 1 tablespoon + 1-1/8 teaspoons.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you so much! May I ask one more question, please? I'd like to make the White Chocolate Whisper in an 11x15 sheet cake pan. When using the Rose Factor, the bases are only for white/yellow/chocolate. Do you suggest using one of these for the WCW cake? How do I make the adjustments for the white chocolate? Thanks again! It's great to be able to ask you directly for guidance!

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Hi Tricia,
Madeleines can be either a cake or a cookie. We consider them a small cake. For our Cookies and Candy chapter in "The Baking Bible", we included baked items that would be small individual servings like rugelach, brownies, and the madeleines. We do not have a classic cookie recipe version, which on the web, many recipes simply do not have baking powder or baking soda.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I'm preparing to make the "Chocolate Sweetheart Madeleines" recipe with the ganache glaze found in your "Baking Bible." Are Madeleines intended to be small cakes? I always thought they were a cookie. Also do you have a recipe for the classic Madeleine?
Thanks so much,
Tricia

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Hi Valerie,
We suggest increasing the amount of sugar in the sugar syrup for the meringue to make the buttercream sweeter. Adding sugar, especially powdered sugar, to the butter or finished buttercream will likely give a grittiness to the buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Valerie,
We suggest increasing the amount of sugar in the sugar syrup for the meringue to make the buttercream sweeter. Adding sugar, especially powdered sugar, to the butter or finished buttercream will likely give a grittiness to the buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Todd
04/ 6/2016 06:27 PM

Todd, i sure wish i knew! she was such a lovely person. i heard she got married but that was years ago already. have you looked on face book?

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Valerie Lash
Valerie Lash
04/ 6/2016 01:59 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,

When I make cakes for people, I typically use your Mousseline Buttercream recipe. Some people have commented that it's not "sweet enough". I prefer it as you've created it, but is it safe to add extra sugar/syrup without ruining the integrity of the buttercream? If additional sugar/syrup can be added, how much do you recommend? Also, would you recommend powdered sugar at all? Thanks!

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Hi Rose:

I saw you on Home Cooking with Amy Coleman some years back - really enjoyed the show. I was good friends with Amy when I lived in Chicago but have since lost touch with her. Do you happen to know what she is doing these days?

Thanks for all the goodness!

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Many thanks Rose! As the flavour was lovely despite the yeast I'm going to try it again soon and pay more attention to the amount of yeast...

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from M
04/ 3/2016 10:27 AM

M, i suspect it has to be the yeast. too much yeast will cause it to rise too much which over-stretches and weakens the gluten. i often make mistakes like that when making more than one thing at a time and sometimes the mistakes turn out to be positive ones such as using unbleached flour for a cake when the pan has a center tube which protects it from the usual collapse in the center (as there is no center!)

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I went a bit baking crazy today and made the cinnamon raisin loaf, the Irish soda bread and the cheddar loaf from the bread bible. I used the same flour for all three and the same dry yeast for the cinnamon and cheddar loaf. The cinnamon loaf turned out perfect (an amazing recipe!) but the cheddar loaf didn't rise properly and I wonder if you have any tips on what could've gone wrong? It looked good up until the proving before the shaping. Then it seemed to loose it's "bounce" and while the cinnamon dough was full of life it felt a it like the cheddar loaf died at that point. While proving in the tin before baking it did rise a bit but never so that it looked "full" and risen. In the oven it didn't rise up either and the final loaf is dense and compact (but tastes great!). The only thing I suspect is that the cheddar loaf had too much dry yeast, I'm not in the US and our local dry yeast comes in packets of 12 grams and is the equivalent of 50 grams of fresh compact yeast. Thus I have some issues measuring the dry yeast according to the recipes in the bread bible. The cinnamon loaf had 12 grams of my dry yeast and fluffed up perfectly. Unfortunately, by mistake, the cheddar loaf also had 12 grams of dry yeast which was most likely to much. Would to much dry yeast make the dough "die" during the proving? Any thoughts are much appreciated!

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Hi Robert,
At the time of writing "The Cake Bible" (1988), 1-1/2 inch tall pans were widely specified for home baking recipes. With the 52nd printing, we have given general directions for increasing recipes from 1-1/2 inch to 2 inch pans.
You can check to see what printing you have by looking at the page opposite page 5 (it has no number but at the top left is written PHOTO CREDITS). On the bottom right, where it is written "Printed in the United State of America," look below it for the set of numbers and initials. The number to the right, ie the last number on that line, is the printing for the book that you have.

Also, the Wedding and Special Occasions section in all printings of “The Cake Bible” has Basic Formulas and charts for butter and genoise recipes for 2 inch high pans, ranging from 6 to 18 inches in diameter, as well as sheet cakes.

If you use a scale, converting the recipes is simpler, faster, more accurate, and less dishes to clean up.

You have a couple of options for 1-1/2 inch high pan recipes to 2 inch high pans.
Volume of a 9 x 1-1/2 inch high pan : 6.5 cups

1. Use your 8 x 2 inch high pans, instead of 9 x 1-1/2 inch high pans
Volume of a 8 x 2 inch high pan: 7 cups

> Try some of the Wedding and Special Occasions section recipes.
> you may have to increase the leavening slightly.
> if the batter fills the pan more than 2/3rds, make cupcakes with the extra batter.
> you may need to increase baking time.
> use cake strips for even baking from sides to center for butter cake recipes.

2. Use your 9 x 2 inch high pans
You will need to convert the recipes by increasing all recipes by 33% that use 1-1/2 inch high pans. OR decrease the recipe by 33% to convert a 2 layer cake to a 1 layer, but taller cake.
(most layer cake recipes written since the nineties use 9 x 2 inch high pans, instead of 9 x 1-1/2 inch high pans.)

3. 9 x 1-1/2 inch high pans are sold by several website suppliers and commercial (many open to the public) cookware stores.
You may see them listed as pizza tins. As long as they are straight sided, they will work.

One advantage you have with Rose's books is that this blog includes under the right side bar's CATEGORIES section, a Book Errata/CORRECTIONS link to all of Rose's corrections for her books. We always recommend to check Rose's correction section if you ever have a question on an ingredient's amount or instructions for a recipe.
You can also print off the listed corrections to have on hand for your book.

Rose & Woody

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Robert Barone
Robert Barone
03/28/2016 06:01 PM

I am anxious to try some recipes from the Cake Bible, ergo I have the following question.

I read in one of your answers to someone that The Cake Bible has been updated for measurements for 2" and 3" pans from shorter pans.

I just bought a new issue and everything is exactly the same as original book. In fact copyright is still 1988. No additional printings listed nor any listings of revisions. I may have missed something or don't understand what I'm looking at but so far no difference.

Could you explain your answer about recipes being adjusted in The Cake Bible to accommodate modern (2")pans from (1 1/2")pans etc. The bible mentions nothing about 2 & 3" pans. Is there a certain formula I should follow.

It is a wonderful book and has more than everything I want. I don't want to mess up because of wrong amount of ingredients or does it actually make any difference and no adjustment are needed to recipes for 2 & 3" pans. I'm trying to do this correctly.

I've no training just doing it by myself, that's why the long question. I also have Heavenly cakes. Grand Marnier cake is wonderful.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
03/24/2016 08:02 PM

Patty, most measuring cups are way off. I would weigh a stick of butter without the wrapper. although that too can be off. It should be 113 grams

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley in reply to comment from Woody
03/24/2016 07:41 PM

Hi Woody,
Me again. Well, so much for that scale. According to it, after taring, 1 cup of water weighs 227 grams! Guess it's not to be trusted! And am now glad I didn't.
Patty

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley in reply to comment from Woody
03/24/2016 07:27 PM

Thank you Woody. I will check my scale. It's an Escali one that I've had for a few years. I've never used the dip and sweep method as I thought I remembered hearing years ago that it might compact the flour. As I recall the dimensions were pretty close if not exact to the book. Of course the real test was the taste and my husband, I and the neighbors agree it passed! Next I plan to try Pugliese. Have loved it for years but have always bought from the grocery store.
Thanks again!

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Hi Patty,
If you have a digital scale, most of the small ones are accurate to within 1 gram to at least 1000 grams. We suggest check the scale's accuracy with seeing if 1 cup of water weighs 237 grams.
You are using the recommended flour, however for "The Bread Bible", Rose did measured flour for volume by the dip and sweep method noted on the Ingredients pages on page 570. You likely did not use enough flour.
The dough should seem soft and stretchy but able to be shaped into a loaf.
The ultimate check is if it matches dimensions noted at the top of the recipe.
Rose & Woody

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley in reply to comment from Woody
03/24/2016 06:34 PM

Thanks for responding so quickly. I always use Gold Medal unbleached a/p flour but did not weigh it. I'm not entirely sure my little scale is accurate but I used the spoon into a measuring cup then level like I have in the past. This is the first recipe I have tried out of the Bread Bible. I've never made a bread with a sponge before so it was a new process for me.

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Hi Patty,
A couple of questions we need to ask.
Did you weigh out the flour?
What brand and type of flour did you use?
Have you had success with other recipes from the Bread Bible?
Rose & Woody

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
03/24/2016 06:23 PM

Hi Rose and Woody, I recently made the Basic Soft White Sandwich Loaf out of the Bread Bible for the first time and had issues when it came to shaping. The dough seemed softer than other breads I've made in the past and it didn't really want to fold well. Any ideas why? I followed the recipe precisely. Would adding additional flour have helped?

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Hi Joan,
We are unaware of any recipes for kokosh coffee cake. I looked on-line to see a few recipes as well as a couple of on-line stores that sell versions of it.
Happy treasure hunting.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I'm on something of a treasure hunt. My great-grandma Sarah was from Russia, and used to make a yeast dough coffee cake filled with cinnamon and golden raisins. I made it with her a few times, as a young child, but the recipe has been lost to history. I'm trying to reconstruct it for our family recipe collection.

I recently was looking at your babka recipe(s) and doing some research and realized it might have been something called a kokosh. It was a single filled roll, shaped like a yule log. I don't remember the dough being particularly rich--not very "brioche-y" at all, if you know what I mean. Have you got any ideas or leads on a recipe? Any help or direction you could point me in would be terrific.

Thank you so much,

Joan

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Hi Jiang,
It just adds more leavening power to the meringue. A good experiment would be for you to make a chiffon without the baking powder to see the difference.
Rose & Woody

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
03/23/2016 02:21 PM

Dear Rose&Woody,
I don't understand the role of baking powder in Chiffon Cake, because most of the leavening comes from the beaten egg white. Would you mind explaining it?

Thank you

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H Shannon,
The mixing times remain the same for any size batter. However, we recommend that your mixer needs to be able to accommodate a batter that only fills the bowl three-quarters the way up its flat beater. You can see the times for the 3-tier cakes in the wedding cakes section are the same.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I love the cake method in The Cake Bible. It produces such a nice texture. If I am doubling a butter cake recipe, would I at all extend the 1.5 minute and 20 second (3x) mixing times for the increase of ingredients? Thank you and best regards, Shannon

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Hi Yvonne,
If any of Rose's recipes specifies just "milk". it is whole milk. We generally use Organic Valley because Rose likes its taste.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose and Woody,
I am planning to bake the All Occassion Downy Yellow Butter Cake from The Cake Bible, Copyright 1988. The recipe calls for one cup of milk, but does not specify what kind of milk - whole, 1%, 2%, skim. Which do you recommend for best results.
Thank you,
Yvonne

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Hi Donna,
We do not have an Aussie mud cake recipe in our repertoire. There looks like there are several good recipes on the web, but they are all for smaller size cakes.
Are you saying that the cake is 13" round x 3" tall?
If the cake is suppose to be 3" tall, we would recommend making two 1-1/2" layers.
The closest recipe we have to this cake is our Chocolate Pavarotti in "The Baking Bible". It has white chocolate instead of dark chocolate, but you could experiment with replacing part of it with dark chocolate. We have made larger cakes with increasing the batter and adjusting the leavening to compensate for the larger size pan.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Gerry
03/22/2016 06:04 PM

Gerry, i wish i could help but it's been years since i made coulibiac much as i miss it. i don't remember having a problem with the salmon shifting. please do let me know if you try out the unsliced fiilets.

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Donna Brand
Donna Brand
03/22/2016 05:40 PM

Dear Rose,
I am in need of your help.  I have been asked to make a chocolate mud cake but the size is enormous – round, 32.5cm x 7.5 or 13”. I thought you would be the best person to ask as I’m sure you’ve made many large cakes.
Can you offer some help – I’m not sure what recipe of yours to use or how to adjust the ingredients.
Kind regards,
Donna

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Hi Marie,
We use Soft as Silk or Swans Down Cake Flours for our baking, which both are available in our area of western New Jersey.
Sorry to hear that Swans Down is not available in your area.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,
I am a cake decorator and baker in my own rights - I do it at my home. I used to use the Swans Down Cake flour. Then I stopped for for almost a year to give myself a break. To my disappointment, I learned recently that they discontinued this cake flour. I was very happy with Swans Down as my cake always turn out to be very soft and silky. Would you recommend a good cake flour, soft and silky as well, that I can use? Just FYI please, i make chiffon cakes with buttercream. I look forward to hearing from you.
Thank you and all the best.
Marie

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Rose and Woody,
Just a note of appreciation and thanks. This blog, books, and tools are such a great help. With the knowledge I've gained - and I am still a rookie- I have successfully altered some recipes from an old magazine for a cake and pizza dough based on what I've learned from you about flour, ingredients, and cake pans.
I've got a long way to go,but I'm much more confident thanks to you both. I'm very excited. I love your books and recipes! They are hands down the best! Thank you!

