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May 1, 2016 | From the kitchen of Rose

Please feel free to post comments here if you can't find another appropriate place. The other question entries became too long for some people's browsers to download.

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Comments

Hi Libby,
It is optional. We recommend reading pages 119, 20, and 456.
Research can be the best teacher, we suggest making the recipe twice. One with and one without being wrapped with a cake strip.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

HI Rose,
Do you recommend using a cake strip when baking the genoise classique cake (from the Cake Bible p. 120)?

Thanks.
Libby

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Tonia
04/18/2017 09:31 AM

hi Tonia,

i added the corn syrup to prevent crystallization because the syrup has to be stirred until it reaches temperature. then the baking soda causes controlled crystallization to give it a texture that is desirable--not crumbly but also not hard as solid caramel.

i did not use the golden syrup because corn syrup does a much better job in preventing crystallization after the toffee is completed, ie it will last longer but if you are planning to use it within a few days it would probably be fine.

REPLY

Hi Rose,

I have a question. I just noticed your buttercrunch toffee in the Christmas Cookie Book and the Baking Bible don't only differ by the additional chocolate and nuts on the outside but there is an addition of corn syrup in the Baking Bible version. Is there a particular reason for this? Also, I really like the taste of Lyle's golden syrup, I have both corn and golden syrup and could easily use corn syrup but would prefer to use the golden syrup, would this make a difference to the final product?

Thank you.

Best,
Tonia

REPLY

Irene Chang
Irene Chang
04/18/2017 08:54 AM

Regarding avoiding soggy pies: I find that adding sliced dried fruit to the bottom of the pie very helpful and delicious. I generally recommend using dried fruit of the same type or color as the filling fruit. For example, dried apples or golden raisins for an apple pie. Sometimes, I will add a different type of dried fruit to enhance and add a new dimension to the flavor. Also I love using dried apricot or dried peach on an apple pie to give an apple pie an apricot or peachy flavor.

To make a very beautiful pie: Using cookie cutters of the type that have springs to eject the dough evenly after cutting make the top crusts easy and fantastic looking. I recommend a variety of leaf shapes. These are handy for when you use ground nuts or chopped cookies in the crust, and the crust dies not hang together easily.

To keep pie crusts from toughening, I use leftover liquor from the liquor cabinet in place of water. This application tidies up the liquor cabinet of bottles nobody drinks and adds an interesting and compatible flavor dimension in the right pie. For example, you might use mint or coffee liquor for the crust of a chocolate pie.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Libby
04/17/2017 12:51 PM

Libby, as soon as the egg mixture is lukewarm remove the bowl from the heat source or you'll get scrambled eggs.

REPLY

HI Rose,
Thanks for your response. Just to clarify - - For the Genoise Classique (Cake Bible p. 120), do you keep the egg/sugar mixture over a simmering pan of water (after it has come to a lukewarm temperature) while you beat the mixture on high speed for 5/10 minutes. I assume that I will need to use a handheld beater and NOT remove it from the simmering pan of water as I beat it for 10 minutes (because I am using a handheld beater).

Thanks.
Libby

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Libby
04/17/2017 11:39 AM

hi Libby,

i'm puzzled by your question because when using a stand mixer the bowl has to be in the stand so it can't still be over the simmering water unless, of course, you have a 6 quart kitchen aid with water bath attachment and then you can just put very hot water in it.

REPLY

HI Rose,
I am going to make the Genoise Classique from your Cake Bible (p. 120). It says to heat the eggs and sugar until just lukewarm (put the bowl over a pan of simmering water). The next step says to beat the mixture on high speed...

My question is: When you beat the mixture using a whisk beater in a stand mixer (not handheld), do you remove the eggs/sugar mixture from the simmering water? I assume you do, but just want to make sure.


Thank you!
Libby

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Chuck
04/14/2017 06:40 PM

hi Chuck,

thank you for thinking of me. but not only do i not have time for consulting, i'm not really qualified to consult on a commercial level with commercial equipment. that said, i have to say that the bagel recipe i developed for "the bread bible" is my top favorite bagel. i hope you have the book.

i wish you much success with your NJ bagel venture! do let us know when it's up and running--maybe we can come to visit.

REPLY

This comment is for Woody:
I have looked all over your web page but cannot find where I can purchase the 10-15 cup Nordic Anniversary Bundt pan that you have listed on your 04/04/2017 post. You wrote it's on sale for $20. I looked and saw numerous places where you advertise the sale. However there is no place where I can order it. Please advise.

REPLY

Hey Rose,
Do you do any consulting?
Would you consider so for a commercial bagel store in New Jersey? We need your help and you are the best! My first cookbook my mom ever gave me was "The bread bible", and it changed my ways of baking at home. Now, purchasing a store with dense bagels and being an ex new Yorker, its time to give the "New Jerseyans" a taste of NY that you and I know so well! Let me know. Thanks!
Chuck

REPLY

Hi Bhavna,
Yours is correct.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody, thanks for the reply. My cake bible chocolate base cake recipe shows butter as 75.67 gms. Is it correct?

Regards
Bhavna

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Peter Nosko
04/ 8/2017 11:26 PM

Peter, i'm so glad it didn't ruin the mousseline. yes exponentially is the word--it happens with so many things for example steak on the grill, first it takes its time to get to 90˚F and then 3 minutes later it shoots up to 120˚F. one really needs to watch everything more often toward the end stage.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Marion Ferguson
04/ 8/2017 11:25 PM

Marion, i was told that it's an easy thing to opt out and cancel. if what you're saying is that it is not the case and that they are trying to contact you all i can do is contact them and let them know what is happening. i'll do that tomorrow although since this is the weekend it may take a few days. i'm so very sorry.

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Marion Ferguson
Marion Ferguson
04/ 8/2017 09:40 PM

I wish to let you know I want nothing to do with this PATREON
Get me out of their trying to contact me. I don't wish to be a CREATOR nor anything else with this rip off!

I want to contribute to Rose's web site. It will not be through PATREON.

PLEASE! GET ME OUT OF THERE.

FERG

REPLY

Thank you Rose. I went ahead and made the lightly sweetened syrup, and I think the taste is fine. Its been too long since I made this to remember the taste. It's going into the Mousseline Buttercream, so I think it will be fine.

The reduction really accelerates exponentially. I will be more careful next time.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Peter Nosko
04/ 8/2017 05:48 PM

Peter, the only problem is if it caramelized which would change the flavor but otherwise you can add water if necessary to create the consistency desired.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Marion Ferguson
04/ 8/2017 05:47 PM

thank you so much Marion. the way it works is you make a donation of any amount one time and then after it's made you have to cancel it so it doesn't continue. it's easy to do but i'm sorry it's the only way Patreon allows it because their goal is to have people contribute on a regular basis but it is not mine--i welcome a one time donation.

REPLY

Peter Nosko
Peter Nosko
04/ 8/2017 05:40 PM

Hi. I'm making your Raspberry puree/sauce and for the first time, using a microwave. I accidentally over-reduced it to probably 1/8th original volume. Can I add water back or will I have ruined the Raspberry flavor?

REPLY

Marion Ferguson
Marion Ferguson
04/ 8/2017 04:01 PM

Rose,
I have been trying to do a one time cash donation to your site. I find nothing that will allow me to do that.

HELP!

REPLY

Thank you so much!

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Hi Orna,
Then any of the flourless cakes with accompanying ganache or buttercream.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks so much Rose & Woody - actually it doesn't have to be dairy free. (Traditional more than a religious crowd 😉)

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Hi Rebecca,
You can simply add add some lemon oil and lemon zest and keep the milk the same.
We use the Sour Cream Cake from "The Cake Bible" as a base recipe for several lemon versions in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and "The Baking Bible".
Rose & Woody

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Hi Ritu,
You can simply omit and have a shorter brownie. We have substituted bittersweet or white chocolate chips, but the sweetness level does increase.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Orna,
We are assuming you need dairy free.
If you have "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" we have the Jancsi and the Sybil's Pecan Torte.
For a topping, in "The Baking Bible" we have Woody's Almond Milk Ganache
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose & Woody,

I was getting ready to try a Hazelnut-Mocha Dacquiose from Food Network and a Flourless Almond-Honey Cake (also Food Network) for Passover... and then I was asked to make a birthday cake. Ugh! How do you make a good Kosher-for-Passover birthday cake?! So naturally I had to turn to my two baking experts who can hopefully save me from a disastrous dessert and make my sister-in-law feel special at the same time! TIA Orna

REPLY

Hi Bhavna,
"The Cake Bible" has been revised for the chocolate base batter. What do you show for the butter?
Also the water is the same. In RHC we decided it would be better to list the water to boil for the coca as its own ingredient versus the previous listing of water as divided for boiling an used from the tap. This was to avoid someone boiling all of the water or just miscalculating how to divide it.
We always recommend weighing versus measuring by volume. This eliminates problems that can happen from making sure flour is sifted, or spooned lightly, or dip and sweep in exactly the same manner every time. With weighing, you can simply scoop it into the bowl on the scale.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Woody,

Thanks for the quick reply!
Yes I did use the bleached cake flour. Only difference I made between 6" and 13 by 9 is that I didn't shift the flour while baking 6".

The reason I asked about the difference between cake bible and RHC recipe is because there is difference in calculation of butter and oil (its less) and than rose has added some plain water to the beaten eggs, in RHC recipes . So was wondering :)

Do you think that would make a difference in the structure of the cake ? I m also wondering about baking powder ,could that be the factor ?

As advised I will try the cake with bleached all purpose.

Best regards
Bhavna

REPLY

Hi Susan,
Some schools that we have known from the past to have good pastry classes:
Institute of Culinary Education. (ICE)
Culinary Institute of America at Hyde Park (CIA)
International Culinary Center (formerly FCI)
Le Cordon Bleu.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hi Bhavna,
The RHC cake is the same as a double recipe of the Basic Chocolate Cake batter with the addition of the oil.
Are using bleached cake flour?
If the 6 inch is successful, the 13 by 9 should as well. You could try comparing the texture of the 6 inch with bleached all-purpose flour to the cake flour.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Hello,

I would like to make a lemon or lime cake. I have been uses method, reverse creaming for a while and would like to continue using it for this cake.
Can I simply just replace some of the milk with lemon juice and add zest? Or can I keep the milk as is and add the lemon juice as a bit extra liquid?

Thank you.

REPLY

Hello!

If one wants to omit pecan/walnuts from Barcelona bars,what would be the substitute for it?does the recipe require any other alterations?

Thanks

REPLY

Dear Rose and Woody,

Hello from Singapore ! I have been baking your cake recipes without much of a issue using cake bible wonderful rose factor chart. Recently first time I baked sheet cake in 13 by 9 inch pan. I converted basic chocolate cake recipe except added 1/4 oil instead of all butter.

Cake turn out well rising 1.75 inches tall in 2" high pan, but at the time of cutting the cake itself was very crumbly. I could slice the cake but in the process too many crumbs were sticking to the knife or falling all over the cake board.

Recently I followed on your baking powder blog, (I use rumford) so I was careful to fluff the baking powder before weighing it. I used cake flour and shift it before making the batter.
I had filled the cake with milk chocolate ganache and frosted with chocolate mousseline.

I had baked the same cake in 6" round and it was superb.

What do you think have gone wrong ?

I would also like to know the difference between this recipe and chocolate cake recipe in RHC on page no. 104.

Would highly appreciate your analysis.

Best regards
Bhavna

REPLY

I'm a teacher who loves to bake cakes with special icings. I am not good at decorating and I'm terribly inefficient. My friends and family and co-workers love my cakes, and I've learned a lot from the cake bible and a couple other cookbooks I live by. I'd like to start a small business, out of my home, just small to medium special occasions cakes. My question is where (anywhere in US) can I learn to bake and decorate with high quality and efficiency? Thank you

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Beth
04/ 2/2017 01:46 PM

Beth, so glad to hear you will be trying them out. even the combi oven--bake a cake in it. nathan myrvold in his baking book mentioned that they are not all that even. maybe they've improved since then. and then are small. do let us know your final decision!!!

REPLY

Thank you so much for your reply! I do have product demos scheduled and intend to explore the possibility of trying out the ovens myself prior to making the decision. It really is a life long commitment! It's helpful to know that you feel the ice cube/cast iron pan is perfectly effective as that allows the steam assist feature in the standard convection to be "nice to have" rather than an absolute in my decision making. The combi-steam oven is still high on my list for the multiple functions...my friend has one and just loves it.

Thanks again. Love your books and your blog. Hope to meet you one day.

Beth

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Beth
04/ 2/2017 11:24 AM

Beth, i have never used a combi oven but have tasted meat made it in which was amazingly juicy.

i find that the ice cube/cast iron pan method for steaming bread is perfectly effective. Thomas Keller uses a big water gun which i've been tempted to get but haven't because i really don't need it.

as for ovens, some show rooms may actually let you try baking in the oven. it's the only way you really can know how well they bake. buying a new oven is close to a life-time commitment so worth doing this. years ago i drove 4 hours each way to try out the gaggenau and also to sharp in NJ to try out their microwave convection oven. i used it for years and did not replace it with another sharp because i've heard that their quality is no longer what it was. miele, near princeton has a great showroom and their ovens have an excellent reputation. but i have to say there's no way i would ever again recommend any oven because the models are constantly changing so the only way you can know for sure is to try it yourself. it also helps to look at reviews on line.

REPLY

I am embarking on a kitchen remodel and am researching appliances. I have been looking at combi steam ovens (full steam functionality but only capable of 425 degrees as an oven and smaller than a standard oven) but have also found full size ovens with "steam assist" function to allow for bursts of steam. I was sold on the combi steam oven until I found the standard oven with steam assist. I understand the combi steam oven is used for much more than baking; however my question is in regard to baking. Do you have any experience with these appliances and are they with the extra expense to have the steam function built in as opposed to the usual home method of ice cubes or hot water at the beginning to produce steam? Also, more generally, are the high end ovens like Wolf or Miele worth the expense? I have been baking on a pretty low end range for years with good results but I have the opportunity to upgrade. Any advice would be appreciated.

Thank you!
Beth

REPLY

Thank you Rose, Now I understand your instruction. I made every effort to follow the recipe, weighing the flour and using Pillsbury all purpose. But, I may have made a mistake. (shrug) Once they were browned they were very moist and light. I have only owned your book for a few weeks and I'm fairly new to baking - 3 months. The Heart of Wheat bread is fantastic.
Bill

REPLY

Hi Susan,
Since we do not have this recipe in our repertoire, we always recommend that you should make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients and following the instructions as stated in the author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website .
I only glanced at the first couple of recipes that came on a Google search which did not go that high with the syrup.
However, experimentation is one of the best learning tools for recipes. Try making a small batch and adapt from the results.
You can also post on the Forums section for others in the international baking community to give their comments.
Rose & Woody

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from William Brown
03/29/2017 04:31 PM

William, if you are not using dry milk powder in the DOUGH you can replace the water in the SPONGE with milk which it is advisable to scald. scalding means bringing it to the boiling point when little bubbles form around the edges. some people don't bother with this step but it ensures killing the enzyme that would slow down yeast development.

there is enough liquid using either water or milk to make a sponge using the amount of flour called for in the sponge. i'm wondering if you are not weighing the ingredients and may be using more flour than was intended. if you measure rather than weigh, and use the dip and sweep method, be sure to stir up the flour first as it may have settled. if you are using a flour other than the brands specified it may have a higher protein content and will therefore absorb more water or milk and need extra. the good thing about bread is that you can always adjust as necessary.

REPLY

Susan Potenzano
Susan Potenzano in reply to comment from woody
03/29/2017 04:21 PM

In Rose's Cake Bible, she states the combination of sugar and corn syrup at boiling will be 238 degrees. When making marshmallow frosting by whipping egg whites with a sugar syrup brought to a temperature of 242, I was wondering of the corn syrup combination would produce the same results as making the sugar syrup. It's just as easier process if the results are the same. Thank you.

REPLY

Hi Susan,
We have not tested the Marshmallow Icing, which website recipes appear to show that the egg white sugar syrup is heated but not to beyond boiling as we do for a sugar syrup for a buttercream.
You could experiment with making an Italian meringue and while it is hot add some marshmallow cream.
Rose & Woody

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William Brown
William Brown
03/29/2017 03:27 PM

I wonder if you would clear up an ambiguity in the recipe for English Muffins: The Bread Bible. Page 168, The ingredients in the flour mixture refer to "the water with the scalded milk that has been cooled to lukewarm).

There is no reference to scalding milk in the directions. The sponge was so dry (using only the 3/4 cup water and butter) that it was impossible to form a dough without adding water. I added a few tablespoons but the dough was still very very thick. Thank you. Willima

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Susan Potenzano
Susan Potenzano
03/29/2017 12:06 PM

Can I use your method of sugar syrup used in Neoclassic buttercream to make Marshmallow icing?

REPLY

Stephanie ( anonymous )
Stephanie ( anonymous ) in reply to comment from woody
03/28/2017 09:46 PM

Thank you. I've been there.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
03/26/2017 05:04 PM

PS, Ann: here is some more information about dry milk powder:

Unlike "instant" dry milk, which is intended to be reconstituted and processed at low heat, the "Baker's Special Dry Milk" is heated during production to a high enough temperature to deactivate the enzyme protease, which impairs yeast production and, what is most critical, gluten formation and structure. This variety of dry milk will not reconstitute in liquid so it must be added to the flour.

The high heat process also produces an exceptionally fine powder, which disperses uniformly through the dry ingredients. Because the particles are so much finer than the more crystalline ones of "instant dry milk," they pack down when measuring in a cup so if replacing "Baker's Special Dry Milk" with "instant" dry milk by volume you will need double the amount to arrive at the same weight.

REPLY

Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ann
03/26/2017 04:58 PM

Ann,

i would encourage you to order the baker's special dry milk from king arthur. refrigerated it keeps for years! it results in a a smoother more mellow flavor and significantly higher rise. if you prefer to use the full fat dry milk you have there is no adjustment needed.

re the plastic wrap. a tea towel to cover the bowl is fine for say an hour but longer i think you should cover it more tightly.

REPLY

Hi Anonymous,
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in sugar free, dairy free, gluten free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes or contact them for substitution recommendations as these are not our dedicated genre of baking. Rose has several listed linked sites under SITES I LIKE including: Fran Costigan (vegan cooking), Bitter Sweet Vegan Blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, and Go Dairy Free.
Rose & Woody

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In making your BAsic Soft White Sandwich Loaf from "The Bread Bible", I do have a couple of questions -

dry milk, preferably nonfat -- I keep full fat dry milk in my cupboard for my cocoa mix, do I need to adjust the recipe if I use the full fat dry milk?

plastic wrap -- I do not keep plastic wrap in my house at all. Typically when I need to over a bowl, I just use a lid or lay a tea towel over it. My mixing bowl doesn't have a lid, so would the tea towel be enough? In other words, does it need a truly air tight covering?

