Whipping Egg Whites: Duck VS Duck & Chicken Whites

Pink Spatula: DUCK & CHICKEN WHITES / Green Spatula: DUCK WHITES ONLY

Pink Spatula: DUCK & CHICKEN WHITES / Green Spatula: DUCK WHITES ONLY

With country living, it is always good to know your neighbors. One day Woody saw a sign for free compost from a horse farm neighbor and also duck eggs. I love duck eggs for…. And duck yolks are great in spaghetti carbonara…. Which means there can be a lot of white, since large duck eggs can have up to 50 grams of egg white compared to chicken eggs having up to 35 grams. The problem is that duck egg whites do not whip up to the same volume or stiff, dense peaks as chicken egg whites.

We did the following test to see if chicken whites could be combined with duck whites to obtain a similar texture to whipped to stiff peaks chicken egg whites.

 OUR TEST PARAMETERS:
1. We used a Breville hand mixer with its whisk beaters.
2. We used the same mixing bowls: 45 grams of duck white VS 22.5 & 22.5 grams of mixed whites.
3. Both whites had the same amount of cream of tartar 1/8 + 1/16 teaspoon.
4. NO sugar was used, which would have helped to stiffen the whites.
5. We beat both sets of whites to stiff peaks.
Technique: Starting at low speed until the whites were foamy, then increasing to high speed to make stiff peaks

RESULTS:
Duck whites only: Green Spatula in photos below
1. Loose and porous consistency and very white in color
2. Began watering out at 10 minutes
3. After 20 minutes, very significant collapse

 Duck & Chicken Whites: Pink Spatula in photos below
1. Dense and very firm texture (though not quite as firm as 100% chicken egg whites), and off white in color
2. Began watering out slightly at 18 minutes
3. After 20 minutes, still holding their shape