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Mar 19, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose

Please feel free to post comments here if you can't find another appropriate place. The other question entries became too long for some people's browsers to download.

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Comments

Hi Jan,
We cannot say much if the cake seems tasteless. Many wedding cakes are done for the styling and decorations versus making a good taste to remember.
On cake mixes, most cake mixes have pudding or some other moistening agent in them, plus many have flavor enhancers as well as the preservatives for giving them a long shelf life and, in my opinion, additives that have your taste buds asking for more.
Have you made cakes form scratch from baking writing authors?
Rose & Woody

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Thank you so much :)

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rebecca
06/26/2017 07:16 PM

Rebecca, we do not allow links on the blog but do feel free to post them on the forums.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rebecca
06/26/2017 07:15 PM

Rebecca, you can make the lattice on a cookie sheet, bake it, and then slide it onto the pie! alternatively you can do cutouts the same way.

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Dear Rose,
Thank you so much for responding. i really like your books, and I hope that I can learn a lot from them. I ended going out and buying my own bleached all-purpose flour, and so I was able to mix it with cake flour. I had both bleached and unbleached cake flour, so I mixed the two and added them to the bleached all-purpose flour. Thanks for the tip! I'll remember it next time I don't have pastry flour.

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Hello. I will be trying Rose's blueberry pie this holiday weekend. I was curious if a top lattice crust is possible on a pie that is cooked on a stove top and placed to set in a baked crust. I am torn because I feel I like the pie better of it cooked on the stove top but love the looks of a lattice top. Thanks

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Tristanio Coppola
06/25/2017 03:09 PM

Tristanio, using the formulation exactly as indicated will come closest to pastry flour. we have not tried other variations using unbleached because unbleached is not as tender but you might want to try it. the good news is that we recently discovered that when using either bleached or unbleached all purpose flour instead of pastry flour, if you add about 1 tablespoon of sugar for a single crust it is an excellent approximation of pastry flour!

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Tristanio Coppola
Tristanio Coppola
06/25/2017 02:25 AM

Hi, I was wondering about making my own pastry flour. I recently purchased the Pie and Pastry Bible and in it describes how to make your own pastry flour by combining bleached all-purpose flour and cake flour. I don't have pastry flour in my kitchen, and I don't bake with bleached all-purpose flour, but I do have both bleached and unbleached cake flour. Would adding bleached cake flour to unbleached all-purpose flour create the right pastry flour as bleached all-purpose with cake flour does? Also, does it matter which cake flour I use, supposing I had bleached all-purpose flour? Thanks so much! :)

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Hi . !!
I have a question... I LOVE cake....but at my niece' wedding ,,,,her cake was pretty ...but it was rather dry ,dense and course and without a lot of taste to it.
I am used to cake mixes....maybe I do not have the most sophisticated palate
Is it me or the bakery where she gets her cake...She also had a cake for her Baby shower and it was the same dry ,dense tasteless cake

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Casey Solis
Casey Solis in reply to comment from woody
06/24/2017 06:30 PM

Thank you so much for the prompt reply.
Your site and books are so very appealing, that for the first time ever, I might follow and buy.
Thanks again. CS

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Hi Casey,
We recommend freezing the galette before baking it. The introduction chapter to The Pie and Pastry Bible gives details.
Rose & Woody

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Casey Solis
Casey Solis
06/22/2017 07:14 PM

It's a question! I've been ill and the blueberries for the galette I was going to make, MUST be used pronto. Neither my husband nor I are up to snuff yet and I would like to freeze my galette.
The big question is; do I freeze after assembling or after baking?
Thanks, I'll check both my email and your site for a possible answer.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Barbie in Florida
06/22/2017 11:18 AM

thank you Barbie! no wonder it suddenly started soaring in numbers on Amazon best sellers!!!

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Barbie in Florida
Barbie in Florida
06/22/2017 10:35 AM

Amazon has The Bread Bible for $1.99 Kindle edition

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Thank you Woody. I did use bleached flour- as instructed. I however made half the recipe. Would all the ingredients be simply split evenly or any adjustments?

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Thanks so much for your information. Seems a lot of information can be found in the book. Thanks again.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from davina
06/21/2017 03:40 PM

davina, i'm going to wait til you have a chance to look at the book before answering any more question bc i think you will find almost everything you are asking addressed in the book. for now, i'll just tell you that i never said to put a pan of water in the oven--it doesn't do much. you need to create steam as i wrote. and no, pans with holes don't seem to make a difference.

as regards baking stones, which are widely available, you absolutely need to preheat the oven for at least 45 minutes with the stone in to get hot enough. also thick crusts are the result of low oven heat.

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Hi Rose,
Do you think a perforation (holes) on the bottom of the pullman pan will be good or it really does not matter as long as i have a preheated stone on the bottom? Is any good stone I need to pay attention to?

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No, I did not. I looked through the window pane and observed it. They most of the time came out with a thick and hard crest. For sure, next time I will put a pan of water and some ice inside. Thanks for the advice.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from davina
06/21/2017 02:38 PM

devina, you should not be opening to oven to check before half way through the baking!

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Thanks. Every time, I baked i noticed that the top turned dry and hard very fast in 3 to 5 minutes. Is this normal?
I am so much looking forward to read your sandwich recipe.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from davina
06/21/2017 09:46 AM

davina, you will see all the instructions on each recipe in the book. i always spray the dough before putting it in the oven but also create steam by preheating a pan at the bottom of the oven and tossing in some ice cubes. soft crust is more a function of the ingredients but you can always brush the crust with melted butter or cream when it comes out of the oven to soften it further and give it a shine or "glow".

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Hi Michele,
Please email me at woody321@ptd.net
So I can have an email address to reply.
Woody

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Hi Michele, You might have clicked the wrong button. This is Davina, not Woody.

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Michele Simons
Michele Simons
06/20/2017 06:58 PM

Hi Woody! My email requesting info on the baking supply and equipment sale has bounced back. Can you please contact me and send me the list? Best wishes as always--Michele in NC

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Thank you for your encouragement.

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Thanks so much for replying to me. I will definitely get a stone. Should i spray water on top of the dough right before putting the dough to bake or keep a small pan of water inside while baking? I love the top crust soft much more than the hard one, especially Hong Kong and Japanese style breads.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from davina
06/20/2017 03:21 PM

davina, you will find that the baking stone makes a huge difference. also creating steam in the oven keeps the top crust soft enough to allow it to expand during the initial stage of baking.

also, you will see in the recipes that for most bread i only do the final shaped proofing until when pressed with a finger tip it slowly fills in. if it keeps the impression it's likely to not rise much more from the oven heat. for white flour breads i let it double but if a large amount whole wheat flour is added double is too much as the whole wheat cuts through the gluten structure and would collapse if allowed to double. you have lots of interesting reading and experiments ahead.

do let us know--i'm confident of your future success!

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Thank you so much for replying to me.
You are right I did not use your recipes. I use Bread flour for all my bread with protein 11% to 13%. I have tried different brand. Because I have never had oven spring while others using the same recipes do have oven spring, i started searching. I just purchased your book on line.
I will try get a baking stone and try. Thanks

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from davina
06/20/2017 09:34 AM

davina, the main reasons for lack of oven spring are:

inadequate bottom heat (best to use a baking stone preheated for a minimum of 45 minutes and set the bread pan directly on it)

over-proofing for the shaped rise

four that is too weak.

i address all these issues in the recipes in the bread bible so i suspect you are not using my recipes?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rosary
06/20/2017 09:31 AM

Rosary, one year ago i bought a Panasonic model: NN-CD989S - 1.5 Cu. Ft. recommended by a friend/colleague and am very happy with it.

please put "know thy oven" in the search engine. i did a very helpful posting a year ago August 6 comparing two ovens. the Panasonic is the only one of the 2 that is microwave as well as convection but it will still be useful for you to read!