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Thank you for your answer! I think the many stages still have me a bit confused but I will convert a dollop of my sourdough base in to a firm starter and go from there and follow the instructions closely.
I think I will also try to play around with my starter in the recipes. My starter is very strong so I feel pretty confident about it handling any dough I stick it in. :) It was made in the middle of Swedish winter using organic rye flour and I use it about twice a week. It has been known to blow the top of its container and splatter the inside of my cupboard with goo....

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Anonymous in reply to comment from Mel
03/19/2016 01:26 PM

hi Mel!

as you pointed out, there are many ways to approach sour dough. But the main thing is if it can double within the parameter of time listed. if so, then it doesn't need more feedings. of course this is also dependent on whether it is a liquid or firm starter and how fresh it is, ie how long its been stored before using it.

read through the entire chapter and i'm sure you will find the answer to all your questions. since you have an active liquid starter, i also give directions using it or converting it to a firm starter. it's all there and you clearly have the experience to adapt the recipes to your chosen way.

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Hi! I just recently bought the bread bible and I have a question about the sourdough section which confuses me. I make sourdough bread all the time but I can't figure out why Rose's recipes are so different from how I've been taught and I'd like to figure it out so that I can use Rose's recipes.
I have a liquid rye sourdough base/starter in my fridge. It's tiny, about 60-70 grams, and when I want to bake I take about 30 grams, add in 200 grams of flour and 200 grams of water and the leave it a Tupperware overnight in room temperature. The rest of the sourdough I feed a bit of flour and water and leave in a cupboard overnight so that it stats bubbling again. Then I keep it in the fridge until the next time.
In the morning I add 450 g flour and 750 g water and make a dough that is then proved to double size, shaped and proved again if needed (depends on how well I manage not to deflate it...).
Rose's recipes all seem to include many more steps of feeding and then discarding parts of the starter during many hours before the actual dough is proved and shaped. I'm just very confused by that process and I wonder if I'm actually doing the same thing at different stages? But I never throw out anything? I'd really appreciate some help! :)

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
03/17/2016 08:27 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,
I was making the Basic White Sandwich Loaf out of Bread Bible and when I was shaping my loaves the dough seemed extremely soft. I had trouble shaping it. Should I have added a tad more flour? I followed the recipe exactly as it was the first time I had made it. And would it do well with substituting some whole wheat pastry flour for some of the a/p flour?
Thank you. You guys have been a big help getting me out of my rut of tried and true bread recipes!

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Hi again Woody, quick question: if I use strawberry preserves as the hamentaschen filling should I be thickening it with corn starch? Thanks, Orna

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Thanks so much for getting back to me, Woody. I made up one of the non-salty batches of dough and they were delicious. Though the cookies look a bit lacy. Is that because the dough wasn't mixed sufficiently? I doubled it so I wonder if that's why I didn't have as much control over it in my food processor. I also didn't refrigerate the formed cookies - would that have affected the texture and smoothness or just kept their form better? (hope that makes sense) I'll be baking up the rest tomorrow. Thanks again for any pointers. Orna

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Hi Orna,
We really do not have a solution for you unless you want to increase the sucre recipe. Fortunately, if you have the freezer space, it can be frozen for a few months. I compared it to the Pasta Frolla dough for the Pizza Rustica which is a semi sweet savory crust, but it has far less salt than what you have currently.
Rose & Woody

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Orna Purkin
Orna Purkin
03/15/2016 04:29 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

I sadly added two teaspoons of salt (yikes) to a double batch of hamentaschen sweet cookie crust instead of 1/4 teaspoon. I realized when I tasted it. :( I already made a new batch of dough, but wondering if there's anything I could do with the salty dough (like make it savory or sprinkle it with sugar?). Not tossing it yet just in case. Thanks in advance. I've never made a pate sucree before - excited to try these hamentaschen. Thanks as always for the wonderful recipes.

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Hi Rose, I'm making your deep-dish marionberry pie from the Pie & Pastry Bible. I have boiled the orange and lemon zest strips as instructed. I am wondering, at any point do I remove these strips after cooking them with the small portion of berries? Or are they going to dissolve?
Also, can you tell me why we boil and rinse them first -- before using them in the pie?
Thanks so much for your help,
Julia

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Hey Woody,

Thanks a ton.

Warmly,
San

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Hi LaShondia,
If you are looking for a good cookie book, we recommend "Rose's Christmas Cookies". Our "The Baking Bible" also has a broad array of cookies. You can get an idea of the cookies in "The Baking Bible" by looking at the weekly posts by the Rose's Alpha Bakers on the left sidebar.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Ms. Rose!! I have been a fan since I discovered The Cake Bible in the Boston public library as a college student. It was the final nail in my budding (or non budding) career in architecture. I have a question. I was a cook by profession (20 years) and although I can bake, I need recipes. With that in mind, I am making banana pudding. I have made pudding from scratch so it isn't hard but, here is my problem. I want to make the cookies from scratch also, but finding a good definitive book for cookies has been difficult. What would you recommend as a good cookie for use in this? PLEASE HELP! LOL.

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HI San,
Yes. Orange can be used as the flavoring, because the Renee is an adaptation of The Bostoni/Orange Glow Chiffon recipes in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes".
1. Replace the water and lemon zest with 91 grams grams orange juice.
2. Replace the unbleached flour with the same amount of bleached all purpose flour
3. Decrease the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon.

Make and bake it the same way as the Renee.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Anita,
Rose established an average weight for a large egg to be 50 grams from weighing out dozens of eggs back in the late 1980's. Unfortunately in these times, younger hens are often used for the egg market. You generally will find that the yolks in a dozen eggs can vary by as much as 25% and the weight of the eggs can vary as well.
We base our recipes on grams to the point that for recipes requiring only yolks we will give a range.
Rose & Woody

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Never mind. I figured it out. This is why I usually read a new-to-me recipe several times before starting. My brain occasionally interprets directions incorrectly. My sponge is currently napping under the flour blankie then will go in fridge overnight for actual baking tomorrow.
Your comments are always very insightful. It's also nice that you give reasons in your books for why things are done a certain way. Example: I have lots of bread recipes that call for scalding the milk but I never knew why until reading The Bread Bible!

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Thanks so much!!

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Hello Rose & Woody,

Hope you guys are well!

I was going through the Renee Fleming Golden Chiffon masterpiece. I was wondering if 'lemon' can be substituted with orange. I mean the oil and zest while all else stays the same to achieve the same in orange flavour.

Please guide,

Thanks a ton

Warmly,
San

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Hi Rose,
I prepared the Salmon Coulibiac in your book for the 5th time recently, along with an experienced cook friend who had never prepared it before. By the way, she directed me to Bill Buford's New Yorker piece including an extensive exposition on Chef Daniel Boulud's agony over the dish.

I have had great success with the dish each time, using your recipe, although the salmon shifted each time during the turnover of the sealed packet, maring the look of the finished, sliced dish.

Have you any suggestions, based on your and others' experience over the years, to overcome this? Might leaving the salmon filets whole and unsliced remedy this? What is the downside to doing this? Boulud's original Colubiac had two filets of salmon with eggs and spinach between, wrapped with brioche.

Your suggestions eagerly awaited.

Best,

Gerry Shaikun

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
03/ 4/2016 05:36 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,
I'm planning on making Basic Soft White Sandwich Loaf from the Bread Bible this weekend as it's supposed to be chilly and rainy (San Diego) and my question is about the full flavor variation you mention on page 247. Do I make the initial sponge as per Step 1, sprinkle the flour blanket over, then ferment for 1 hr room temp & refrigerate 8-24 hrs? Or do I do the overnight fermentation before I add the flour blanket? Thank you very much. I've never made this type of bread before and am excited about trying something new.

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Was looking over the recipe from the Cake Bible for Chocolate Fudge Cake page 60. The amount of 3 large eggs does not come to 150 grams of weight. Which one is correct for this recipe?
Thanks,

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Robert
03/ 2/2016 01:18 PM

Robert, the yolk is on the chart on page 404 as it says for the 6 & 9" pans.

yes, still leave the oven turned off for 1 hour.

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I may have gone right by the answer but:
Page 405; heavenly Cake book; under 12" pan instructions: mixing liquids: Mentions "extra yolk" where is that in ingredients list?

Next: Same heavenly book: Page 242 Highlights for success (cheesecake) Bake 1 hr 10 min for firmer cake...do you still leave in turned off oven for 1 hour?

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I may have gone right by the answer but:
Page 405; heavenly Cake book; under 12" pan instructions: mixing liquids: Mentions "extra yolk" where is that in ingredients list?

Next: Same heavenly book: Page 242 Highlights for success (cheesecake) Bake 1 hr 10 min for firmer cake...do you still leave in turned off oven for 1 hour?

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Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald in reply to comment from kristin
03/ 2/2016 11:16 AM

Thanks for all your help Kristin. I do have a very good thermometer, a Thermopen, and watched the temperature very closely. I have never made caramel with milk before, only water and sugar and added the cream when the mixture was caramelized. The liquid portion of the caramel looked good. It was the dark brown bits adhered to the bottom of the pan that threw me. Did I burn the milk solids, or the butter solids? As the bits were not burnt but dark brown, should I have added this for a deeper caramel flavour to the cake?

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Dear Rose/Woody,

Hi , I needed an advise from you. Can you tell me which frosting besides the cream cheese frosting goes best with red velvet cake? If I were to convert your red velvet cake recipe in the RHC into cupcakes - how many cupcakes who one recipe make? Lastly, do you think your sour cream chocolate ganache ( recipe in RHC) would go well with red velvet?

Thanx in Advance

Zahra.

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Oh, my bad regarding nit stiring. I just noticed you sa7d itvwhat tge recipe instructed. I would definately try my former suggestion though of testing it in water when the thermomitir reads close to temperature. I have to get myself a candy thermonitor. I think too whole milk is probably best but I could be wrong.

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Hi, I know Im not anbexpert but I find what helps me when making caramel is putting a small amount of caramel in a glass of cold water when when it gets close to temperature hto see if it can be formed tinto as soft ball helps. If its a hard ball like a lollypop and makes a noise when hit against counter its a bit too overcooked. I understand there might be more you can do,so see what Rose or Woody suggest but thats whats helped for me whem making caramel sauces and syrups. Also sometimes not stiring it could help just swirling it by moving the pan, but I could be wrong in the case of this particular recipe.

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Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald
03/ 1/2016 10:05 PM

Just a question as to where I went wrong. I thought I had made all of the good recipes but realized that Karmel Cake from Heavenly cakes was still on the "to do" list. I made the caramel part but had issues with the caramel itself. I stirred as instructed till the mixture came to the boil and then carefully watched the temperature. After about 10 minutes the temp was at 113 C and the colour looked good but when I poured the caramel into my glass container, I realized that the bottom of the saucepan was coated with congealed very brown chunks. They did not come out of the pan with the caramel. Did I use too high a heat? Also I only had 1% milk in the house and usually cook with full fat. Would that have made a difference? Any input would be appreciated. The final product does not smell burned and is a nice caramel colour but I do have a few very fine curdled chunks in it - should I sieve those out? Thanks for all the help.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
03/ 1/2016 04:50 PM

thanks for the full disclosure! the upside of longer rising time is that it develops even more flavor! and yes--torpedo shape is fine.

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OK. Underproofed. So I actually didn't wait long enough. And I did forget to do the fingertip test. Bye the way, can this basic hearth bread be done as a torpedo?

Thanks!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
03/ 1/2016 04:34 PM

Ed, this is characteristic of underproofed dough after the final shaping. that is why i was very specific in giving the finished dimensions in addition to the fingertip denting test. the time frame is not cast in gold because it is related to room temperature. if you find your dough is not rising fast enough put it in an enclosed area such as a turned off microwave with a glass or 2 of very hot water. you don't need to cover the dough as the moisture for the hot water will keep the surface moist.

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I made my first attempt at basic hearth bread. It had crisp crust and great flavor, but contained a large air gap in the top third under the crust. I know you ask several questions to see what might have been done wrong, so I'll try to provide everything I can think of without making my post too long.

1. I used King Arthur bread and white whole wheat flour
2. Fresh instant yeast
3. Weighted everything on my Escali scale
4. Let the sponge rest for one hour with the dry ingredients on top
5. Mixed with dough hook as instructed in book
6. First rise to double
7. Second rise for about 1/2 hour followed by overnight in refrigerator - rose to more than double.
8. Took out of fridge about 90 minutes before forming round loaf (pg 65)
9. Let loaf rise under sprayed plastic wrap. It got to 8 inch diameter but could only get it to a little over 2 inches high instead of your suggested 3 inches, even after 90 minutes. So I gave up and started the baking. I made sure the rising temperature was between 75 and 80, using the air temperature probe attached to a Chef Alarm.
10. I had preheated the oven to 475 (calibrated with Chef Alarm instructions), one hour with baking stone on lowest shelf and pan on oven floor.
11. Slashed and misted the top of the unbaked loaf with water, placed on parchment lined aluminum half-sheet and onto the baking stone and ice cubes in pan on oven floor - closed immediately.
12. After 10 minutes, I found the loaf had dramatically expanded to what looked like a deformed and partially deflated basketball - ended between 6 and 7 inches high.
13. I turned on convection at this point and lowered temperature to 400 rather than 425 because using convection.
14. Baked to 200 degrees.