Thank you
Ann

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Hi
I hope this is ok to ask in this forum. I am just now reading your "Baking Bible" and have discovered the cause of a problem I frequently have, on one of the first pages. I often, lately, makes cakes and cupcakes that sink in the middle. I agree that my issue is likely too much leavening, as I have a requirement to make them gluten free, egg free and dairy free. The easiest egg replacement recipe I have found, a vegan recipe, requires baking powder that is additional to what is required in the recipe. We can't do any nut or seed replaces so I am a little lost. I want realistic cake, with unrealistic ingredients. That's not asking too much is it? 😘

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Hi jean,
the webmaster is looking into the Forums registering problem. It may take some time.
Rose & Woody

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hi

sorry for being a pain. but still cant get on the forum. i register for newsletter with no problem ,but forum they cant do. it is the same email as you have now and the newsletter ......i have wrote number of replies back to who ever is handling the forum,but get same response ,first told account waiting for approval and now cant use the email provided. what is going on? how is it possible you get my email and the newsletter department but not the forum? Again SAME e mail. thanks

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Hi NaomiN,
We do not have a Kolacky recipe in our repertoire, but have seen several by others on the web. We do have this posting:
Yeast Conversion
Apr 04, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose in Ingredients

As this question comes up with great frequency, here's a second posting with a little more information on converting different types of yeast.

To convert fresh cake yeast to instant yeast, for 1 packed tablespoon/0.75 ounce cake yeast use 2 teaspoons instant yeast or 2-1/2 teaspoons active dry

1 teaspoon instant (aka instant active dry)=1-1/4 teaspoons active dry or 1-1/2 packed teaspoons fresh cake yeast

1 teaspoon of instant yeast or active dry yeast=3.2 grams

If that may help. We saw one recipe that used 4 cups of flour and 2 packets of active yeast.

You may also want to post your question on the Forums for our community of baking bloggers to offer suggestions.
Rose & Woody

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Help. I found my deceased mom's old recipe for Kolacky. It says to use: one small cake yeast. (there are 4 cups flour in the recipe)
I've read some of the blog entries, but I'm kind of dense and I don't know how much of the yeast cake to use. I've already purchased one I found. It is Red Star's 2 oz. cake of yeast.
Pls....may I have a simple answer? Thanks in advance........

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ian
03/16/2017 02:05 PM

Ian, the most unshrinking pastry i know is my favorite flaky and tender cream cheese pie crust. it's in the baking bible, pie and pastry bible, and also on this site if you but it in the search engine.

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I'm having trouble creating an empanada dough that's not elastic. Not
elastic!?! you're probably thinking. Why would anyone want that?
Here's my problem. I'm using two dough recipes for my empanadas. One
similar to a pizza dough for savoury fillings and one similar to a pie
crust for sweet fillings. Everything about them is perfect except that they shrink first when I'm stuffing the empanadas and then again when they're baking. The
shrinking causes my edge to completely disappear and also allows the fillings to burst through the seam in the oven to make a hot mess. How can I solve this
problem?

REPLY

Hi jean,
It can also be your Spam filters. The webmaster will send an email when you sign up for the Newsletter or Forum that has a link to activate your account. Make sure to check your Spam mailbox for the activation email.
Rose & Woody

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Hi jean,
With how to slice a cake, we will give instructions with specific recipes. Such as 'with a sharp straight edge knife heated with hot water and wiped dry" for cutting through a ganache and spongy cake. Or for cheesecakes, we generally recommend using dental floss to cut through the cake and pulling it out one side.
Rose & Woody

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i have done evey thing you said still can not get on..could you help me or have some one send me a email. you have my email thanks

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Hi elizabeth,
Yes. You can convert the sour cream cake with the Rose factor in "The Cake Bible" as a guide to make your various sizes. The full fat sour cream will give you a denser cake and better flavor. We also have a cream cheese cake in "The Baking Bible", which is our densest butter cake without incorporating ground nuts. We have not tried making it as a 15 inch round layer.
Rose & Woody

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Hi. I made the sour cream cake and it was awesome. I do have a question. I am thinking about making this cake for a wedding cake. 15", 12". 9" and 6". When I made the 9", it came out good but I am looking for it to be a little more dense. I did realize I used "light" sour cream instead of full flavor. Do you think this makes a difference or recommend another cake that is a little more dense for wedding cake? I also made the golden butter cake but it was too soft and crumbly.

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Hi jean,
For registering, you may need to clear out your web browser cookies, cache, or past history to be able to register.
You may also want to try using Google Chrome as a web browser
Rose & Woody

REPLY

that would be great,but for some reason every time i try to register they say my email is not correct. been trying for two days and still get same response. how do i get past this

REPLY

Hi randall,
We suggest that you post this on the Forums section, which will give your request more visibility for our international baking community to give suggestions to this subject.
Rose & Woody

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Hi jean,
Depending on the type of cake, the frosting, the thickness, one may have a preference on what works best for slicing a cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,

thanks for the help. I have one other question, why would you cut a cake slice with back of knife blade angled up a little when you cut a slice of cake. Is there a reason for doing a angle cut down to slice cake vs straight down and no angle. i been looking through books and things and can not find a answer. Sure hope you can help me.Thanks

REPLY

Hi jean,
We would say that it is just a matter of preference and/or what surface the cake is on.
Rose & Woody

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hi
When you cut cake for slices ,you know when you cut down to bottom to remove slice,well i seen where people bring their knife straight out towards the body and seen others bring knife angled up some and out when they remove knife. Both done with serrated knifes and cake knifes and chef knife too. would you know why or when you would do either of the those actions ....straight out to body to remove knife or angled up some knife to remove knife. Thanks in advance.

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Is there some baking expert, whom would sign a non-disclosure, non-compete agreement who can assist with product developments, i.e., substitution ingredients, ph level attainment, etc.

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Hi marion,
Have you confirmed that your self raising flour is the equivalent to what you used in England?
You may need to adjust the baking powder to compensate for a difference.
Have you tried converting some your recipes to using all purpose flour and baking powder?
As far as high altitude baking, Rose gives some recommendations in her books on high altitude baking. However, since we both do not live at high altitudes, we also recommend these four sources for more extensive recommendations:
1. Susan Purdy’s “Pie in the Sky: Successful baking at High Altitude”
and her website “High Altitude Baking” linked on our SITES I LIKE.
2. Letty Holloran Flatt’s “ The Chocolate Snowball: And Other Fabulous Pastries From Deer Valley Resort”
3. General Mill’s website for Baking Crocker & Baking at High Altitudes
4. USDA’s website for recommendations

We also suggest to look at Craftsy's website as their baking and cooking kitchens are located in Denver, CO.
Rose & Woody

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I have lived in canada 17 years but my british cake recipes dont do very well. Do i need to adjust ingredients, or temperature.
i use self raising flour in my cake recipes for doesnt seem to rise here.
I know the sea level is higher in Alberta so wondered if I need to adjust temperature. Can you help thank you

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Thanks Woody, I likely over-mixed the batter because I didn't hear my timer go off at first. It wasn't much longer, but it did make a big difference! It is good to know that reducing the baking soda wasn't the problem.

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Hi Laura,
From our experience, the reducing of the baking soda should not have caused the air bubbles. It may have been from a difference in mixing time, or something accidentally mis-measured.
Rose & Woody

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The first time I baked the Down Home Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake in a 9- x 2-inch round cake pan, it domed just a bit and cracked a little on top around the edges when I left the baking soda at 2 teaspoons, even though I wrapped the pan with a Wilton Bake-Even Strip. The second time I made the cake, using the same pan wrapped in a bake-even strip, I reduced the baking soda to 1 3/4 teaspoons plus 1/8 teaspoon and the cake baked up level and the top didn't crack, but it had a lot of air bubbles on top and within. I thought the first cake’s interior structure looked better. I baked both cakes for 30 minutes. Do you think reducing the baking soda caused the air bubbles, or would there be another cause? Thanks!

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Thank you so much for the response - will do!

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Hi Orna,
We always recommend that you make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences.
A texture component of these meringues is the soft crunch from the whole pecans. The hardness of even finely chopped hazelnuts may detract.
We suggest making a small batch with the pecans, hazelnut gelato, and Nutella ganache first to see if you like the combination.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose & Woody,

I came across your praline pecan meringue ice cream sandwiches and thought they would make a wonderful passover dessert. But I'm wondering if they would work with hazelnuts instead of pecans (chopped fine and course) and a hazelnut gelato filling and drizzled with a Nutella ganache. I was hoping to get your feedback before investing the $$ and time. Thanks so much as always! Orna

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Thank you for your reply! Laura

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Hi Roxann,
Knowing how your oven performs is a key to successful baking. If your oven bakes with top and lower elements, that might explain why your oven is baking some recipes in a shorter amount of time.
As far as ingredients, we suggest to always check you baking powder for its leavening power if it is older than one year or the marked expiration date. If you use cornstarch as a baking ingredient, we suggest that you look at our posting "Nouvelle Génoise (Repair)". We found a major difference in results when using an organic cornstarch versus a name brand GMO cornstarch.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Laura,
We suggest making the batter with slightly less baking soda and baking it in a 9 x 2 inch round pan. Your baking time will also be longer, which we suggest that you start checking at 30 minutes. You may want to look at the Sour Cream Butter Cake on page 35 and the Golden Almond Cake on page 37, which use 9 x 2 pans and have similar amounts for their ingredients.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks for your reply. Will try blueberries!

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Thank you for your reply. Yes, it is more scientific curiosity than anything else, as baking is by nature precise. (It has been said this is why it appeals to me.) No dark pans or convection ovens here. And most of my recipes provide instructions as to the location of the rack. I am wondering if perhaps the composition of ingredients has changed over the years. If so, that might explain the difference in baking times for older recipes.....or not!

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"Everything I bake is done in less time than the recipe states"

Dark pans, placement in the oven, convection.

Stuff is done when it's done, so if you're getting good results, I wouldn't worry about it, except in the spirit of scientific curiosity.

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I have a general question: : Everything I bake is done in less time than the recipe states. I have an oven thermometer and I check it prior to placing the pan in the oven. I get consistent results (the setting versus the thermometer), Some of the recipes are old (which I initially thought my be the reason---although I could not guess why), but others are not. It is making me a little nervous every time I put something in the oven! Can you think of any reason why this is happening?
Thank you.

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Hi,

I have a question:

To bake the Down-Home Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake (page 64 The Cake Bible) using either a 8- or 9-inch by 2-inch deep round pan, should I decrease the baking soda any? This recipe does not contain baking powder.

Thanks,
Laura

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Hi Libby,
If possible, we recommend refrigerating the cake unfrosted and wrapped airtight, and stored in the refrigerator. Store the buttercream separately in the refrigerator, unless you can make the buttercream the morning of serving the cake. Let both warm up to room temperature for four hours before frosting and applying the nuts.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Ritu,
You can substitute the almonds as instructed for the walnuts. We have not tried using sliced strawberries as they usually get too mushy and can turn gray when baked in as a filling. We used blueberries in "The Baking Bible" instead of apples. However, they were strewn on the top of the cake halfway thru baking, then the crumb topping applied over them.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,
I want to make the Sicilian Pistachio cake from Rose's Heavenly Cakes. Can you make it 3 days ahead before serving? Do you have to refrigerate it or can you leave it out in an air tight container for 3 days?

Thanks so much!
Libby

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Hi!

In apple crumb cake, from the heavenly cakes book, is it possible to substitute walnuts with almonds and apples with strawberries?
Would appreciate it very much if you could please guide me on this
Thanks

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from John
02/27/2017 12:51 PM

hi John,

for a firmer filling chill the pie for a few hours before serving. re the crust, after shaping it into a disc try pulling it a little to see if it is a bit stretchy. that way it will definitely hold together on baking. if it isn't knead a bit more. also, if you are not using a national brand all-purpose flour, or a pastry flour, the protein content will probably be lower and will be much more tender meaning it may not hold together well.

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Hi Rose,

I made the lemon meringue pie from your cookbook using your basic flaky pie crust recipe. It was delicious, but fell apart upon serving. I am a TOTAL novice but would like to learn. The dough held together nicely when I rolled it out but broke easily when I served. The filling, while thick, was not firm. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
John

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Hi Anna,
We ask how much batter are you placing in each liner?
We suggest 45-50 grams, which will fill the standard liners two-thirds to three-quarters full. You may wan to experiment with filling some half full as well.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I have the same problem everytime I make the Downy Yellow cupcakes from the Cake Bible. I do not know what I am doing wrong, but the cupcakes overflow like crazy. The overflow is so bad, that the surface of the pan is totally covered! Please help me, the cupcakes taste fantastic but look like mistakes!

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Hi Anna,
Rose has various recipes for caramel for sauces, glazes, toffee, and as an addition to frostings in her books. Details are given for the visual appearance, temperature, tips, troubleshooting notes, etc. However, we do not have a dedicated chapter for just caramel.
Rose & Woody

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Anna Richter
Anna Richter
02/24/2017 07:34 AM

Do any of Rose Beranbaum's books have a discussion of caramel frostings and glazes? I am frustrated with my hit or miss results and would like a comprehensive explanation-a book would be great-on cooking caramel.

Thanks,
Anna

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Thank you so much!
I look forward to experimenting with this. I appreciate your expertise on subbing white for brown sugar.

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Hi Rebecca,
We always recommend that you make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. You may also want to experiment past what you think is the best results to fail the recipe so that you know the recipe's limits, and contact the author for her/his advise.
You can also post a picture on the Forums section for others in the baking community to give their comments. If it is one of Rose's recipes, be sure to include that information.
1. yes. you can substitute any liquor or extract for vanilla
you could try replacing a bit of the milk, after you see how just replacing the vanilla
2. we suggest by weight to try a 3:1 sugar: brown sugar ratio
you may find that you need to adjust the leavening
Rose & Woody

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Hello.
I apologize for the questions. I am learning lots here. I was curious if the White Velvet cake can handle substitutions:

1. In liquid. I would like to replace the vanilla for bourbon and possibly a little bit of the milk for some extra bourbon as well.

2. Sugars. I would like to add in some brown sugar, maybe a 2/3 brown sugar and 1/3 white sugar (by ratio of weight, not cups)

With your knowledge do you think this would be suitable to attempt or would it fail immediately?

thanks

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Thank you :)
Great to know. Rose has a Craftsy class for cookies and chocolate? Would she ever do one for her cakes? I would be the first to buy it.

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Hi Linda,
That is a giant pan holding 24 cups compared to most tube pans holding 16 cups.
Who is the manufacturer?
Have you checked with the manufacturer, since many of them supply recipes with their pans and on their websites?
If you are making angel food or chiffon cakes, you can likely just increase the amount of batter stated for a standard tube pan from 25 to 33%. With chiffon cakes, you should slightly decrease the leavening in proportion to the other ingredients.
We would suggest experimenting with angel food batters first since egg whites are the sole leavening component.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Dora,
Are you using one of Rose's recipes?
Since angel food cakes use only egg whites, which should not have an eggy smell, are you using fresh egg whites?
For our recipes we state that an angel food cake will rise almost 2 inches above the pan and then shrink to be almost level with the rim. A cake tester should come out clean, the cake should spring back when lightly pressed near the center. The cake should then be set enough to suspend it several inches above a countertop in a draft free area.
Because angel food cakes are by nature very sweet, we frequently fold in finely ground unsweetened chocolate after the last addition of flour mixture.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rebecca,
The Chocolate Layer Cake benefits from the addition of oil due to the drier texture that chocolate can give to cake batters. We did try adding oil to the Downy Yellow and the White Velvet Cake, but found the addition was not as desirable.
The taller cake in Rose's Heavenly Cakes is due to the decrease baking powder. For single layer cakes, we generally engineer our cakes to be domed, and engineered to be flat for layer cakes.
We suggest that you try experimenting with adding oil to see what is your preference.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rebecca,
From our experience, taller cakes require slightly less baking powder in proportion to the other ingredients.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Pat Rucker
02/21/2017 09:58 AM

Pat, i suggest lightly whipping the crème fraîche and then using a whisk, fold it into the italian meringue.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Adriaan
02/21/2017 09:52 AM

Adrian, it's sour dough starter that has the consistency of biscuit dough. after feeding it on a regular basis (i feed mine once a week) i store the excess in the freezer and defrost it when ready to use it to enhance the flavor and texture of bread.

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I want ta ask what the "old stiff starter" is in the Challa recipe?

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Hello Rose or Woody, I have attempted angel food cake and I have a couple issues I cannot find the answers to and I am hoping you can help. My first issue is that the top part of the cake is shrinking away from the pan as it is cooling, it is not falling out when inverted but shrinking quite a bit. Also, the cake tastes very good but there is a very noticeable eggy smell that is quite off putting. Please help if you can, I love making this from scratch as there are no artificial ingredients but I don't notice that eggy smell with a store bought angel food cake. Thanks so much...Dora

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Hello,

I received an 11.5"X11"x6" (6Quart) Tube cake pan as a gift. Where would I find recipes to fill this giant?

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Hi,
I think that I'd like to try creme fraiche in italian meringue (not butter creme)
When and how is the best way to add that?

Thank anyone in advance for his/her time :)
Pat

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I was reading the comments under the Chocolate Layer Cake with Caramel Ganache and I see that some oil was added to create a more moist cake with a finer crumb and higher cake. Could this be done with the White Velvet as well?

Thank you :)

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Thanks so much. I am a hobby baker so I was just looking to save time. I appreciate the knowledgeable response. I'll play around with the recipe. Do taller layers require more or less baking powder?

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Hi Rebecca,
We purposely do not write recipes for layers taller than 2 inch, because of the problems with making an evenly textured and evenly baked cake. However, for your wanting a slightly higher than 2 inch baked cakes before leveling, Nordicware makes a slightly taller than 2 inch pan or use a 2-1/2 inch springform pan.
You should be able to adapt Rose's base recipes and baking powder to make taller layers.
We prefer not to use 3 inch tall pans for baking 2 inch high cakes, because the side walls of the pans can reflect to over bake the tops of the cakes .
Rose & Woody

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Hello.

First of, I love your books and recipes. I love tall cakes and want 4 inches of cake (Four 1-inch layers). I just bought 2 inch pans to see how they back compared to the 3 inch pans I was using. Is there any way to be able to bake 2 layers that end up with a tad more than 2 inches each (a tad more so I can level and shave off caramelization).