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What did i miss? I never have oven spring when i bake bread.

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Does Rose have a recommendation for a microwave/convection oven?

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Hi Leticia,
Both recipes for the pancakes ,on page 100, and the waffles, on page 103, are correct for using BLEACHED flour. I have made both and enjoyed Rose's as well. We both weigh are ingredients. The pancakes should be fluffy (and tender, if using cake flour), but may seem slightly drier than some recipes to compensate for the addition of the blueberries.
For "The Cake Bible" all recipes use bleached flour, unless specifically stating unbleached or a different flour, like buckwheat. When it was written, unbleached cake flour was not available.
One advantage you have with Rose's books is that this blog includes under the right side bar's CATEGORIES section, a Book Errata/CORRECTIONS link to all of Rose's corrections for her books. We always recommend to check Rose's correction section if you ever have a question on an ingredient's amount or instructions for a recipe.
You can also print off the listed corrections to have on hand for your book.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

I have several of your baking books and have enjoyed them greatly. I recently purchased The Cake Bible. I have trie the buttermilk waffles/ pancake recipe 3 times and it comes out very thick and have to add another almost cup of buttermilk and they don't come out right. Is there a possible typo in the recipe? There is either too much flour or not enough liquid.

Thank you-

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Karen
06/16/2017 05:51 PM

Karen, please see step 2 on page 518 where i wrote to sprinkle the flour mixture on top of the sponge and let it stand for 1 to 4 hours at room temperature. if it is longer then you need to refrigerate it. of course if it's very hot in your kitchen then go with the shorter time at room temperature. you can decide how long based on whether the sponge is bubbling through the flour mixture.

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Hello,
I have a new question but for some reason, I was not able to open the "post a new comment" link, so I am hoping that I will receive a reply even though I am adding my question onto Rebecca's post.
My question relates to the challah recipe in Rose's "The Bread Bible". The recipe calls for making a sponge. The sponge contains eggs and the recipe calls for making it and setting it aside, either overnight or earlier in the morning on the day the bread will be baked.
I am wondering if the sponge should be refrigerated in light of the eggs,or if it can safely be kept at room temperature?
Thank you very much. I appreciate your assistance. Karen

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Hi Rebecca,
The 2-stage method for mixing generally gives softened butter cake recipes a more tender and open crumb. For this recipe, Rose wanted a firmer crumb to support the blueberries.
However, the 2-stage method could be tried for you to see the difference.
In "The Baking Bible" we sprinkled the small blueberries on top of the cake after it had baked for two-thirds of the baking time for the cake's batter to be mostly set and to prevent the berries from all sinking to the bottom of the cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rebecca,
We always recommend that you should make the recipe with exactly the same ingredients and following the instructions as stated in the author's recipe to establish your control and to experience what the author's thoughts were for composing the recipe. From there you can adapt the recipe.
Our thoughts are that the batter was not evenly mixed. When we make cake batters in a stand mixer, we always finish off the mixing by using a large spatula to scoop the batter off the bottom of the mixing bowl and then stir/fold the batter to be uniform. We also will use a ladle to scoop out the batter up from the bottom. Cupcakes made with the the last of the batter scraped off the sides of the pan will frequently be a different appearance from the rest. Also, letting the cupcakes sit for 20 minutes before baking will give you more doming.
We agree that you may have under baked the cupcakes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Jessica,
Since any color is by the perception of one seeing it, we suggest that you make a small batch of the butter cream and try it with the chocolate cake recipes that you are testing. Pale chocolate color for us is a lighter milk chocolate versus dark chocolate color.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Ashley,
The 3 tier Wedding Cheesecake on page 507 that serves up to 150 is the same recipe as the Cordon Rose Cream Cheesecake on page 81.
We suggest making the 3 Tier and cut the cakes for 100 servings.
You could tier the layers with some engineering of using supportive discs and posts between same size layers, for a 2 tier cake with 9 and 6 inch layers by 4 plus inches tall.
Rose & Woody

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Hello.

I was curious if Rose's blueberry muffin recipe could be made the reverse creaming method like her banana muffins instead of the method of creaming butter and sugar together at first.

Thanks.

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Ashley Cristiano
Ashley Cristiano
06/15/2017 12:20 PM

Hi Rose, Woody, and readers! I want to try making the party cheesecake (which serves up to 100 people) in your book, THE CAKE BIBLE. However, I want to test the recipe out first to see if it is suitable or not/I like it out of all of the other cake recipes I have tried. Is there a way to "downsize" this cheesecake recipe without taking anything away from it but its size. Or is the party cheesecake the same recipe as the cordon rose cream cheesecake? Also, I know cheesecakes are a bit heavy but is it possible to tier them, such as having 2 tiers? Thank you very much for your time and any advice you can give! I really appreciate it! =)

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Hello. I had recently baked a batch of Rose's Texas banana muffins, but in a standard muffin size tin. Some of the muffins baked and domed well, but then really deflated once cooled. Deflated so much that they were flat. Also, the bottom of the muffin looked buckled in the liner and they started baking about 1/4 inch (1/2 centimetre) from the bottom of the liner so that there was a pocket of air at the bottom of the liner. When I sliced into the muffin, the bottom of the muffin looked a bit raw as it was darker than the rest of the muffin. The top of the muffin looked cooked, but could maybe stand another min or two in the oven. I really like the texture that this muffin gives. It is a texture I have been searching for for a long time.

Can anyone offer suggestions on why the muffins baked this way so I can prevent it in the future? Thank you.

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Thanks, Woody, Increasing the baking powder by 1/8 teaspoon did help some. (I also lowered the oven temperature from 375 to 350 degrees.) The tops weren't perfect, but that is okay, since the cakes are served turned upside down. Laura

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Hello! I am making a 3-tiered "all chocolate" cake for a family wedding this summer using recipes from The Cake Bible and Rose's Heavenly Cakes (both heaven-sent in my opinion!!). Because it will be outdoors and in the low 90s, I have narrowed the exterior frosting down to the Chocolate Mousseline Buttercream or the Chocolate Truffle Silk Meringue Buttercream. I am leaning towards the latter, because of the more delicate flavor (each tier will have different fillings, so I'm going for a more subtle exterior flavor), but I need some clarification on the color. In TCB it says "pale chocolate color"-- can you give me something common to compare that to or maybe direct me to a picture of it? The bride wants the cake to be "obviously chocolate", so I'm concerned that it might be too pale. Thank you for your assistance and for year amazing baking references!

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Thank you so much for your quick and thoughtful reply!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Kelly
06/12/2017 09:57 AM

Kelly, best to freeze it unbaked and when ready bake it frozen. it will take about 20 minutes extra but the benefit is the crust starts baking before the filling defrosts so it gets crisper. be sure to protect the edges with a foil ring and you may need to tent the top if it gets to brown but cut a vent in the foil so it doesn't stem. say hi to Donna!

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Good morning,

My co-worker Donna LaBrasca sent me your way. My sister lives several hours away and has an apple tree, she would like to make me an apple pie and freeze it so that I can bring it back with me next time I go up to visit. Is it best to make the pie and freeze it unbaked or bake the pie, cool and then freeze it? Thank you for any assistance.

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Hi Andrea,
Food Lab for Serious Eats, and just google for Harold McGee.
Rose & Woody

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Andrea Kiner
Andrea Kiner in reply to comment from woody
06/10/2017 10:32 AM

Hi and thank you. Can I have the links please. Thank you.

