Sublime Ketchup from Chef Michael Anthony

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I have been a lover of ketchup since I was a little girl and my grandmother served me spaghetti with ketchup and butter, thinking it was like the tomato sauce which she saw our Italian neighbors preparing. I never dreamed one could make real ketchup at home. But when I ordered the hamburger special at Gramercy Tavern, in New York City, it was served with the best ketchup I had ever tasted and I learned that it was the creation of executive chef Michael Anthony (one of my top favorite chefs). I immediately begged for the recipe. Chef Michael's ketchup is a world apart from even the best bottled store-bought variety. It is a brilliant blending of ingredients--less sweet, more vibrant, and far more complex. You will see why when you look at the ingredient list. It takes time, and attention, especially when cooking down the sauce so as not to scorch the reducing juices, and you'll need a food mill to achieve the classic silky consistency, but boy is it worth it! For me there is no going back.

I made one-quarter the recipe Michael sent which I am listing below, but do feel free to increase the recipe if desired. Makes: 400 grams/350 ml/1-/2 cups + Tomatoes and Vegetables

624 grams/22 ounces Roma tomatoes, cored and rough chopped (I used canned San Marzono)
114 grams/4 ounces white onion: medium dice
56 grams/2 ounces red bell pepper, charred, skinned, seeded, medium dice
3/4 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced
1 medium clove garlic, minced
1 medium clove garlic confit (see Note)
7 grams/1/2 tablespoon canola oil
Seasonings 1/2 teaspoon pink peppercorns 1/4 teaspoon cumin seed 1/4 stick of cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon whole coriander 1 small allspice 1/16 teaspoon cayenne pepper salt, a large pinch

Gastrique 82 grams/1/4 cup corn syrup
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

Note: To confit the garlic, I added the oil to a very small pan and on the lowest possible heat cooked the garlic (cut in half the long way), turning it over from time to time until light golden. Then I used the oil to sauté the vegetables.
1. Heat oil in a saucepot (I used one with a non-stick lining); add onion and peppers, and sweat (sauté until translucent).
2. Add tomatoes garlic, and spices, all at one time; bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, prepare the gastrique:
3. Heat corn syrup in a small saucepan until it begins to caramelize. Separately, bring cider vinegar to a simmer (I heated it in the microwave). When the corn syrup is golden brown, slowly stir the cider vinegar into the syrup. It may seem to seize up once or twice, but will quickly melt and become smooth. Then stir in the red wine vinegar.
4. When the gastrique is smooth and fully incorporated, add to tomatoes and stir well. Cook uncovered, stirring often, for approximately 45 minutes, or until desired consistency is achieved.
5. Cool slighty, and run through the fine disc of a food mill.

WQXR Nutcracker Sweets Annual Holiday Posting

I taped these radio segments with host Naomi Lewin of WQXR in December of 2010. When she invited me to do the show it was because she was familiar with my book Rose's Christmas Cookies. What she didn't know at the time was that as a little girl I was a toy soldier in George Ballanchine's second production of The Nutcracker Suite at City Center in New York. Doing this show was like a revisit to my past!

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Martha Stewart Live Radio Show: Baking Bible Tour Finale, part 17

IMG_8108.jpgOur six weeks of touring concluded just about where we started--New York City. We left extra early to be sure to arrive at the Martha Stewart New York studios well ahead of time given the variables of traffic on route 80 and arrived so early we headed straight to the reasonably close by Doughnut Plant for doughnuts and coffee. They claim to be creator of the world's first crème brûlée doughnut, which quickly became the Doughnut Plant's signature, and also square jellied filled doughnuts. They now even have shops in Japan. IMG_8101.jpg IMG_8103.jpg The engaging manager enjoyed telling us about the doughnuts and, as a self-proclaimed dessert lover, looking through our new "Baking Bible." IMG_8097.jpg My dear friend Martha had recently made one of my cupcake recipes on her television show, so I was looking forward to an unstructured live radio conversation with her on her Sirius Radio Show. I had been on several times in the past with her radio host Lucinda Scala Quinn. But when we arrived at the studio we were informed that Martha had the flue. We also learned that I was to share the air time with another cookbook author, Carol Barrow. We were both delighted to make her acquaintance. Her wonderful book, "Mrs. Wheelbarrow's Practical Pantry: Recipes and Techniques for Year-Round Preserving" on canning and preserving was released just after ours. She brought along several of her homemade preserves for all of us to enjoy. IMG_8104.jpg Lucinda, who had moderated my 92nd Y event just a few weeks ago, and had read my book cover to cover, stepped in for Martha. We briefly talked about "The Baking Bible" and then went on to discuss my thoughts and tips for solving common baking problems, after which Lucinda opened up the phone lines for me to answer caller's questions from Delaware to California. The time went all too quickly with the lively array of questions. With our final event completed for the year, we decided to celebrate with an excellent lunch at the nearby Trestle on Tenth. We toasted over wine and enjoyed sharing the Brook Trout with Chanterelles and Roasted Cauliflower, followed by a perfectly cooked to rare and delicious Dry aged Beef Burger with exquisitely crispy and flavorful shoestring French fries, dusted with paprika. IMG_8114.jpg IMG_8118.jpg A grand finale to an amazingly successful and enjoyable tour filled with events, old friends and new, family, bloggers, radio hosts, and culinary professionals. More events, however, are already slated for next year from Dallas to upstate New York to mile high Denver. We are grateful to the brilliant team at our publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for their support and creative ingenuity.

