Rose’s Baking Basics Production Phase 19: Our Rose’s Baking Basics Book Tour Western states-Part 1

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Or terrific publicist, Sari Kamin, put together a great schedule for our whirlwind Western states tour, with each day having multiple events whenever possible. First stop was Philadelphia, which is west of our home base, to do a demo at the Philadelphia Free Library-Downtown. This library is the only one in the country that is equipped with kitchens for doing cooking classes and presentations. Several libraries have inquired about including this option since cookbooks are becoming increasingly popular for libraries, as the most requested books. Rose was very moved when Suzanna Urminska commented that all of her books were checked out and many of them dog-eared from repeated visits to homes. Many first time purchasers for a book by Rose came to hear us, and the story of our book. It was also our first time to present our PowerPoint presentation.

Our dear Dallas friend, Zach Townsend, who has contributed to several of our books both with a recipe and proof reading, not to mention arranging amazing events, was our escort for great Dallas dining and also arranged another unique venue for us to demo our cranberry scones at a spectacular arboretum. Two outside and a huge indoor facilities enable the arboretum to run different events at once. A familiar face was amongst the audience, Connie Akins Mullin , who had given us a tour ,on our last visit, of the now closed Dallas Pirch Housewares store. After our demo we all went for a walk surrounded 90,000 pumpkins that the arboretum had turned into a Peter Pan’s Neverland theme.

In Denver, we were greeted by our friend and former recruiter for Craftsy, Denise Mickelsen, and we all enjoyed a delicious catch up early dinner before the book signing at The Tattered Cover bookstore in Aspen Grove. Our friend Jenny Hartin, of Eat Your Books, was moderator and had her friend do a live Facebook Video of the event. The highlight of our Denver trip was once again given by Rose’s long-time dear friend Holly Arnold Kinney, who opened her Fort restaurant doors to host a delightful Les Dames Escoffier book party. We enjoyed a delicious buffet and the chef made our bourbon balls from the book. It was also great reuniting with other old friends and meeting new ones.

Our first stop in Seattle was the wonderful Book Larder bookstore where we were able to do our PowerPoint presentation while munching on my favorite cake in the book—Triple Lemon Bundt, prepared by the owner. The next evening we once again were invited to do a class at Tom Douglass’s Hot Stove Society. Tom generously commented that his wife prefers to bake out of our books versus his, and the class preferred our Rosa’s pizza to his pizza shop’s pizza (I’m sure they were being polite!). Bridgett and staff did a great job juggling and presenting our triple recipe presentation: Beer Bread, Cranberry Scones, and Triple Lemon Bundt cake with samples for all to enjoy along with the pizza challenge.

 

Then on to San Francisco to the legendary Omnivore Books. Celia Sack has hosted book signings for many of our books and has become a treasured friend.

It was a joy as always to get to see Rose’s brother Michael, wife Mia, and son Alex, and we had a great dinner at Rich’s Table.

 The next day was at the grand Market Hall, our first ever book signing in a supermarket. Our signing table was stationed in the store’s bakery and coffee shop section. Christine Falconer and her staff had samples of the Triple Lemon Bundt cake and Whoopie Pies at a nearby tasting table, with both packaged for shoppers to purchase! (It was Whoopie Pies for dinner at the airport.)

After the signing we ran into a very unexpected delight—dear friend, chef and restaurateur Daniel Patterson shopping with his two kids. Turned out it was actually his round number birthday!

Then off to Portland for two days until returning to San Francisco.
Stay tuned for our Western states tour-Part 2.

 

Rose's Baking Basics Production Phase 18: Our Book Launch! and more

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Our book launch day arrived with Rose first doing a morning demo of our Cranberry Scones at Martha Stewart Living Test Kitchen for a 42 Burner post. (For our touring we chose Cranberry Scones, Apple Galette, Triple Lemon Bundt Cake, and Beer Bread as our demo’s and class recipes.) Afternoon was a podcast interview with Evan Kleinman for Record Good Food (KRCW).

We love Umber Ahmed’s Mah-ze Dahr Bakery and overjoyed that Umber hosted our book launch. Her delicious Vanilla Choux and champagne appeased our palates as we helped set up for our evening’s guests.

