A Great New Egg White Discovery

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For anyone new to this blog, I will repeat my essential egg white beating information and then tell all of you about a change that will appear in all my upcoming postings and future cookbooks about beating egg whites. First, it is invaluable to know that used in the correct proportion of egg white, cream of tartar will ensure never risking overbeating the egg whites and having them dry and breakdown. For every large egg white (2 tablespoons/30 ml/1 ounce/30 grams use 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar. So for 8 egg whites (1 cup/237 ml/8.5 ounces/240 grams) use 1 teaspoon cream of tartar. If using Safest Choice Pasturized Eggs in the shell, double the cream of tartar as follows: For every large egg white (2 tablespoons/30 ml/1 ounce/30 grams use 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar. So for 8 egg whites (1 cup/237 ml/8.5 ounces/240 grams) use 2 teaspoons cream of tartar. Now for the great new information: Instead of waiting to add the cream of tartar until after the beaten egg whites start to foam, add it right in the beginning along with the egg whites. In the past, I have always said to wait until the egg whites start to foam because conventional wisdom dictated that cream of tartar slows down the foaming when beating the egg whites. But now that electric mixers are used they are powerful enough--even hand held models--so that the variation of speed in foaming when adding the cream of tartar right from the beginning is virtually unnoticeable. I thank Hector Wong, and Zachary Townsend, for recommending this time-saving technique.