Anyway, as I said, big loaf with hidden huge air gap. The crumb in the bottom half was fine but the portion at the bottom of the air gap was dense. I thought it might be due to overproofing in step 9 above, but the very top never collapsed, only the inside. I thought I'd get suggestions before making another attempt. Also, can this bread be done as a torpedo loaf?

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Okay, nexttp time I will add the unprocessed bran so they will be even better. I love croissants. Bakery croissants are often good and flacky but lack that buttery taste, often I think butter substitute is used. Starbucks croissants are delicous buttery and flacky but tgey charge. Seeing how much work theybare to make I coukd see why, though Im sure starbucks has machines to make them.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from kristin
03/ 1/2016 12:40 PM

hi Kristin,

so glad you liked the croissants. yes the bran is unprocessed wheat bran and it's there for the flavor. i also like the appearance of it in the dough. do try it!

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Iv heeard Oreos make a nice crust too.

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Hi, I madethe croissants from the bread Bible, they came out great. I used Kerrygolds higher fat cultured unslated butter that they now make, next time Ill try Pulgras. Finlandia I believe slso now makes a higher fat cultured butter. Kerrygold just hspprned to be on ssle. I think whrn the book was written kerrtgold only made the salted sweet cream butter, not the higher fat cultured butterer.
I did use the wheet germ but was undurevof whst kind of wheet brsn yo use. Did you mean unprocessed wheet bran? Was the bran called for to mske the croissants heslthier of did you find it improves the tasre and texture?
All in all though they were great croissants. Ill have to try again with the wheat bran. I used fifteen tbsps of butter only because that was what was left from my stick and it was just easier to finish it off.So it was extra buttery snd delicous.

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Hi Shannon,
We only recommend to apply a chocolate graham crust after baking the cheesecake and as described on pages 83 and 324.
Another choice for crusts the chocolate version of the Biscuit Roulade on page 142. This cake crust can be baked and placed in the pan as either a base or the base and sides, before baking the cheesecake. In "The Baking Bible" we did this for the Marble White and Dark Chocolate Cheesecake. The biscuit sides have the look of patent leather.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose and Woody,
The Cordon Rose Cheesecake is the best I've made or eaten. My son requested a chocolate graham crust. Could the recipe be made to include the graham crust with some modifications. I wouldn't want to sacrifice too much of the creaminess. Thanks for your time.

REPLY

Hi Tricia,
The 1988 edition of "The Cake Bible" is the only edition but there have been several revisions over the years. The newest, 52nd printing came out last year. To ensure that you get this newest printing, you need to go to the book store and look at the page opposite page 5 (it has no number but at the top left is written PHOTO CREDITS). on the bottom right, where it is written "printed in the United State of America," right below it is a set of numbers and initials. The number to the right, ie the last number on that line, is the current printing.

The 52nd printing gives added instructions for 2 inch high pans. (You can also see this on the corrections/errata page on the blog.

You have a couple of options.
Volume of 8 x 2 pan : 7 cups
Volume of 9 x 1.5 pan : 6.5 cups
1. Use your 8 x 2 pans
in the Wedding and Special Occasions section, there are several base recipes batters that can be converted to any size of 2 inch high pans.
(we suggest to try some of these first if you are going to use your pans.)
you may have to increase the leavening slightly.
if the batter fills the pan more than 2/3rds, make cupcakes with the extra batter.
you may need to increase baking time.
use cake strips for even baking from sides to center for butter cake recipes.

2. 9 x 1.5 inch high pans are sold by several website suppliers. You may see them listed as pizza tins. as long as they are straight sided, they will work.

3. Buy 9 x 2 inch high pans
You will need to convert the recipes by increasing all recipes by 33% that use 1.5 inch high pans. OR decrease the recipe by 33% to convert a 2 layer cake to a 1 layer, but taller cake.
(most layer cake recipes written since the nineties use 9 x 2 inch high pans, instead of 9 x 1.5 inch high pans.)

One advantage you have with Rose's books is that this blog includes under the right side bar's CATEGORIES section, a Book Errata/CORRECTIONS link to all of Rose's corrections for her books. We always recommend to check Rose's correction section if you ever have a question on an ingredient's amount or instructions for a recipe.
You can also print off the listed corrections to have on hand for your book.

Rose & Woody


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Hi SG,
The caption should say Chocolate Bread (page 28), which is a pound cake.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose or Woody,
In "The Cake Bible", most recipes call for the use of a 9 inch x 1 1/2 inch cake pan. I have pans that are 8 inch by 2 inch. Do you think I could use them and what would be the adjustment to the batter? I am willing to spring for new 9 inch but I can only find the 2 inch depth. Kindly provide a resource for the 1 1/2 inch pan if they are made today. Also is there a new version of The Cake Bible? The one i just purchased looks like the copyright is 1988.

All the best,
Tricia

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I have the 1988 edition of the cake bible. On page 1 of the photo plates there is a cake that looks like a chocolate pound cake - but it isn't listed in the photo caption. Do you have a recipe for chocolate pound cake? Would love to have one from you as I've tried many recipes and they don't compare to yours! Thank you

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Hi Dora,
Rose gives some recommendations in her books on high altitude baking. However, since we both do not live at high altitudes, we also recommend these four sources for more extensive recommendations:
1. Susan Purdy’s “Pie in the Sky: Successful baking at High Altitude”
and her website “High Altitude Baking” linked on our SITES I LIKE.
2. Letty Holloran Flatt’s “ The Chocolate Snowball: And Other Fabulous Pastries From Deer Valley Resort”
3. General Mill’s website for Baking Crocker & Baking at High Altitudes
4. USDA’s website for recommendations
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose & Woody,

Do you have any information on high altitude baking, I am now living at an elevation of 5100 feet and I'm wondering if I can bake as usual or do I have to adjust ingredients for the higher elevation. I would love to know the science behind high elevation baking if you could. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Dora

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Hi sjmarell,
We have not converted this recipe for a 9x13 inch pan, which has a volume slightly under the volume of two 9 inch round pans. About 70% of the batter for the 6 and 9 inch layers is for the 9 inch layers. So you can calculate your ingredients for 70% to make the batter for the 9x13 inch pan. We cannot give you an adjustment for the leavening since it was engineered to work for both cake layers. We suggest to calculate it to the 70% and see what are the results.
Rose & Woody

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How do you adjust the Grand Marnier wedding cake to bake in a 9x13" pan? Do I change the baking soda or powder?

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Hi Jorja,
We are treating a business turn as the complete action of business letter fold.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rosemarie,
You can use the Rosefactor as a start with calculating the square in area for the square cake to the closest round cake size pan. For Ex: a 8 x 8 inch square pan has virtually the same area as a 9 inch round pan.
You can then increase or decrease all of the ingredients to match to the closest round pan, EXCEPT leavening. Here you may need to reduce the leavening a bit to have the same results for the top of the cake. Baking times should be similar, but we recommend to start checking at the shortest baking time frame.
Cakes strips are even more important to use for butter/oil cakes because of the corners on the pan.
Rose & Woody

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Jorja Dufresne
Jorja Dufresne
02/16/2016 09:45 AM

What is a business letter turn [not fold]?

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Rosemarie Nemes
Rosemarie Nemes
02/15/2016 06:31 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,
Thanks so much for being such an amazing resource! I Always learn so much from you. If I want to use your butter cake recipe with 6", 9", and 10" square pans can I use the rose factors for round 8"', 11", and 12" pans? How would your formulas transfer to square pans? Thanks.
Rosemarie

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Karlie
02/15/2016 01:39 PM

Karlie, it is true that cocoa powder toughens the structure so there has to be a way to tenderize it which could be more leavening or, as in this case, more butter.

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Hi Rose,
Reading the information about Cocoa powder makes me a little bit confusing. You stated that recipe using cocoa powder needed more leavening because cocoa powder toughens the structure of the cake. But according to the recipes in "The Cake Bible", I found that the All-Occasion Yellow Cake had more baking powder than the All-American Chocolate Cake.
Is there a mistake, or just because did I misunderstand?

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Rose,

Your books have been a godsend. I come from a family of incredible baking women who passed away when I was a little girl. Their wonderful recipes were not written. You've brought their wonderful goods back into my home.

I still search however for a beautiful cassata cake recipe....any tips you can provide will be greatly appreciated. Bringing back family heritage and treasures has been a great gift. Thank you. You are so talented.

Best regards,
Tricia P

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Hello Rose & Woody,

Thanks a ton for all the guidance, means a lot.

Very rarely authors entertain queries, guess that's another reason why you guys are so sought after!

Appreciate your time and patience,

Thank you is an understatement,

Warmly,
San

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Hi San,
For you and others who can only obtain UN-bleached all-purpose flour at a reasonable price, we recommend that you read two of our postings.
Our Power of Flour posting: in which we experimented with making a basic butter cakes with either whole eggs, egg whites, or yolks using bleached cake flour, bleached all-purpose flour, unbleached all-purpose flour, and additions with cornstarch and potato starch, and with different levels of baking powder.
Kate of Kate's Flour. Kate Coldrick, who lives in England, developed a "bleached" all purpose flour using her microwave. You can also get more details by looking at her linked blog, A Merrier World, under Sites I Like on the left sidebar of our blog.
When Rose visited Kate several years ago she was amazed at the difference in texture and height of the cakes that Kate is now able to make using her Kate’s flour.
Kate's website, "A Merrier World", is also on our SITES I LIKE.
We are unfamiliar with Mary Berry's recipe. It looks eggy from the ratio of ingredients. We suggest to visit Mary Berry's website and contact her or see if there are any comments as others may have had the same experience.

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Hello Rose & Woody,

Thanks a ton for the prompt reply, I feel like a VIP!!

Well, I'm in Bangalore, India. You guys are genius!!Well, I did dust the cake tin with cocoa instead of flour, thinking it wouldn't be visible! I strictly stick to Rose's books as my previous experiences with other authors have not been pleasant.

We do not get bleached/unbleached variety here. It is the normal All-Purpose flour. Not even cake flour. Have to look really hard for these but they are very pricey. I am a budget baker, so they're off my shelf, but usually the normal AP has been kind so far. I will surely use bleached/unbleached flour now on, promise.

There's one other thing (swear it's the last): I baked Mary Berry's Victoria Sponge following the recipe to the T. She used Self Rising flour as did I, with 4 eggs+ 225 gms self rising flour+ 225 gms castor sugar+ 225gms Butter+ 2 level tsp Baking Powder. The cake turned out eggy- it smelled of egg after baking. I've baked sponge cakes before, but they never smelled so.

Why do cakes smell eggy? I have never found an answer on the world wide web thus far.

Please can you help?

With deepest gratitude,

Warmly,
San

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Hi San,
We always recommend to follow an author's recipe for ingredients, equipment, and technique. Your comment on removing the cake from "the tin" has us wondering if you live in England or a former British Commonwealth country.

Your crumbling could easily be your flour as it is likely unbleached. What flour are you using?

If you want to use a smaller pan, then you should reduce the ingredients.
We also recommend to use baking spray with flour (we only use Baker's Joy) or shortening and flour for coating the parchment and sides of the pan. Cakes are more likely to stick to cocoa dusted pans.

Were your local store bought pans have sloped sides?

Cakes strips too are beneficial for producing and evenly baked butter/oil cakes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody,

First of all, a big thank you to Rose and you, for coming out with awesome recipes that amateurs like me can bake and get genuine appreciations! I love the fact that most recipes are one pan for a small family like mine!

I need your advise to a problem that has been recurring ( so far it's happened twice, so do not want to have a third!!)

I baked the Chocolate Layer Cake With Caramel Ganache from Rose's Heavenly Cakes to the T except that I used an 8"x 2" round Wilton cake pan I lined only the bottom with parchment paper and dusted it with cocoa just to be sure the cake won't stick. I baked the cake in a convection oven which rose as it should. When I let it cool for the stated 10 mins and tried to remove the cake from the tin to transfer it on to the rack for further cooling, a part of the base stuck to the rounded side of the tin! Despite, sitting it in the fridge before crumb coat, I had further crumbling when I was applying the chocolate ganache. I somehow salvaged the cake with the help of chocolate sprinkles to cover my fiasco, but it's left me wondering, where I may have gone wrong.

This is the second time, the first being another chocolate cake that gave me the same outcome with the Wilton Cake Pans. Earlier I used pans from a local store, and never had this issue. Could it be the pan?

Please help, I so love baking..

Warmly,

San

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HI rai,
Yes. It is in The Baking Bible.
Rose & Woody

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Sounds great. Thank you. I'll let y'all know how it turns out. Do you have the Baking Bible version of the Strawberry Mousseline?