When I baked in 3 inch pans, I noticed that the sides were shrinking but center wasn't baked yet. I was doing 1.5x recipe (not base recipe) though in 8-inch pans. I was considering trying a heating rod.

I thought I would ask the experts for advice.
Thanks

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Hi Luù,
For proper baking, there should be at least 1 inch on sides of the cake pan and 2 inches between the pan and heating elements.
Rose & Woody

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Thượng Giang Lưu
Thượng Giang Lưu
02/17/2017 09:31 AM

Dear Mrs.Rose,
when I came to Europe, I thought that I would be blessed, because a big oven is something needed in every apartment in Germany. They work well in spite of a touch of temperature's inaccuracy. Unfortunately, I have to move to a new and quite small apartment, in which this kind of big oven doesn't fit. The only one, which is suitable, is a mini 24L oven.
The standard round cake pan in Germany is 5x26 cm, and luckily it just fits the 24L oven. The problem is, I don't know if the cake with this pan can be baked properly or not.
I'm looking forward to your advice (and also your new book in 2018)

Thank you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
02/11/2017 05:07 PM

By the way, if making the rye bread and not using La Cloche you might want to lower the oven temperature to 375˚F if you find it is browning too quickly. the 25˚F higher is a general rule but may vary depending on the bread and your oven.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DFahl
02/11/2017 04:55 PM

DFahl, no one has ever noticed this before but i'm not surprised you were the one who did based of the precision of your question. i really appreciate knowing the page numbers.

i had to read the book pages several times to be sure and then checked the equipment section, page 578 under Pointers For Success Using La cloche Bread Bakers: Raise the baking temperature given by 25 degrees! i'll have to submit this little correction for the next printing.

So when using La Cloche, preheat the oven to 425˚F and then lower it to 400˚F.

thank you so much and also for your lovely appreciative comments much appreciated!

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Sorry I meant The BREAD Bible.

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Dear Mr. Wolston or Mrs. Beranbaum

Hi again I have another question about the Pumpernickel Bread recipe from the Baking Bible. As I tend to read a recipe a few times before starting it I have become a bit stuck on a direction. On page 333 Step 8 paragraph 3 it reads: "Bake for 10 minutes lower the temperature to 400[...]"

My problem is that in step seven the directions state the oven should be preheated to 400. I assume from reading all of step 8 that I am to lower the oven to 375 as that is the step when the bread is not being made in a La Cloche. However, I wanted to be certain before I make a fumble.

I am using a cloche for the recipe.

Thanks again for the wonderful work my family and neighbors have loved everything that comes out of your many books.

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Hi Tonia,
Enjoy experimenting.
Maybe a quarter teaspoon of baking soda and decrease the baking powder by 1/2 teaspoon.
Rose & Woody

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Hi John,
What we do on most countertops is wipe the countertop with a water moistened washcloth. Then draw your doughmat up over the edge of the countertop and slide it over the moistened countertop.
This should create a suction to hold the mat in place.
If not, then tape the corners with painter's masking tape.
Enjoy it, we used ours just yesterday.
Rose & Woody

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HI:
This is not really a cooking question, but I was looking at your site and I noticed you use a Magic Dough mat. Does it stick down on it's own or must I do something to it first. I got one as a present and I like it but it moves and I cannot find any information on it other that it exist.
Thank You

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Hi,

Thanks for the feedback. How would you go about adding baking soda to Roses recipe?

Thanks

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Hi Tonia,
Sugar cane for mass production can be In a liquid form, which could influence the texture of the cookie. The baking soda could contribute to more aeration for the cookie.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose,

Thank you for your wonderful books and for making Christmas time always so special, when it comes to that time of year and I sit down with a cup of tea and flip through my copy of Rose's Christmas Cookies book. Thank you so much for instilling in me a passion for the art of baking.

i have a question about a particular cookie that I know you would be the perfect person to ask - I am so thankful for this blog!

I have made your kourambiethes many times and love the recipe, however, I was recently gifted a box of kourambiethes that were just divine and I'd like to work out how to make them. The ingredients are as follows:

Butter, Roasted Almonds, Wheat Flour, Sugar Cane, Sugar, Egg, Water, Vanilla, Bi carb of soda and baking powder.

These particular cookies are very aerated on the inside (some of the cookies have noticeable holes in them) and are golden on the outside and quite crunchy at first bite. They are also very smooth in appearance (in contrast, the cookies from your recipe produce a somewhat cracked edge once baked). I'd also like to know the difference between sugar cane and sugar and the role that might play in the final product. As well as the addition of bi carbonate of soda and what the addition of that leavening agent would have on the overall texture of the cookie.

Thank you very much.

Best, as always,
Tonia

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Hi Jennie and Sally,
We do not have an actual Anne of Queens Torte recipe, but we have chocolate cake recipes and a frosting that you can use for the components.
If you want an oil based chocolate cake which we saw for two online recipes, we would suggest our Deep Chocolate Passion cake that we use for our German Chocolate Cake in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and the Double Damage in "The Baking Bible".
If you want an butter/oil based chocolate cake which we saw for two online recipes, we would suggest our Chocolate Layer Cake in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes".
In all of Rose's books with cake recipes, we have a wide range of butter based chocolate cakes.
For a substitute for the standard cream cheese/powdered sugar frosting, we recommend the White Chocolate Cream Cheese frosting in "The Cake Bible", which is also the Dreamy Creamy White Chocolate frosting in "Roses Heavenly Cakes".
We find that powder sugar frosting have a grittiness, which the white chocolate frosting does not.
Enjoy composing your own Anne of Queens Torte.
Rose & Woody

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Sally Elias Keszey
Sally Elias Keszey in reply to comment from Jennie
02/ 6/2017 07:22 AM

You must have been watching the same show I was on TV last night! I also googled Anne of Cleves torte and found nothing

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Do you have a recipe for Anne of Cleve's torte?

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woodywolston
woodywolston in reply to comment from DFahl
01/31/2017 02:28 PM

Hi DFahl,
King Arthur Flour is the only nationwide source that we know.
You can easily make both caramel powder and caramel color. Caramel powder from King Arthur is caramelized and then pulverized corn syrup. Most caramel powder recipes are simply caramelized and then pulverized sugar, although some recipes may add oil and salt. The Bread in 5 website by the Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes authors has a recipe for caramel color.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Mrs. Beranbaum,

I adore your cook books and helpful tools. I recently was given The Bread Bible and I want to try and make the Pumpernickel bread (pgs. 329-334). It looks like the perfect bread for my Aunts.

However, I am currently stymied the recipe calls for Caramel Powder or Caramel Color and I cant seem to find this product anywhere. King Arthur Flour is out of stock and has been for a long while. I have been searching other places with little luck. Is there a replacement or fix or trusted place to get this particular ingredient?

Thank you for your time and all your hard work!

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woodywolston
woodywolston in reply to comment from Rose
01/28/2017 01:37 PM

Rose,
We do not having grain free coconut flour breads in our repertoire for breads.
Sounds like the cider vinegar may have lowered the pH which the acidity may have changed the color.
We always recommend that you should make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients and following the instructions as stated in author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe, which it sounds like you did. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
You can also post a picture on the Forums section for others in the international baking community to give their comments.
Rose & Woody

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Anonymous in reply to comment from Amy
01/28/2017 01:31 PM

Hi Amy,
We ask you how you define "deflates".
Most butter & oil cake tops will lower a certain amount as they cool in their pans before you unfold them. Depending on the author's intentions for the cake's top, the author will usually have the leavening set to achieve it. We prefer a flat as possible top for a two layer cake, and slightly a rounded top for a single layer cake. Our cakes will typically have the center area lowering from a quarter to a half an inch. The sides can also lower slightly.
Sponge cakes, like chiffons and angel food cakes, need to "deflate" slightly at the end of baking to set the cake, and many times noted by the author as a signal that the cake is done.
As a guideline in "The Cake Bible" Rose stated the height for each finished cake recipe, as the book, like most baking books in those years, did not have pictures of most every recipe for examples.
Rose & Woody

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I made grain free coconut flour bread today using a dark in color echo secrets loaf pan. The recipe calls for coconut flour golden flax seed butter eggs and 1 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar. The egg whites were folded into the bread mixture. I put parchment paper on the bottom of the pan as directed and lined the rest of the pan with butter. After baking, the bottom 1+ inch of the loaf had turned bluish, yet the parchment paper was still white, leading me to believe that it was not the pan. Any ideas on how this could've happened?

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Can Lactaide milk. be used to replace whole milk in bread receipes?

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Hi. I have a question regarding baking a cake from scratch. Every time we bake, and we follow the directions EXACTLY, the minute we take it out of the oven it falls. It can look beautiful and nicely rounded on the top but immediately "deflates" when removed from the oven. Of course it always tastes good, but it is frustrating. Any ideas? Thanks.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Frank
01/27/2017 11:42 AM

Frank, please see the understanding on page 314 which explains why i give it a 4 hour room temperature rise instead of an overnight one. the basic hearth bread can be baked the same day as mixing it but i much prefer the flavor when given an overnight rise. i do say that the dough starter should sit at room temperature for 1 to 4 hours but is the minimum!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Sally Elias Keszey
01/27/2017 11:35 AM

thank you Sally for your feedback. and i love knowing about the strudel!

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Hello! When I first got The Bread Bible, the first loaf I made was the Basic Hearth Bread. After that, I moved onto the next loaf in the book, Heart of Wheat Bread. In Step 2 for Basic Hearth Bread, the instructions say to "...allow to ferment for 1 to 4 hours...", while Step 2 in Heart of Wheat Bread says to "...allow it to ferment for 4 hours..."

These loafs are very similar in many respects. Was this difference intentional? Does something about the makeup/ingredients of the Heart of Wheat Bread require the sponge to ferment the full 4 hours, rather than less?

Thanks in advance for your answers.

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Thank you for your response! Today I am making the croissants to your exact specifications just so I can get an idea of what it should "feel" like before I try to alter it. And so far -- just as you suggested-- it has been the easiest dough to roll out. Its interesting that you mentioned a higher protein flour -- I was just thinking to myself that this is the first time I haven't used some quantity of bread flour and yet the dough has been very cooperative.

Next time I will try rolling it then refrigerating overnight before shaping it. Thanks again. And BTW, your strudel was the most successful one I have ever made. You have turned me into a cult follower!

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Sally, here's another idea: instead of allowing the dough to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes wrap it well and refrigerate it overnight or until you are ready to proceed with the recipe.

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Sally, i think it would work well to store the refrigerated dough overnight before shaping so that you could bake them in the morning for breakfast.

the benefit of allowing the dough to rest and begin to rise before rolling it and making the dough package is that it strengthens it without having to add a higher protein flour which i find makes it tough.

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Sally Elias Keszey
Sally Elias Keszey
01/25/2017 09:24 PM

I recently purchased the Pie and Pastry Bible and I'm trying your recipe for croissants. Other recipes I have used for croissants always have the first proofing after the four turns. I am curious as to why you proof the dough the first time before you complete the turns. The main reason I ask is because with your method it is very difficult to have croissants for breakfast. So I'm wondering if I can do a 30 minute rest after making the dough, then do my turns and then do the first proofing overnight?

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Hi Sheila,
We recommend to trim, torte, and wrap each layer separately in freezer weight plastic wrap (or two layers of plastic wrap) and bag the layers in freezer weight reclosable bags. Granulated sugar should not cause any moisture problems, but will almost as fine of a crumb. You can also make a "pseudo" superfine sugar by food processing granulated sugar for a minute.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Karen,
We always recommend that you make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences. You may also want to experiment past what you think is the best results to fail the recipe so that you know the recipe's limits, and contact the author for her/his advise. The book's recipe is correct as we tested this several times including making them for the book's photography The Errata/Correction section is up to date for "The Baking Bible".
Since you used a less high protein flour and substituted buttermilk for the heavy cream, we would suggest to lower the amount of buttermilk, if you intend to substitute those ingredients.
You may want to check Marie Wolf's “The Bake Bible Along with Rose’s Alpha Bakers” in the Featured Fans section and read fellow bloggers' comments on their baking through most of the recipes in “The Baking Bible”. Lots of pictures and great stories as well.
Rose & Woody

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Hi El-Mongy,
We do not have anything of this nature in our repertoire. We have previously commented on what we thought could solve your problem.
You may want to submit your question on the Forums for our international community of bakers to possibly offer advise.
Rose & Woody

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no baking involved this a cake batter eaten raw its my recipe
1 -i cook eggs and sugar (& some glucose very small amount ) in microwave until reaches 75 degree c stirring every 30 second( i get a egg syrup save to eat great to use in molten lava cakes and brownies btw)
then add to it salt leave it cool
2- i brown the butter and put the flour immediately stir for like 30 second
and take it off heat leave it to cool
3- mix both just until emulsified add yogurt or sour cream and vanilla
serve immediately or within 30 min
and then eaten like that
this what i meant by edible cake batter :D

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I just purchased the beautiful Baking Bible & tried to make the Irish cream scones. I had to replace bread flour withRobin Hood (Canadian) all purpose flour & used buttermilk instead of cream, as that is what I had. The mixture was very sticky- so sticky when I went to knead lightly that it stuck to my hands horribly & I had to add quite a lot of flour just to make it slightly manageable. I had to bake in blobs as there was no way they would shape into a triangle. Is there errata for this recipe or are the ingredient amounts incorrect, as the actual dough was not like any other scone I have done before. 😂

Thanks for your help.

Karen


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Just curious what you would advise regarding the best time to level/torte the White Velvet Butter Cake, if I plan to freeze it. It always turns out great..very moist, but when I thaw it, the top is very wet. I don't know if that moisture has been drawn out of the cake itself or just condensation? I always cool completely before wrapping and freezing. Should I trim/torte before wrapping and freezing? Cake seems to turn out very well with granulated sugar too...was all I had! Thanks very much.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from A.R El-Mongy
01/24/2017 09:28 AM

AR, try mixing the flour with some of the brown butter to water-proof it. that should help. whose recipe is this and what do you mean by edible cake batter. all cake batter is edible after baking. are you implying that the egg batter is meant to be eaten raw?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Claire
01/24/2017 09:25 AM

the pucker pie keeps at room temp for only one day. did you refrigerate it?

as long as curd pools slightly on the surface the temperature isn't important. italian meringue should be the best possible choice but it's hard to fight humidity.

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A.R El-Mongy
A.R El-Mongy
01/24/2017 06:23 AM

i am doing this edible cake batter with brown butter and roasted flour and egg syrup and yogurt but the problem is the flour absorbs the water content after a while and the flavor get more starchy and less flavor is there's a way i can do to prevent that like putting something to prevent flour from absorb the water i tried glucose and glycerin and(syrup instead of water and some of the sugar) is there an ingredient to help better emulsification and keep the water busy so the flour can not talk to it

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Thank you for your reply. I love you all the more for your responsiveness! Yes, I did use Italian Meringue. The last time I made it was a year or two ago. I live in Houston, so it's always humid and often warm. It was weepy on the top more than the bottom next to the curd. Is there a good solution to this? The Pucker I made last night looked gorgeous when I took it out, very much domed and just barely starting to turn slightly golden. It shrank a tiny bit before I went to bed but still looked good. When I woke this morning it had pulled away and shrank incredibly. I heated the curd to thick but the temp was reading closer to 182 with my thermometer. Could this be the problem? It was thick and was starting to steam, so I didn't want it to curdle. I kept it cooking at 182 for a while but it didn't get hotter. What do I want it to look like when the pie is done to prevent overcoming? Thank you!!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Claire Y
01/23/2017 04:14 PM

Claire, did you use the italian meringue for the lemon meringue pie? it is much more stable. as a safeguard you could put a thin layer of biscuit cake or cake crumbs between the filling and the meringue which will absorb any possible weeping. but meringue is chancy if you experience humid weather so the pucker pie might be the way to go. i can see from your photo (it is only possible to post photos on the forums but i was able to see it) that it is very over-baked. it should not shrink from the pie crust. and dusting it with powdered sugar will improve its appearance.
re the shaker pie, it is absolutely imperative to wash the lemons with a scrubby and liquid dishwasher detergent to remove the nasty flavor from their having been sprayed. that might be the reason your tasters found it too bold.

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Hi. I am testing different lemon pies to make for a dessert auction. The Shaker Lemon was delicious but some tasters thought the flavor too bold. I love your Lemon Meringue but, in the past, I have had issues with the meringue weeping. That's fine at home or for informal parties but the Auction is part of a formal fundraiser and the conditions re: refrigeration are unclear. I made the Lemon Pucker last night and it is many people's favorite flavor, but my pie was very ugly. I expected some contraction as it cooled, but it seriously retracted from the crust. Did I not cook the curd or the pie long enough? Any advice, on how to resolve that issue? Or on a beautiful, formal looking yet bright and bold (but not too bold) pie?

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Hi MaryAnne,
We do not have a Sicilian Ricotta Cheesecake in our repertoire. Virtually all of our cheesecakes are baked in a foil wrapped springform pan in a waterbath to create a creamy texture as Rose prefers cheesecake to be on the custardy side versus the drier baked side.
We always recommend that you should make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients and following the instructions as stated in author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. We suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
You can also post a picture on the Forums section for others in the international baking community to give their comments.
Not knowing the recipe, we would suggest to bake it longer, and if it looks like it is going to start over browning, to tent it loosely with foil. You could also try adding some cornstarch.
Rose & Woody

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Hi!
I made Sicilian Mini Cheesecakes and the flavor was fine but they were less firm than I would have liked, almost like custard. I'm not a very experienced baker so I'm looking for suggestions about what I could try to make them denser/firmer. They are made with ricotta so maybe less ricotta? More flour? Longer baking time? No baking spray in the foil papers? Any suggestions would be appreciated!

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Hi Michelle,
Yes. You can make it in the Nordicware Bundtlette pan with probably 4 cupcakes.
Since the mini-bundts should be considered cupcakes in size, we suggest that you increase the baking powder by 1/8 teaspoon, if you want less doming (flatter bottom when inverted) for them.
Enjoy experimenting.
Rose & Woody

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Hi there! Would the Chocolate Streusel Coffee Cake (RHC, p. 55) work well in the Nordicware Bundtlette pan (5 cup capacity, 6 mini bundts), with extra batter as cupcakes?
Thanks!
Michelle

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Hi Betty,
It sounds like you are now baking in a new location and your proven results recipes are now having problems.
First, we recommend that you check your butter's temperature to be sure it is within a range of 65 to 72 F. If you do not have a thermometer, the butter should cool but be soft enough for you to press it down, but not mushy.
Second, would be to knead in some more flour with a few of the cookies to see if that helps.
You can also experiment with the whole wheat flour. Not only for making a taller cookie, but a different flavor and texture.