Baking Bible Book Production Phase 14

SMT.jpgWe were very fortunate to have Davidson's Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs and our publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt sponsor this virtual media tour. The Satellite Media Tour, aka SMT, went out to 11 cities and each appearance was under 5 minutes long. The advantage of an SMT is to have an author be on several television shows without having to travel to each city. Instead, from a studio in Manhattan, within a span of 3 hours, via satellite hook up, I talked to individual television shows from Atlanta, Georgia to San Diego, California. All of these cities were ones that were not on our actual tour schedule, so this gave the television hosts the opportunity to talk to me for the benefit of their audiences. Woody and I both prepped all the recipes a few days ahead and then transported them to Wellesley MA on the first leg of the tour and on to New York City the following day to have everything ready for the morning of the SMT. Woody did a great job as food stylist and Erin Schwitter, of Artisan Production House, made everything run super smoothly in her beautiful new studio. Here's a close up of the "Mud Turtle Pie:" Mud_Turtle.jpg To see the podcast, click on this link: SMT

Edible Radio Podcast for The Baking Bible

height_360_width_640_overlay_Edible_Radio_Logo_1400x1400_RBG-2.jpgKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley Radio, was a delight to meet over a phone interview. Click here to listen to an informative and dynamic discussion about the Baking Bible, recommendations and tips for holiday baking, and for one of my top favorite recipes from the book: The Chocolate Hazelnut Mousse Tart.

Did You Know?

Now here's something I didn't! When blind baking (baking a pie or tart crust without the filling before adding it) I like to use a large coffee urn filter to contain the beans or rice which are used to weight down the crust and keep it from bubbling up or slipping down at the sides. I prefer it to parchment because I find there is no need to coat it with nonstick cooking spray to keep it from lifting off a little of the crust but mostly because its shape conforms perfectly to that of the interior of the pan. A sheet of parchment has to be pleated in order to achieve this shape.Fellow blogger Cenk Sonmezoy, from Turkey, has a terrific blog called CafeFernando. One of the great tips I learned from him as that by simply crumpling the parchment it practically shapes itself to curve into the dough lined pan. As a graduate of FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) I should have figured this out long ago. But isn't it the case with all great ideas that one experiences that "why didn't I think of it" moment? Thank you Cenk!

The Food Network Upcoming Appearance

I've only ever been on the Food Network once before and it was with David Rosengarten (you can see it on my YouTube postings). When I was asked to be a judge of a baking contest last week I almost turned it down because it was all so top secret I wasn't sure just what I was getting myself into! Also, it was a vacation day for me and my husband and doing the show meant having to drive to a studio in Brooklyn instead of an early departure to our country weekend home.I'm sure glad I went with my instincts of "this somehow sounds promising" as it turned out to be the Bobby Flay "Throw Down" show. I've known Bobby for many years now and have always valued his food and his friendship. I've been given permission to reveal this much about the show but the rest will be in about a month when the show airs. I'll be sure to do a posting announcing the details. Meantime, this much I can say: I ate one of the desserts I judged for lunch--all of it!

Bay Area TV Appearance

KQED Channel 9 (Northern Calif)Sat, Mar 31, 2007 -- 1:00 pm Master Class at Johnson & Wales Asian Noodles (#306) ...Guest chef is Rose Levy Beranbaum, best-selling author and pastry guru, who turns a banana split into an ice cream pie... I've never gotten to see my appearance on this show so would be very grateful if someone in the bay area could tape it for me!