Thanks, rai

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Hi rai,
We recommend the White Whisper or the Sour Cream cake, and frost it with the Moussline flavored with strawberry puree or strawberry butter.
We suggest that you look at Rose's YouTube video made at General Mills on making the Strawberry Mousseline with strawberry butter. We modified our technique for making Mousseline in Rose's Heavenly Cakes and The Baking Bible to adding and beating in the meringue all at once into the creamed butter. This makes it less likely that the buttercream will curdle where you cannot beat it back to a buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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I am wanting to make a birthday cake for my Poppa. He is quite partial to strawberry and vanilla but really cannot stand chocolate. What would you recommend as wonderfully delicious light cake? I own the Cake Bible.

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Hi Roseanna,
The refrigeration and frozen times apply for both before and after for buttercreams. If you frost the cake with refrigerated buttercream that you made for the cake, we recommend that you freeze any remaining buttercream for a future cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi woody,
Thank you for your reply.
I never baked yellow downy cake yet but I see recipe from youtube . I may try later . This she loves me cake I used bleach cake flour . May be too much heat so that create high dome which after cooling is not flat after cooling. I will try again this weekend.

Thank you

Nuchi

REPLY

Hi Nuchi,
1. The cake was engineered to not need a cake strip. A butter/oil cake should dome during baking and then flatten on cooling. Have you had success making the All-Occasion Yellow Downy cake that was adapted for this pan?
Are you baking with bleached all-purpose or bleached cake flour?

2. We suggest whatever setting is for baking per Sieman's recommendations. you want to contact them.

3. If you cannot get baking spray with flour, then we recommend applying a light coat of shortening, then flour, and tapping out the excess. We recommend Baker's Joy.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Audrey,
Vegan, gluten free wedding cakes are not in our repertoire. Although there are several websites that work with alternative baking, we recommend to look at
Fran Costigan's website and her books.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Jiang,
We suggest that yo look at the FloRo Elegance cake in "The Baking Bible". With all of Rose's recipes we have researched and tested and tested the recipes. We did adapt the All-American Chocolate cake by adding some oil in "rose's Heavenly Cakes.' As we have recommended before, experimenting with a recipe is always worth the results whether a success or failure to the control as you will learn from the experience.
My T'ai Chi master had a wonderful saying.
"Small loss, small gain.
Big loss, big gain"
Rose & Woody

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Can the butter cream for Woody's Lemon Luxury Cakd be made in advance? I am a little confused by the storing tips on page 3. Thank You

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I have baked " she loves me cake " from Rose's heavenly cake book and I found some problems please kindly suggest

1. I use Nordic daisy bakeware which is dark color so I reduce temperature to 160 C as recommend in the book . while baking the center of the cake start to rising like dome and surface at center are broken . I read to prevent this problem by using the cake strip however this is not jus regular round bakeware shape. how to use it ? pls recommend to prevent this dome shape. Also top part is also rough look like shape of some bubble inside , pls advise how to prevent this .
2. Seem my cake is over bake as it is dark brown and the side of the cake start to shrink from the bake ware . even I bake around 42 min and recommend temperature is 45 min . I used siemen oven which has function of top + bottom heat + fan , may be it is too much heat and I put in middle rack . there is another fuction is only top + bottom heat ? may be I should only use function top + bottom heat without fan ?
3. pls suggest the trick to use this kind of special bakeware of detail like daisy . I don’t have oil + flour spray so I just brush bottom of bakeware with unsalted butter spring with some cake flour and shake out the access flour . however seem it not go over all small corner so I brush it all over again . the cake came out with small trace of flour , or some cake still struck on the bake ware.

Thank you . though it is over bake but taste is excellent .

REPLY

Hello,
Do you have suggestions or recipes for a vegan, gluten free cake for a wedding cake?
Audrey

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
02/ 5/2016 05:06 PM

Dear Rose&Woody,
I seriously adore your Chocolate (or Devil Food's) Cake. Then my friend give me a Devil Food's Cake recipe from Flo Braker. I find that Flo Braker recipe contains lot more water and use MORE BAKING SODA than yours. I also want to add more water into your All-American Chocolate recipe, but I'm so confused. Will adding more water make the cake WEAKER (the cake will collapse, dense and heavy - that I add more baking soda to compensate the volume) or STRONGER (that I have to add more baking soda to tenderize)?
I hope you will give me the answer for such "scientific" situation.

Thank you.

REPLY

Hi Orna,
We revised this recipe in "The Baking Bible", to be a hybrid two-stage/creaming method.
1. In a bowl, combine the dry ingredients except the sugar.
2. In the stand mixer bowl, beat the sugar with the oil and butter, which will be smooth and dreamy.

We do not have formulas for blending food colorings and what color a cake will appear after bake. Enjoy experimenting with blending red and orange to achieve Denver Bronco orange.
Rose & Woody

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Also - I know you said the butter/oil mixture will not be completely smooth. But each time I've made this, even when I first mixed the butter, there are always pieces of butter - it is not at ALL smooth. Is that right? Does the butter then just get incorporated in when you mix in the dry ingredients? Thanks again. Orna

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Oops, I meant Valentine's Heart 😃

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Orna Purkin
Orna Purkin
02/ 4/2016 05:21 PM

Hi Rose & Woody,

I just made your beautiful valentine's red velvet rose and then made a batch of cupcakes too. (BTW I found that using 1/2 oz of red food coloring was sufficient to produce a very bright red hue!) And I was about to make another batch when hubby walked in and said, "You have to make them orange!" (Bronco's fan 😃 ) So I wanted to check with you experts before I attempt it! Do you think that will work? I only have a small package of red, yellow, green and orange. I'm thinking I should mix 1/4 oz each red and orange? Thanks so much in advance.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from jan formanek
02/ 4/2016 04:23 PM

Jan, i would prefer to use no crust rather than any of the ones available for purchase. that said, my pie crust freezes beautifully so if you have time before the shower you could whip up two in the time it makes to go the the supermarket and back!

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rosary
02/ 4/2016 04:21 PM

Rosary, my cherry tree was hit by lightning years ago. i was so sad and never replaced it. Montmorency is my fav as the hardest cherries to purchase.

REPLY

This warm weather is turning my thoughts to spring.

My cherry tree died two years ago after one last amazing cherry crop. I want to replant this year. What are the best varieties for baking? Montmorency? (I'll be planting in the Catsklls.)

REPLY

jan formanek
jan formanek
02/ 4/2016 11:53 AM

I'm in a bind! having a shower for my daughter (twins!) and want to make quiches.
is there any way to buy pre-made pie crusts?
no time for the "real baking".
help!
jan

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Hi Barbara,
For food safety concerns even though the eggs are baked, we can not recommend the oblivion being at room temperature for more than 6 hours.
You may want to check with companies that ship perishable food items on how you can send it in a refrigerated mailing container.
Your kids will need to refrigerate as well until it is to be served.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose,

I would love be to send the Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte to my kids in college as part of a Valentine's Day care package. I would overnight the torte. The recipe says the torte should be refrigerated, then brought to room temperature. Do you think it is okay to leave it at room temperature so I can mail it?

Thank you,
Barbara

REPLY

Hi Pari,
The guidelines for storing butter cakes is on pages 3 and424. Treat the sauce as a buttercream for storage.
Beer is a component for the flavor. However, the alcohol content, just like in vanilla, will dissipate during baking.
Bleached all-purpose flour is needed for the structure of the cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, I plan to bake the sticky toffee pudding from roses heavenly cakes . I have a few questions-
1. How far in advance can this cake be made ?
2. How many days can it stay refrigerated ?
3. Can it be frozen ? If yes for how Long ? What the best way to thaw it before serving.
4. Does the butterscotch toffee sauce need to be warm before serving ?
5. Can the sauce be made in advance and refrigerated / frozen ? What is the best way to thaw it
6. If this cake is needed to be made for kids what is the substitute for beer
7. Can cake flour be sutsitued for all purpose flour ?

Thanks
Regards
Parizad

REPLY

Hi billy,
Under the Recipes on the right sidebar, you can find several recipes. Many libraries carry Rose's books. Rose also has over 150 videos on YouTube from her television series to guest appearances to demonstration videos. You can also see step by step photos and commentaries on recipes from "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and "The Baking Bible" on the bake thrus on the left sidebar.
Rose & Woody

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billy patscher jr.
billy patscher jr.
02/ 1/2016 06:52 PM

these reicpes look too hard i'm a beginner i'm told i'm a good cook i make alot of reicpes i'd like to get your cookbook but i can't afford it i'm handicpaped i don't know or understand nothing the ingredients are a mile long special temps special techniques help ? please emai me at billytophat@optonline.net

REPLY

Hi Robert,
We suggest make a 6 cup recipe of either the Midnight Ganache or the Miss Irene Thompson's Dark Chocolate Frosting in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes". You will have some extra.
Rose & Woody

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I need a recipe for dark chocolate fudge icing/frosting for a two layer 12" cake

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Hi diane,
We can make some suggestions for your inquiries. However, your questions referring to Rose Cake Diva should be directed to Rosie at the Rosie Cake Diva blog site (which is not us). We have used the Dreamy Creamy/White Chocolate Cream Cheese Buttercream with success for piping. It can hold up for 10 hours in cool room temperature. The White Ganache recipe in "The Cake Bible" can only be used for a filling, served over fruit, or added to stabilize whip cream.
Another buttercream to try is the Mousseline Buttercream in "The Cake Bible" and its revised version in "The Baking Bible".
We appreciate Marcy referring you to us. Her Majestic New Year's Honey Cake recipe is in "The Baking Bible".
Rose & Woody


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diane wenzel
diane wenzel
01/27/2016 12:48 PM

Hi Rose
Marcy Goldman referred me to you with my decorating questions. (we bumped into each other on quizup). I am making a wedding cupcake tier for my son's upcoming wedding and have been experimenting with different recipes, icings, decorating techniques. I am particularly taken with Rose Cake Diva's 2 colour hydrangea and roses using the 2d Wilton tip. I am also going to experiment with the 104 petal tip to make roses. I am having hard time finding icings that are not too sweet, are light tasting and still pipeablek, especially for the two tone effect which requires layering two different kinds of icing in bag. I tried Rose the cake diva's cream cheese icing and it was too runny. I have since found a buttercream recipe that is not too sweet that works but i would also like for variety to find a firm enough cream cheese based icing and also hopefully a whipped cream/white chocolate option. I found your best ever cream cheese buttercream which sounds ideal. would that work for my purposes? also what about your white chocolate mousse/ganache? is it pipeable and could cupcakes be left out a couple of hours at the wedding table? Also after research i bought the white powder meringue to try to stabilize the cream cheese icing. I added a tbsp but it didn't help at all. Do you use white powder meringue to stabilize icing and if so in what ratio to the whipped cream if using or icing sugar if using? thank you so much for your assistance. I want to make this cupcake tier as perfect as it can be for my son's wedding. So far blueberry lemon cupcakes with cream cheese icing, mango curd cupcakes with buttercream icing and coconut cupcakes (marcy's recipe) hopefully with whipped cream white chocolate ganache if it can hold up, are on the menu. look forward to hearing from you
Diane Wenzel

REPLY

Hi Jiang,
With experience with baking different types of cakes, pies, and etc, one will develop a sense of what works and what does not work. We are constantly discovering and experimenting as ingredients can change and modifying previous recipes.
1. In all of Rose's books with cupcake recipes, we state adjusting a layer cake batter for cupcakes. In most cases, just as you would increase the baking powder for a smaller size round pan, you increase for a cupcake. There is not a set formula, you will need to experiment. Some bakers want a domed top others want a flat top for their cupcakes.

2. We suggest that you look at our posting "Fear of Génoise -- an Important Lesson" and reviewing Rose's Understanding, Highlights for Success, and Tips sections in her books on how far to beat the egg foam. It is helpful to weigh out separately the egg yolks and whites, as large eggs in the USA have typically smaller yolks in the last several years. It also works for a 9 inch cake to simply add an extra yolk. We also use organic, non-GMO cornstarch. As I stated above, its a sense of knowing from your own experience.
Rose & Woody

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
01/26/2016 10:06 AM

Dear Rose&Woody,
1. I always want to bake the normal cake batter into cupcakes. Do I need to adapt or just keep going with the recipe? I tried to add 1/4 teaspoon more baking powder but the cupcakes sunk in the middle...
2. Have you ever tried to overbeaten the WHOLE EGGS when you making Genoise? Many bakers (and even Rose in "Chocolate Oblivion Torte" in Baking Magic) said that it was totally right to overbeaten the whole eggs. I tried to, but I found that the texture was coarse and give an unpleasant feeling when eating. Can you please give me more clearly information in this case?

Thank you.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ruth Hartt
01/22/2016 11:30 AM

Ruth, i was still away from the computer when you asked about the raspberry essence so i forwarded your request to Aftelier. i know they answered you but i also wanted to let everyone who might read this thread know that Mandy Aftel's Aftelier is where one can get the essence and many other amazing flavors and aromas.

i'm so glad we made the extra third sheet cake so that we had enough cake to bring to the book signing after the wedding dinner!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Bob Heuman
01/22/2016 11:28 AM

Bob, while i value the bread machine for mixing the dough i do not use it for baking. you are correct that different brand of bread machines have different settings. i understand that you need to make bread without having to go through shaping and oven baking but i am not able to help you except to recommend a good bread machine cookbook which will help you adapt recipes designed for other methods. Beth Hensberger's "The Bread Lovers Bread Machine Cookbook" would be an excellent choice. It is consistently in the top #3 on Amazon and you can check out the reviews. I know Beth and I feel confident that the recipes are well-tested.