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Hi Andrea,
We have to say we have never tested water activity. Lowering pH, would be adding some type of acidity.
We suggest the Forums for you to post your question. You want to ask Harold McGee or Serious Eats. We have links to both of them.
Rose & Woody

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Hi everyone,
My question is more about food science. I want to know if there is anyway to lower water activity(AW) value, and the (PH) in buttercream frosting especially meringues?

Thank you.

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Rita Wampler
Rita Wampler
06/ 8/2017 10:22 AM

My mother had the cook book Rose's Christmas Cookies which had one of her favorite recipes - Maple Sable Sandwich Cookies. However once she passed, we realized there was a whole section missing from the cookbook which included that recipe. We are wanting to compile a book of her favorite recipes and would like to include that recipe. Would there be a way we could get a copy of that recipe?
Thank you

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Hi Deena,
May we assume you are a professional baker, since you are using 4 inch high cake pans?
From our testing we have seen that even using a 2 inch high pan for batters engineered for 1-1/2 inch high pans can have the baked cake being:
1. over browned on the top due to the pan's higher side walls reflecting in heat like a reflector oven.
2. shorter and denser cake due to the top setting earlier.
3. possibly drier or more crumbly
However, the proof is in pudding as we suggest you try baking the same recipe 1-1/2 inch high pan.

We also advise to use cake strips with most softened butter or oil based recipes.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Laura,
Your plan sounds good.
Rose & Woody

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HI Ashley,
We appreciate your asking what to make for the birthday celebration fro The Cake Bible.
What to make will need to factor in how many people are coming to the party. For example, you technically could "tier" two cheesecakes like you would for a wedding cake, but a cheesecake usually only serves up to 16 servings, as cutting pieces "wedding cake" style is very difficult. If your dad likes chocolate frosting, ganache is perfect blend of chocolate and heavy cream, and more stable for hot weather. If you like a recipe using a 1-1/2 inch tall pan(s), we advise that you convert the recipe to using 2 inch high pans. The Wedding and Special Occasions chapter has base formulas for most sizes of 2 inch high round cake pans and sheet pans and frosting recipes. Enjoy the adventure and some taste testings.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,

What is the significance of cake pan height on baking assuming you are adding the same amount of batter into the pan? I have baked cakes in a 4" pan with the batter recommended for a 1.5" pan (just because I only have the deep ones on hand). The cakes turned out nicely but then again I don't know what they would be like if I had used a 1.5" pan.

Thanks
Deena

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Thanks, Woody, The surface of the cakes had a cracked "mountain peak" in the center where batter had bubbled up through. I will try the recipe again to see if adding 1/8 teaspoon additional baking powder will help. The ramekins may be too deep. However, they are the perfect size in diameter for the pineapple slices. Laura

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Greetings Rose/readers! I have just come across The Cake Bible at my local library and coincidentally, I have been charged with the task of making my Dad's 60th birthday cake and the party will be in about a month. Thus, I have time to experiment with different recipes. The cake will probably be two-tiered. The problem is, I don't know what recipes to try first. There are so many recipes and they all sound so delicious and amazing! Does anyone have any suggestions or favorites? My Mom really likes Bavarian Creme (and I read in your book Rose that the Pear Bavarian cream is your favorite Bavarian cream) but, I don't know what kind of cake would go well with it and what kind of frosting either. My parents also like cheesecake but I'm not sure if you can have two tiers when it comes to cheesecake. They also like whipped cream frosting but, I'm not sure how well the whipped cream frosting will hold out in the hot July summer weather and I'm not sure what kind of cake or filling would be appropriate. If anyone can please help, I would be very appreciative! Thank you in advance!!! =)

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Hi Laura,
We are assuming your “volcano” surface top is that the top has hillocks with depressions in their centers, like bubbles being popped.
Since the cakes are inverted with the cake tops now being the bottoms for serving, you could just leave the recipe as is. Or you could increase the baking powder slightly and see if that produces just some hillocks or a smoother surface.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Woody or Rose, I have another question about the Individual Pineapple Upside-Down Cakes recipe in Rose's Heavenly Cakes.

I tried the recipe again using four 10-ounce soufflé ramekins (3 3/4" diam. x 2 1/2" deep), rather than eight 5-ounce ramekins as before (I don’t have the Nordic Ware pan recommended and wanted a bit larger cakes than the 5-ounce ramekins make). The cakes had a “volcano” surface on top. To correct this, do I reduce or increase the amount of baking powder in the recipe? (I searched this topic on your website, but am a little confused about what to do in this case.) Thanks so much!

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Thanks for the reply, Rose. I wasn't sure because that temperature is lower than the boiling point for water. I made the cakes, but not the caramel drizzle. The cakes were very good! Laura

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Laura
06/ 2/2017 01:26 PM

yes Laura it is! i was just thinking about those wonderful pineapple cakes and how i made them for a dinner collaboration with andré soltner of lutèce and ariane daguin of d'artagnon shortly after 9-11. the dinner was auctioned ad sootheby's! i got a lovely note form the Rose's who were winners of the auction after the dinner.

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Is the temperature correct in the paragraph below copied from my book Rose’s Heavenly Cakes p. 341 (Individual Pineapple Upside-Down Cakes)?

“Return the caramel to low heat and use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to stir the mixture until smooth, scraping the thicker part that settles on the bottom. Raise the heat and boil, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the caramel reaches 140 degrees F/60 degrees C and is reduced to between 1/2 and 2/3 cup (4 to 5 fluid ounces). Pour it into the prepared glass measure and set aside until cool.”

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anonymous
06/ 2/2017 09:08 AM

we always do a signing in SF and omnivore books and that's pretty near Menlo Park!

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That's pretty much my thinking too. Thanks, Paul

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Hi Cynthia,
The convection should not affect the in the oven off timeframe. Although we have not taken a temperature reading after turning the heat off, we have checked to make sure it only jiggles slightly. However, the temperature should be above 160 to set the eggs safely.
The coconut cheesecake is a flavored version of Rose's basic cheesecake recipe. If you have not baked cheesecakes in a waterbath before, we suggest making sure the water is very hot, 140ish F. You can even go a bit hotter, versus baking at a lower temperature for a longer period.
Rose & Woody

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You bet. I live in Menlo Park(and rent BethAnn Goldberg's StudioCake kitchen whom you mentioned in one of your books). Hope to see you at Keplers in MP when your book comes out !

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anonymous
05/31/2017 05:54 PM

Kathleen, i don't know where you live but when the basics book comes out fall of 2018 i will list the cities we visit and hopefully you live in one of them and can come by at one of the events! thank you!!!

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Thank you. And you're my inspiration, by the way. Wish I could meet you!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Kathleen Goitia
05/31/2017 04:11 PM

Kathleen, in the UK in years past lemon curd was kept at cool room temperature over the entire winter so assuming you are not living in the tropics it can easily sit out at room temperature for at least one day and i would say even in hot weather it would be fine for one day. the acid in the lemon preserves it.

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Kathleen Goitia
Kathleen Goitia
05/31/2017 02:49 PM

Are there any recipes for lemon curd filling for cakes that can sit out at room temperature all day?