My Television Series: Baking Magic with Rose Levy Beranbaum Now Available on YouTube

I can't tell you how many times I've heard from readers of my books and wished I could just be with them in their kitchens to guide them through the maze of baking. Well now - thanks to the magic of television - I can be! If you believe a picture is worth 1000 words, here's some exciting news - I recently finished taping 13 episodes for a brand new public television cooking series called BAKING MAGIC WITH ROSE LEVY BERANBAUM. The series has started to air on PBS stations across the country. WGBH--CHANNEL 2 IN BOSTON PREVIEWED THE FIRST THREE EPISODES AS PART OF THEIR PLEDGE DRIVE. PBS stations air their programs at different times depending on the local market. I would suggest you get in touch with your local PBS station and ask them if they are planning to air Baking Magic. Feel free to let them know that you are very interested in viewing the program.Now you can see step-by-step demonstrations of all those important baking techniques that you've been reading about. The series includes a wide range of recipes from all three of my "bibles" (Cake, Pie & Pastry, and Bread) bringing you a delightful assortment of baked treats.

Great Pumpkin Pie

Two years ago, i was a guest on the PBS show "Seasonings with Dede Wilson. " Whenever this show airs, usually pre Thanksgiving time, we get tons of requests for these two recipes. Here they are now!

Oven Temperature: 375°F.
Baking Time: 50 to 60 minutes

Serves: 8

In this recipe, I cook the pumpkin and spices before baking, which makes for a more mellow and pleasing flavor. Puréeing the pumpkin in a food processor produces a unusually silky texture.

The crunchy bottom crust is a result of creating a layer of gingersnaps and ground pecans to absorbs any excess liquid from the filling, and also baking the pie directly on the floor of the oven.

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(*) dark brown sugar adds a delicious butterscotch flavor but masks some of the pumpkin flavor.

Special Equipment: A 9 inch pie plate, preferably Pyrex, a maple leaf cutter

On a floured pastry cloth or between 2 sheets of lightly floured plastic wrap, roll the pastry 1/8-inch thick and large enough to cut an even 13-inch circle. Use an expandable flan ring or a cardboard template as a guide to cut out the circle. Transfer it to the pie pan and tuck the overhanging pastry under itself. If desired, reroll scraps, chill and cut out decorative designs such as leaves. (Bake them separately at 400°F. for 6 to 10 minutes or until golden brown, brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar in the raw. Remove to a rack to cool.)

Cut the border into a checker board design or use a form or spoon to make a flat but decorative border (see page 00). Do not make a raised border or extend it over the sides of the pan as it will not hold up so close to the heat source. After pouring pumpkin filling into the crust, push every other checkerboard border well over toward the filling or it tends to flip over against the pie pan. Refrigerate, covered with plastic wrap, for one up to 24 hours.

Preheat the oven to 375°F. at least 15 minutes before baking time.

***Bake directly on floor of oven or have the oven shelf at the lowest level and place an oven stone or cookie sheet on it before preheating.

Process the gingersnaps and pecans until finely ground. Sprinkle them over the bottom of the pie crust and using your fingers and the back of a spoon, press them into the dough to coat the entire bottom, going about 1/2-inch up the sides.
In a small, heavy saucepan, stir together the pumpkin, sugar, spices and salt. Over medium heat, bring the mixture to a sputtering simmer, stirring constantly. Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 to 5 minutes, until thick and shiny.

Scrape the mixture into a food processor, fitted with the metal blade, and process for 1 minute. With the motor on, add the cream and milk, processing until incorporated. Scrape the sides of the work bowl. Add the eggs, one at a time, processing just to incorporate, for about 5 seconds after each addition. Add the vanilla along with the last egg.

Pour the mixture into the pie shell and set it directly on the floor of the oven. Bake the pie for 50 to 60 minutes or just until a knife inserted between sides and center will come out almost clean. The filling will have puffed and the surface dulled except for the center (The filling shakes like jelly when moved. This will happen before it has finished baking so it cannot be used as a firm indication of doneness; conversely, if it does not have this consistency you can be sure that it is not baked adequately.) If the crust appears to be darkening too much on the bottom, raise the pie to the next rack. After 30 minutes, protect the edges with a foil ring.

Place the baked pie on a rack to cool. When cool, the surface will be flat. If you have made decorative designs, place them on now.

Store: 3 days, room temperature.

Understanding
I prefer using canned pumpkin purée to homemade from fresh pumpkin as the canned is more consistent in quality of flavor and texture.
The crust border should not be too raised, nor extend past the pie plate because baking so close to the heat source, and at the lower temperature required for the custard filling, the border would not set quickly enough and would droop over the edge and break off. Since it does not extend past the edge, it is not necessary to shield the edges until 30 minutes instead of the usual 15 for a one crust pie.
Characteristic star-burst cracking is the result of overbaking. If desired, cover any crack(s), should they develop, with baked pastry cut-outs.

Adapted from The Pie and Pastry Bible, Scribner, 1998