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Hi Pilar,
The "azúcar cruda" is light brown sugar. We generally use Muscavado brand light brown sugar from India Tree.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose,
I would like to make the "Bizcocho fudge (glasé) of chocolate" from your book TCB, and I am not sure what "azúcar cruda" means?
I searched on google and it looks like brown sugar but I want to be sure before buying and preparing all the ingredients.
many tks!
Pilar

REPLY

Hi Chris,
Thank you for alerting us. We are in contact with the publisher. It was surprising to see that he has 3 different covers for his "baking bible" and credits that he also wrote "The Cake Bible". He also has done the same thing to many author's cookbook titles and cover designs from Thug Kitchen to Joanne Chang's Baking with Less Sugar.
People can always write reviews for his "books" on Amazon to voice their objection to his misleading unaware buyers.
Rose & Woody

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Good morning!

I wanted you to be aware that there is an author self-publishing books on Amazon with titles and covers suspiciously like Rose's. His name is Valeriu Cotet and his recent release of his "The Baking Bible" has a cover very similar to Rose's Baking Bible (not identical, but very close). This may be something that Rose (or her publisher) may want to investigate further as a possible copyright infringement.

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Hi Sohey,
We do not have one using white chocolate. However, in the "Cake Bible" page 305, Rose has a Food Processor Poured Fondant recipe. An instant-read thermometer is highly recommended for monitoring the temperature.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I have used "Lacquer Glaze" for my cake decorations many times and love it. Thank you for the wonderful recipes. However, I was wondering if you have any recipe for white chocolate glaze with pouring consistency that covers a cake and sets nicely. I am making a train cake for my grandson's birthday and want to make different color wagons :) I would appreciate any other recommendations. Thanks
Sohey

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Hi Ruth,
For the Milk Chocolate Ganache syrup that is brushed on the cake we used 18 drops of Mandy Aftelier's Raspberry Essence for the two nine inch layers. It can be ordered from: www.aftelier.com.
The Raspberry Ganache is on page 191 in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes". We use Perfect Puree of Napa Valley's--Raspberry Puree for the Raspberry Sauce so that we do not have to spend the agonizing time of deseeding the raspberries.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Joan,
We suggest that you use a bleached all-purpose flour that has the same protein % as the Robin Hood flour.
We use General Mills bleached all-purpose flour.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Lesley,
It is a combination of both the beating time and the oatmeal.
Rose & Woody

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I have the Bread Bible and use a Black & Decker B2300 bread machine, which does not have a pause and is designed for 2-2.5-3 pound loaves. Where you have a bread machine mentioned, you do not accommodate these types of bread machine, which always have a 15 minute wait at the start to allow the ingredients to come to room temperature, and which do not provide any timetable information for their various cycle choices. I am currently making Levy's Jewish Rye, with the sponge in the bread machine pan, the unit set for basic white, light crust and 2 pound loaf, and with the rest of the ingredients on top of the sponge, and 4 hours added to the base 3 hours 20 minutes so that the machine's mixing will not start until 4 hours 15 minutes after I pressed start. How would you handle those using my type of bread machine, where using the dough cycle and the oven do NOT appeal at all due to weakness in the hands and wrists, and general old age?

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I was lucky enough to attend your appearance in Vancouver, and taste that fabulous cake that you made for Nathan and Michel wedding. You mentioned an raspberry essence from Berkeley, and that just 9 drops was needed for the 9" round, but I was unable to catch exactly what essence it was so that I could procure some for my own kitchen. I was absolutely blown away by that raspberry flavour.

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Hi Rose:

I love your books and have made many of your recipes.

I have a recipe for a Polish sweet bread which my grandmother always made. This is not a sandwich bread. She used Robin Hood flour, the original bleached, for all of her baked goods. I cannot always get it and was wondering what brand I could substitute. I'm happy to send the recipe if that helps.
Thank you.

Joan D.

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Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald
01/15/2016 04:03 PM

Have made your refrigerator Banana cake many times - have even had to send it home in visitor's luggage when they have asked for seconds. Today I had left over zucchini, a couple of nice brownish bananas and a couple of carrots, so gave the Many-Splendoured Quick Bread a go from Heavenly Cakes. I did not expect the wonderful results. Has a slightly different, very pleasant flavour from the Banana loaf. What amazed me the most was how light the loaves are -is it the 3 minutes beating or the instant oatmeal?. (I rarely make one large loaf and always go for 4 mini loaves as we can eat one and freeze three. The mini loaves took about 35 minutes). Thanks again for another wonderful recipe. This will definitely be in my arsenal of Christmas loaves to give out

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Hi Michelle,
We are answering your question just as we are leaving.
The recipe is not in any of the books. You can replace the whole eggs with an equal gram weight of egg whites. Make the recipe in the same manner. The whiter buttercream will be softer in texture than the whole egg version.
Rose & Woody

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Where would I find the recipe for the all egg white version of the White Chocolate Buttercream you suggested? Thank you!

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HI Wendy,
We will be discussing this with the blog masters and will have an answer for you after we return from an event in Canada after January 20.

To stop getting email responses by others for this thread you need to do the following:
1. Make a reply comment to the latest “list” comment that you receive.
you can simply write “thanks”, “yes”, “,,,,”

2. UNcheck all 3 boxes

Remember me next time?
Let me know if someone adds a comment?
Replying to comment from Woody

This should work so that you do not receive emails for the thread or posting.
Rose & Woody


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Wendy Handler
Wendy Handler in reply to comment from woody
01/ 9/2016 04:54 PM

This is what comes up every time intry to log on either ipad, iphone or my dell

The following errors were encountered

Your membership account has not been activated yet.
Return to Previous Page

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Hi Wendy,
We each have successfully logged onto the Forums today and know that others have done this as well. We suggest you try logging on a different computer.
Rose & Woody

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Wendy Handler
Wendy Handler in reply to comment from woody
01/ 9/2016 03:37 PM

I tried twice to register but no activation confirmation was sent. How do I get in touch with webmastrr
Wendy

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Hi Jiang,
1. Rose gives a good description of what is a genoise compared to other sponge cake in "The Cake Bible" and "Rose's Heavenly Cakes". A classic genoise recipe is heated whole eggs that are then whip to "soft " peak. The batter has clarified butter added to it. Genoise cake batters generally use less sugar than other cakes and are brushed with a sugar flavored syrup to moistness and sweetness.
Most other sponge cakes have soft or stiff peak egg whites.
An author may describe and/or label cake as she or he envisions the recipe. An example is The White Genoise in "The Cake Bible" which Rose notes as a cross between a genoise and an angel food cake.

2. If the recipe does not use baking powder and/or baking soda, you can likely use the Rose factor charts for Genoise as a reference once you have calculated your recipe to be a half recipe to bake in a 6 inch round by 2 high pan for one cake. As far as baking times, you will need to experiment.

3. The best test for doneness is following the author's instructions for baking times and adapting to your experience with how your oven works.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Wendy,
That is handled by the webmaster. We suggest to see if you can "log on" to a Forum already in progress.
Rose & Woody

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
01/ 9/2016 01:14 PM

Dear Rose&Woody,
today I have some questions about Sponge Cake and Genoise.
1. What are the specific factors that distinguish Genoise and Sponge Cake? If I beat egg whites to stiff peak, then beat in the egg yolks and add butter, can I call a Sponge cake as a Genoise? If I beat whole eggs but don't add butter, can I call it Genoise? If I beat egg seperately, then I fold the egg white into the egg yolk and also add butter, can I call that Genoise?
I know this question is a little bit... ridiculous, but it actually confuses me sometimes.

2. The Japanese Strawberry Shortcake uses a Sponge Cake (or Genoise???!!) with a quite high amount of milk and butter. I wonder: Will the Rose's Factor for Genoise cake work for this type of recipe (the baking time and the amount of batter=? What is the best way to test the doneness without opening the oven's door?

Thank you.

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Wendy Handler
Wendy Handler in reply to comment from woody
01/ 8/2016 06:07 PM

I never got the email to activate the forum. Could you look into it please.
Wendy

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Hi Wendy,
We do not have any postings or written instructions in any our books. There are several YouTube and blog sites that show how to apply gold leaf on the web.
In general:
1. you should avoid the leaf contacting your hands as it will likely adhere to them
2. it helps to wear cotton gloves
3. use a soft, dry artist brush or sharp knife to apply the leaf
4. use razor blades, Xacto knives, and sharp knives to cut the gold leaf
5. cut and apply the gold leaf in a draft free area

Our policy is for bloggers to post their pictures on the Forums section.
Rose & Woody


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Hi Michelle,
The Light Whipped Ganache or the all egg white version of the White Chocolate Buttercream would be good choices.
Rose & Woody

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Wendy Handler
Wendy Handler
01/ 8/2016 12:53 PM

Years ago I cut out one of your recipes from a cooking magazine. Finally this New Years I made it...Golden Crown Cheesecake...it wax heavenly....so I bought your book The Baking Bible...I am excited to make one of the recipes.

I tried to post a pic...absolutely beautiful...but woukd not let me. I used the edible gold leaf for the first time and had difficulty. What is the correct way to use it?

Thanks,
Wendy

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Hi Woody and Rose,
My family loved the Miette's Tomboy from RHC. Can you recommend a few additional frostings that you think would go well with the cake? Would Whipped Cream Ganache work?

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Hi Ellen,
We suggest you try Rose’s Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust with cream cheese, which is posted on the blog. For your small tarts we recommend to minimize shrinkage:
1. Roll the crust 1/16 to 3/32 inch and cut 6 inch rounds
2. Line the tart pan
3. Roll your rolling pin over the rim to cut off the excess crust
4. Gently press the dough against the pan side’s to extend it slightly above the rim
5. Cover the crust lined tart pans in the freezer for an hour or two before baking
6. Blind bake with weights as you have in the past adding some more time as you see fit

You can also roll at 1/16 inch and cut out 8 inch rounds to fold over the excess for double layer sides and trim the top.
Rose & Woody

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Ellen Sherman
Ellen Sherman
01/ 7/2016 01:54 PM

I have made Rose's pastry crust with cream over and over for 3" tart pans and despite lining and weighting for 10' at 350 degrees, the pastry always shrinks.

Is this crust- with the baking powder, cream and butter not suitable for small tarts?

Any help will be most appreciated.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
01/ 3/2016 11:27 PM

thank you Ed--so glad you liked it. looking forward to hearing your reaction to the 100% durum!

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Rose. Just a followup on the semolina torpedo. It was excellent. I really liked the chewiness as well as the taste. I'll try the next time to use just the durum flour to see how it compares. So many recipes - so little time! Thanks.

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HI Elle,
Since these are intended mostly for pie crusts, we use 3/32 inch thick tracks for flaky pie crusts. You can stack the 1/8 and 3/32 inch thick rails to give you just under a 1/4 inch thick rail.
We use the 1/8 inch track for rolled cookies, and the 1/16 inch track for mini pies and galettes.
Rose & Woody

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I just ordered the Rose's fast tracks dough thickness rails, to help me when rolling out my dough to a certain size. Most of the recipes I use, say roll out to 1/4" thickness. But, the three strips in the order does not seem to offer that size. ?

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Oops! Too late. I already made the semolina torpedo, adding both a little bread and all purpose flour. My structure concern overrode the flavor issue. I did use 425 degrees, but that was probably not an issue because I was running convection. I haven't tried it yet but it looks real pretty. I was surprised that it is as small as it is, but it matches your specs exactly. I'll report back to let you know how I like it. There are a couple other people in the house who will give their verdicts as well.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
01/ 2/2016 06:17 PM

Ed, on second thought, i would make it the first time with 100% durum flour because the taste is amazing that way. i think when i wrote that you can replace some of it with unbleached all-purpose flour it was just a suggestion--something you can experiment with to see what proportion pleases you the most ie flavor versus structure.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
01/ 2/2016 06:09 PM

Ed, you're right--450˚F if using la Cloche. also go with the bread flour sub as in the understanding where it is referred to as all-purpose that has to be an error which i will now fix. thank you !

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I notice that you indicate preheating for the Semolina Torpedo as 450, but 425 if using La Cloche (Bread Bible, page 367). However, on page 578, you indicate as a pointer, to raise the temperature by 25 degrees when using La Cloche. These seem to contradict each other. I checked the book corrections and didn't find anything relating to the matter. Also, you indicate on page 369 that replacing some of he durum flour with unbleached all purpose can yield a better shape and less moisture loss. How much all purpose? And is this in addition to the bread flour option you talk about at the bottom of page 368? I'm looking forward to trying this bread but want to make sure about this. Thanks.