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I have made coconut cheesecake fr Heavenly Cakes several times and the center is so soft it falls off after slicing. My oven is convection and I was wondering if the fan running after turned off cause the causes the oven to cool down too quickly for this method. I even tried baking for one hour. An inch around the top was brow and again too soft to stand or slice properly. If I wanted to try baking at a lower temperature longer could you tell me how to do that. Or what is the ideal center temperature for cheesecake? Delicious but soft to the point of collapse.
Thanks for your help

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woodywolston
woodywolston in reply to comment from Ritu
05/29/2017 11:56 PM

Hi Ritu,
We are assuming you are in Great Britain or a Commonwealth country?
You may want to try Kate's flour, microwave heated "bleached" flour which we have posted on the web and she has on her website--A Merrier World.
Rose & Woody

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woodywolston
woodywolston in reply to comment from James
05/29/2017 11:53 PM

Hi James,
Generally, if we do not specify a time, it is because the time from should be under 10 minutes. We consistently have that time frame with the eggs at room temperature and using a large metal bowl over a pot with simmering water. The base should come out custardy thick after cooling.
With an instant-read, we usually read around 120 when the chocolate is fully melted, then a dip with adding the eggs. Then up to 140 for the mixture.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose,
Making your White Chocolate Lemon Buttercream for the first time this weekend and I ran into a bit of a hurdle with the custard base. My ingredients were weighed, I used G&B WC, but once on the double boiler it took an hour an fifteen minutes for the mixture to reach 160F. This was a pretty intense workout whisking the entire time, as the mixture starts out quite thick, and nothing in the recipe gives an idea as to this length of time. Is my experience odd, or is the White Chocolate Custard base supposed to take over an hour on the stove?
-Thank You

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Hi Woody
1.Unfortunately cake flour is not available here, so I use All-purpose flour+cornflour (85+15%).
2.Yes i weigh the ingredients
3.The pans are little more than 2in in height

I was asked specifically for a white chocolate cake and I guess this is the only one.But will surely try the golden luxury cake.

Your inputs are truly appreciated.

Thanks

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Hi Ritu,
We ask some questions.
1. are you using bleached cake flour, such as Soft as Silk?
2. are you weighing your ingredients, especially the whites?
3. are you using 1-1/2 inch high pans?

A couple of suggestions. The tops of cakes can become overly browned with higher, 2 inch high pans. You can convert most of Rose's recipes using 1-1/2 inch pans to 2 inch pans by making a 1-1/3 recipe. Cake strips will also help with baking a more even texture softened butter or oil based cake. You can also try replacing a couple of tablespoons of the butter with canola oil.
The Golden Luxury Butter is the yolk version of the White Whisper.
Rose & Woody

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Hi
White chocolate whisper cake from the book Cake bible comes out a bit dry, crumbly and with a hard crust. I use cake flour and baking time is about 33mins. What could be the reason if you could please help me in understanding and would it be a better option to use plain flour?

Is there any other recipe with white chocolate which can be used?

Thanks

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Thanks for the explanation Woody. I will try the chocolate cake both ways and see what works best for me. Laura

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Kris Viles
Kris Viles in reply to comment from woody
05/25/2017 04:18 PM

I am just writing so I'm able to uncheck the remember me next time and let me know if someone add a comment. thanks for your help.

I did get a response from the author and it fixed the problem perfectly.

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Hi Laura,
Yes. The amounts are correct as written both for the Perfect All-American Chocolate Butter Cake conversion to a 2/3 recipe and the Chocolate Base Formula recipe.
We wanted to make the conversion of recipes from 1-1/2 inch to 2 inch high pans reasonably easy with a generic, across the board, conversion of all ingredients, without separate listings for the leavenings. For The Cake Bible’s wedding and special occasion base formulas, there are separate baking powder charts for different sizes of pans to factor in that leavenings have to be engineered separately for flat top layers. (Rose also wanted to give reasonable amounts by grouping pan sizes for the baking powder level.) So technically, the 2/3 recipe with the 2 teaspoons will likely produce a slightly domed cake. In Rose’s Heavenly Cakes, this same amount of baking powder is used for the single layer Chocolate Layer Cake with Caramel Ganache, an adaptation on the All-American (with the addition of some canola oil) designed to produce a slightly domed cake.
Rose likes to engineer butter and/or oil single layer cakes to dome slightly for appearance, or flat for stacking for multiple layer cakes.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mary Anne
05/25/2017 01:24 PM

organic valley and stony fields are my favs and they are both 40% butterfat. soft as silk is bleached cake flour without leavening. only self rising flours will contain leavening.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum
05/25/2017 01:22 PM

Jim, i should have told you you need to uncheck both the remember me next time and the let me know if someone adds a comment.

let me know if this works and i'll remove your comment. also a good test would be to post your response to me which should have been posted as a comment (re convection etc.)

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Thank you again! Flat beater it is!

I'm using Organic Valley Heavy Whipping Cream. Online it says that's "365% minimum butterfat". And Soft as Silk is ok, or does it contain additional leavening (I've already recycled the box!). Thank you!!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mary Anne
05/25/2017 10:00 AM

Mary Anne, for my recipes, always use the flat beater unless the whisk beater is specified. in the cake bible i didn't write flat beater but in all subsequent books i have just to be sure people knew which one to use. the whisk beater is used for sponge type cakes to incorporate ore air.

what is the fat content of the cream you are using or what brand? if it falls apart it means the cake is too fragile which means too much butterfat or too much leavening.

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Thank you so much for your response! Yes, I'm using Soft-as-Silk cake flour, which is bleached. I read through the discussion of baking powder amount/cake pan height and on the last try, adjusted the powder down to 1 tsp. This time, the cake fell apart - coming out of the pan, moving between cooling racks, and getting it onto the plate for icing! So questions I had included: 1) should one use the whisk or paddle when beating the batter? 2) can one over-beat the batter, or am I not beating it enough?

Thank you again - it does taste fantastic!!

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Mary Anne Holmes
05/24/2017 11:07 PM

Mary Anne, i also had a problem several years ago with the butter cream cake. i think it was the fat content of the heavy cream that had changed or that i started using 40% instead of the lower fat content brands. my notes say that i dropped the baking powder to 3/4 teaspoon. i'm assuming you are using bleached cake flour--this is critical. i do hope this works for you because it really is/was an amazing cake! i admire your persistance trying it so many times. please let us know if this works for you.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Jim Just
05/24/2017 10:57 PM

hi Jim,

only quick breads can be mixed in 3 minutes. if customer service says that you shouldn't knead yeast bread for more than 3 minutes, then the machine is not suitable for bread making. it is excellent for cakes--no one will dispute that! and i have used my kitchen aids for years without a problem. i think you have to use your own judgment here. for ex: when i make bagel dough, which is a very stiff dough, i only make a half recipe at a time so as not to put too much strain on the motor.

the question for the engineers is: which is better for the machine: 7 minutes at speed 4 or 20 minutes at speed 2? if you are really concerned with kitchen aid's warning, best to get a bread machine to use just for the mixing process. they are designed specifically for bread and are really inexpensive these days. one can often find them at the salvation army for a song!

regarding the cast iron pan, my Wolf oven is a commercial model so that could be why i've never had a problem. if this is a warning from your Wolf model, best to put the pan on the lowest shelf or instead of using the pan use one of those big blast water guns to create the steam.

i hope this helps.

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Hi Kris,
We had a similar experience with a ATK chocolate pound cake recipe. We are assuming that you have tried baking the cake longer.
Are you weighing your ingredients as weighing them is the most accurate way to measure them?
Are you using a lighter colored loaf pan?
Have you tried wrapping the pan with magic cake strips or homemade foil cake strips?
Since you are making the recipe strictly to the author's method, we suggest that you contact the author for her/his advise and/or check her/his website to see if there are any errata/corrections to the recipe.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Anna Maria,
You may want to look at Rose’s posting--Kate of Kate's Flour as this may be the closest flour to what you have read in the UK cookbooks. We are aware that United Kingdom flour manufacturers produce a “bleached all-purpose flour” by a heat-treating treatment. Kate Coldrick, who lives in England, developed a similar "bleached" all-purpose flour using her microwave. You can also get more details by looking at her linked blog, A Merrier World, under Sites I Like on the left sidebar of our blog. We recommend using this flour for any cake recipe with butter that has been softened but not melted and oil cakes. European recipes, such as Genoisé, can use unbleached flour.

When Rose visited Kate several years ago she was amazed at the difference in texture and height of the cakes that Kate is now able to make using her Kate’s flour.