Here is a general checklist that we use when working in another kitchen that may help you identify your problem.
1. Is my oven still heating at the same temperature as my previous one?
2. Is my kitchen able to be controlled for heat and especially humidity to match my previous kitchen?
3. Am I using the same brands of ingredients, or substitutions that I know I can count on?
4. Am I weighing my ingredients?
5. Am I using the same brand of measuring cups and spoons?
6. Have I checked with other bakers in the area for potential problems?
7. Is the water the same hardness as in my previous location?
8. Am I at the same altitude versus having to adjust my recipes for a different altitude?
Rose & Woody

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Betty Moenkhaus
Betty Moenkhaus
01/21/2017 04:24 PM

When baking Toll House or oatmeal raisin cookies, they often come out flat. Currently in S FL, and I put butter out on porch to soften. Could it be TOO Soft? Can I be beating it too long?
Re flour: can I use half whole wheat in the dough without any other changes?
Many thanks for any help.

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Hi rose2,
Is this one of our recipes?
Are you making sure that the butter and eggs are at room temperature (65 to 75F)?
Some yellow cake batters can have a slightly curdled look to them, but the baked cake will have its proper texture and appearance.
Rose & Woody

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I can't make a yellow cake to save my life. The batter keeps curdling. What am I doing wrong?

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Hi Joan,
We ran a test using whole eggs instead of just egg yolks for the Neo-classic Buttercream. It worked using a ratio of 1 whole egg (50 grams): 2 yolks (37 grams). The butter integrated best using the whisk beater.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks! Can't wait to try the recipe out!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Joan Majtenyi
01/18/2017 11:20 AM

hi Anne,

luckily this is going to be an easy addition as the recipe for the pâte was cross referenced in the book on page 328! all you have to do is roll the dough between 1/8" to 1/4" thick (they wrote 4 to 5 mm) and cut out rounds with a cookie cutter or an inverted glass. set them on a cookie sheet that is lightly buttered or sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. bake in a preheated 350˚F oven for about 10 minutes. transfer to a rack to cool and then sandwich with the ganache. whew! that's the only one of my 10 books that has a blank page that wasn't intended!!!

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Joan Majtenyi
Joan Majtenyi
01/15/2017 01:25 PM

I have a question, but first a compliment I totally love your neoclassic buttercream. I made a three-tier wedding cake using it and it was fabulous.
The question is how to adapt this to whole eggs instead of yolks. I have a recipe from my Hungarian mother-in-law that produces (if you're lucky) a chocolate buttercream that my husband loves. It involves beating whole eggs with sugar and cocoa powder over boiling water for at least 30 minutes. Her test of doneness is that it gives a thread between your thumb and first finger. Then you cool and beat in butter. This is tiring and not dependable. I think there should be a way to adapt your neoclassic corn syrup method. Do you have any ideas of how to adjust the proportions?? Evan an insight would help. Thanks and thanks for your wonderful book. Joan

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I purchased Rose's book "A passion for chocolate". Really love it, but page 200 was a blank. This page contained the instructions for Les Pique-Niques (cocoa cinnamon cookies). Could you forward me those instructions? I would love to try those cookies out!
Thanks!
Anne Sheehan

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Hi elizabeth,
The weight of the nuts and their fat content have been factored into the recipe.
If you cannot use them because of someone who has an almond allergy (but not to other nuts allergy), you can substitute another ground nut by equal weight.
If you cannot make the recipes because someone is allergic to all nuts, then we suggest making the Sour Cream cake that these recipes are based from.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum
01/14/2017 02:57 PM

Roxann, yes, you still release the steam. the texture will not be quite as airy with the added ham and cheese. as for type of ham, i've used black forest but whatever is your favorite will be just fine.

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In the P&PB, the recipe for Spicy Cheese Puff Variation (Gougeres) (page 544):
If doing the ham and cheese variation, what type of ham is best? Also, I assume I do the steam-releasing step and return to the oven for ten minutes no matter which type of puff is being made, correct? Will the ham and cheese puffs still be hollow inside?
Thank you.

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Anonymous in reply to comment from Ruby
01/13/2017 05:26 PM

Ruby, my thought is that if you follow their recommendation which is the same for all their mixers, and use #2 speed, you will have to beat much longer which, i should think would tax the motor to about the same degree as a shorter time at speed 4. as long as you are not making a large batch of very stiff dough such as bagels, and the motor isn't straining, you should be fine. it's really a judgement call.

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I have Rose's heavenly cakes book. I am interested in making the Golden Dream Wedding cake and the Grand Marnier Cake. Will the cake be effected if I omit the almonds in the mix?

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Norma, that would be about 1 teaspoon lemon extract per cup of flour. do keep in mind that lemon extract is not nearly as intense as lemon oil! i would divide the recipe in 8 and start with 1/2 teaspoon of lemon extract. then bake one cookie. if you find you would like more lemon flavor i would knead in 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon to the remaining dough. you can also add some extract to the frosting--a few drops at a time, to taste.

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Norma Piermarini Marshall
Norma Piermarini Marshall
01/11/2017 05:27 AM

I just received a recipe from a relative for sugar cookies made with pineapple. The recipe calls for 8 teaspoons of lemon extract which seemed way out of proportion to me but I almost never make cookies and don't eat anything with sugar. My cousin said she wasn't sure whether extract was supposed to be in the cookies batter or the frosting. Her mother's recipe called for the following ingredients:
6 eggs
4 cups of sugar
2 pounds of butter flavored shortening
4 teaspoons of baking powder
2 cans of crushed pineapple (drained, reserve juice)
8 teaspoons of lemon extract
6 to 8 cups of all purpose flour
My cousin added the extract to the frosting which was simply 1 box of confectionary sugar mixed with the juice of the pineapple.
Any advice would be helpful.

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Hi Adam,
You are taking on a marvelous task. In "Rose's Heavenly Cakes", we have a pumpkin cake recipe that is made in a tube pan and frosted with a silk meringue buttercream. The texture is a bit lighter than that of a carrot cake.
We have not tested this cake for the various sizes for wedding cakes, however, it should work with some diligent testing,as we have made carrot cake in the standard wedding cake sizes.
We suggest making it in a tube pan to see if it will meet your expectations, and then work from there. "The Cake Bible" has a wedding and special occasions section that gives formulas and charts for making basic cake batters and guidelines for converting a recipe to various pan sizes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Anonymous,
We suggest that you look at King Arthur Flour's website for Special Patent flour that they have as a flour product, or discuss with them a flour close to patent flour besides their Special patent Flour.
India Tree makes a high quality powdered sugar.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Libby,
If timing permits, we recommend making and frosting with the adornment recipe the same say, unless we specify in the instructions otherwise (except ganache).
We suggest looking at the storage times on page 3 for "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and the whipped cream pages in the Ingredients section.
Rose & Woody

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Ihave some old family baking recipes that call for 4xx sugar and patent flour. What are the modern equivalents of these ingredients?

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Hi Rose,
I am an amateur at-home baker that has taken on the large project of making the cake for my wedding. It is a fall themed wedding and I want to incorporate fall flavors like pumpkin. I've done a ton of research and found that there aren't too many recipes for a light cake that included pumpkin or some kind of pumpkin filling. I assume it has to do with the heaviness of a pumpkin purée. Do you have any suggestions regarding using this ingredient in a lighter cake that would be suitable for a wedding? Thank you in advance.

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HI Rose,
I am going to make the chocolate tweed cake (using the Wondra flour) for a 90th birthday. I would like to make and frost the cake the day before the party. Would this be ok or should I frost the cake the day of the party.

Thanks so much for your advice.
Libby

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Libby, wondra makes or more tender but also a little less high.

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HI Rose,
I made the heavenly vanilla bean angel food cake but substituted lemon zest for the vanilla beans. (It turned out fantastic.) I have been using Swanson cake flour, but this time I used Wondra. It turned out fine, but my cake was 3 1/2 inches high instead of my normal 4 inches high when I removed it from the pan. I also noticed that when I used the Wondra flour, the batter did not rise above the cake pan like the other cakes I have made with cake flour. I am wondering if it is the Wondra flour, or maybe I need to whip the egg whites a little more stiffly because the Wondra is more delicate or if the lemon zest weighed it down. Do you have any thoughts? (The texture and taste were phenomenal!)

Thanks for your comments.
Libby

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Libby, i'm so very happy to hear that SOS-chef is still in business. they had closed for a while some years back and i didn't now that had reopened.

assuming the Sicilian pistachios are peeled there is no need to blanch. you will need to call or contact SOS-chef to find out if this is the case as they used to be.

the food stylist found those slivered pistachios i think at kalustyan. you could ask SOS if they could get them for you or just chop the whole ones which would still look great.

no need to add the pistachio essence to the cake if using the sicilian pistachios.

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HI Rose,
I am going to make the Sicilian Pistachio cake and have a few questions.

1. If I use Sicilian pistachios (ordered from SOS-chef) do I need to use pistachio essence or would it still be good to go ahead and add the pistachio essence (from Lacuisineus) to the buttercream AND cake batter? (I was wondering if it would be too strong -- but I want a definite pistachio taste). I will add the essence if you think it will enhance the cake.

2. Do I need to blanch the Sicilian pistachios that come from SOS-chef?

3. In the photograph, it looks like the pistachios are slivered. It seems that the ones from SOS-chef are not slivered, but whole. I guess I could coarsely chop them, but your cake looks so pretty!!

Thanks so much for your advice.
Libby

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Hi Leticia,
We do not have any recipes for beignets. Deep fried dessert recipes are not part of our genre for baking book writing, research, and testing.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose, Happy New Year! I have three of your baking books, love them. I can't seem to find a recipe for beignets. Is there one you have tested or a favorite one from another chef? Would love to make beignets!

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Its an honor to participate and be representative of your country. I'm very happy for her & hope she is recovered. I'm partial to fly myself. :)

Jealous too. If she moves across country to Va. Beach, she'd be welcomed! Good masters' coaches are hard to find, much less any who are willing to teach adults that are differently abled and learn to swim as adults.

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thanks for asking Vic. her speciality is butterfly. she didn't win any medals due to injury but was so happy to participate ad on her return to the US she got to meet president Obama.

she grew up in Snohomish, Wa and had excellent teachers.

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Vic Nicholls
Vic Nicholls
01/ 2/2017 06:17 PM

Ok its not baking but ...

How did your Granddaughter do in Rio? Is she a fly and IM'er (my preferred, although free is pretty good) but I saw she did back also?

How did she learn to swim? I learned to swim as an adult and you can't find any handicapped swim teachers. They'll teach kids but not adults.

Vic

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from June
01/ 2/2017 01:51 PM

June, so glad you noticed. the weight is correct and should be 16 tablespoons.

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I've had my cake bible for many years and have used it so much that it's falling apart. It's a great book. Today is the first time that I'm making the perfect all American chocolate butter cake and I think there is a typo in the recipe. It's says 12 tablespoons, 8 ounces, 227 grams of butter. I think the tablespoons should be 16 tbs which is 8 ounces and 227 grams.

Please let me know. It also mentions in the understanding that the butter is increased from the all occasion butter cake

Thanks!!!

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Jane, thank you for your appreciation of my work (and play!). I'm sorry we didn't get the chance to meet a year ago january when Woody and i did a book signing at Barbara Jo's wonderful book store in Vancouver.

i checked amazon canada and am relieved to see that the pourfect products are all listed as being available. truly weighing is infinitely superior to measuring but accurate measuring spoons are indispensable. i never use measuring cups to measure favoring scales instead, but i do use the spoons all the time.

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Hi Rose,

I recently acquired your baking bible, bread bible and heavenly cake books. I was so impressed I gave my daughter and son in law the same books for Christmas.
I am thrilled to have found you....as I love baking and always want to learn more.
I have hunted high and low for you 12 measuring spoon set and was really disappointed to see it was unavailable at this time. Could you maybe call Randy? There are no kitchen stores in the Vancouver area that carry spoons like yours.
Please tell me the shortage is only temporary as I need two sets for starters.

Thanks much,
Jane

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mpressivewoman
mpressivewoman
12/31/2016 02:52 PM

Hi and Happy New Year! (just 10 hours and 15 mins central time)

I became a Rose fan upon the very first release of The Cake Bible, an old and truly loved friend and companion!

I would love to see an updated list of ingredients and equipment for all categories (Cakes, Pies & Pastries and Bread) concise and in one location on the website.

This I realize would be a formidable task but believe it would a great gift from rose to her fans in 2017!

with love and great admiration,
Marti

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I use this recipe all the time for cupcakes without any changes.Baking time for cupcakes is between 18-22 minutes. One recipe should make 20-22 cupcakes.

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Brenda Gary
Brenda Gary
12/30/2016 02:02 PM

I want to use Roses All American Chocolate Butter Cake recipe to make cupcakes. Do I use the recipe as is and how would you recommend I adjust baking time and or temperature?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DG Ewing
12/30/2016 10:33 AM

PS: i should have written to hold back 1/4 cup of the flour, not the yeast! i can tell i intended for all the yeast to go in bc then i said to whisk the mixture before adding the salt so that it doesn't come into direct contact with the yeast! i'll add that to the errata. thanks for bringing it to light.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DG Ewing
12/30/2016 10:03 AM

dg, i can see how it is written is a little confusing so i'm glad you did it right! all the 1/4 cup durum and yeast should be added and then if necessary when shaping or if the dough is too sticky the extra bread flour for knead is added.

i'm so happy to hear of your success. bread baking is mostly very forgiving--more flour and it's a less airy and chewier bread--you will discover how to alter the recipes to suit your taste perfectly but thanks for starting by following the recipe as i intended it to be.

i love engineers--i try to think like one!

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Thank you,

So, I hold back the yeast; when do I add it to the mixture?

What I did: I mixed it in with the 1/4 flour reserve and then used the entire 1/4 cup during kneading....I am not sure that was what the recipe is indicating.?? Was my method correct?

But the bread was wonderful....my 32 yr old son said it is the best bread he has ever had. Wow !!

This is the 5th recipe that I have tried from your book and everyone of them were great!

Your breads are ROCK....
Thanks again
dg

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DG Ewing
12/29/2016 05:53 PM

dg, the recipe is exactly correct as written. please be sure to check and print out the errata page of corrections from the sidebar on the right to address any things that might not have been corrected in the printing you have.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Adam Stevenson
12/29/2016 05:12 PM

Adam, French flour is quite different from the US flour--it has a different ash content and when i tried substituting it for our bleached flour it shrank drastically from the sides of the pan. i have not worked with it to substitute for all purpose but i can tell your that bleached vs unbleached makes a difference. i suggest putting this out on the forums as hopefully someone has experience with this.

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Adam Stevenson
Adam Stevenson
12/29/2016 04:57 PM

Can you substitute French style 55 flour for American AP flour? Do you need to adjust with some other flour?

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Hi Rose, I have your book and started to make the Golden Semolina, but got very confused with the instructions on page 366 step 2 (I am a bread making beginner, and a retired engineer)

"whisk together all but 1/4 cup of the duram flour and the yeast. Then whisk in the salt.... Gently scoop it onto the sponge to cover completely."

I thought that you are saying to hold back the yeast with the 1/4 cup of flour.....but if so then the mixer only has the sponge yeast of 1/8 tsp...

What is the correct answer?

Thank you
dg

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Hi Janet,
Rose's Cake Strips only come in one size for a 9 x 2 inch round pan OR 8 x 8 inch square pan Or smaller pans with clamping off the excess. You could cut them to make silicone strips to use a few for encircling larger pans.
For larger pans, we:
1. make 6 inch wide strips of heavy duty aluminum foil to the length needed encircle the pan with a couple inches extra.
2. make 6 inch wide paper towel strips, then fold them to make 2 inch wide, layered strips.
3. center the paper towel strips on the foil, running length of the foil to about an inch from each end
4. fold up the foil on each side of the paper strips to form a trough.
5. moisten the paper strips with cold water.
6. fold over the sides to encase the paper towels to form a 2 inch wide strip
7. fold over the ends to encase the paper towels.
8. wrap them around the cake pan with the "open folded end" up.
9. use paper clips or clamps to attach them to the pan.
(they can go inside the pan, as you will likely be frosting the sides)

We have reused the strips several times by opening up after they have cooled and , either using new paper towels or letting the paper towels dry out for the next time.
Rose & Woody

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Do you make the Rose's heavenly cake strip for 10", 12" and 14" round pans/

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Hi Carol,
A couple of thoughts. For the flattening, it may be from them spreading on the parchment or if they were not wrapped tightly. For the being underdone, did you try increasing the temperature or baking time for some of the batches?
We revisited this recipe for "The Baking Bible" and made two revisions.
1. we replaced the parchment with aluminum foil. This makes it easier to remove them and the aluminum foil minimizes their flattening.
2. we added 28 grams of flour.
We suggest that you look at the Rose's Alpha Bakers link where you can read and see photos of the members' reviews for making this recipe.
Rose & Woody

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Thank you so much for answering my questions on resizing the Kourambiethes, Rose and Woody. It is so very generous of you to share your expertise in this way!

Merideth

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Hi Merideth,
We suggest that you shape the cookies to be 1" wide by 3/8"tall, and try baking time range of 10 to 12 minutes. Depending on your oven having hot spots, it may not be necessary to rotate.
Try shaping and baking a few to see the results and adjust to make this great cookie.
Rose & Woody

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Hi David,
We list the 227 grams amount because:
1. it is 2 sticks of butter--easy to list,especially if one does not weigh.
2. some people have gotten less left over.
Rose & Woody

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Hello,

I recently made the Kourambiethes from "The Baking Bible". They were a huge hit! I'd like to try the recipe again, but this time make them about half the size to fit on a Christmas cookie tray with other small cookies. Any tips for adjusting the recipe to make smaller cookies would be greatly appreciated! For instance, should I press down the cookies as much as with the larger size? Should I expect to just cut the baking time in half? Is it still necessary to rotate the trays?

Many thanks!
Merideth

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I made Rose's rugelach recipe from the Christmas Cookie Book, and for the first time ever, my cookies came out flat and underdone. I fridge my dough and cookies as directed in the recipe, actually more, so the dough was nice and firm. I've made rugelach before, did not have this problem. Suggestions? Help? Thank you in advance

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Hi Rose/Woody,

Your "Molasses Sugar Butter Cookies" on page 341 requires 227 grams of butter to be clairifed (Beurre Noisette); but there is always left over (about 2 tablespoons, after 146 grams has been taken out.

Since I never have a use for the left over, I decided to experience by reducing the amount of butter to be used in clarifying; and came up with 190 grams of butter instead of 227 grams. When the butter is clarified, I get between 146 grams and 148 grams of Beurre Noisette before the browned solids is added.

What do you think?