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Hi Linda,
We generally only us a crumb crust, whether prebaked or not, with a filling that is either not baked, such as a chocolate cream pie, or a filling or topping that only needs several minutes to set the filling or topping. In “The Pie & Pastry Bible”, Rose’s Great Pumpkin Pie uses ground gingersnaps as a barrier coating over the flaky pie crust to absorb some of the baking juices from the pumpkin filling.
We suggest that you contact the author of the recipe for her/his advice on how to solve this problem is you want to stay with this crust, as the author must have had to address the problem in her/his testing.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

I make a great pumpkin pie with a creme cheese/ricotta filling and gingersnap crumb crust. The crust ingredients are gingersnap crumbs, butter and sugar. The shell is baked for 10" at 425, then the whole pie is baked 10" at 425, and another 25" at 350.

Here's the issue. The crust tends to get crunchy and sometimes too browned during cooking. However, the filling needs the baking time.

Do you have any suggestions to help the crust be chewy-er and not over browned?

Thank you and Happy New Year!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Lesley
12/29/2015 02:12 PM

we are so glad you discovered this Lesley. thanks for the excellent and detailed feedback. yes--the UK is a paradise of quality dairy ingredients-- but sadly no bleached flour.

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Having been born in the Uk, I am used to high butterfat whipping cream that you can almost whip with a fork. I have spent years in Canada bemoaning separating cream and don't particularly like the taste and texture of the powdered additives to thicken and hold the cream. Then I discovered Rose's 2 methods for stabilizing cream in Heavenly cakes. I have been asked for the recipe innumerable times when I use the cream cheese and creme fraiche version. Since creme fraiche is so expensive and hard to find here, I make my own. The taste is delicious and the cream stays together completely. This weekend I tried the cooked cornstarch method as my son in law hates cream cheese and can taste it in anything I produce. It worked equally well and my pavlova did not go soggy although I missed the depth of flavours that the cream cheese version imparts. Thanks again Rose and Woody.

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Hi Yvonne,
You may want to write a comparison of the ingredients and amounts for Shirley's pound cake recipes on pages 16 and 36. It appears that her egg and egg yolk combination on page 35 best suited her preference for taste and texture for adapting her bundt style cake on page 16 to a 9 by 2 layer cake.
You could vary the total amount of egg using the formula of 1 large egg=1-1/2 whites=2 (to 3) yolks. Your texture and taste will change as well.
In "The Cake Bible", Rose has general base batters for white (egg whites), yellow (egg yolks), and chocolate (whole eggs). "The Cake Bible", "Pie & Pastry Bible", and "Bread Bible" also have ingredient and their weights per cup chart.
A key to designing and adapting recipes is to have a digital scale so that you can weigh your ingredients, especially for flour, eggs, and especially egg yolks.
Large egg yolks can vary from the past years standard of 18.6 grams/yolk to now being 12 to 20 grams/yolk.
In "The Cake Bible", Rose presents an Understanding section after most of her recipes to show how the recipe relates to other recipes that are similar.
Enjoy experimenting. We always recommend to bake the author's recipe exactly as it is presented. In this case, we suggest you make both of her recipes, before adapting.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose and Woody,

I don't know how to quite word this question so please forgive me, in advance, if I confuse you. I'm going to try to articulate it as best I can.

I'm currently studying Shirley Corriher's book, BakeWise. In it she teaches Baker's Percentages and Formulas to create good cake recipes and spot bad ones.

On page 35, if you have a copy, she touches on the weight of eggs being greater than the weight of the fat. This makes sense to me but here's where I get confused. While she elaborates on finding the proper amount to use in a recipe for other ingredients, she does not elaborate on the choice of egg combination she used. Here's what I mean and what I'd like to understand.

She chose to use 2 Large eggs and 3 large egg yolks. Can you possibly explain how and why she chose to use this egg combination? (that's the best way I can describe it). I'd like to understand this concept. How does one know that 2 whole eggs and 3 egg yolks (or any combination thereof) is what's needed for a recipe? Her book doesn't touch on this. I know eggs provide fat and structure but I don't understand how to choose to use either only whole eggs, only egg yolks, only egg whites or some combination of both in a recipe. Neither do I understand how to adapt a recipe if I decide to not use the whole egg (egg + the white).

I hope I didn't confuse you too badly. As always, any advice you have is greatly appreciated. I appreciate that you answer baking questions for your readers, it's a great help.

Sincerely,
Yvonne

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Hi Jana,
We recommend using your standard oven for baking yeast breads as many times we state to use a baking stone and to introduce steam by placing ice cubes in a pan on the oven floor. Once you are satisfied with your bread baking results, you then could experiment in the Breville.
You can make any of the quick breads and muffins in the Breville.
Rose & Woody

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hi Rose. I'm new to baking yeast bread. I got your book as a gift - been devouring it & am ready to start my adventure. My question to you is with oven - I was planning to bake in the gas powered oven of my range, but happened to see your posting on Breville SmartOven. I have a Breville SmartOven, which of course is electric. Would you recommend I use the Breville for my baking yeast bread? I have used the SmartOven for cakes, quick breads etc. Appreciate your help.

Love your book - truly a bible !

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Charlie
12/28/2015 10:26 AM

Charlie, we just made rugelach 2 days ago using non-stick foil. a little jam leaked out onto the foil but was so easy to remove and it caramelizes slightly on the bottom of the rugelach which is nice. but if you want to avoid leaking the best thing to do is to concentrate the jam in a microwave or in a saucepan on a cooktop so that it will be spreadable when cool but thicker.

if using apricot jam, instead of concentrating it, mash it with a fork and it will not thin out--straining it makes it really thin.

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Hi Shina,
We do not have a almond ring coffee cake recipe in our repertoire. However there are many versions on the web and in books. We do have similar recipes in "The Bread Bible" and "The Baking Bible" for a ring style sweet bread.
Rose & Woody

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Please help help with Rose's RUGELACH, no matter what I do my jam leaks out during baking into a pool of liquid and crusts all around the cookie. :( Please help, I tried buying a better brand of Jam, still a sad mess (albeit delicious) but a mess!

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Hi I am looking for almond ring coffee cake receipe, do you know where I can find it.

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Hi Michelle,
You should be able to use the springform pan, as long as it is light colored metal. We suggest clamping off the excess of the cake strips right at the mechanism.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody, Can the Miette's Tomboy (RHC, p. 145) be baked in a 6x3 springform pan, rather than a standard round cake pan? Does the springform mechanism interfere with the cake strip? Thank you!

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Hi Fran,
Some questions we need to ask.
1. Are you using only bleached or only unbleached all-purpose?
2. Are you weighing your ingredients?
This is critical for flour, because unless you have a rigid regiment for prepping your flour before measuring and measuring into a cup, whether it is by lightly spooning, scooping, or sifting, you can never be consistent to within a gram or two.
3. Have you checked your oven to see if it is still heating to the temperature you have set.
4. Are you using different baking pans from before?
Rose & woody

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Fran Marcyjanik
Fran Marcyjanik
12/26/2015 02:49 PM

about 6-7 yrs ago all my Christmas cookies were very Hard, not just crispy but very hard to bite. I tried to figure out the problem and finally decided it was the flour, that was the only thing that ALL the cookies had in common so I didn't use the Robin Hood flour any more. All was well until this Christmas when the same thing happened whether it was a reg. cookie or a Pizzelle or the little cheddar slices. They were all HARD to bite into.Do you have any idea what the problem might be?

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Hi Marcus,
Our official tour is completed. We will be doing several events during 2016, which we will post in the Current Announcements section of our blog. In most cases, we also will post an upcoming event for more details (any posting also posts on Facebook). Our next event will be in Chicago at the International Housewares Show in early March.
Rose & Woody

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I just received The Baking Bible as a gift. When your appearance schedule for 2016 is available could you share it here or on your Facebook page? I wasn't able to make it at the last minute earlier in 2015, but I don't want to let another opportunity pass. Thanks

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Lesley
12/24/2015 10:00 PM

thank YOU Lesley for a wonderful holiday gift of such a positive response. it reminds me of the first time i tasted classic buttercream and how shocked i was having been accustomed to the gritty confectioners sugar buttercream.

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I wanted to wish you both and your families all the best for the Holiday Season and thank you for all your sage advice and help
I also wanted to comment on your neoclassic buttercream. I have always made Mousseline buttercream but tonight I was making a pavlova and had 6 egg yolks remaining. I have looked at your neoclassic buttercream but never got around to making it - no idea why since everything else of yours always turns out perfectly. I am not sure after completing the buttercream, that I will ever use egg whites again. I cannot believe the lovely rich flavour that the yolks impart to the buttercream and how quickly and easily the buttercream came together. Silky is an understatement. Thanks for another great recipe.

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Hi Kate,
There are several brands on the market. We used Fat Daddios for our tests which are very sturdy and come in various diameters and heights. You can also use "tart rings" for a browser search.
We would not suggest pastry cutter rings.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rosary
12/21/2015 02:41 PM

as i've always made my own strudel i can't say for sure but i would think the thinner the better so you can make many layers.

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Which number Fillo do you use for spanakopita and for strudel.

The Greek place in Astoria insisted that you use #7 for spanakopita triangles but with the double layer it seems too thick and the pastry came out dull and, despite lots of clarified butter.

And which number for strudel? Perhaps the problem is that we are lucky here in NY to have so many choices! Not just fresh Fillo dough but what number would you like?

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I received the Baking Bible for Christmas and couldn't help but open it early for some xmas baking. I want to make th kouign amman, but I can't find pastry rings. I have looked at Bed Bath and Beyond, Michaels, and Sur La Table, and all tried to sell me pastry cutters, but I am not sure if those can go in the oven. Can they? And, if not, where I can buy pastry rings? (I appreciate that you include directions for making the rings, but I would rather use something commercial and sturdy). Thanks!

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Hi Rose
I must tell you that my family and I have enjoyed your recipes for the last 25 years. One recipe in particular has become a holiday tradition. The tiny little fruit cake gems from your Christmas cookie book. Alas this year we have a problem. We moved last week and I can't find d my copy of your book. I've tried to find a kindle version but ha e had no luck. Is the recipe any where online ? With 4 days till Christmas Eve I really have to get cracking. Please help
Thank you
Best regards
Patricia

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Hi mary,
We have tried making the oblivion with white chocolate, in fact, it was the first test that Rose asked me to do for "Rose's Heavenly Cakes". It failed miserably. But it then became with more testing into the White Chocolate Buttercream.
Enjoy experimenting for a savory version. Hector Wong, who lives in Hawaii, did his take on the oblivion by replacing the butter with avocado.
Rose & Woody

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maria holden
maria holden
12/17/2015 11:33 PM

Hello Rose,
Yet again last week, I made the Chocolate Oblivion Torte, and it was magnificent...but it got me wondering about a white chocolate version as well as a savory version. I was wondering what might happen with a combo of cocoa butter, beef tallow and eggs...?

Thank you as always,
Maria

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Lesley Wormald
12/17/2015 09:31 PM

thank you Lesley, much appreciated!

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Thanks. I do keep a ring binder of laminated bread recipes, so, yes, time to add the frequently used cakes and pastries as well.

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Hi Dana,
Rose has made a point with her later books to only work with a publisher that will publish the book with a stitched binding. Publishers virtually only publish a hardcover book later as a paperback. Our suggestion is to 3 hole punch the pages and place them in a 3 ring binder. We also laminate recipes that we make frequently so that we do not have to worry about the pages getting stained.

In "The Baking Bible" we did include metric measurements for most entries in the instructions. Our future books will include them. We will say that our current books are heavily inked with metric measurements written along with the ounces, cups, etc., including marking in the total weight of ingredients on the top of the ingredients chart as a reference when checking weights of mixed batters and doughs to be sure all ingredients were measured correctly.
Rose & Woody

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I have been using both The Cake Bible for many years and the Pie and Pastry Bible for perhaps a couple fewer. The bindings have given up and pages are starting to fall out.

I wonder if Rose and her publisher have ever considered issuing spiral bound versions of her books for those of us who use them as frequently as I do. It would also mean the book would lay flat when in use. I'm not sure if this is practical from the publisher's point of view, but it would be from the baker's.

While I'm making suggestions: For those of us more used to working in metric and measuring by weight, it's great to have those measurements in the recipes. But I find when measurements are referred to in the instructions (when an ingredient is divided, for example)the metric reference isn't included. This has caused me problems at times, forgetful as I am, so it would be useful, in future editions, to be consistent throughout the recipe.

Dana

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Hi ritu,
The black raspberry liqueur is to give the cake a fruit flavor to compliment the peanut butter ganache similar to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. You could try a cherry liqueur. Or switch to a nut flavor liqueur like Frangelico.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Fran,
Yes. You should start over. We suggest that you look at Rose's posting "Fear of Génoise -- an Important Lesson". As the recipes states, the heated egg mixture needs to beat for a minimum of 5 minutes in a stand mixer. Even if you see that the egg foam has quadrupled in volume before the 5 minutes, you need to keep it beating for the foam to have the correct structure for mixing with the flour and clarified butter.
Rose also has a couple of YouTube videos on making genoise batters.
Rose & Woody

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Lesley Wormald
Lesley Wormald in reply to comment from Elsie Potts
12/16/2015 12:40 AM

I would like to answer the Escali scale question. I have an Escali and do a ton of baking and will only weight ingredients - I am from Europe and never got used to cups. I have owned other scales but the Escali is the best. A Canadian consumer show did a comparison against commercial scales and the Escali rated top for accuracy. (not surprising as it is the choice of many laboratories). It is easy to operate and the greatest feature is the adaptor so that you can operate the scale without the battery. Nothing times out - if you run our of ingredients you can run to the store with stuff still scaled and it will be on when you return. Even with the battery, the shut off is longer than the scale I owned before this one from a different manufacturer. Easy to operate, easy to read and reliable. I owned my Escali before Rose added one to her line, but she picked the best model.

