Rose’s Baking Basics Production Phase 20: The Eastern states Tour-part 2

 Rose on set with Food 52’s Kirsten Miglore

Rose on set with Food 52’s Kirsten Miglore

The St Louis JCC’s 40th Annual Book Festival welcomed us to our largest attendance for our PowerPoint Presentaion, with many Q & A’s and books to sign.

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Back to Manhattan and Brooklyn to stop first at our favorite lunch headquarters, Gramercy Tavern, for their perfectly cooked Tavern Burger. Then up Broadway for our podcast interview with Anna Hezel for The TASTE Podcast at Penguin Random House’s studios. Anna was previously with Food52. You can listen to our podcast on the link below.

 

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 And Food52’s video studio was our next stop to do a Food52 YouTube episode with Kristen Miglore. Our Molasses Sugar Butter Cookie was the recipe for the most enjoyable no-stress video that Rose has ever experienced.

Click the link to view the video.


 

Evening was our first time visit to Four & Twenty Blackbird’s main bakery in Brooklyn. Sisters Emily and Melissa have been making hand-made crafted pies for their bakeries since 2010, to international acclaim. We met them two years ago when the four of us were judges for Miro Uskokovic’s annual employee pie contest at Gramercy Tavern, Manhattan. At the shop’s bar-like counter, Emily interviewed Rose while attendees listened, asked questions, and tasted pies from the bakery. Mendy Greenstein, one of our Rose’s Heavenly Cakes and The Baking Bible bake through bloggers chatted with Rose in person for the first time. And Rose was delighted to have several members of her family attend.

Cherrybombe University invited Umber Ahmad-Mah-ze-Dahr Bakery, Deb Perelman-Smitten Kitchen, Patti Paige-owner of Baked Ideas, and Rose to be judges for their team cookie competition. Along with judging the competition event, Cherrybombe U sold books from several authors, including ours.

 Umber Ahmad, Deb Perelman, Patti Paige, & Rose with cookie teams

Umber Ahmad, Deb Perelman, Patti Paige, & Rose with cookie teams

 

A return to Miele’s Showroom cooking school, in Princeton, NJ to give a demo of the Apple Walnut Bundt Cake. Vicky and staff made five recipes for the class attendees to enjoy while we did our presentation. We were delighted to meet two of our bloggers, one of whom travelled all the way from Maryland.

Fante’s Kitchen Store, in the Italian market area of Philadelphia, was our final book signing stop before Thanksgiving. Another Alpha baker, Michele Simon and her husband, Smitty, came up from Raleigh, NC, with a basketful full of Rose’s books to be signed and presents for both of us.

Colleagues TV host Pat Nogar and vegan specialist cookbook author Fran Costigan, who had recently moved to Philly came to get books and chat.

Michele and Smitty waited until we were done signing to go to a nearby coffee shop for a wonderful couple of hours of conversation and their giving us some loving gifts of a variety of vinegars, oils, and Michele’s hand crafted glass work.

Our kindred friend, Mariella had two Philly cheese steaks for us to take home.

Rose’s Baking Basics Production Phase 12: The Galleys is Here!

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The Galleys is a paperback version of the book printed with black and white photos and shades of gray fonts instead of colored fonts. It is basically the black and white version of the ‘laid out pages’ that we and the proof-readers were given to submit revisions. This version of the final copy edited manuscript is sent to many of the same businesses: book stores, on-line sellers, and reviewers that received the BLAD (Basic Layout and Design) pamphlet.

Because the Galleys is not the final proofed and corrected manuscript for the book, the Galleys are always labeled ‘ADVANCED UNPROOFED COPY. NOT FOR RESALE.’ Some reviewers will test a few recipes from the Galleys, despite realizing that a recipe may not be in its final corrected form. This is unfortunate and not the intention of the Galleys, which is to give an overview of the breath and scope of the book that work months ahead of the advanced copy. During our first proofing pass, we found several inputting errors where 2/3 cup was printed as 1/3 cup. If using volume rather than weight, this is a recipe for disaster!

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Excited, we are and will be, to hold and flip the pages of our paperback version for the next six months until the hardcover book arrives. The SEPTEMBER label is when the book becomes available for retailers to sell. 

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Rose's Baking Basics Production Phase 11: The Laid Out Pages

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The ‘laid out pages’ phase is our first opportunity to see our book come alive. The ‘book’ arrived as 200 twin-page pages complete with photos, fonts, and text. Alison did an incredible job of integrating fonts, background colors, the 600 step-by-step photos, and charts into a masterpiece with her design for our book. This is just one of the four forms which enable us to experience our book, before it becomes the real thing—our hard covered book. But ‘laid out pages’ also means our ‘first pass’ to proof it against the previous copy-edited version.

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Seeing the entire layout with the photos in place has helped us to revise and improve the content, as it is much easier to compare similar recipes and phrases and flip from one set of step-by-step photos to another. Our guesses for how many revisions we would want to make were quickly surpassed, but happily, knowing that the book will hopefully be error free when we review the ‘laid out pages’ again for a ‘second pass’. Then our book goes back to the publisher to add our acknowledgements page and the index pages.