We also have her technique for making her flour in “Rose’s Heavenly Cakes”.

Rose & Woody

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Hi Tiya,
Generally, we recommend them for butter and oil cake recipes baked in layer cake and two-piece tube pans. In Rose's Heavenly Cakes and The Baking Bible we included them in the recipe's equipment section.
For other author's recipes, we suggest try her/his recipes both ways to see if the strips achieve better results.
Rose was the first to have a silicone cake strip product, Rose's Heavenly Cake Strips, which fit 9 inch round and 8 x 8 inch square pans and can be clamped to fit smaller pans. We are still using our original, 11 year old strips.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose:

I'm using your Bread Bible cookbook and I have two 'corrections'. First, Kitchen Aid has a sticker on their dough hooks to "use Speed 2 only, see instruction manual". the cookbook calls for kneading at speed 4. Their customer service also says not to knead for more than 3 minutes.

Second, you call for placing a cast iron frying pan (or something similar) on the floor of the oven; we have a Wolf oven and placing anything on the (sealed) bottom of the oven would void the warranty -- the finish will crack.

love the cookbooks, thank you! Jim

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Question... I have a recipe that I make that is a "pound cake" style, in a 9x5 loaf pan. It has no leavening agents but it does rise. The problem is every time I make this, even though I use a tester and no crumbs or wetness comes out, when I cut into the center I always have an area that is not cooked all the way. It's not a big area, about 4 inches in the center and the upper half. I make sure the butter is the right temp when mixing with the sugar, but no matter how many times I make it, it's not cooked in the center. Thoughts?

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Thanks so much for your response! As a follow up, could you suggest if I should be using cake Strips for Butter Cakes?

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Hi Tiya,
Yes, you can bake the 6 and 9 inch layers at the same time. the 9 inch layers will be set by the time for removing the 6 inch layers.
Rose & Woody

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I apologize if this question has been previously answered. I have some UK cookbooks and would like to know if Rose has a recommendation for the best U.S. flour to use in place of UK plain flour. I know she has worked a lot with UK flour in developing a UK version of The Cake Bible. White Lily makes an unbleached version of their AP flour (not self-rising)and I suspect that that flour might be a good choice. Although I have read that UK plain flour has a 10 or 11% protein content, I have the impression that UK plain flour is closer to a softer flour like White Lily. I have not been able to find an answer to this question and would greatly appreciate Rose's expertise.

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Hello Woody/Rose,

I am planning to use the 3-Tier Chocolate Butter Wedding Cake Recipe for my daughter's Birthday cake. I would only need 2 Tiers (2 layers of 9 inch and 2 layers of 6 inches) though. My question is, can I bake 4 layers at the same time in the oven and since the baking time for the 6 inch cakes is about 25-35 minutes and for 9 inch cakes is 35-45 minutes, will the 9 inch cakes fall if I open the oven door at 25 minutes to remove the 6 inch layers out. Any suggestions?

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Adele Phyllis Unterberg
Adele Phyllis Unterberg
05/21/2017 12:24 AM

Dear Rose,
It was wonderful to see you. The service was beautiful and heart rendering.Please keep in touch.
Best wishes,
Adele

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Mary Anne Holmes
Mary Anne Holmes
05/20/2017 12:24 PM

I have made the Golden Butter Cream cake about 7 times now, and every time, it falls in the middle. I use a 2" high cake pan, room temp ingredients carefully wieghed. I've tried the whisk on the kitchenaid artisan mixer, and I've tried the paddle. I used 1/8 tsp less baking powder..Nothing works. At first it was a challenge, now it is simply maddening. I want a one-pan cake because it is just 2 of us. It tastes better than the Sour Cream Butter Cake, but at least that one works. What could possibly be going wrong, or is it supposed to do this?

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Sorry, that should be 2 teaspoons (10 grams) baking powder in the recipe I just posted.

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I calculated the amount of baking powder would be 3 teaspoons for a double recipe, enough batter for one 9-inch by 2-inch cake pan, of the Chocolate Base Cake in The Cake Bible (pages 489 – 483).

The amount of baking powder would be 2 teaspoons if I reduce the Perfect All-American Chocolate Cake to 2/3 recipe, enough batter for one 9-inch by 2-inch cake pan.

Why is there such a big difference in the amount of baking powder between these two recipes, which seem to be identical otherwise (2 teaspoons in the first and 3 teaspoons in the second)? Are my calculations off?

Two-third recipe Perfect All-American Chocolate Butter Cake from The Cake Bible, enough batter for one 9-inch by 2-inch cake pan

1/4 cup + 3 tablespoons (lightly spooned into cup) (42 grams) unsweetened cocoa (Dutch-processed)
2/3 liquid cup (158 grams) boiling water
2 large eggs (100 grams) (weighed without shells)
1 1/2 teaspoons (6 grams) vanilla
1 1/2 cups + 4 teaspoons (158 grams) sifted cake flour
1 cup (200 grams) sugar
2 teaspoons (15 grams) baking powder
1/2 teaspoon (3.5 grams) salt
2/3 cup (5.3 ounces/151.2 grams) unsalted butter (must be softened)

REPLY

Hi Libby,
For genoise cakes, we do not use cake strips.
You may want to make two cakes, one with and one without to see.
Rose & Woody

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Hi abby,
That one is not in our repertoire. You may want to check with Marcy Goldman.
Her Betterbaking web site is on our links.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rose and Woody,
Question: When you make a genoise cake, do you personally like to use a cake strip around the pan?
I am wondering if that would help get some additional height.

Thanks.
Libby

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Hi,

I've tried about 8 different recipes for Eire Kichel...aka Jewish Bowtie Cookies. Mine turn out flat instead of airy and puffy.

I've been trying to make them like Bea's Bakery in Tarzana, CA.

I'd appreciate any help you can give me.

Abby

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Thanks for the tips and I am going to read those sections in the cookbooks. I am meticulous about weighing all ingredients in grams and I am constantly calibrating my scale to ensure accuracy. I was afraid of over whipping the batter with a stand Kitchen Aid for 7 minutes instead of 5.

Libby

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We give tips for successful génoise and sponge cake recipes in The Cake Bible, page 119 and Rose’s Heavenly Cakes, page 153. Rose also has a blog posting, Fear of Génoise -- an Important Lesson with more recommendations in the article and comments. Here are some points for successful génoise;
1. Weigh your ingredients for accuracy. This is especially important with eggs which can vary as much as 25% in weight within a carton of eggs. If you cannot weigh your eggs, we suggest adding an extra yolk.
2. Heat the egg and sugar mixture to warm to the touch.
3. The egg mixture needs to be beaten for at least 5 minutes when using a stand mixer and 10 minutes over hot water when using a handheld mixer to produce a almost to soft peak egg foam that is triple to quadruple in volume. The volume can look correct in a shorter time span, but it will not hold its structure during baking.
FOR MANY BAKERS, not beating the mixture long enough is the main reason for dense and deflated cakes.
4. Gently but thoroughly fold in the flour using a large balloon whisk or slotted skimmer and finish folding by reaching to the bottom of the bowl with a silicone spatula.
We ask are your angel food and chiffon cakes baking to their correct heights?
5. Gently fold in the butter and foam mixture just until it is incorporated.
6. Avoid opening the oven door until the minimum baking time to prevent the génoise from falling.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Tara,
Yes. You can flavor the cake layers. For the lemon layers we suggest lemon oil.
You may want to make some test batches with cupcakes.
Rose & Woody

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Dear Rose,
I made the chocolate raspberry genoise (Heavenly Cakes) a few times and each time the cake did not rise "almost to the top of the pan" as the recipe indicates. Then baked cake was about 1 inch high, and as a result, it I had fairly thin layers after I cut the layers horizontally. I did whip the sugar/egg mixture for 6-7 minutes using speed #10 on the Kitchen Aid stand mixer and it seemed that the mixture quadrupled. I also used cake flour (Swans Down bleached cake flour). The cake still was delicious!! I had the same experience with the Genoise Classique in the Cake Bible.