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Elsie Potts
Elsie Potts
12/16/2015 12:13 AM

Why do you believe that the Escali Alimento Rose Limited Edition Digital Scale is the best for baking?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anna
12/15/2015 09:23 PM

So glad you figured it out as well didn't have the answer.

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Ack! Never mind. Figured it out.

Sorry to clutter your inbox.

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Rose,

I can't recall the username I use on your forums, and can't seem to find anywhere to ask for technical help of this nature. I can change my password, no problem, but can't seem to figure out how to learn what my username is. (i.e., I already have a username, I just haven't accessed the forums in a while, and have switched computers since then.)

Any advice?

(It doesn't help that a family member keeps interrupting me every time I try to hunt the information down, sorry.)

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Fran Laughton
Fran Laughton
12/15/2015 12:44 PM

I am making the white gold passion Genoese. After removing the yolk/sugar mix from the heat and placing the mix on the stand mixer, it whipped up but after 2-3 minutes, deflated and keeps on getting more liquid looking. Do I need to start over?

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Season's Greetings!
"Genoise chocolate cake with peanut butter ganache" has black raspberry syrup .Since black raspberry /liqueur is not even remotely available what can it be substituted with?
Thanks

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Anonymous in reply to comment from Rob
12/13/2015 10:24 AM

Hi Rob,
the honey % is not missing, ie it doesn't appear anywhere else in the book. the only percentages i list are for the main ingredients: flour, water, yeast, salt, butterfat--also seeds and grains. should you want to determine other percentages, all you have to do is divide the weight of the ingredient by the total weight of the flour.

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Dear Rose:
RE:The Bread Bible. Heart of wheat bread.
In the Baker's Percentage for this bread "Honey" is missing. I have calculated it to constitute 1.9% of the total. Hope it is correct.
best regards
Rob

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Anonymous in reply to comment from tom
12/12/2015 09:08 PM

Hi tom,
Yes. It is a for 1/8 teaspoon for both the baking powder and salt. We will check with our webmaster as most of time the posting shows--teaspoon for both. I just looked and it did not sow at first, then when I went back to the posting it did show Rose & Woody

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on the home page for flaky pie crust. It calls for bakingpowder. 1/8 of what unit.? tsp?

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Hi David,
We suggest either asking their buyer to find out from the manufacturer OR look at the bag’s information and contact the manufacturer.
If the wholesaler is going to sell the flour, they will need to know to properly represent it to their customers.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Jiang,
We suggest you refrigerate the dough for up to 3 hours, or freeze the dough for up to 1 month. If longer than 2 hours refrigerated, let i warm up to room temp.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose/Woody,

My local wholesaler once sold cake flour in 20kg bags called "Cake Flour". But they are no longer stocking it. Instead, they now carry another brand called "Baker's Flour"; but no one there could be certain whether or not it is cake flour. What should I look for in terms of ingredients to be certain that it is cake flour?

David Chau

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
12/ 8/2015 11:16 AM

Dear Rose&Woody,
I'm sorry for keeping asking a lot of questions, but because the Christmas is coming...
I have make 3 batches of Rose's Gingerbread Cookies. How long can I keep them in the refrigerator and in the freezer?
Thank you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Liu Shang Jiang
12/ 7/2015 11:15 AM

yes Liu. better the traditional way than an imperfect thermometer.

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
12/ 7/2015 11:10 AM

Dear Rose,
thanks for replying quickly. I'm actually working with the Angel Lemon Chiffon Pie in "Pie and Pastry Bible".
I also have some problem with my meringue. Because I can't find a good candy thermometer, I don't know how to make Italian meringue, which needs the hot sugar syrup? I just wonder: Do the traditional way of testing sugar by using cold water will work?
Thank you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Bread Bubba
12/ 7/2015 11:04 AM

bread bubba, of course you can't scald buttermilk as it curdles, but you can use it in yeasted recipes just as you can use milk that has not been scalded. you won't get quite as high a rise but the trade-off in flavor would be worth it.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Michelle
12/ 7/2015 11:03 AM

Michelle, batter can sit in pans for a while before baking, especially if refrigerated, but they lose significant volume if you pour the batter a long while after mixing it.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Liu Shang Jiang
12/ 7/2015 11:00 AM

Liu Shang, i wouldn't but if you have any doubts make a small batch and you will see the difference and can decide for yourself!

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
12/ 7/2015 10:49 AM

Dear Rose&Woody,
for some emergency case can I use bottled lemon juice (99,88% lemon juice) for Lemon Curd?
Thank you.

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Bread Bubba
Bread Bubba
12/ 7/2015 08:26 AM

Rose,

I have been making cultured buttermilk and putting it in everything. I was thinking about using it in yeast dough cinnamon rolls...but I remembered your tip in the Bread Bible regarding scalding milk for the protease enzyme. What about buttermilk? Can it be used with yeasted recipes. Does it need to be scalded or will it turn to yuk.

Thanks,

Bread Bubba

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Hi Rose and Woody, Thank you. I successfully made an excellent test (1) chocolate velvet fudge cakelette in a bundlette pan. It came out so nice that my husband advised me to consider making these individual cakelettes for an upcoming function for a personalized touch instead of one large cake. I only have 1 pan that will make 6 at a time. I will need to Make about 18, so 3 sets of 6. My question is if I make one large batch of batter, will it be a problem to let it sit while the other batches bake? I'd rather not have to make 3 batches of batter or buy 2 more bundlette pans

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Hi Sohey,
On page 511, we mention how Kate Coldrick in the UK made her own "bleached" all-purpose flour by using her microwave.
Rose’s posting--Kate of Kate's Flour on this blog describes the technique. You can also get more details by looking at her linked blog, A Merrier World, under Sites I Like on the left sidebar of our blog.
When Rose visited Kate several years ago she was amazed at the difference in texture and height of the cakes that Kate is now able to make using her Kate’s flour.
We also have her technique for making her flour in “Rose’s Heavenly Cakes”.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Michelle,
I check my test reports and photos for the Chocolate Velvet Fudge Cake form "Rose's Heavenly Cakes". I did have some cracking on the top for two different Nordicware metal bundt pans. After the book was published, we tested again and found that increasing the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon helped to minimize the cracking. You do get a slightly lower in height cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi, I live in UK and recently have bought your "Baking Bible" book. Unfortunately, most of the recipes in this book call for "bleached all purpose" flour, which is not available in the UK. Is there any other alternative flour or method you can recommend to replace it. Could I replace it with normal plain flour available here? I can't wait to bake the recipes from this book.

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Hi. I am still practicing my presentation of the chocolate velvet fudge cake. I wanted to know if cracking of the top is natural or is this an indication that conditions were not quite right? In other words is in normal for a cake in a tube pan or bundt pan to crack? I haven't yet tried the silicone pan and wonder if that might make a difference to achieve a beautiful non cracked top. I see lots of advice on how to make a level layer cake but not much information available on tube pans.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
12/ 3/2015 09:41 AM

yes Ed--it's true--all pastry flour is unbleached, but it has a lower protein content than unbleached all purpose and even slightly lower than bleached all-purpose so it makes a tender crust.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ruth A Cave
12/ 3/2015 09:39 AM

Ruth, the most accurate and quickest response one i've found is the Thermoworks chef alarm. if you click on "rose's family of products" and then go to Thermoworks there is a direct link. be sure to order the oven clip accessory which clips onto the oven rack and holds the probe securely in place.

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I notice that you recommend Bessie and King Arthur for pastry flour. I can only find these in unbleached form. Since you normally recommend using bleached flour for pie crust, I thought some clarification would be helpful. Thanks.

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Ruth A Cave
Ruth A Cave
12/ 3/2015 06:42 AM

Would like your recommendation for an oven thermometer.

There is such a wide variation in accuracy from all that

I have purchased.

Thanks,

Ruth Cave
Grand Finales
New London, NH

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Hi Anonymous,
By rolling the dough into the corners and using a ruler and dough scraper, you should be able to roll the dough to have straight sides. You will likely have some degree of rounded corners, which you can leave OR trim the dough on two opposite sides to have squared off corners and slightly smaller croissants.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose&Woody,
This is quite a ridiculous question, but seriously I can't roll my Croissant or Puff Pastry perfectly in a rectangle or a square. Do you have any tips that can help my dough really attractive?
Thank you.

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Great, thank you!

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Hi Leticia,
We recommend Bessie and King Arthur for pastry flour. Other brands may have a more wheat taste.
Yes. You can substitute half and half.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

I am a big fan of your highly skilled baking! I purchased another of your great books- The Pie and Pastry Bible. I tried the pumkin pie recipe and apple crumb pie recipe. I had a hard time finding pastry flour, but finally found Arrowhead Mills Organic Pastry Flour. I I do notice a better crust with pastry flour, but too much of a strong wheat texture and taste. Is there a pastry flour brand you recommend or should I try making my own with AP flour and cake flour?

Also on the pumpkin recipe I saw your response not to blind bake so will try that next. I prefer half and half to milk-could I substitute?

Thank you!

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There is one comment I have on the pastry. Tradition in our house mandates that leftover pastry be turned into jam tarts which requires some rolling and re rolling of the dough. After all the initial very delicate handling, I thought that the pastry might become a little hard after a 3rd and 4th re rolling. In fact, it held up very well and was still very elastic and my husband said that the tart pastry was as good or perhaps even better than the pie!!

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Thank you, Rose. I guess it's time to actually read that Recipe Deck I bought!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rosary
11/27/2015 10:01 PM

Rosary, you're right--we have to do a video. we did a step by step of exactly what you suggest in the "recipe deck" which is part of the new "rose's signature series."

meantime, i have to tell you that even the original recipe in the pastry bible worked but the baking bible one is my favorite. if you can pinch together a small amount and it holds together you can be sure that it will work. if it is still powdery, use the heel of your hand to "smooch" the dough together. if the butter isn't adequately integrated it will not hold the dough together. the dough should be just slightly stretch with streak of butter throughout and not large pieces of butter which would cause holes when baked.

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Well someone beat me to my question!

I have made hundreds of your pies and still have the same problem -- too dry. Does not roll out well. Has cracks so the filling leaks through.

I do weigh all ingredients meticulously (I even calibrate my scale occasionally). Make my own pastry flour (2-1 bleached all-purpose & cake flour). But the kneaded dough never gets to the point of being as malleable as it was in your PBS video, Rose. I am using the extra cream, as per the new recipe. Expected that to help but it didn't.

All I can think of is that the problem is in the processing.

Do you have another video showing how much you process it at each step?

1) the size of the butter after you cut it (it's not possible to get 1/2" "cubes" from a stick. Do you mean 1/2" "pieces" instead of cubes?

2)what the coarse meal looks like after processing the cream cheese and flour.

3) What the butter "peas" look like after the first processing

4) What the butter "peas" look like after the second processing

5) What the mixture looks like when you take it from the processor. I know it will be in particles and will not hold together, but how badly will it not hold together.

6) What the dough looks like after kneading.

A video showing all this would be amazing -- if it's possible. Thanks for listening.

Warmly,
Rosary

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Quick question: If I'm using pastry flour in the dough, should I use pastry flour to flour the board, etc. as well? TIA

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I am SO happy to find these responses! I just looked the recipe up in my Baking Bible and I see that you give latex gloves as an alternative to the ziplock (which I tried myself) and that the measurement of heavy cream is increased. And the butter pieces are smaller. BTW Rose, I did use pastry flour (weighed). But I wasn't weighing the liquids - was just measuring with spoons. I'll try weighing all ingredients this time. I'm excited to try it again now - I'll keep you all posted. Thanks so much for the speedy responses. One more question - I happen to have mascarpone cream cheese - do you prefer your version with cream cheese or mascarpone cheese. Just curious. Oh - and one more: have you baked with honey crisp apples? I have fuji and granny smith for these pies, but I always wonder if honey crisp would bake up well. Thanks again!

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That explains it. I made the cream cheese pastry from the Pastry bible a few months ago since every recipe of yours always works out, but I had difficulty with this, crumbly etc. I tried again a couple of days ago and wondered why it turned out so well. After this post, I suddenly noticed that I had used the Baking Bible recipe instead of the Pastry bible. Take care and Happy thanksgiving

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
11/26/2015 09:43 AM

thanks so much Ed--we were about to write this same thing! also, of course, if measuring the flour instead of weighing Orna may be getting more flour than called for. and finally, if using unbleached flour it requires more liquid and also is not as tender.

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I'm going to break in here because I just noticed that the Baking Bible increases the amount of cream by 50% over what is listed in the Pie and Pastry Bible. I just made the crust yesterday using the higher cream amount and found it easier to work with the dough. Also, I've always found that the dough just out of the food processor is very crumbly and letting it rest a longer time in the refrigerator after kneading it in the bag also helps.