She came a half hour before opening the doors. She strolled in to Rose’s complete surprise—our kindred spirit, book writing friend and sister baker Lisa Yokelson from Washington, DC. Soon the bakery was jam packed with well-wishers enjoying our Cranberry Scones and Chocolate Butterscotch Toffee and our stylist, Erin McDowell’s, Cherry Pielets version of our Cherry Pie, while conversing with friends and colleagues.

 

Despite the torrential rain and gridlock, caused by the meeting of UN General Assembly, the bakery quickly became crowded with friends and family. We couldn’t have asked for a more joyfully delicious book launch.

 

The next day began with our making a couple of stops at book stores, as we love to do surprise author book signings for our books on their shelves.

15th Street Sushi is dear friend Marco Gnann’s favorite place for sushi and ours as well. They also have a terrific pastry chef! After our sushi lunch, it was off to the 92nd Street Y. Corby Kummer wrote an incredible review for The Cake Bible when it launched 30 years ago. His article propelled a record 18,500 book sales in one day! So who better to be Rose’s moderator.

 

 The very next day, we drove to Philadelphia for the beginning of our Western states part of our book tour. Stay tuned for Western states tour part 1 posting next week.

Barnes & Nobles surprise book signing visit

Barnes & Nobles surprise book signing visit

Rose's Baking Basics Book Review: LA Times' 10 cookbooks to give and get this holiday season

FROM LOS ANGELAS TIMES STORY

We came across this review written by Amy Scattergood on Nov 2. From her article:

“From left: “Milk Street: Tuesday Nights” by Christopher Kimball; “Rose’s Baking Basics” by Rose Levy Beranbaum; “Bestia: Italian Recipes Created in the Heart of L.A.” by Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis with Lesley Suter (Little, Brown and Company; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Ten Speed Press)

Cookbooks are some of the best gifts you can give your food-minded friends and relatives because they’re easy to find, simple to wrap — and can often trigger reciprocal dinner invitations. Among this year’s wealth of cookbooks are a few excellent baking books, some new books from award-winning folks whose other books might already be on your shelves, and two debut books from Los Angeles chefs. Here are 10 new cookbooks to put on your gift list.

“Rose’s Baking Basics” by Rose Levy Beranbaum (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $35)

Do you (or whomever you’re gifting) need another of Beranbaum’s baking books? You really do. This one, her 11th, features 100 recipes for the essential stuff: cookies, cakes, pies, tarts and breads along with toppings and fillings. What makes this book particularly useful is all the photos — 600 of them, apparently — often in step-by-step sequence. All these pictures are pretty, yes, but also practical because baking is so often somewhat intangible without visual aids. They also offer pretty good incentive because there’s nothing like more than 300 pages of pictures of cupcakes, brownies, rugelach, chocolate rolls, lemon and blueberry tarts, and babka to make you want to start baking.

“Bestia: Italian Recipes Created in the Heart of L.A.” by Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis with Lesley Suter (Ten Speed Press, $35)

Ever since Menashe and Gergis opened Bestia, their Italian restaurant in downtown Los Angeles, in 2012, the place has been packed. With the couple’s first cookbook, which features 140 recipes from the restaurant, you can just make their intensely flavorful, creative dishes at home — since the place is still one of the hardest reservations in town. This is rustic Italian food, through the lens of Menashe’s technique-intensive cooking: pastas an pizzas, pickles and charcuterie. There’s an ample pantry section, with the mostardas, soffritto and sauces that are fundamental to the dishes, plus recipes for the ’nduja and salumi for the ambitious. And the final chapter is filled with Gergis’ brilliant fruit-intensive desserts. Here’s hoping the duo are already testing the follow-up to this book — their second restaurant, Bavel, is as hard to get a table at as their first.