Question: Is there a chance that I over whipped this egg/sugar mixture OR do you think I did not fold in the flour as quickly as I should have? (I found that it was somewhat difficult to incorporate the flour so that there were no white specks left.)

Thanks for your help!
Libby

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Tara McKinley
Tara McKinley
05/13/2017 10:29 AM

Hello, I m baking the white butter cake from Rose's Cake Bible for an upcoming wedding. I will be making 12", 10", and 8" tiers (3 layers per). The groom wanted lemon and bride wanted strawberry. I am planning to make the 12" tier filled with a strawberry ganache (using Roses rasp ganache recipe). The othe two tiers I thought I could use a lemon curd between layers with a white choc ganache. My question (finally - right?) - can I flavor the basic white butter cake with strawberry powder or essence 9for the 12" tier and the lemon tiers with some lemon juice or extract? I have used her conversions for the amount of cake etc, and do not wish to upset the balance.

REPLY

Thanks Woody! Will do :)

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Hi Tiya,
We suggest checking them 5 minutes before the first time frame of 20 minutes.
Our goal for making cupcakes is for their tops to be relatively flat for frosting them. The mini cupcakes will likely dome a bit. We recommend making a smaller test batch to see if you want to make adjustments. Enjoy experimenting.
Rose & Woody

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Hello,

I am planning to make Yellow Butter Cupcakes from Rose's Heavenly Cakes but I want to make mini cupcakes instead of the regular sized ones. Could you please suggest how this would change the baking time and anything else that I should consider modifying?

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Hi Tessy,
You can buy "The Cake Bible' or any of Rose's baking books that use bleached flour because we have a solution.
Since you may not be able to purchase bleached cake flour, you may want to look at Rose’s posting--Kate of Kate's Flour. Kate Coldrick, who lives in England, developed a "bleached" all purpose flour using her microwave. You can also get more details by looking at her linked blog, A Merrier World, under Sites I Like on the left sidebar of our blog. We recommend using this flour for any cake recipe with butter that has been softened but not melted and oil cakes. European recipes, such as Genoisé, can use unbleached flour.
When Rose visited Kate several years ago she was amazed at the difference in texture and height of the cakes that Kate is now able to make using her Kate’s flour.
We also have her technique for making her flour in “Rose’s Heavenly Cakes”.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DFahl
05/10/2017 09:46 AM

the recipe is right in the book. it calls for mineral oil but i think any neutral oil will be fine--mineral oil is colorless.

REPLY

Dear Rose
I am all new to baking and I would like to purchase the Cake Bible. However reviews revealed that the recipe does not work with UK flours. I would like to know if there is a UK version of the book or if you can recommend a suitable book. Thanks

REPLY

Thank you for the quick response. What sort of oil? Vegetable?

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from DFahl
05/ 9/2017 05:17 PM

DFahl,the best way to get the appropriate type of cocoa butter is on line. chefcentral.com carries it. alternatively you could make the creme ivoire using oil which is actually easier to work with because it does not set up so quickly.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Susan Siemers
05/ 9/2017 05:15 PM

Susan, i will report this to my blog adminstrators. it opens up fine on gmail and aol so the looks like the issue is with outlook.

REPLY

Dear Ms. Beranbaum,

I want to make the Creme Ivoire Deluxe (pg 246 and 247 of the Cake Bible) however I am running into a big of a problem. The recipe calls for Cocoa Butter but I can't seem to find any. I've consulted some health food stores and different food shops but their Cocoa Butter appears to be geared towards skin care and moisturizer. I doubt this is what you intended when you wrote the book and this might just be the age of the Cake Bible and shifting quirky trends. Do you have any suggestions for a brand of cocoa butter I can trust or a fix for the recipe?

And a little prattle:

Thank you so much for the wonderful books over the years. Your help with the Pumpernickel Bread has turned it into a family favorite. My family has a tradition that we bake a new type of cake every birthday as anyone can guess the Cake Bible has been invaluable for your family. This year I'll be making the White Lilac Nostalgia cake for my mother (sans candied lilacs as I can't find a florist for edible lilacs in my area and the flowers sadly don't grow here very well). She is very excited.

Thank you again for all your hard work!

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Susan Siemers
Susan Siemers
05/ 9/2017 03:00 PM

Sorry to contact you this way, but couldn't find any other way to do it. When I try to open your email with your latest newsletter, it crashes Outlook. It is only your email that is doing it. It appears that there might be a virus of some sort in it. I couldn't even close the program with task manager, had to reboot computer. When I tried again, all other emails opened fine, but yours again hung up the program, wouldn't open.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Retta Finn
05/ 8/2017 10:56 AM

Retta, i never had a buttermilk cake with mini chips. the only time i used mini chips was in the grandmarnier cake. but i can tell you that the buttermilk country cake on page 41 of the cake bible has proven, over the years, to be the favorite yellow cake in the book. oh wait--you wrote chocolate and buttermilk. this is definitely not my cake and here's why: i discovered years back that cocoa makes the best chocolate cake and mixing the cocoa with boiling water releases a lot of flavor. i actually tried doing this with buttermilk but buttermilk curdles terribly on boiling. so in short, this has to be someone else's recipe. you best option to to try searching on line for a chocolate buttermilk cake with mini chips.

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Dear Rose,

For years my mother and I used one recipe for my children's birthday cakes, year after year. In fact, when my daughter turned three we made three double-batches and turned them into a huge landscape for Thomas the Tank Engine! My problem is that this is the first year my mother is no longer with us, and it's been a few years since I've made it. My daughter is turning 18, wants "Grandmother's Cake," and I can't find the recipe.

My memory is that it was one of your recipes; a chocolate cake that used butter and buttermilk, and that had the variation of stirring mini chocolate chips into the chocolate batter as the final step before spooning into pans. I thought it was in your Cake Bible, but I can't find my mother's copy. I've bought a new copy (new edition?) and nothing looks familiar. Please, can you help us? I just really want to make this for my daughter. -- Thank you, Retta Finn

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Hi Libby,
The syrup amount is the correct amount for us presenting the recipe. We have seen that many times that the amount of syrup required to saturate and moisten a cake seems excessive as we are applying it, but that is why we recommend the 24 hour time frame for the syrup to permeate the entire cake.
Once you have done it with the stated amount of syrup, you can decide what is your preference and those getting to eat this wonderful cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi laceyface,
From our making this recipe several times, the 3/4 cup yield has worked.
We suggest that you just do not reduce it as far with the microwave method.You may also want to try making it in a sauce pan and then weigh it when it is the correct consistency. Then try making it in the microwave using your weight result as your target.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Paul,
We are unfamiliar with the recipes and suggest checking with Williams-Sonoma to see if they have any corrections for their version. We have seen many times, including our own, that a publication errors in reprinting. The 2 teaspoons sounds more correct than 2 tablespoons, since a teaspoon of baking soda equates to 3 to 4 teaspoons of baking powder. You may want to make a 6 cupcake batch with the Williams-Sonoma one to see.
Rose & Woody

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HI Rose,
I made your Polish Princess cake from the Baking Bible. I loved all the flavors!

I do have this question. When I made the tea vodka syrup, I had about 2/3-3/4 cup. [I did measure all the ingredients in grams -- 177 grams for the water, for example.] I brushed 1/3 of syrup on the bottom as the recipe stated. As I was brushing the top with the remaining syrup, the cake appeared to get soggy or very wet. Since I was afraid that the cake would be too soggy, I did not use all the syrup and I had about maybe 1/8 cup left (definitely less than 1/4 cup). Should I have gone ahead and used up all the syrup to brush the top?