David

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HI Nancy,
My Rose baking first book.
The black dots simply meant that it was not practical to list or convert (usually grams to fractions of ounces) for that ingredient. In most cases, the measurement is less than a tablespoon.
We do hope you are or in the future will be weighing your ingredients for accuracy and consistent results.

If a recipe uses egg yolks, do measure them vs just going by the number of yolks. In recent years, yolks are usually smaller than when The Cake Bible was written. A recipe stating 4 yolks can easily need 6 yolks for the correct value and weight.
ALSO, please print off the Cake Bible's Errata/Correction pages that we have on the blog. Click on that link under the right sidebar's Categories. If your book does not have them, these pages will have conversions from 9 by 1-1/2 to 9 by 2 inch round pans.

Enjoy many adventures.
Rose & Woody

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Hello there. I'm new to scratch baking and have bought the Cake Bible book. In looking at the recipes I notice under weights that there is a black dot. What does that mean?

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Thanks. This helps and is what I thought but was not sure. I have made the chocolate tweed version two times and loved it. It turned out fantastic when I was using my hand held beater. I plan on making the chocolate tweed and the vanilla for a 90th birthday.

Question: would it make a difference if I cooled the cake in a kitchen that was 60 degrees? That was the case when the cake had all those holes.

Thanks again!
Libby

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Hi Libby,
1. We think you may have over whipped the egg whites. They should hold their shape like the top of a Dairy Queen ice cream cone when holding up the whisk beater.
This is just before the whites begin to "clump"in the mixer.
2. It is possible to add the flour mixture in the KA's bowl, but tricky to incorporate it evenly without over folding.
However, if you can transfer the whites gently into the large bowl that you make it with the hand mixer, that should work well.

My bridge group loves the Chocolate Tweed version.
Rose and I differ on tools for folding. She prefers a large silicone spatula, where I always use a large slotted skimmer. But she is always happy to appoint me to the folding task.
Rose & Woody

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HI.
I did smear batter around the edge of the pan. I did run a metal spatula around the pan in a circle without lifting the spatula up. Is there a special technique in doing this?
Also, I did tap the pan on the counter 2 times thinking that this would get rid of air pockets.
I also make sure my oven was pre-heated and heated at 350 before I put the cake in. In fact it was heated about 45 minutes prior to putting it in the over. I also calibrated my oven to make sure the temperature was 350.

Change in technique:
1. Before I used a hand held electric mixer when the cake turned out well. This time I used a Kitchen Aid mixer. I am wondering if the egg whites were over whipped. But the cake did rise well and did not fall or shrink.
2. I transferred the whipped egg whites to a large shallow bowl and then I folded in the flour/sugar/vanilla bean mixture. This seemed to give me more room. Should I just fold the flour into the egg mixture that is in the Kitchen Aid mixing bowl? (I had 5 quart bowl.)

The cake was heavenly -- loved the flavor and texture. But I had these huge gaps/holes/chunks when I pulled the cake out of the pan.

Thanks. Any advice would help!
Libby

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Hi Libby,
Did you do the following:
1. Smear batter on the sides of the angel food pan before spooning in the batter?
2. Run a spatula through the batter to minimize air pockets?
3. Change any ingredients?
4. Change a technique from before?
Rose & Woody

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Hi Carol,
We do not have the recipe on the blog. However, Amazon has it at 31% off.
Rose & Woody

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Carol Reinbold
Carol Reinbold
12/15/2016 10:02 AM

I have lost the pages for Crescent Cookies in your Rose's Christmas Cookies book which I have had for years. These are my grandkids favorite and I really don't want to use another recipe. How can I get this recipe?

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Hi Rose,
I am desperate. A few months ago I made the Heavenly Vanilla Bean angel food cake 2 times with great results. However, today I made it twice and it failed both times. Around the edges of the pan, there were huge gaps -- it looked like I cut into the cake along the side (outer edge of the cake). [The inner part was fine.} The cake rose just fine. But when I took it out of the pan there were these HUGE gaps/holes in the cake. Do you have any idea what may have gone wrong? I want to make the cake for a 90th birthday party.
Thank you very much.
Libby

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Hi Rose & Woody,

Thank you for the speedy reply.

Will keep at it until I succeed.

Warmly,
San

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Hi Susan,
If you have already purchased the books, Rose will be happy to autograph one or more.
If you have not bought some of the books, we do have them on sale with Rose signing, and me as well for Heavenly Cakes and Baking Bible.
You can email me at: woody321@ptd.net for the pricing on Rose's books. We ship by US media mail.
Rose & Woody

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Hi San,
With bleached all purpose flour both of our 6 x3 and 6 x2 cakes are fudge and dense, and will dip in the center.
So we are uncertain what to advise.
Rose & Woody

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Susan Scanlon
Susan Scanlon
12/ 9/2016 05:38 PM

Hi Rose,

The Cake Bible is one of my most well loved cookbooks. My daughter is about to graduate from culinary school and is working as a pastry cook (soon to be pastry chef) at the 1789 in Washington, DC. We are giving her your entire collection of cookbooks as a graduation present. I would love to send you one to autograph for her. Would that be possible?

Thanks in advance.

Susan

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P.S: I baked them in two 6x2 inch pans for 35mins

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Hi Rose & Woody,

How's the Holiday season keeping you!!

I baked the Tomboy Cake today. This time like you'd advised to reduce the baking powder by 1/4th.

Yet again I have a very fragile cake. I weigh the ingredients and follow instructions to the T. I'm still failing to understand where I am going wrong.

The recipe is so great, and super tasty..if only I can make it look as good as it should be!

Please help,
San

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Hello,

You folks make great suggestions on bakeware, so I wondered if I might be able to make one to you.

I have for a number of years used bakeware made by Alan Silverwood Ltd, from Birmingham in the UK. Their stuff is phenomenally good, made of heavy gauge anodized aluminum. Fantes in Philadelphia carries some of their stuff.

One thing that they make which is very handy is a collapsible 12x12 cake tin allowing you to bake a 1x1 up to 12x12. You can also buy extra dividers to make more combinations simultaneously. What Fantes doesn't have, as the do not stock all that Silverwood makes, several amazon sellers will ship to you from Britain.

Thanks,
Nate

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Hi Nancy,
We have had the same experience here. Our dear friend Mariella Esposito of Fante’s kitchen supply shop in Philadelphia investigated this problem. It is most likely that it is from calcium sulfate which is in hard water. The other circumstance can be from residue left on it when you wash the bowl in your dishwasher. Mariella contacted a silicone bakeware manufacturer who recommended to soak the bakeware in a solution of vinegar and water for 20 minutes, and then rinse the bowl.
We will try this with ours.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Sharon,
We have not tested or converted these recipes to 2 inch high layer cake pans, but you should be able to do it. The results may be similar, however you will need to adjust the baking powder separately from the rest of the ingredients.
We purposely made these recipes in a springform 3 inch high pan to achieve the same airy texture as chiffon cakes made in the traditional tube pan.
Enjoy experimenting.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose and Woody

Have baked the Chocolate Cuddle Cake from Rose's Baking Bible a couple of times with great success each time...

Wanted to know if I can bake the Chocolate cuddle cake as well as the Renee' Fleming Golden Chiffon cake in normal individual 6 by 2",7 by 2" or 8 by 2" cake pans to get similar results...the pan mentioned is a 9 by 3" springform pan.

Kindly revert,
Sharon

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I have Rose's silicone baking bowl and I'm having a hard time keeping it clean. After I wash it with soapy water, dry it and put it away, the next time I pull it out it has a white powdery residue on it. Why is that? What's the best way to clean it?

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Thanks for getting back to me, Woody. I happened to check back tonight and saw you responded. I ended up using the Spice Cake recipe from RHC as I didn't want to risk ruining the carrot cake for the church function I was making it for. It was a hit! Thanks again!

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Hi,

I have a Kitchenaid Pro 600 that came with a Powerknead Spiral Dough Hook. The instruction manual suggests not running the mixer past '2' while using this attachment but many of the recipes in the Bread Bible start at a low setting like '2' and go up to '4'. Would you recommend starting at '1' and going up to '2' while using this attachment? How might this impact overall kneading time?

Thanks!

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Dear Rose or Woody,
I have been baking the same ginger cookies recipe for years so I have been using the same porportions of flour, butter and baking soda, baking in a 350 degree oven for 12 minutes. I'm wondering why the cookies sometimes turn out chewy and other times, cake like?! Is it the temperature of the cookie dough when it goes into the oven?
Many thanks,
Ayako

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Hi Tony,
1. up to 10 days refrigeration.
2. when possible, we prefer to make the mousseline when it can be used immediately after making it.
3. we have to combat seasonal humidity and deal with the furnace room which is next to our baking kitchen. a dehumidifier if you do nor have air conditioning for the kitchen is a good idea. we have both a air conditioner for our kitchen and a blower fan to reduce the temperature in the boiler room.
Rose & Woody

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Tony Bridges
Tony Bridges
11/29/2016 12:36 AM

Rose, Woody or anyone in Georgia,
I am making Rose's Strawberry Mousseline for her Chocolate-Covered Strawberry Cake due 12/9/16. My concern is humidity and shelf life.

1) How long will the Strawberry Mousseline last refrigerated?

Below are date options and relative humidity.

2) What is the best time for me to make the Mousseline?
Date Options:
12/1/16, Thursday, SUNNY one week and one day before the party; after 6 pm; 54 % humidity
12/2/16, Friday, SUNNY one week before the party; after 6 pm; 53 % humidity
12/7/16, MOSTLY SUNNY, Wednesday night after 9 pm; 63 % humidity
12/8/16, SHOWERS, Thursday, all day; 72 % humidity
12/9/16, SHOWERS

If I purchase a dehumidifier and have this running in the kitchen when I make the Mousseline, will that help?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from margriet hecht
11/26/2016 04:19 PM

hi Margriet!

there is a terrific site you may enjoy--www.springerlejoy.com

she recommends holding back about 1/2 cup of the flour and after the dough sits for 30 minutes or so you can add the extra flour as needed but that the dough should be silky but slightly sticky. she also suggests covering the bowl as you work with a damp cloth. these are excellent suggestions because different environments vary in humidity.

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margriet hecht
margriet hecht
11/26/2016 03:24 PM

Hello Ms Beranbaum ! November 26 2016

I have your wonderful "Rose'sChristmas Cookies "book and use it mainly around this time of the year.
I come from Swiss/ German parents and the tradition was that we had a wonderful display of cookies ONLY to be made at Christmas time.
I have continued the tradition and struggle every year with the "Springerle" recipe.
I make 1/2 the recipe that you prescribe in your book and follow it to the T. I decrease the liquid from the eggs to 6 fluid ounces since the eggs are often much too big.
However, the dough is so dry and crumbly that it is impossible to roll out and make my cookies with the beautiful cookie forms I inherited. I am tempted to add more fluid. My grandmother and my mother never used Anise extract. They used Arak ( I believe is a rice liquer) which is nearly impossible to find here in the US. So... what liquid should I increase? Egg-white?Just plain water or something else alcoholic?
Please help !
Thanks!
margriet

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rose Levy Beranbaum
11/15/2016 01:35 PM

Vicki, i now see why you thought you had to add fresh pumkin. the amount in italic which is listed as pumpkin FILLING is for the entire filling not the pumpkin! mystery solved.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Vicki Duffy
11/15/2016 01:15 PM

Vicki i did a google search and absolutely do not find my every using either fresh pumpkin or 5-6 cups of pumpkin for a pie. here is the link on my blog for my pumpkin pie but you can also find it if you put pumpkin pie in the search box at the top.
you can also paste this link in your browser:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/11/great_pumpkin_pie_1.html#.WCtQF3eZNyo

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Sheila Rowledge
Sheila Rowledge
11/15/2016 12:46 PM

Hello...I seem to have lost my first attempt to post a question. I was wondering if my baking powder, "Magic Baking Powder" should be measured in gms or tsp as the weight is 4 gm/tsp and your usual brand is 5gm/tsp. It makes a significant difference for the 8 inch, 2 inch deep white velvet cake recipe amount. I am working on a wedding cake. The 12 inch and 10 inch are turning out great, but I am a questioning the amount of baking powder for another try on the 8 inch. Occasionally, I get the slight dip in the middle of the cake.The baking powder is comprised of cornstarch, monocalcium phosphate, and sodium bicarbonate. Thanks for your advice. Am loving "The Cake Bible" and "Rose's Heavenly Cakes"!

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Sheila Rowledge
Sheila Rowledge
11/15/2016 11:05 AM

Sorry, error in my post.. meant to say that my two 8 inch white velvet cakes would call for 6.3 tsp, based on the weight of my baking powder (4 gms /tsp) Thanks

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Hi Woody,

Thanks a ton as always for a godspeed reply!!

Happy Thanksgiving

Warmly,San

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Vicki Duffy
11/14/2016 03:10 PM

Vicki, exactly where and/or on what page if in one of my books do you see this? i prefer using libby's canned pumpkin--one can! in fact, i just made it for the photo shoot for upcoming book last week!

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Vicki Duffy
Vicki Duffy
11/14/2016 02:43 PM

I am not sure if this is the right place to ask a question, I cannot find anything else.
The question is regarding Roses Pumpkin Pie. The instructions say to use 3 3/4 cup of pumpkin liquid, and 1 cup of canned pumpkin. Do I have to use fresh pumpkin?

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Thanks, Woody. You're the BEST!!!

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HI David,
For butter cakes: Black Chocolate Party Cake in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" that has the cocoa syrup to add moistness.
For sponge cakes: Mexican Killer Kahlua Chiffon Cake in "Rose's Melting Pot"
that also has a kahlua syrup.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty Kinley
11/13/2016 09:51 AM

Patty, old school baking was probably the dip and sweep method and depending how long the flour has sat in the bin it will affect the amount as flour settles. that's why current day recipes if using this method usually suggest stirring it up first with a whisk for consistency of amount. lightly spooned tends to me more uniform in consistency so why don't you try 1 cup with dip and sweep to see the weight, make one of the breads, and see if you need to add more or less flour. then you can convert the weight to lightly spooned. i give the weights in my books but you can determine them on your own as well. lovely to have family recipes to hand down!

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley
11/12/2016 10:08 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,
I love making bread from your recipes as they are extremely precise which makes for more consistent outcomes. However, I have inherited bread recipes from both my and my husband's families that are...less precise, shall we say? If I want to make them more reliable, how do I figure grams of a/p flour per cup to pass them along to the next generation?
Thank you so much. You all have done the science to make my baking much better!

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Hi Rose,

A friend of mine who went to a pastry school (SAIT, Calgary, AB), and now has a small home base business.

Her chocolate cake was dense, yet so moist and melt-in-your-mouth kind of feeling.

Of all your chocolate cake recipes, which one would you recommend to achieve that dense, yet moist texture?

Thanks, Rose

David

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Hi San,
We suggest to make a half recipe and use a quarter-sheet pan 13 x 9. The biscuit roulade does have an eggy taste to it considering the high ratio of the eggs to the other ingredients. But since it is almost always used in a jelly roll or as a cheesecake base, the fillings and frostings, or the cheesecake flavors are the major flavor component of the dessert.
Since there is no leavening, you can adjust the amount batter to work for your pans. For a recipe calling for this as a base, simply make two quarter-sheet pans.
Rose & Woody

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HI Rose & Woody,

Hope you'd a wonderful Halloween!!

I tried the 'biscuit roulade'. Well, since I have a small convection oven-24l and an even smaller toaster oven, I couldn't use the pan 17"x13" jelly roll called for and used a smaller one instead that was,to put simply, miserably. The cake was really fat and was a sweeter version of an omelette.(i'd put all the batter in the default sheet sort of pan that I got with the oven).

Is there a way to make a roulade for someone like me with a small oven? I want to buy a jelly roll pan, but don't know what size would suit me best. I cannot buy a standard oven since I have space constraints. So, am really a small batch baker here.

Could you please, like you've always, guide me?!

Warmly,
San

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HI Valerie,
We are sorry we somehow missed seeing your question. Hopefully you have experimented, as we have not tried to convert this cake recipe. Generally, we lower the leavening for a tube pan versus its layer cake pan equivalent. Since you are making a larger sheet cake, which you decrease the leavening, you may need to adjust the leavening just slightly down.
Rose & Woody

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Janice,
We wish the dough could be frozen or delayed further, but from our testing, we found the texture to be too compromised. Dough baked with further delays does not puff up to have the same flaky, open laminations of dough.
Do make a few with reheating and a few from refrigerated dough after an 8 hour (overnight delay) so you can see the differences.
Rose & Woody

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HI Howard,
Yes. It has been translated, but not available for this country.
However, please email me at woody321@ptd.net. We have a few author copies, which we can sell you one of them.
Rose & Woody

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I just baked the Kouigns Amann from the cover of the Baking Bible. Divine! Absolutely wonderful.

Can this dough be frozen or delayed in the fridge for longer than the 2 hours listed? I would love to make these for breakfast Christmas morning, but I don't want to be up at 3 AM in order to make it happen. :-)

I realize they can be reheated, but I suspect they won't be quite as good as the one I just ate.

Regardless, I want to thank you, thank you, thank you for this recipe! You were with me every step of the way, and it came out beautifully the first time!

All the Best!
Janice

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howard scott
howard scott
11/ 6/2016 08:42 PM

Hi...are any of your bread baking cookbooks transliated into Spanish? my son's mother in law is from Peru and does not speak English...she is wanting to try baking bread using a more structured approach...thx!

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love you Norma!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mazmin
11/ 6/2016 05:52 PM

thank you--i look forward to seeing the questions.

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Hi Rose, I have an assignment on finding one icon in my pastry career. I would like to choose you. Would you be kind enough to answer a few questions for this assignment? I can email them to you.

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Thanks very much...

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Janet Stevens
Janet Stevens
11/ 4/2016 05:00 PM

I use Rose's sponge technique when making communion bread for my church. The flavor is wonderful (after serious alterations to the recipe) the the breads should be about the size of a # 2 1/2 can -- pretty large after baking. Though I cut them with a can big enough for that, they always shrink in baking. What am I doing wrong?

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Hi Chris,
We have only made one butter layer cake in a pan taller than 2 inches and that is the Tom Boy in "The Baking Bible", because we wanted to stay true to the Miette Bakery's way of making it.
We have seen that butter layer cakes baked to taller heights than for 2 inch high pans can: be inconsistent in texture and doneness, sink in the middle, have a over browned crust, and/or a combination of any of these. Some bakers will use metal cores to assist the the baking of the middle of the cake.
We prefer to opt for making a two layer cake versus one thick layer cake.
We recommend using the charts in "The Cake Bible's" wedding and special occasion section to assist you in converting a batter for an 11 x 2 inch round pan for a 10 x 10 x 2 inch square pan. You will have to adjust the leavening down a bit to prevent doming.
Rose & Woody

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Hi
Love this site and have the Cake Bible and used it many times - thanks! I want to bake a chocolate cake in a 10x10x4" pan. I need a recipe for a pan this size or I have a recipe which I normally use to bake in 2 9x2" circular pans. How do I go about doing this conversion. I've tried before but the middle sunk - I know, probably too much baking powder - please help.