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"Rose’s Baking Basics" Now Available for Presale

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The official pub date is September 25, 2018 but the book has just become available for presale, which means that the price is guaranteed.

This is my 12th book and the first one that will offer over 600 captioned step-by-step photos of the critical steps for making the recipes. These photos were all taken in our baking kitchen, prepped by Woody and me, and performed by me, which means that they represent exactly how we make the recipes.

There are also 22 full page beauty shots, styled by the reknowned food stylist Erin Jeanne McDowell, author of The Fearless Baker, and dear friend.

All photographs were taken by the esteemed photographer Matthew Septimus.

The book includes over 100 recipes for cookies and small treats, cakes, pies, and favorite breads including pizza. The recipes are presented exactly in the order in which one should bake, so they will have Set Ups for ingredients (mise en place) ahead of the steps for combining them.

Gâteau Très Orange

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When I was growing up, I was spoiled by my grandmother who squeezed fresh orange juice for breakfast every single day. Pasteurized orange juice from a container or bottle paled by comparison.

I have always loved the flavor of orange, almost as much as lemon which is my top favorite, but never more so than when I started making recipes from Jamie Schler’s new book Orange Appeal. Her book, focusing on many ways both sweet and savory, inspired me to create this cake that is the most orangey cake in my repertoire.

Arriving at the precise amount of orange zest to orange oil was a delicate balance. Too much orange oil and it becomes almost petrol in flavor. For us, these amounts work perfectly. You can vary them according to your own tastebuds.

Serves: 12 to 14

Oven Temperature: 350˚F/175˚C

Baking Time: 50 to 60 minutes

Equipment One 10 cup metal fluted tube pan, coated with baking spray with flour

 Batter

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Preheat the Oven

* Twenty minutes or longer before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven.

* Set the oven at 350˚F/175˚C.

 Set Up for Ingredients (Mise en Place)

* 30 minutes to 1 hour ahead set the butter and eggs on the counter at room temperature (65˚ to 75˚F/19˚ to 23˚C).

* With dish washing liquid, wash, rinse, and dry the oranges and zest them (see Notes).

Make the Batter 

1) Into a 2 cup/500 ml glass measure with a spout, weigh or measure the egg yolks. Add 60 grams/1/4 cup of the sour cream, the orange oil, and vanilla, and whisk lightly until combined.

2) In the bowl of a stand mixer, fitted with the flat beater, add the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and orange zest and mix on low speed for 30 seconds.

3) Add the butter and the remaining 122 grams of sour cream. Mix on low speed until the dry ingredients are moistened. Raise the speed to medium and beat for 1-1/2 minutes to aerate and develop the cake's structure. The mixture will lighten in color and texture. Scrape down the sides.

4) Starting on low speed, gradually add the egg mixture in 2 parts, beating on medium speed for 30 seconds after each addition to incorporate the ingredients smoothly.

5) Scrape the batter into the prepared pan, and smooth the surface evenly.

 Bake the Cake

6) Bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until a wooden skewer inserted near the center comes out clean and the cake springs back when pressed. The cake should start to shrink from the sides of the pan only after removal from the oven. Rotate the cake halfway around after the first 40 minutes of baking.

 Shortly before the cake is finished baking, make the orange syrup.

Orange Syrup

Makes: 102 grams/6-1/2 tablespoons/96 ml

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1) Reduce the orange juice by about 2/3 (see Notes). Then stir in the sugar until dissolved. Add the orange oil. Cover it and set it aside.

Apply the Syrup and Cool the Cake

2) As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, place the pan on a rack, poke the cake all over with a wire cake tester, and brush it with about one-third (34 grams/2 tablespoons/30 ml) of the syrup. Cool the cake in the pan for 15 minutes. Invert the cake onto a serving plate.

3) Brush the top and sides of the cake with the remaining syrup. Cover with plastic wrap and cool completely.

 Store Airtight: room temperature, 3 days; refrigerated, 5 days; frozen, 2 months.

 Notes

* The zest incorporates most evenly into the batter if set on a piece of parchment and allowed to dry for several hours. It then can be frozen for several months.

* When Seville oranges are in season the juice gives a more intense orange flavor to the syrup so the orange oil can be omitted. Do not use the Seville orange zest as it is very bitter unless candied in marmalade. Blood orange zest, however is a great alternative.

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* The best way to reduce the orange juice is to pour it into a 4 cup/1 liter glass measure with a spout that has been lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray. Microwave it on high power, stirring every 30 seconds to prevent air bubbles, which would cause the juice to burst out of the container. This will take about 15 minutes. Alternatively you can reduce the orange juice on the cooktop, stirring constantly.

* You can replace the reduced orange juice with an equal amount of frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed.

To see the posting on this marvelous book click on the link below

Orange Appeal