Thanks so much for your advice!
Libby

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Hi Robin,
To our knowledge, the only Lemon Bar Rose has is the Lemon Bars in "Rose's Christmas Cookies". However, Martha Stewart and several others have recipe on-line with lemon curd and cranberry. We do have a lemon curd with cranberry swirls as a tart in "The Baking Bible."
Rose & Woody

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Robin Carole Schatz
Robin Carole Schatz
05/ 2/2017 05:47 PM

Many years ago, I clipped a recipe of yours from, I think, the Washington Post. It was similar to a lemon square, but instead of a lemon curd topped shortbread crust, the curd consisted of butter, eggs, and frozen cran-raspberry juice. I loved that recipe and wanted to make it for a shower I am attending. Alas, I can't find the recipe anywhere -- in my files or in any of your books (maybe I'm missing a book?). Can you help me? Thanks.

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I recently made the banana split pie and had trouble with the chocolate sauce. In the Pie and Pastry Bible it says it can be made in the microwave, so I used a greased Pyrex and heated the mixture, intermittently stirring it, until it reduced to 3/4s of a cup. It was however not the consistency of chocolate sauce. It was more of a solid ball that couldn't be piped or drizzled on the pie. Can you tell me what I did wrong? The instructions in the book only said that you could do all of the steps in the microwave to prevent scorching with no other specific directions. Thank you

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Paul McCarthy
Paul McCarthy
05/ 1/2017 10:57 PM

Hello, I'd appreciate your thoughts on this. A reader requested a cake recipe in the Gourmet magazine "You asked for it" column from May 1991, called "Chocolate Cream-Cheese Cake Bellissimo" from a Mount Shasta California restaurant called Bellissimo. Essentially it is like a 12 inch black-bottom cupcake with a chocolate glaze. Here are the ingredients for the cake batter: 3 C all-purpose flour, 2 C sugar, 6 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder, 2 Tbsp baking soda, 1 tsp salt, 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar, 3/4 C corn oil. I have made it and it tastes overly of baking soda, and the amount simply seems excessive considering the rest of the volumes. I have seen a virtually identical recipe for 24 cupcakes from Williams-Sonoma, but it only calls for 2 teaspoons of baking soda even though the volume of ingredients is greater for pretty much everything. I suspect this is yet another recipe mistake. Your thoughts would be welcome. Thanks, Paul

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Laura Rowe
Laura Rowe in reply to comment from woody
04/30/2017 06:07 PM

Thanks for getting back with the correction, Woody. Laura

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Hi Laura,
Thank you for bringing this to our attention. Rose just added this to the Errata/Corrections section:
page 314, corrections in bold: top of the chart should be: MAKES: SEVEN 4 3/4-INCH FLUTED TARTLETS
OR EIGHT 4-INCH TARTLETS MADE IN FLAN RINGS

page 315, under EQUIPMENT should be: Eight 4- by 3/4-inch flan rings or seven 4 3/4- by 3/4-inch fluted tart pans with removable bottoms

Rose & Woody

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Thanks, Woody, The Bittersweet Chocolate Cookie Tart Crust recipe should make eight 4 ¾-inch tartlets. I only have 4 ¾-inch tartlet tins, so am not sure how many to make to accommodate the amount of filling in the Chocolate Pecan Blast recipe or if it makes much difference.

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Hi Libby,
We do not recommend freezing the cake completed cake, because of the passion fruit curd will lose flavor. Storage times for the cake and buttercream are on page 3 and in "The Cake Bible". We suggest freezing the cake and frosting separately, and refrigerating the passion curd for up 10 days. You could complete the cake a couple of days ahead of serving it and letting the cake and buttercream warm up to room temperature a few hours ahead.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Cynthia,
Have you tried chilling the GNB a bit before piping?
Have you experimented with the White Chocolate Buttercream that is in "Rose's Heavenly Cakes" and The Baking Bible"?
Rose & Woody

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Cynthia Pedro
Cynthia Pedro
04/27/2017 01:33 AM

Hi Rose and Woody,

I love rose's golden neoclassic buttercream and i have never used any buttercream with shortening since ive tried GNB. I discovered adding white chocolate in it and people are loving it. But my problem is i cant pipe any roses using GNB it just would not form into flowers even using the flower piping nozzles like the russian nozzles. is there a way of using GNB for piping flowers

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Hi Laura,
We are away in New York for our book's photo shoot, but do not have our books here. So we will answer your question on Friday.
Rose & Woody

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Which is the correct number of pans to use for the Chocolate Pecan Blasts page 314-315 The Pie and Pastry Bible. Within the recipe there is a discrepancy between the yield (makes seven or eight) and the tart crust and and equipment (both eight or eight). (see below)

Chocolate Pecan Blasts

Makes: seven 4 3/4-inch tartlets or eight 4-inch tartlets

Bittersweet Chocolate Cookie Tart Crust for eight 4-inch tartlets or eight 4 3/4-inch tartlets (page
61), prebaked and cooled

Equipment: Eight 4- by 3/4-inch flan rings or eight 4 3/4-inch fluted tart pans with removable bottoms

(I tried to post this question under corrections for The Pie and Pastry Bible, but I wasn't able to access the comments.)

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HI Rose,
Can you freeze a completed White Gold Passion Genoise (in Heavenly Cakes, p. 173)?

Thanks so much. I also really appreciate all your answers to my questions!
Libby

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Hi Libby,
You can use it taking in account of The Notes we wrote concerning the differences. You may want to experiment making single layers using the Windra and cake flour/cornstarch to see which you prefer.
Rose & Woody

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Thanks for the response, Woody! I meant I wanted 3 layers of 6 inch cake and didn't mean that each layer will need to be 3 inches high. Apologize if my question wasn't clear.

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Hi Tiya,
This recipe is the same as the Base Yellow Cake Formula in the Wedding Cake chapters. The base recipe is for a single layer 6 inch cake. We do not recommend baking a 3 inch high cake as it is difficult to bake the cake uniformly throughout.
Rose & Woody

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Hello,

I want to use the All-Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake recipe from the Cake Bible to make a 6-inch three layer cake. Could you please give me pointers on what adjustments I would need with respect to the baking time and quantities.

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Hi Rosary,
We are on a photo shoot, so I do have access to RHC. I think we just dilloped and smoothed the curd over the layer of the buttercream for the filling layers.
Rose & Woody

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Yes. I'm familiar with incorporating the curd into the mousseline. I was talking about the decorating instructions for the Woody's Lemon Luxury -- to first make swirls in the buttercream and then swirl dollops of the curd that goes on top.

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Hi Rosary,
Just the photos in our books and what Rose shows on her YouTubes. For incorporating the lemon curd, we usually just blend it into the cooled buttercream in the mixing bowl
Rose & Woody

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Thank you for your suggestions, Woody. The Lemon cake with the components you suggested was amazingly good and the birthday boy was extremely grateful!

I don't suppose you have a photo of what the top of the cake should look like. I couldn't quite figure out how to swirl dollops of the cured through the buttercream.

Thanks again,
Rosary

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HI Rose, I made the Genoise Classique cake (Cake Bible) and it was wonderful. Now am going to make the White Gold Passion Genoise (Heavenly Cakes). I noticed that in the Passion Genoise, the recipe uses Wondra flour.

My question is: Could I use Wondra flour in the Genoise Classique cake that is used in the Star Spangled Raspberry Cake (Cake Bible)? The recipe says to use cake flour/cornstarch and since Heavenly Cakes was written after the Cake Bible, I am wondering if Wondra flour could be used in the Genoise Classique cake. Would Wondra flour make the Genoise Classique cake too fragile for the Star Spangle Raspberry Cake?