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Hi Glory,
We have not tried any other citrus fruits for making posset, but there are recipes on the web. Technically, most citrus fruits should work, however you may need to adjust the amount of citrus juice because of its pH (acidic level).
Rose & Woody

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Glory Shabouk
Glory Shabouk
11/ 4/2016 09:17 AM

Hi Rose - This is in reference to your Lemon posset in the Baking Bible- do you think it will work if subbing the citrus fruit? say tangerine or passionfruit? Not everyone loves lemon-crazy right? I may also do It a la woody style- gluten free, so my celiac friends get to enjoy:).
Btw I just recently made the orange mouselline butter creme (with tangerine) on top of good old spice cupcakes =)) and it was THE BEST THING I PUT IN MY MOUTH!

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Stanley Levine
Stanley Levine
11/ 3/2016 11:24 PM

From an old postng in your site (M&A 5oth reunion)I learned of Ricki Marzani's death "in her 40s". We were good friends as teenagers, renewed our friendship when I returned to NYC in the 80s, but lost touch after I moved to South Carolina for a teaching job. I am very saddened to learn of her death. I always kept the irrational expectation in the back of my mind that we would inevitably run into each other again by chance, as we did in the 80s (on a Manhattan bus). I was finally impelled to actively seek her out after watching a singer-songwriter on ETV who reminded me of the songs Ricki, I and our friends would sing together - but several decades too late. If you could share anything about her later life, or her death, please let me know.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Jeremy Scheck
11/ 3/2016 09:16 AM

Jeremy, it's not the same publisher so the ones at fault (responsible) will not send out hard copies to the many people who have ebooks. i will investigate how amazon handles corrections and redownloading. my guess is that once you've purchased the ebook it is redownloadable in the same way. i'm now in the proofing process which will take all day so stay tuned.

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Thanks!
While I very much appreciate that, could I possibly be sent a hard copy? I don't know if I'll be able to download a revised copy. Otherwise I'm a big fan and baker. I'd be honored if you checked out my website www.afterschoolbakery.com.

Thanks,
Jeremy

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Jeremy Scheck
11/ 2/2016 11:02 PM

Jeremy this is deeply distressing. I have reported it to the publisher HMH who is not the same publisher as the hard copy. Tomorrow I will spend the day going through each and every chart and will do a posting with the results should I find any other errors which I trust will be corrected on the ebook.

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Jeremy Scheck
Jeremy Scheck
11/ 2/2016 07:59 PM

Hi,

I was making my first cake from The Cake Bible kindle ebook when I noticed a typo that cost me the ingredients of the cake. For the Butter Cream Cake, it lists 1/8 tsp for baking soda and 6 grams. After I added 1/8 tsp and mixed it, I realized that 1/8 tsp is much less than 6 grams. With a quick search, I realized I needed 1 1/4 tsp instead. I had already made the batter before this so I had to discard and start again. I'm upset about this and other typos in the E-book (another is it says "unsalted batter" in the pound cake recipe). Could I be sent a hard copy?

Jeremy

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Yvonne,
There are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize or have expertise in eggs substitution, sugar free, dairy free, gluten free, low fats, and other dietary specific baking. Please investigate and try some of their recipes or contact them for substitution recommendations as these are not our dedicated genre of baking.
The advantage you have with these authors and bakers is getting expertise from individuals who have done this because it is their lifestyle.
We do not have any recommendations since we have not run tests for egg substitution.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Woody/Rose,

I am interested in substituting the eggs in my cake recipes and thought to come to the Senseis of baking. I have a few questions for you regarding this. If you have an older post to refer me to that's fine just point me there, please.

1) What can I use in place of the eggs?

2) What would be the ratio?

3) Will this affect the amounts of the rest of the ingredients in the recipe? i.e., Will I have to re-calculate all of the other ingredients when I use the substitution?

4) Will the texture of the cake be totally different than if I were to use eggs? I'm trying to accomplish the same texture and taste as if I had used eggs.

I've read a few different things I could use to replace the eggs but I wanted to get your input. Your insight and guidance is always appreciated.

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Hi Virginia,
If you have "The Pie & Pastry Bible", on pages 568-569, Rose gives the substitutions for using lime instead of lemon. The zest and juice are the same, however, the sugar is decreased to 100 grams/1/2 cup. The curd is only head to 185 F. Because the color is a pale yellow-green, we suggest adding some drops of green food coloring.
Rose & Woody

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Norma Piermarini Marshall
Norma Piermarini Marshall
10/28/2016 05:35 AM

I was very excited to come home after babysitting my grandchildren to find my new copy of The Baking Bible. What I love most about your cookbooks is every recipe is perfect! I look forward to reading this cover to cover starting tonight. Today is about teaching my granddaughters how to make pasta from scratch...Love you pretty lady...Norma

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Hi Virginia,
I am not seeing a lemon chiffon in Rose's Celebrations.
Which recipe and page number may I refer to?
Rose & Woody

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can lime zest and juice be substituted at par for lemons in the lemon chiffon in Rose's celebrations cookbook?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Patty Kinley
10/26/2016 09:54 PM

Hi Patty, finished température is not dependent on the size of the bread--it is always the same but if the dough is baked in smaller pans it will take less time.

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Hi Rose and Woody,

I'd like to make the Golden Wheat Carrot cake into a 12x18 sheet cake. Judging from the recipe, if I divided it in half that would essentially be one base recipe which I would then apply the RF numbers to multiply the volume. Does this sound right to you? Also, I'm assuming the baking powder would be a level 6, but would I also adjust the baking soda level? Thanks for your help! I've learned so much from your cookbooks!

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley
10/24/2016 12:17 PM

Hi Rose and Woody!
I recently purchased some mini loaf pans. If I want to use (from the Bread Bible) either the Basic Sandwich Loaf or the Basic Hearth Bread and divvy up the recipe into quarters to put it them, do I use the same temperature to tell when they're done? I've never done this before so it will be a complete experiment. Thanks for all your help! I'm becoming a more confident bread baker working my way through the book with the Bread Bible Bakers!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Michael Cutliff
10/16/2016 11:38 PM

Michael, i'd like to add that it really helps to bake the pie low in the oven and set it on a baking stone that has been preheated for at least 45 minutes.

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I used King Arthur flour and Plugra on the first attempt. Then I found and used President butter on the next batch along with the King Arthur flour.

I think you are right about the Kouign-Amann. I was considering making them but I was a little intimidated with the process.

I am practicing the croissants again today. I am also going to make my first attempt at the Kouign- Amann.... Thank you for the suggestion.


I will definitely let you guys know about the scholarship.
Thank you!!!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Kim
10/16/2016 09:54 AM

please tell us exactly which butter and which flour you used. high butter fat butter is important. crisp flakiness also requires a low humidity environment., glad to hear you're getting the layering as without a sheeter it is much more difficult to achieve this.

you might also want to consider the kouign amann--the one on the cover of the baking bible.

do let us know about the scholarship--we are rooting for you!

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Hi Rose,
Please Help! Recently I visited a bakery and had the most exquisite croissant. The owner stated he based his croissant recipe on your recipe. I purchased both The Bread Bible and The Baking Bible. On my first attempt the croissant came out very tasty and had beautiful layers. But, they were not flaky or crisp. I followed the recipe exactly (except I didn't use the wheat). I used all of the suggested products. I was able to complete all of the turns and allowed the dough to rest after each turn. I monitored the temperature of the room and the dough. I cannot recreate the flakiness or crispness of that croissant.
I'm planning on entering a bread baking contest to win a much needed scholarship to pay for baking and pastry school. But I need to perfect this recipe. How can I achieve the crispness and flakiness I need?

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Thanks so much!

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Hi Ritu,
Since the caramel is replacing the sugar, this is basically a variation of Rose's butter cake recipes. We suggest using the Rose Factor charts in "The Cake Bible" to scale this recipe up to a larger round cake size or possibly 18 x 12 sheet cakes.
Enjoy experimenting. We would suggest making a 13 x 9 first to see about adjusting the baking powder before scaling up to the 18 x 12.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Michael,
The bottom crust should properly brown according to the author of the recipes instructions. If you have "The Pie and PastryBible", Rose also gives instructions for freezing a two-crust fruit pie before baking so that the bottom crust is less likely to get soggy and brown more.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Bethany,
The culprit is likely your King Arthur Unbleached cake flour.
We suggest that you look at our Power of Flour postings in which we experimented with making a basic butter cakes with either whole eggs, egg whites, or yolks using bleached cake flour, bleached all-purpose flour, unbleached all-purpose flour, and additions with cornstarch and potato starch, and with different levels of baking powder.
We generally only use unbleached flour for butter or oil leavened cake recipes if the cake has a strong and dense structure like a carrot cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi

Your Karmel cake is a hit! Its required for a big event next week so it has to be baked in large quantity.
What would you recommend that its made as a loaf or a large baking pan.
Thanks
Ritu

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Michael Cutliff
Michael Cutliff
10/13/2016 09:45 PM

How do you brown the bottom crust of an apple pie ?

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Hi Rose, I have been baking with your books since The Cake Bible was released. For nearly 25 years your cakes have been delighting my family and you have taught me most everything I know about baking. For years, I have tried to figure out why my cakes are so tender, to the point of crumbling. The texture of my two favorite layer cakes, the all American butter and all American chocolate, is so fine that frequently I can't support frosting. I weigh absolutely everything to the tenth of the gram when necessary and the only difference I can come up with is that I use King Arthur unbleached cake flour versus standard bleached cake flour. I can't bring myself to buy bleached now that an alternative exists. If that is the problem do you have any suggestions? If that's not the problem, what else can I try? Thank you so very much for taking the time to answer this! Bethany

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Hi Liz,
We have to say that there are no current plans for a 100% gluten free baking book as this is not our sole genre of baking. You do propose an interesting idea with combining all of Rose’s previous recipes and adding a few more which we could suggest to a publisher. Unfortunately, the book may only be viable in a Kindle format due to a limited number of recipes.
Fortunately, there are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize in gluten free specific baking. For most of these authors, gluten free is their way of life on a daily basis.
We also have reviewed and recommend Alice Medrich’s book “Flavor Flours” which is an excellent book for alternative flours to wheat flours, in which she researched recipes for taste and texture where the altenative flour gave a new dimension to the recipe versus just putting out a gluten free baking book.
We made the Chocolate Cloud Roll last week.
Rose & Woody

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Hello Rose & CO,
I am a long time Fan! Last year my son was diagnosed with Celiac disease. (as you probably know that means no wheat at all, etc etc.) I got rid of many cookbooks, but not yours! The other day I remembered you had a few recipes for Passover and what not with out flour! I know these will be excellent because you are making some thing delicious not trying to be gluten free! Right now I am making Sybil's Pecan Torte with Coffee Cream. I am wondering if you would consider putting together all your gluten free recipes in one publication, and possibly creating new ones. For us it's not a diet fad it's a medical nessesity. Anyways thanks for all your excellent work! Liz Tree PS MY go to is the Chocolate Cloud Roll!!!!

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LOL - It does help to keep the Faith with a giggle - re the Angel Tweed Cake, when we baked it in the Heavenly Bakers, I baked it three times on one weekend - it fell three times. I entitled the blog "The Lost Weekend." I understand there is a new fangled angel-food pan out that I might try now. Once again, thanks. I'll post re the new Woody's Lemon one tomorrow. You have restored my faith, as always.

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Thanks Woody, I have had no response from the Forum. I froze the sad cake and will make another one just to make sure. Perhaps I can just take off the tops of the bubbly one and frost it and share it with the neighbors. My daughter seems to think the bubbles will have risen to the top and will just slice off. At any rate, thanks for always being here for us. We all love you for you kindness. I never feel stupid when I ask silly questions. Will advise new results for this favorite cake of mine.

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Hi Joan,
The recipe is correct for the baking powder. We have had the "volcano" effect (we call them "hillocks") at different times with butter cakes, and really do not have an answer, other than it may be due to some moisture aspect. This effect almost always occurs with the upside cakes. If the inside texture is ok, then the cakes are fine. You can always slice off the "hillocks" or invert the cakes. Where you have the advantage of weighing out the batters, many simply make a good estimation when dividing the batter between pans. So that should not have caused the problem.
This recipe has been tested and made many, many times for almost 30 years, since it is the Golden Luxury Butter Cake in "The Cake Bible". You may want to read what the Heavenly Cake Bake Along bloggers wrote for their "Rose's Heavenly Cake" reviews of the recipe.
One always wonders what happens when things fail. Frankly, we made the Angel Tweed cake on Sunday, a very easy recipe. And to our horror, it fell out of the pan within minutes after inverting it on the bottle, even though our cake tester and wood skewer showed it was "done". Fortunately, we have a large supply of frozen egg whites for making it again. The second one did come out fine.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Glenna Turner
10/ 4/2016 10:00 AM

Glenna, your comment is a joy to read! obviously you are an extraordinary baker. did you happen to catch the posting i did on CT in Rio where the cheese cake had a guava sauce?

A dessert buffet is a marvelous idea and maybe i can add it to the wedding cake book!

your kids will never forget this! you gave them a truly extraordinary gift. and thank you for your support of my books (which i feel so fortunate to be able to write and publish).

my mother was a dentist and growing up i too never imagined the possibility of being a baker. it happened through a circuitous route!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Victoria Nicholls
10/ 4/2016 09:55 AM

Victoria, thanks for asking. Haley didn't win medals this time but she did break her own record and was quite simply overjoyed to be part of the paralympics. most of all i'm proud of the extraordinary sportsmanship she exhibited. in one of her posts she wrote that paralympians don't want to be referred to as inspirational but as athletes. i disagree: i think they are both as is anyone who excels against the odds and the odds are present for everyone. it takes incredible focus, discipline, and determination to excel at anything.

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Glenna Turner
Glenna Turner
10/ 4/2016 03:03 AM

Ms. Beranbaum,
I have no question. Just a heartfelt thank for writing "The Baking Bible" (see Amazon.com for my 5-star review, if you like). My son was married last June and he and his fiance asked if I would make a "dessert" for the wedding, a sheet cake or something. After much questioning, discussion and baking trials,(everything from vegan chocolate cake, to pecan pie tarts, to cheesecake shots and a smallish 3-tier wedding cake centerpiece, bottom tier of carrot cake with cream cheese rosette frosting, the center a German chocolate cake with caramel pecan frosting and a top layer of key lime cheesecake with mascarpone cheese stabilized whipped cream, all specifically requested by the bride) I ended up making a "tasting" sized dessert buffet of 9 different items and cheesecake shots with 6-8 different toppings and a 3-tier centerpiece cake. The caterer even asked if I'd come work for her.(I was very flattered.) This all started with your Mango Bango Cheesecake recipe in which I substituted guava puree for the mango and a graham cracker crust (just more time efficient). The result was nothing short of miraculous. It was the overwhelming favorite. This filling recipe has become my go to recipe for just about every cheesecake I make. I've been able to adapt it to so many different flavors, guava, Nutella, pumpkin, strawberry, grasshopper and even turtle. I tried making a "New York" style cheesecake about 30 years ago, following the directions exactly and the result was a complete and utter failure. I never tried again. But with your recipe and some helpful advice from my pastry chef son-in-law, David Ramirez, I have become the cheesecake queen of my family and have found a new passion in my near retirement years. My only regret is that I wasn't really aware that being a baker was a career option when I was coming of age in the 70's. My dream now is to create a new trend in wedding reception options. The tiny bite dessert buffet with something for everyone with a more modest cake as a centerpiece instead of just one giant cake. What do you think?
By the way, I was so pleased with "The Baking Bible", that I've added a few of your other "bibles" to my cookbook shelf. Yours are the very best books out there and you're my baking heroine!! Thank you again.

Your grateful student,
Glenna Turner, Lakeland, Fl

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Victoria Nicholls
Victoria Nicholls
10/ 3/2016 08:52 PM

It is ok if you delete this but I wanted to know how someones' granddaughter did at Rio? :)

I was rooting for Tiffany and Ellie.

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Hi Woody - Yesterday I made Woody's Lemon Luxury Layer Cake again, and this time produced a monster of volcano bubbles. This is the one I was going to freeze and carry to Dallas on the 16th for a party, sigh. I wrote the long saga to you and sent it email with pictures to your email: woody321@ptd.net because I wanted you to see the pictures. I don't know if you ever got it if that is an email for the sale list. I also posted the story in the Forum but didn't know how to attach the pics there. I am going to have to remake the cake but wanted to know your thoughts first. I probably fiddled it too much before placing in oven because of the smaller batter amount in the one pan. Other than that, I don't know. Hope you can help. I don't want to ruin another one. Thanks. Joan

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Hi Daniel,
Sounds like you are having great results with your technique.
Other than referring to Rose's tips in "The Pie & Pastry Bible", we recommend trying her revised cream cheese flakey crust recipe. It is on the blog under this posting name: Rose's Favorite Flaky & Tender Pie Crust.
In "The Baking Bible", it is the only flakey butter crust that we used.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
I wanted to let you know how the pie turned out with the frozen blackberries. I thawed them out overnight in the refrigerator and then strained out the juices and reduced them to half on the stove. I then added this back to the fruit with the cornstarch, sugar, lemon and salt. Once I added this, the juices really started to come out of the fruit fast, probably from the sugar. I strained out the juice, which was about one cup, and simmered this on the stove until it boiled and thickened from the cornstarch that was in it. This actually worked great, although it cut back on how much filling there seemed to be by a lot. Next time I might use six cups blackberries, then add the sugar once thawed to release the juices more, add the cornstarch to the juices on the stove, then add the lemon and salt at the end. Let me know if you have any professional tips to add, but thanks for the help! I appreciate your advice greatly!

Thanks Again,

Daniel

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Hi Margaret,
We have to say that there are no plans for a 100% gluten free baking book as this is not our genre of baking. We do have several gluten free recipes throughout Rose's many baking books.
Fortunately, there are many cookbooks, television cooking shows, and websites that specialize in gluten free specific baking. For most of these authors, gluten free is their way of life on a daily basis.
However, since we both do not live at high altitudes, we also recommend these four sources for more extensive recommendations:
1. Susan Purdy’s “Pie in the Sky: Successful baking at High Altitude”
and her website “High Altitude Baking” linked on our SITES I LIKE.
2. Letty Holloran Flatt’s “ The Chocolate Snowball: And Other Fabulous Pastries From Deer Valley Resort”
3. General Mill’s website for Baking Crocker & Baking at High Altitudes
4. USDA’s website for recommendations
Rose & Woody

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Hello I have enjoyed your recipes since 1996 and the cake bible is my hands down favorite book. I wonder if you have any plans of developing a book that is high elevation AND gluten free baking?????