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Hi Rose & Woody,

This is my 3rd year making your delicious Apple Crumble pie, and I'm afraid I'm still having such trouble with the cream cheese dough. I just re-made it AGAIN by hand - instead of the food processor - but it still comes out too dry. I think the main problem has been that I was leaving the butter pieces too big, so not enough moisture in the dough. The first time I added a little water. This time I used rubber gloves and tried to knead the dough to pull it together. (is that ok?) But it still seems very dry and hard. I'm having a hard time with the ziplock bag method. I love the pie and the topping and all. Is there another dough I could use instead, or should I add water? Or do you have a youtube clip I could watch? I just watched your old one from 1988 but a) it's not a cream cheese dough and b) it's not your ziplock method. But I loved watching it anyway! Anyway, happy Thanksgiving, and if you could give me any pointers before I attempt yet ANOTHER batch of dough I would be most appreciative. Warmly, Orna

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Thank you so much for your speedy reply. And just in time! I am about to roll out my pastry dough now. Hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Sherrie Sanet
11/25/2015 09:12 PM

Sherie, don't blind bake the crust for the pumpkin pie. Best to set it on a preheated baking stone or for the first 20 minutes of baking on the floor of the oven.

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Sherrie Sanet
Sherrie Sanet
11/25/2015 08:50 PM

Could you please tell me if you blind bake the pastry crust for pumpkin pie?
I make a slight variation of your Pumpkin Pie recipe from your book, "The Pie and Pastry Bible" and love the addition of nuts and ginger snaps on the bottom. But if I blind bake it, would I add the nuts and cookies before I bake the crust, or should I skip the blind baking all together. Thanks!

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Marsha, how high is your altitude? I'm at 5,000 feet and never had an issue with neoclassic buttercream. If your sugar wasn't completely dissolved in the corn syrup it would definitely lead crystallization and the frosting being grainy. Try it again and if the sugar doesn't dissolve again, start the sugar over. Therefore you don't waste the expensive butter. Also, depending on how grainy and crunchy it is, it can still be edible. I've messed up buttercream once, it's a bit crunchy and grainy, and no one noticed and everyone still loved it.


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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from marsha
11/25/2015 09:57 AM

Marsha, definitely the altitude is the problem. the mixture is not getting hot enough to dissolve the sugar. also organic sugar has what is called 'impurities' which will cause crystallization. i would start by using a refined sugar to see what happens and also add a little water to compensate for evaporation that will take place as the the syrup will take longer to heat at high altitude. do let us know the results of your experiments!

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I recently made the neoclassical butter cream as directed on the cake bible, but my frosting came out grainy and crunchy . Even though my sugar syrup was boiling I think that the sugar was no completely dissolved in the corn syrup. I live in a high elevation and water boils here at 208. Is it possible that this was the issue? I also used organic sugar (Kirkland brand) which seems more granular. Could you give me some tips to remedy the problem. Thanks

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Hi Brooke,
We have not made a Pumpkin Bread, but are assuming you have made a quick bread with the streusel topping. If so, then we suggest that you let it sit uncovered for a few hours before serving.
Then use your oven's broiler to dry the streusel and crips up the pecan streusel topping.
About an hour before serving, position your oven rack to height that your quick bread's top will be 4 to 5 inches from the broiler elements. Set your oven to the broiler setting. Place the quick bread on a baking sheet. After the oven's broiler setting has preheated, position your bread under the broiler elements. Check the bread every 20 seconds until the pecan streusel topping has crisped up. Then let the bread rest at room temperature for awhile before slicing it.
Rose & Woody

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Hi! Last night I baked a pumpkin bread with pecan struesel topping.Apparently I was a little impatient and sealed the breads before they had enough time to cool because this morning there was a lot of condensation in the container and now the struesel topping is soggy. If I stick them back in the over for a few minutes will this solve the problem or will it dry out the bread? Any information or tips is appreciated! Thanks :)

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Hi Richard,
If you saw it in this video, Baking Magic Tips 13-Buttercream Made Simple, the ice bath would have been used to cool down the mixer bowl after adding the sugar syrup to speed up cooling of the mixture before adding the butter.
Rose & Woody

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The neoclassic buttercream video on you tube shows a bowl of ice water, but does not show it being used. Was the hot syrup bowl set in the pan to cool as it was beaten by mixer?

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Hi Michelle,
We suggest using a smaller pot os you have a little more depth. Also, you may want to have a artist brush and some water in a bowl near the cooktop so that you can wash down any sugar crystals that splatter up on the sides.
Rose & Woody

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Rose and Woody, I tried to complete the vanilla mousseline recipe in the Heavenly Cake book. I have several instant read thermometers and I cannot seem to get to the firm ball stage before the sugar syrup crystallizes. Any suggestion? Perhaps a different pot smaller might help. I need a smal batch so I didn't want to use a larger recipe. My candy thermometer won't reach into the pot low enough and I wonder if my instant read are accurate.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from lin
11/20/2015 09:18 PM

lin, i suspect you are not allowing it to mature or sit long enough to firm up. you could try replacing the egg with 3 tablespoons of egg white (45 grams).

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Hi Debbie,
Baking sugar free cakes is not part of our baking repertoire. Fortunately there are many cookbooks and websites that specialize in sugar free cake baking. For a specific cake recipe, we suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise.
Rose & Woody

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Debbie Roberts
Debbie Roberts
11/20/2015 09:22 AM

my sugarfree cakes are not as thick and light..... what can I do?

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Dear Rose

I absolutely love the taste of your Less Fruity Fruit Cake. i tried baking in many sizes (cupcake size, financier size, loaf tin size) and using bread flour but the texture is super crumbly except when it is frozen. but when it thaws, the cake is super soft and crumbly. Taste is still super awesome

I did an informal comparison of the ratio against traditional fruit cake and noticed that the liquid component is significant higher.

Any tips on making it less crumbly would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks!!

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Dear Rose & Woody,
I am making the Banner Bananna Cream Pie from the PPB. I would like to make it with the carmel version of the pastry cream. However, in the pie recipe (p.201)it says to substitute 1:1 milk:heavy cream for half-and-half in the pastry cream, and it says substitute milk for the half-and-half in the carmel pastry cream recipe. Which substitution do you think would be most appropriate if using the carmel pastry cream in the BBCP.
Thank you kindly for your help,
Vince

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Hi Michelle,
Typically for butter cakes, the smaller the diameter of the pan, more baking powder and/or baking soda per percentage of the batter needs to be added to create a flatter top for the cake.
We recommend that you look at the Wedding and Special Occasions chapter in "The Cake Bible", in which Rose gives her Rose factor, formulas, and calculations for butter cakes for: scaling up or down from a given cake pan size, baking time guidelines, servings, approximate batter weights, and baking powder adjustments. There are also base batter formulas for butter, genoise, and cheesecakes. Several frosting recipes are also included.
We have found that the formulas and calculations will give you a starting point for working out favorable results through testing.
Rose & Woody

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Rose and Woody,
Thank you so much for your quick reply. I did use a heating rod (MIA) as recommended in the Fat Dadiddo's website in the center. Do you think the flower nail would be better?
Frankly, I think I will just not use the 3" pans and go with the 2- 2" depth that you recommend. One last point? Any change in baking powder needed?

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Hi Michelle,
Baking a butter or oil cake recipe in a 3 inch high pan faces a challenge in achieving a somewhat level top and having a uniform texture throughout the cake.
You could try placing a flower nail in the center of your 3 inch high pan after pouring in the batter, along with the cake strips, to help bake the center of the cake and a uniform texture.
We recommend to bake 3 individual cakes, but using shorter in height pans (1-1/2 to 2) for a 3 layer cake. (The 3 inch high pans can overtake the tops and prematurely set the cake to a lower height.) OR Bake 2 individual cakes in 4 by 2 inch pans and torte them for a 4 layer cake.
In "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" we had only one butter cake using a 3 inch high pan as we were showing the cake as it was given to us by the contributor of the recipe. We did offer a variation with using 2 inch high pans and notes on the two cakes being different.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Jiang,
We have not done that substitution, so you will need to experiment as the texture and sweetness level will radically change.
The FDA no longer considers 161˚F safe for egg white meringue. If you want to make a meringue at this temperature, you should consider using pasteurized eggs and meringue recipe from the manufacturer of the eggs, as we no longer use the Safe Meringue recipe.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,
I recently bought the cake bible and it has really helped me with my baking, but I have a problem that I cannot solve. I am trying to utilize the all occasion yellow downy cake recipe for a mini cake in a 4 x 3 inch aluminum pan and having trouble (falling center, not cooked, etc). I cut the recipe down by weight to accommodate the difference in pan size. I am not sure how to adjust the baking power. I used 2 cake strips (cut and pinned since I couldn't find any that small and a heat rod) and no success. My last and best attempt was a beautiful rising cake until the last 5 min of baking. I may have bumped the oven because it was beautiful, then sank. The volume of batter may have been a little high in the pan; it didn't overflow but rose above the height of the pan. I planned to torte the cake into 3 layers. I have 2 more, 4 x 3 in pans so another idea is splitting into 2 or 3 pans. Can you help? I'd like to get this technique down and then use it for similar cakes.

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
11/17/2015 12:46 PM

Dear Rose&Woody,
I'm now working with 'The Pie and Pastry Bible' and I have some questions:
I really want to make the Mousse (Chiffon Bavarian) with White Chocolate to make White Chocolate Mousse. Can I just simple replace the dark chocolate with the same amount of white chocolate?
I also find that my thermometer doesn't work properly. Is there another way to test the egg white's temperature (161F) in Safe Meringue Recipe?
Thank you.

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Annette,
We suggest to bake by the recommendations for baking frozen pies on page 19 in “The Pie & Pastry Bible”. The flavors should not be affected.
Rose & Woody

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Annette Chollet
Annette Chollet
11/16/2015 10:40 PM

Dear Rose, I am making a blueberry pie for Thanksgiving dinner and will be using frozen blueberries. But what I would like to do is make the whole pie ahead of time and freeze it. Would that affect the flavor of the blueberries or the pie?

Thank you so much. Because of you and your pie bible, I have become an almost legendary pie baker. My mother and grandmothers are smiling in heaven.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Dolores Fuser
11/16/2015 11:57 AM

Dolores, i am so sorry to hear about the problem you are having with my silicone cake strips. as i bake cakes all the time and have been using mine for years i have never had this happen and no one else has reported this. of course where you purchased them will no doubt refund you but if you contact the manufacturer i'm sure they will want to see the strips to determine what could have caused this and will replace them. please contact Harolds Kitchen: pplancher@haroldimport.com
or call (800) 526-2163 and ask for Pamela Plancher or customer service.

i am also wondering how the strips split as they are designed to go around 9 inch pans and can be stretched and you say you used an 8 inch pan. how did you secure it to the pan?

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Dolores Fuser
Dolores Fuser
11/16/2015 12:28 AM

I would like to know how long your silicone cake stripes are suppose to last. I ordered another after the first one split in the oven in the middle of my cake baking. I thought it must have been a fluke so I recently ordered another. IT HAPPENED AGAIN. This was a big waste of money for me and it really irritates me. What do you plan to do about this? It really is not fair. It was around an 8 inch pan both times so I reLly don't understand this. Waiting for your reply.

Dolores

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Hi Daisy,
If you are making Rose's Basic Flaky Pie Crust from "The Pie & Pastry Bible" with a food processor, we state that the right amount of waters when the dough holds together when you pinch it. With both food processor and hand method,the dough should feel slightly stretchy when pulled after kneading it.
You may also want to try Rose's cream cheese and cream pie crust recipe, which is the only flaky pie crust that we used for our pie recipes in "The Baking Bible".
The recipe is on this posting "Rose's Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust".
Rose & Woody

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I live in the desert area of Phoenix, Arizona. Because of the dry climate, I have a hard time knowing how much water to add to my pie crust so that it will stick together. Any tips?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty KInley
11/10/2015 04:13 PM

Patty, please refer to the bottom of page 247 "ultimate full flavor variation" which says to "allow the sponge to ferment for 1 hour at room temperature and then refrigerate if for 8 to 24 hours."

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Patty KInley
Patty KInley
11/10/2015 11:54 AM

I'm also making the soft white bread in the Bread Bible and have a question about the sponge (I've never made a bread with a sponge before). I know it says you can leave the sponge for 1-24 hrs, but is that refrigerated, or on the counter? I'd hate to leave it on the counter and have it turn out nasty. I was planning on making the sponge one of these afternoons then doing the rest the following day.
Thank you very much. I've baked bread before, but am new to this particular style. And I love that you give the science behind it. That helps a lot.

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Hi Nicole,
We believe it is more likely a mixing problem OR that your butter is too cold, if it only happens occasionally and you are following the same protocol for setting the oven’s temperature.
Having a band of dense cake near the bottom from not mixing enough is a common problem with chocolate cakes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose!
We occasionally have a problem with baking some of our cakes and we can't seem to figure out what it is exactly. Our bottom layer of our midnight chocolate cake and sometimes our carrot cake is coming out dense and rubbery. The top 2/3's of the cake is nice and light. It only happens occasionally. Is it an oven temp issue? Or a mixing problem? I have a picture that I can share with you. I look forward to hearing from you!
Thank you!

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