Thank you!
Libby

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Rachel
04/23/2017 08:39 PM

Rachel, the recipe is in rose's Christmas cookies. But as a Mother's Day gift I will post the recipe on the blog for this Saturday.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from A.R El-Mongy
04/23/2017 08:34 PM

A.R. Is it my chocolate chip recipe you are using?

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thank you rose and woody !

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Hi Rose,

My mother-in-law misplaced your recipe for Scottish shortbread cookies and she's a big fan! Is there a place where I could find it? I'd love to surprise her for Mother's Day.

Thanks,
Rachel

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i am talking about the cookies not the chocolate thank you so much for your Response
i have spots on the top of the cookies

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from A.R.elmongy
04/23/2017 09:21 AM

A,R, it sounds like you are getting chocolate bloom. have you tried using packaged chocolate chips? i've never had this happen with them. if you are storing your chocolate in a warm place and then putting it in a cold place that will cause the bloom to form.

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A.R.elmongy
A.R.elmongy
04/23/2017 03:29 AM

Hi Rose,
I have light colored spots on the top of my chocolate chips cookies and it looks ugly why is that
BTW i tried different methods / chilling my chocolate first before mixing but still the spots always occur

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Hi Libby,
We have not worked with the Goya product, and suggest that you contact them.
Perfect Puree is available on-line and at select grocers.
Rose & Woody

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Hi Rosary,
You can add lemon curd to the Mousseline as we did for the White Chocolate Buttercream. Or just some a bit of lemon zest or oil.
The Hong Kong cake is very light in flavor, and is 2 inches in height. We suggest splitting in 2 layers.
Rose & Woody

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HI Rose,
I would like to make the White Gold Passion Genoise (from Heavenly Cakes). I am only able to get (Goya's) frozen Passion Fruit "pulp" (not puree). This pulp does not seem to have any seeds. Do you have any suggestions on how to make this pulp into a "puree"? (I also was not able to find Perfect Puree "concentrate").

Thank you very much. I appreciate this website!!

Libby

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Thanks, Woody. To clarify:

Are you suggesting that I use Mousseline buttercream with lemon curd added to it? And that I also use lemon curd between the layers, as in Woody's Lemon Luxury?

Regarding the Honk Kong sponge cake, are you suggesting that I can split that in half (or in 4) layers?

Thanks so much, again. This forum is an amazing gift to all of us from you and Rose.

Rosary

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Jerry Ruth
Jerry Ruth in reply to comment from woody
04/21/2017 10:48 AM

Woody,

Thanks for the response and suggestions. I think I am going to try the chiffon in the round pans.

Also I want to thank both you and Rose for all your hard work and dedication to creating such detailed and wonderful recipes, because of you two and your work, you make all of us home bakers look good! :)

Jerry

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hi Rosary,
You can easily adapt the Woody's Luxury by making a 4X recipe of the Base Yellow Cake from "The Cake Bible" (page 492) and add the lemon zest. Basically the same cake, less the white chocolate.
Make the Mousseline Buttercream as a substitute for the White Chocolate Buttercream and add the Lemon Curd.
Being a chiffon cake, the Renee Fleming is what it is with the depression when baked without a center tube.
We also suggest you look at Rose’s posting for the: Hong Kong Sponge Cake--an Amazing Technique. Along with the recipe there is also a video by Vietnamese baking blogger Linh Trang making the cake and explaining how she created this cake to prevent dipping. You can add lemon zest to the cake.
Rose & Woody

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Hi debb,
Yes. You can simply increase the leavenings by the same ratio as you do for the rest of the ingredients. We have not experienced the bubbling when we have made larger batches. Hopefully, just a fluke.
Rose & Woody

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hello rose !!! wonderful baking bible ! your granola cookie is my family's favourite ! question regarding doubling the recipe: can i simply double or triple the baking soda and baking powder when multiply by 2 or 3 - or should i uae a didferent formula or ratio for the leavener when increasing ? when i double the recipe, it looks a bit off - bubbly on the top while baking.

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I am desperate. I hate the taste of white chocolate but I decided to give one more try and made Woody's Lemon Luxury Buttercream for a special birthday. I used Green & Black's white chocolate. The lemon curd is delicious and the texture of the finished buttercream is glorious. But it still tastes like white chocolate and I still hate the taste. I might complete and bring this cake, anyway, but I need another suggestion for a lemon birthday type cake.

Can the Renee Fleming Golden Chiffon cake with Lemon curd Whipped Cream & Powdered Lemon Zest be baked as a layer cake? If yes, what would I fill it with? Lemon curd, or just the lemon whipped cream? Or the Light Lemon Curd buttercream?

Or Rose's Cheesecake with Lemon Curd on top? If so, how much lemon curd?

Any other thoughts?

Thank you
Rosary

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Hi Jerry,
We have converted the Orange Glow Chiffon to a 9 inch round pan in Rose's Heavenly Cakes, however it does have a depression in the center, which can be topped with whip cream. We suggest that you look at Rose's posting: Hong Kong Sponge Cake--an Amazing Technique. This cake has a flat top, can be flavored with orange juice, and you can see a video on how to make it. Another possibility is the Grand Marnier Cake, which can be baked as a layer cake.
Rose & Woody

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Tom
04/20/2017 09:35 AM

hi Tom,

i've never had a dewberry--not sure if they even grown in my area. first thing to consider is how much sugar they require. if they are not as tart as blackberries, you'll need to cut the sugar. as for masking raspberry flavor, i find that blueberries marry well with other berries so might be a good idea to do a combination. you could also make a crisp instead of a pie.

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I need to make an orange layred cake this weekend for a baptism, any ideas on how I can convert a yellow or white cake into one. Should I just add orange zest or substitute orange juice for the liquid? Or can the Orange Glow Chiffon be baked in 9 inch round pans? Any ideas or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

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I just picked a mess of fresh dewberries and had a few questions:

- If I made a pie do I just follow the blackberry pie recipe?
- My wife thinks they taste just a hint too much like raspberries and she hates raspberries (which is weird). Any ideas to cover that up (probably not but thought I'd ask)?
- If you had any other great dessert ideas for dewberries please let me know.

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Anonymous
04/19/2017 05:47 PM

1. neither one nor the other

2. neither one nor the other

these would not be classic génoise or biscuit but a variation.

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Hi Rose,
1.if a Sponge is made by beating whole egg (Genoise method) but no butter added in, could I considerate this as Genoise or Biscuit?
2. and if a Sponge is made by beating separated egg whites and egg yolks with butter in it, could I considerate this as Genoise or Biscuit?
Sorry for asking this question, but the definitions really make me confused.
Thank you

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Rose Levy Beranbaum
Rose Levy Beranbaum in reply to comment from Luu
04/19/2017 02:49 PM

hi Luu,
biscuit does not have any butter and has egg whites beaten separately both of which make it a very light cake with the strength to absorb a lot of syrup without falling apart. génoise not only has butter, it uses whole eggs though these days i add an extra yolk for every 4 whole eggs because the proportion of yolk to white has decreased due to younger laying hens being used in commercial venues.

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Hi Rose,
Today I had a discussion with my friends about Sponge Cake. He said that Genoise was just a Biscuit with extra butter added into it. But I always thought that eggs in a Genoise recipe should be beaten whole, not separated, while a Biscuit really needed the beaten separated egg yolks and egg whites. Another friend from Italy agreed with me and said that the Genoise, because the whole eggs were beaten, was moister than Biscuit but also shorter, a little bit denser and absorbed less syrup, because the beaten separated egg whites incorporated more air into the Biscuit batter.

Which statement is true?

Thank you,
Luu

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