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Thank you for the prompt response and suggestion - into the freezer it goes! I wish you and Rose continued success!

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Hi lellani,
Many of our chocolate butter or sponge cake recipes state 5 to 7 days refrigerated. However, this is also dependent on how cold your refrigerator can hold its temperature. Also, the longer a cake is sitting in the refrigerator, the staler the cake is becoming.
We would suggest making a new cake. Freeze this one fora later use to add to a trifle or other recipe where a large proportion of the frosting or filling can give it moistness.
Rose & Woody

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Hi,

How many days will chocolate cake tightly wrapped in plastic and ziploc keep in the fridge? I read that freezing is the best way to keep it moist and tasting fresh, but I thought I'd get around to using it in less than a week and decided to leave it in the fridge instead. It'll be a week old by tomorrow and I'm not sure if it'll be safe to eat as I'm making cake pops with it. The cake pop process (rolling, coating, decorating) takes me an extra day to finish. Your advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Brittney
09/28/2016 01:01 PM

Brittney, the flour mixture is always added to the top of the sponge after mixing so it forms a "blanket." you did the right thing. but did you let it sit for an hour at room temperature before refrigerating as the instructions indicate?

i wrote either to let it sit from 1 to 4 hours at room temperature or 1 hour and then refrigerate overnight. i have never let it sit out all day at room temperature so on your return home, if it has risen too much and the mixture that bubbled through the flour blanket looks flat and fallen instead of spongey and bubbly, the dough will not rise as much. i hope it was cool where you left it and that it will be fine. do let us know!

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Hello, I am a little bit confused by the basic hearth bread recipe. I began making it last night for sacaduros and noticed that the sponge said it needed to rest 1-24 hours. However when I was following instructions, the recipe says to make the sponge then to make the flour mixture. Do you add the flour mixture to the sponge immediately then ferment for 1-24 hours? Or do you just let the sponge with out the flour blanket ferment for 1-24 hours? I went ahead and added the flour then put it in the fridge over night but when I looked this morning it looked the same as when I put it in the fridge the night before. So before I left for work this morning I put it on the counter. Help!

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Hi Tracey,
Thank you for your thoughts. We prefer the taste of Dutch process cocoa in cake batters, but everyones' tastes are different.
Have you tried adding or substituting up to 20 percent of the butter with canola oil (which we did as an adaptation of the chocolate cake in "The Cake Bible" for "Rose's Heavenly Cakes"?
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,
I'm a huge fan and live by The Cake Bible (TCB). I always give new bakers a copy of TCB and consider it a must-have staple in every kitchen. I'm in a cookie craze right now and trying to find out what makes a cookie soft. I have many cookie recipes that claim they will produce a soft cookie rather than a crisp cookie, but when I bake the cookies they are not soft. I am very careful to never over-handle the cookie dough, so I know that is not the issue. Is there a specific ingredient(s)that helps make a softer cookie (ie: brown sugar vs white sugar; cornstarch vs all purpose flour; eggs vs egg-less dough, etc.)? Thank you for all your wonderful recipes, instructions and helpful tips.
Happy baking,
Cecelia

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Earlier this summer I wondered if I might use the roll-in fat proportions for both Danish and croissants interchangeably, since they are very close, but not identical. You suggested averaging the butter & flour proportions from the two recipes and using the average amounts... A very simple solution, and you asked me to tell you how it went. (Sorry I forgot about that until now). It worked fine, with no discernible difference in the end product as far as I could tell. However, your recipes recommend 3 turns for the Danish and 4 for the croissants. I give them both 4 turns and think I get more even butter distribution in the Danish dough that way.
Dana

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I have made the yellow and chocolate cupcakes.
I use bleached cake flour for the recipes. I also use unsweetened cocoa because I have found that the dutch process makes the cake more dry.

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Hi Patty,
Rose's Favorite Yellow Cake is in "RHC" as the Apple Coffee Cake (you can just omit the apples and crumb topping) and as the Yellow Cupcakes. It is also in "The Cake Bible' as the Sour Cream Cake.
Rose & Woody

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley
09/21/2016 08:23 PM

Hi Woody,
I just got Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I don't see Rose's Favorite Yellow Cake in there? I see yellow cupcakes, but not cake. Am I missing something?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Kari S.
09/21/2016 10:03 AM

Kari, i think a denser chocolate ganache would be too rich and heavy so i would recommend making a ganache glaze to serve separately to pour on top and/or to garnish the plate.

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Hi Tracey,
We need to ask some questions before giving some suggestions.
1. Have you made other chocolate butter/oil cakes that are moist from Rose's recipes?
2. Are you using bleached cake flour or bleached all-purpose?

The addition of oil was to adapt the All-American Chocolate cake in"The Cake Bible" to be a moister cake, which was taste tested by many and also was well reviewed by our Heavenly Cake Bake Along bloggers.
Rose & Woody

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Good evening

Every time I bake the Chocolate Layer Cake, from Rose's Heavenly Cakes, the cake is extremely dry in texture. I am baking for the prescribed time in a fan oven adjusted to -10% temp. I have played around with different temperatures with no success. Can I add sour cream or buttermilk for added moisture?

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Hi Rose,
I have been baking your cakes for years and am an incredibly large fan of The Cake Bible and Heavenly Cakes. I hate to question you, but I am embarking on making Orange Chocolate Crown (from The Cake Bible) for my husband's birthday, and I wanted to know if you could suggest a way of making it more chocolaty. I wasn't sure if making a regular ganache as opposed to the light ganache, which the reciepe calls for, would be too heavy for the biscuit or too overpowering for the delicate orange flavoring. Any input or insight would be deeply appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Kari

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Hi Patty,
A correction to making a bundt cake. Leave the baking soda the same at 1/2 teaspoons. Just increase the baking powder.
Woody

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley
09/17/2016 12:39 PM

Hi all (again)
I'm starting the sponge for the Basic Hearth Bread in Bread Bible. My question is about getting the full flavor variation. I do plan on letting the starter take a full day nap in the fridge under it's flour blanket, but for the comment about refrigerating the finished dough overnight, is that before the rising, or afterwards? Alternately, between steps 3 and 4, or between steps 4 and 5.
Thanks for all your help.

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Hi Patty,
For butter and oil based cake baking recipes, we always state bleached cake or bleached all-purpose flour for the best results.
We always recommend that you make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences.
We suggest that you look at our Power of Flour posting, which I baked a basic butter cake in many tests with egg yolks, egg whites, whole eggs and bleached cake, bleached all-purpose, and unbleached all-purpose flours.
Unbleached has its place in baking, just not necessarily in cake baking. We only us it for one cake, the genoise sponge cake baked in a standard springform pan, where we do need the structure of the unbleached flour to make the recipe work.
Rose gives the best visual during presentations of why you need to use bleached flour. Bleaching roughens the surface of the flour particles so that they can absorb the butter or oil. Where unbleached flour particles are like ballbearings in which the butter or oil slip by them and are just suspended in the batter.
Fortunately, bleached flours are readily available at most supermarkets.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks Woody - Off to Walmart - ; )

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley in reply to comment from Woody
09/15/2016 06:50 PM

Thank you very much for your prompt response Woody! I just put in an order for Heavenly Cakes so as soon as it comes in I'll be good to go. Along with that, I'm assuming it calls for cake flour. If I don't have cake flour, am I okay using a/p flour? I generally get either Gold Medal or King Arthur unbleached.

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Hi Patty,
In "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" the Rose's Favorite Yellow Layer Cake recipe using whole eggs and a yolk is the batter for the Lemon Poppyseed Bundt Cake.
Most butter/oil recipes can be converted to bundt pan. You can increase all of the ingredients for Rose's Favorite Yellow Layer Cake by 20%. Except the baking powder, which you should try 1-1/2 teaspoons (3x increase), which is due to the inner walls of the bundt pan.
We suggest that you make a test one first and adjust from your results.
Rose & Woody

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Patty Kinley
Patty Kinley
09/15/2016 03:57 PM

Hi Rose and Woody,
I'm looking for a yellow cake for use in a bundt cake pan. Would I be able to adapt either Rose's Favorite Yellow Layer Cake or All Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake to a 10 or 12 cup bundt pan?

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Hi Joan,
We always recommend that you make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients, equipment, and techniques as called for by the author's recipe to establish your control. From there you can experiment by substituting one ingredient or adjusting one technique at a time to obtain results that match the control or to your preferences.
Fortunately, there should be another grocer near you that has bleached all-purpose and bleached cakes flour. Even Walmart carries Swans Down.
You can look at our Power of Flour posts and see the difference in results with unbleached compared to the bleached flours.
The King Arthur cake flour is Unbleached.
Good luck hunting.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody, I am embarking on a project for a friend who is having a party in Dallas. I plan to make abut four kinds of financiers, and Woody's Lemon Luxury Layer Cake, and the Rose Genoise. Will freeze the financiers and carry. Well, it all sounded easy until I began looking at the recipes and was met with different varieties of 'flour'. I have made the wonderful lemon cake three times and was never concerned about the flour. Now, however, I see recipes that call for "cake flour, or bleached all-purpose flour." Hmm. My grocer has no bleached flour. I have some SwansDown Cake flour, I muse. Then I am met with unbleached and so forth. The Chocolate Cherry Financiers want "all purpose flour." The rose cake would like to have "cake flour, or bleached all-purpose." The Golden Ingots would like "pastry flour, or Wondra." I looked up King Arthur's site and see that he has a new Queen Guinevere flour, but I wonder was that okay? The Chocolate ingots want "bleached all-purpose flour". And last, but not least for this adventure, Barcelona brownie calls for "all-purpose flour," and doesn't care if it's bleached or not bleached.
I so wanted to use the new Illanka for my ganache, but could not find it except on-site and they wanted $20-plus to ship so I had to forego for now. I can't wait to try it.
Can you please tell me what I should do with this flour flummox?
I think I will make the lemon layers here, freeze, and carry to Dallas, but the molded rose I think I should bake there, although I could carry the syrup etc.
Appreciate your good advice. Am so sorry to bother you since you are so busy.
Best, Joan

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Hi grace,
We generally only use sheet pans for sponge cakes like the Biscuit Roulade on page 142. If you are making taller cakes, then we recommend the White Base Cake recipe on page 491 and use the Rose Factor charts on page 490 and 492 to convert the recipe to a 18 x 12 or 13 x 9 inch cake.

In "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and in "The Baking Bible", we used the White Genoise from "The Cake Bible" for shortcake bases. Since the genoise uses clarified butter, you can refrigerate the cake.
Rose & Woody

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thank you very much for the quick reply. much appreciated. I have two other questions please, I like the white cake, can I double the recipe to make a 1/4 sheet or even a half sheet?

also which recipe do you recommend when make a strawberry shortcake? or any cake that requires refrigeration that normally you would use with whipped cream? thank you so much!!! i love the book.

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Hi grace,
We always recommend to use the same ingredients, the recipe's method, and equipment so that you can establish a control to know the author's intended results for the recipe.
When "The Cake Bible" was written 28 years ago, 9 x 1-1/2 inch round pans were the standard available pans in the USA. That is now changed to 9 x 2 inch pans.
You can use 8 x 2 inch round pans for recipes that call for 9 x 1-1/2 inch round pans, as 8 inch pans will hold 7 cups where 9 inch pans will hold 6.5 cups. You may need to add a smidgen more of baking powder to achieve the same baked top. Your cakes will be taller and may take an extra minute or so to bake. We also recommend to use cake insulating strips wrapped around the sides of the pan.
For cakes that use 9 x 2 or taller pans, we recommend to look at the Wedding & Special Occasions chapter page 489 to 493 that explain how to convert a recipe to different size pans.

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grace cista
grace cista
09/13/2016 11:20 AM

I love your cake bible...I notice most of your cakes u use a 9 inch pan, can I use an 8in pan instead?

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Liu Shang Jiang
Liu Shang Jiang
09/11/2016 11:55 AM

Dear Rose&Woody,
is it true to say that acid ingredients make cake moist?

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Hi Woody! Thank you so much for your help. It worked great and I have a shiny beautiful ganache without bubbles!

Warm regards,
Judy

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Thanks a ton Rose & Woody..

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HI Judy,
Have you tried the method on page 271 in "The Cake Bible" to add heated cream to the food processed chocolate in a bowl?
That should guarantee virtually no bubbles.
Rose & Woody

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Hi San,
I checked all of our tests as we tinkered with the amount of baking powder. The best we were able to achieve was a mostly flat top rounding off at the edge. We did get dipping at times. We had less dipping when we made the 2 pans version.
You may want to try adjusting the baking powder 1/4 teaspoon less and adapt from the results.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody! Thank you so much for the reply. Although I admit I had not looked in the cake bible for a recipe for ganache I realized that the process I was using was not at all good for ganache. I was following a recipe I found online which cooks the chocolate and cream on a very low heat in a saucepan.

That was the first mistake, the second was that I had not brought my chocolate to room temperature, and the third is that because the giant Callebaut 5kg bar is so hard to break in even sized pieces that was probably not helping maters at all. I should have just referred to the Cake Bible to begin with like I always do!

So I took your advice and followed the recipe in the Cake Bible on page 269-Dark chocolate ganache filling, frosting and sauce. You mentioned it would still be pourable and suit my needs. I did everything exactly as directed and even watched Rose making it on YouTube to be sure I followed it to the letter.

The food processor is amazing in getting all he already cut chocolate into smaller more similar pieces. I poured in the hot but not boiled whipping cream and let the processor go for just a few seconds after just like Rose. The ganache was the best I have ever seen so shiny and all one colour. The only thing is that there were so many bubbles I could not use it to top my cakes. I strained it through a fine mesh sieve three or four times but still could not get rid of the bubbles. Please let me know how to get the fabulous ganache in you book without all the bubbles.

Regards, Judy

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HI Rose & Woody,

Hope you guys are swell, and thanks a ton for releasing the Cake Bible E-Book.

It's the Tomboy cake again! I have followed instructions to the T every time, yet the cake comes out very very fragile and delicate. Though it initial rises in the centre, by the time it's done it dips substantially (in the centre with what looks like a dent).

The texture, taste, moisture and everything else is heavenly, wish I were able to perfect it. Could you please help out?

Warmly,
San

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Hi BglLvr,
This is engineered to be a cake recipe, but it is virtually the same ingredients and instructions for making cupcakes. Just fill your cupcake liners about 3/4 full. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
Depending if you want flatter or more domed tops, you may want to adjust the baking powder for your next batch.
Rose & Woody

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Actually, the end result is to be a cake. The original recipe is for cupcakes. The desired product is a cake.

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Hi BglLvr,
We have cupcake recipes in several of Rose's books. In this site we have a yellow cake recipe on this posting "Rose’s Favorite Yellow Cake" that you can use to make 18 cupcakes. This recipe has been used by thousands of home bakers and professionals for nearly 30 years.
You may want to get a hold of "The Cake Bible", "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and/or "The Baking Bible" for books with our cupcake recipes.
Rose & Woody

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Hello! I'm sure it's here, but I'm not finding it. I want to use a tried and true cupcake recipe to make a cake. Considerations? Alterations? Suggestions? Help!

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Hi Patty,
Are any of the biscuits or pie crusts from Rose's books?
Many two crust pie recipes will state to place a foil ring that will cover the pie's border to protect it from over browning. You should be able to get a browned top crust with this method.
We recommend that you should always confirm with a oven thermometer, what your oven's temperature actually is per the setting you set. Many are lower than the setting.
You could try these:
1. brush butter on your biscuit tops
2. glaze with an egg glaze (listed in the Pastry Bible or on line) OR spritz with water & sprinkle sugar on pie crust tops
3. raise the oven rack position
4. use a butter based pie crust
Rose & Woody

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Patty Cooke
Patty Cooke
09/ 1/2016 01:29 PM

Hi Rose,

Whenever I make biscuits or pies, they do not brown on top. It doesn't seem to matter if I get ready made crust or biscuits or hand make them. I have had this problem thru many ovens, so I think it's me. They get dry, or brown on the edges but they are not pretty and sometimes they are not even tasty. I follow the directions and/or instructions. What do you think?

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Hi Judy,
Since you have had favorable results with other chocolates, we ask what brand(s) and what cacao %?
Does the Callebaut ganache discolor at room temperature or refrigerated, if not frozen and/or used on a cheesecake
Although we call the dark ganache a frosting, it is pourable for your application. We usually use a higher percentage cacao and higher amount of cream to chocolate by weight ratio. The food processor method uses the same ratio as the regular ganache.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose, I was typing so fast I made a mistake it's a 1 to 1 ratio. I noticed the recipe in your book is for ganache frosting but I am just using regular ganache that pours onto the cakes that are collared so the ganache is just on the top. Is the procedure with the food processor the same for my ratio and for regular ganache not frosting?

Cheers, Judy

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Hello Rose, I was wondering if you could help me with my ganache problem. I use a 3 to 1 ratio of callebaut 54.5 % that I buy from Costco online.
I use the ganache to top my cheesecakes and then freeze the cakes. The problem is after being chlled to harden and before freezing, the chocolate is dark in some spots and light in other spots. It almost looks marbled or even worse spotted with two different colours light and dark even though I have only used the dark chocolate. Also even when I am first mixing it and it's all emulsified there is streaking of light and dark. I have never had this problem before with other brands, also it looks ok when I first put the cake in a container to freeze, then two weeks later I take it out and the light discolouration is there again. I am so frustrated and I don't know what I am doing wrong since part of the batch is great and then part of the batch is a much lighter colour on the outside and darker on the inside. All using the exact same batch from the same bowl. There is also a big difference in shininess from one cake to another. HELP!!!! Me Rose😩
Regards, Judy

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The wife is out of town for a week so I went on a baking binge: Ricotta Loaf, Beer Bread, Perfect Peach Pie, Key Lime Pie and two batches of Apple Strudel - disappointed in the first batch so I made a second that was much better even if not perfect. I then had a problem of how to get rid of it without eating all of it myself. My solution was a to freeze the bread after sampling some and inviting a bunch of guys over for dessert and a movie. They were kind enough to eat all of the pie and strudel that I hadn't yet gotten to. So now the decks are cleared for my next round - Genoise au Chocolat with Chocolate Mousseline and Heart of Wheat Bread. Is there a twelve step group for people with a baking addiction? :) By the way, I have found my best fruit pie baking results are achieved when baking from frozen according to your directions. With a silicone pie shield on, the edge crust reaches the same level of browning as the rest of the top. Just perfect.

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Hi Christy,
When one’s proven results recipes are now having problems, the following checklist of questions may help.

1. Is my oven still heating at the same temperature?
2. Is my kitchen able to be controlled for heat and especially humidity when i had good results?
3. Am I using the same brands of ingredients, or substitutions that I know I can count on?
4. Am I weighing my ingredients?
5. Am I using the same brand of measuring cups and spoons?
6. Have I checked with other bakers in the area for potential problems?
7. Have I changed the method for making the recipe?
(This happens a lot with us, where we come up with a short cut or a new method that may work at first.)
8. Am I storing the cookies the same as before?
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Beth
08/29/2016 02:14 PM

Beth, if you have "the bread bible" there is a detailed section on starters-- how to convert a liquid starter to firm one and vice versa, and how to tell if your starter is active enough to raise the bread. alternatively, king arthur has a great 800 help line.

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Hi rose!
I've been making cutout sugar cookies for a while and recently I've came across this problem where my cookies crack after a few days. It's a small crack that grows on the back of the cookie and I've inspected each cookie after it cooled and there are no cracks but after a few days a crack will appear and it grows, eventually breaking the cookie in half! I've tried everything and nothing seems to help.

Thanks
Christy

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Are sourdough starters interchangeable? I was given some King Auther sourdough starter,and I would like to use it for your recipes. I really wasn't sure which type of starter it was closest to. Also, I've been feeding it about once a week or so. When a recipe says to use a freshly fed starter,can I assume that a week old starter is fresh enough?

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Hi Rebecca,
There are many ways to flavor this cake. Rose's Heavenly Cakes will give ideas for adding other flavoring ingredients although the base cake recipe maybe made with whole eggs or egg yolks. However, you can then convert the recipes to using egg whites and adjust the recipes from testing.
Some ideas:
1. Add a lemon oil and/or lemon zest for a lemony flavor.
2. Use the white velvet cake as the cake batter for an upside cake.
3. Add lighter in weight fruits like dry cranberries or currants , likely cut into smaller pieces, into the batter.
4. Add heavier in weight fruits like blueberries during baking around the 3/4 of the baking time. This will help to minimize the fruit sinking to the bottom, unless you are serving the cake inverted.
Rose & Woody

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Hello. I have the Cake Bible and Heavenly Cakes has been ordered. I was curious if your white velvet/vanilla cakes can be easily altered to make lemon or other flavours or have fruit added like blueberries. I bake a lot and would love to just have your one recipe where I can make alterations. Thank you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
08/22/2016 09:43 AM

Ed, when i want to use clarified butter i specify that so buttered is just unsalted butter but you can use parchment instead.

haven't made apple strudel for a long while now and am longing for it! enjoy!

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I plan to make strudel (apple) for the first time this weekend, including attempting to make and stretch the dough - even have the 4 ft round table. I must admit that it looks a little scary, but what the heck. I have some questions. You indicate that the sheet pan should be buttered. Because I'm concerned that regular butter might burn at the recommended baking temperature, should that be clarified butter spread on the pan? Could I skip the butter and just use parchment? Also, I didn't see anything in the book corrections, but are there any additional tips that might not already be in the book? Thanks!

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Hi Rose & Woody,

THANKS A TON for the insight and that too at jet-speed!!

I'm overwhelmed and grateful from the bottom of my heart.

Warmly,
San

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Hi San,
Depending on what is trying to be achieved in a cake recipe will determine what adjustments need to be made for converting the recipe for cupcakes. Also, what your preference is for a cupcake. Some people like domed cupcakes, others prefer a flatter top for holding the frosting. We generally strive for a just a slightly domed cupcake for a good base for the frosting.
Where we try to achieve as close as possible flat top for a multiple layer cake to give even thicknesses of fillings, Rose prefers a slightly domed cake for a single layer cake.
For most multiple layer cakes recipes, we slightly reduce the amount of leavening for cupcake recipes.
For single layer cake recipes, like the Red Velvet, you can stay with the same amount of leavening or a slight increase.
We do not have leavening conversions on record for all of the layer cakes in our catalog of cake recipes. However, the cupcake recipes given in Rose's Heavenly Cakes will give you a several examples.

If halving a 2 layer cake batter with leavening for a 1 layer cake, you generally can just divide all of the ingredients by 2. Unless, you prefer a more domed top, which you usually can decrease the leavening slightly. I was just suggesting experimenting with a half recipe incase, you do not like the results.

Baking temperature should stay the same. Bake on the middle oven rack position. Probably start checking the baking time around 18 to 20 minutes.
Rose & Woody


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Hi Rose & Woody,

Thank you. Should I make changes in the baking temperature/time? Could you please suggest a guestimate?

Also, is there a formula of sorts to halve the recipe? Or any recipe for that matter? I'm sorry to be such a "genius", but am very new to baking and Rose's books are my only teachers.

Warmly,
San

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Michele Owen
Michele Owen in reply to comment from Woody
08/19/2016 05:54 AM

Thanks so much for getting back to me. I refroze it as soon as I found out what happened so I will make sure to use it when it will only be out for a couple of hours. Michele Owen

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Hi Michelle,
The storage time we state for this buttercream is 1day at room temperature. If you are using it today and it will only be at room temperature for a several hours, we believe it will be alright.
However, food safety is always a concern of ours. Fortunately, yours was frozen.
Rose & Woody

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I made your white chocolate cream cheese buttercream and froze it. The power was out for about 18 hours. When I realized it the buttercream was room temp. Can I still use it?
It was in my freezer chest in my garage.
Thanks,
Michele Owen

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Hi San,
We have not tested them in cupcake form, but they should work. We suggest making a half recipe and try filling of the baking cups from 1/2 to 2/3rds full.
Rose & Woody

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HI Rose and Woody,

I was wondering if I'd bake the meittie's tomboy cake as individual cupcakes. I am planning to use the cardboard baking cups also known as disposable baking cups: the square variety.

Please help out, cos I love that cake.

Warmly,
San

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Hi ruth,
We are assuming you are talking about the Black Chocolate Party Cake on page 119. Our testing notes show that the batter should fill the 10 cup bundt pan to 1-1/4 inches below the rim. Coming out of the oven, the center of the cake was 3/4 inch above the rim. Finished height was 3-1/4 inches.
When we have substituted coconut palm sugar for granulated sugar, we have done it by equal weight. We have not tried it as substitute for turbinado sugar.
Coconut palm sugar is lighter than granulated or turbinado.
If your cake is shorter than the above, it is probably from the palm sugar. We use three ovens to give a range for baking times. However, ovens can vary which may be why yours was done in less time than our numbers.
Rose & Woody

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HI there. I have used your books for years and am really enoying the new Heavenly cake book but I have a question. I made the Black Magic Birthday cake in a Nordic Ware pan. It seemed to back up beautifully but after I put the syrup on it and let it sit in the pan before unmolding it sand at least a half inch down. Is this normal? why do you think it did that> I did have to use some coconut palm sugar as i did not have enough turbinado sugar. Please help me understand why this happened.

I baked it at 350 and it was done in 45 min. I used a toothpick as I don't have an instant read thermometer. I have never used one of those.

looking forward to a response.
Ruth

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Hi rosalind,
We have several recipes listed on the Right sidebar which you can access by clicking under CATEGORIES and the Recipes heading.
We will say that this web/blog site is not a site for finding all of Rose's hundreds of recipes. To do that would entail adding the entourage of advertising links to our blog, which we do not want to present to our followers.
We also have a Forums section for bloggers to discuss various topics as well as us answering many questions that do not pertain to Rose's recipes and books.
One advantage we have above most blog/websites are documented bake-alongs for 3 of Rose’s books. Click on one of the links on the Left sidebar. You can read commentary, step-by-step ideas, and photos for:
The Bread Bible Marie Wolf’s blog “BreadBasketCase” under SITES I LIKE
The Bread Bible Rose’s Alpha Bakers “the Bread Bible bake along”
The Baking Bible Rose’s Alpha Bakers “The Baking Bible Bake Along”
Rose’s Heavenly Cakes Marie Wolf and bloggers “Heavenly Cake Bake Along”
Rose’s Heavenly Cakes Hector Wong “Hector’s take on Rose’s Cakes”
You will also see from postings and topics under CATEGORIES, that Rose has postings on many subjects.
Rose & Woody

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How do you access recipes or is this just a forum for people who have your books? I keep searching for types of cake, pies, etc. and the exact same home page comes up every time. Even when I clicked on contact nothing came up so here I am posting a comment. Help.
Thanks

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Hi Sue,
We ask are you using the same brand and size of eggs that you use in Florida?
Adjustments for high altitude baking are fairly minor. Susan Purdy writes in her book "Pie in the Sky", for whipping egg whites for an angel food cake that above 2,500 feet, you want to beat egg whites only to soft, slightly droopy peaks as they will stiffen and expand during baking. At 5,000 feet, to add some water and cream of tartar. So if you are above 2,500, you may need to adjust.
Rose always recommends for whipping egg whites to a stiff peak to add 1/8 teaspoon of cream of tartar per 1 egg white into your mixing bowl.
The only experience that we have had with a longer time frame for egg whites has been from whipping pasteurized eggs in the shell.
Rose & Woody


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I live in Florida and when making tapioca I have no problem with beating the egg whites to soft peaks. Takes about 5 minutes.
While here in NH I tried making tapioca, and the egg whites took about 1/2 hour to get them to soft peaks.
Does elevation make a difference?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
08/12/2016 05:45 PM

yes Ed that's exactly the case. it will be a less sweet version because you are not making an italian meringue you are simply adding 1 egg white whipped and then a little sugar to the whipped cream. both versions are good.

REPLY

Dear Rose and Woody,

Thank you for your inputs. As advised by you, will experiment with converting the recipe for one pan first.

Will definitely keep you posted on the results.

Kind regards,
Nmc.

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So what you are saying is that if topping with Italian meringue, only then do you fold Italian meringue into the filling. Otherwise, just the plain meringue. Wouldn't that mean a different sweetness for each option? Or was your intent to take out the scant two cups before adding the sugar syrup?

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Hi Trish,
We frankly do not make topsy turvy cakes. However there are two approaches.
The best for guaranteed results is to make standard cake layers, fill the same size layers, slice each stacked cake layer for your desired angled tops and/or bottoms, frost, and assemble. (There are many websites with DYI instructions.)
The other is with pans shaped for making topsy turvy cakes, with the risk of unevenly baked thru out layers. Baking a 4 inch tall cake, especially larger sizes, is challenging. If you plan on using these pans, it is best to try recipes supplied by the manufacturer of the pans, until you get a feel for what to expect for results.
We recommend that you look at the Wedding and Special Occasions chapter in The Cake Bible, in which Rose gives her Rose factor, formulas, and calculations for butter cakes for: scaling up or down from a given cake pan size, baking time guidelines, servings, approximate batter weights, and baking powder adjustments. There are also base batter formulas for butter, genoise, and cheesecakes. Several frosting recipes are also included. We have found that the formulas and calculations will give you a starting point for working out favorable results through testing.
You will see from the charts that the baking powder does not increase in the same proportions as rest of the ingredients.
We suggest that you make 3 separate batters for your 6 & 8, 10, and 12 inch layers.
A 12 x 12 inch pan holds around 19.5 cups. We generally fill a pan half full with a butter based layer cake recipe .
We always use cake strips for insulating the pan sides, and especially if you plan on baking cakes up to 4 inches high.
Enjoy the challenge. Have cupcake liners ready if you have too much batter during your testing.
Rose & Woody


Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Ed Gianni
08/11/2016 11:28 AM

Ed, that's correct. the syrup is for the Italian meringue and, as i wrote on page 184 under variation, INSTEAD of making the italian meringue.....

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Hello there,
Im looking to make a topsy turvy cake...cakes will be 12,10,8,&6 in.Im aware that leavening for a tall cake must be increased.One simply can't double a small cake recipe and get the desired height of 4in.Can I get some suggestions on how much more leavening I need to add? Also, am I to understand that a 12x12 pam needs about 19 cups of batter? If that is so ,I'm sure it won't be the same amount for these topsy turvy cakes as one side is shallow.How do I figure out the amount of batter needed for ea pan?Can u give me a rough estimate as to how much batter i need?Thanks so much in advance

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In the Key Lime Pie recipe of Pie and Pastry Bible (pgs 182-184), the meringue folded into the filling when using a meringue topping contains the sugar syrup. But in the whipped cream topping variation, you do not specify the sugar syrup. Is that correct? Thanks.

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Hi Nmc,
We have not worked out the conversion of the Sour Cream cake to the 12 inch size. However, looking at your numbers, it looks like you have too large of a recipe.
When we engineer a recipe, we try to do the following for butter/oil cakes.
1. Have a batter that fills the pan the same as it does for the original size pan. In this case at half full.
2. Although we do most every ingredient by weight, we try to keep volumes at reasonable measurements.
3.The combination of Baking Soda & Baking Powder for a larger cake will usually be a lower as you can see in the book. This is assuming that the original has a flat top. We generally consider Baking Soda to be 3 times stronger than Baking Powder. So we will increase it slightly, so that there is more room to tinker with the Baking Powder measurement.
4. We work out the formula with 1 layer first.
5. Have cupcake liners ready for excess batter to make use of it.
Enjoy experimenting to adjust your recipe for flat layers.

Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Michael
08/10/2016 05:34 PM

Hi Michael,

while water boils at 212˚F, other liquids do not have the same boiling point.

It's possible that your thermometer is not 100% accurate but bottom line is if using your thermometer and it is the proper consistency when it registers 220˚F then that's what you should use.

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Rose, I have a question about what I think are typos in the Cake Bible - at least mine, which is a 25th printing. For the Raspberry and Strawberry Conserves, the target temperatures for the syrup are 210 and 208 degrees F. Since these are below the boiling point of water, this seems erroneous. I've done some Raspberry Conserve and had it come out quite well when I hit 220 F. Is the proper temperature for the Strawberry then 218 F?

Thanks and I apologize if this was already addressed in an earlier erratum.

Michael

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Yes , it is the sour cream cake from the Cake Bible. I used the Rose factor and multiplied the base formula by 7 , so 259 gms egg yolks, 560 gms sour cream, 700 gms each of sifted cake flour and sugar, 595 gms unsalted butter, 11.69 gms salt and 38.57 gms baking powder.

I calculated these amounts to fill two 12" cake pans. I hope I got it right.

I have two questions.

1. How should I calculate the baking soda level for this amount?

2. In case I do just one 12" PAN instead of two, how do I calculate the amount of batter ?

Thank you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anne
08/10/2016 11:30 AM

hi Anne, i think spicy italian sausage would be great--either cut in chunks or ground sausage but in either case sautéed. so glad you liked the recipe!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from David Chau
08/10/2016 11:16 AM

hi David, if you have the cake bible, see page 254 where i explain how to enrich cream with butter for whipped cream. i don't think it would work with milk as you can't whip milk but i do think it would work if cream were called for in a recipe where it was not required to be whipped. as i add up to 1/2 cup/ 4 ounces of butter for cream that is only 20% butterfat i would think 2/3 cup would be about right for whole milk which is only about 3.5% butterfat.

but keep in mind that even if all the %s are the same, processing, such as turning cream to butter, always decreases flavor. it's good to have this information if one runs out of cream and has milk on hand.

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Hi Nmc,
We are assuming you are basing this on the Sour Cream cake from “The Cake Bible” that Rose presented as posting about it.
1. What % did you increase the rest of the ingredients Or how many grams of flour, sour cream, and egg yolks are using?
2. What is your calculation for baking powder?

Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

Someone told me that if I am in need of 1 cup of heavy cream, just combine 2/3 cup of whole milk with 1/3 cup of melted unsalted butter. Is this true or just total madness?

David

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Dear Rose,
I am new to the q&a forum, though I have been following your blog for some years now. I also have all of your books and to say that I am a Big Fan of all the great work you have done in this field, and continue to do , would be an understatement. Your love and commitment to this science comes through in your honest approach to this field. You are my guru, someone who has literally held my hand in my personal journey through the wonderful world of baking, especially cakes. Thank you!

I would also like to post a question abound your favourite yellow butter cake. I have to prepare a cake for a 100 people, for a very dear friend's 60 th birthday. One of the tiers would be a 12 inches round. I have worked out the formula for this size, however, the recipe includes the addition of baking soda as well as baking powder. I have worked out the quantity for the baking powder, but would like to know how to calculate the amount of baking soda. I would really appreciate the help. Thank you.

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Your Sicilian Vegetable Pizza Roll from The Bread Bible is so delicious and easy. Do you have a suggestion for adding meat to the vegetables. We had a round table of ideas after enjoying it tonight and I thought I would ask your opinion as well.
Thank you for your time.

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Thanks, Rose! No need to be sorry, I am very happy for the recipes and think they are working out great! I will try reducing the juices and will let you know. I am planning on trying this week at some point.

Thanks Again,
Daniel

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Daniel S
08/ 7/2016 10:29 AM

hi Daniel,
i'm so sorry you are having this experience as i tested this recipe with frozen blackberries and this did not happen. i wonder if these blackberries went through freeze/thaw/freeze and released extra juice. check the Alpha Bakers site as some also had this happen. i would thaw the berries and reduce the juices (toss the berries with the cornstarch and sugar mixture before adding back the reduced juices. do let us know!

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Hello,

I have been making many pies this Summer from the Pie and Pastry Bible, which I love, and trying to get a few great recipes in my repertoire. I am having trouble with the filling for the blackberry pie using frozen blackberries. I first made a double pie crust and found that the juices coated the outer sides and bottom if I did not seal it well. Today I tried a lattice pie crust using the same recipe and found that the outer sides and bottom were covered in juice and the lattice top was submerged in a few places. Should I try precooking the fruit as in the designer cherry pie recipe? Would this remedy the issue?

Thanks!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Judith Berg
08/ 5/2016 09:32 AM

Judith, you can find several recipes on this blog using the Ankarsrum using weight that are my recipes but if you would like to make recipes from their recipe booklet you will need to contact them directly. i'm sure they will be able to tell you what they consider the weight of 1 cup of flour. i am not familiar with their recipes which were probably developed in Sweden.

the US representatives and distributers are the Beckers: (770) 516-5000 or try emailing Ashley McCord at: support@ankarsrumoriginalusa.com

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Manisha Singh
08/ 5/2016 09:26 AM

Manisha, the only replacement i know of is a higher gluten flour. where it is indicated in the recipe it will contribute a chewy texture and lighter crumb.

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