“Milk Street: Tuesday Nights” by Christopher Kimball (Little, Brown and Company, $35)

Christopher Kimball, who co-founded America’s Test Kitchen and started Milk Street in 2016, has come out with the second book from the Boston-based cooking school and magazine. The conceit of this book is that Tuesday nights are best accomplished with quick meals that make use of staple ingredients. So here are 200 recipes that are organized by the time it takes to make them (“fast,” “faster,” “fastest”), plus categories like “easy additions” and “one pot.” The dishes span many cuisines and there are fun sections such as “weeknight pizza” and “recipes that let you walk away from the cooking” — nice, if you want to load up the oven and go read the rest of the book.”

Happy Birthday for The Baking Bible

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Our Baking Bible is celebrating its 4th birthday today.

It is in its 5th printing and still going strong on Amazon’s top 50 best baking books. Winner of Best Baking Book of the Year 2015 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals. We recently did a book signing after our blueberry pie demonstration for Rose’s Baking Basics book to Chef Tom Vaccaro’s pastry class at the Culinary institute of America, Hyde Park campus, which several students had us sign their purchased copies of The Baking Bible. On our visits to book stores, we frequently have the opportunity to sign each store’s copies of The Baking Bible.

Lemon Cheesecake Soufflé Recipe

The one that almost got away!

The one that almost got away!

Fifty years ago I tasted a cheese cake that was almost as light and airy as whipped cream. I never forgot it. The bakery was in Princeton, NJ and when I moved back to New York City I actually took a bus ride to the bakery trying to persuade them to give me the recipe. They promised they would send it but never did. Finally, all these years later, I figured it out. Instead of adding the whole eggs to the cream cheese batter, I separated them and whipped the egg whites with the sugar Italian meringue style. I added a little extra sugar to compensate for the sugar syrup that sticks to the sides of the pot.

The resulting cake is so fluffy it makes a sound when you put a fork to it.

 Serves: 10 to 12

Oven Temperature: 350˚F/175˚C

Baking Time: 50 minutes (55 minutes if using a silicone pan instead of aluminum foil for the water bath), plus 1 hour with the oven off

Plan Ahead Make the cheesecake at least 1 day before serving.

 Equipment One 9 by 3 or 2-3/4 inch high springform pan, lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray, set in a slightly larger silicone pan or wrapped with a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to prevent seepage; A 12 inch cake pan or roasting pan to serve as a water bath

Preheat the Oven   * Twenty minutes or longer before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven. Set the oven at 350˚F/175˚C.   Mise en Place   * One hour ahead, into the bowl of a stand mixer, place the cream cheese, cornstarch, and 25 grams/2 tablespoons of the sugar at cool room temperature (65˚ to 70˚F/19˚ to 21˚C).  * Into another 1 cup measure with a spout, place the lemon zest, and weigh or measure the lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap.  * If using a cake base, trim it to size and set it on the bottom of the pan. If using lady fingers, cut off the rounded edges and arrange them on the bottom of the pan, placing them rounded crust flat sides down and cutting or tearing smaller pieces to fit into any gaps. Cover the pan with plastic wrap while making the filling.   Make the Batter   1) Into two small containers, separate the yolks and the whites.  Cover and reserve the egg whites to make up a total of 4 egg whites for the meringue in the chart below.   2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the cream cheese mixture on medium-high speed until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, about 3 minutes.  3) Gradually beat in the egg yolks and continue beating until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.  4) On medium-low speed add the lemon zest, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat until incorporated.  5) Add the sour cream and continue beating just until fully blended, 20 to 30 seconds. Detach the whisk beater and use it to reach down and whisk in any mixture that has settled to the bottom of the bowl.  6) Remove and wash, rinse, and dry the whisk beater to remove any trace of oil. If you do not have a second mixer bowl, scrape this mixture into a large bowl and thoroughly wash, rinse, and dry the mixer bowl and whisk beater to remove any trace of oil.

Preheat the Oven

* Twenty minutes or longer before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven. Set the oven at 350˚F/175˚C.

Mise en Place

* One hour ahead, into the bowl of a stand mixer, place the cream cheese, cornstarch, and 25 grams/2 tablespoons of the sugar at cool room temperature (65˚ to 70˚F/19˚ to 21˚C).

* Into another 1 cup measure with a spout, place the lemon zest, and weigh or measure the lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap.

* If using a cake base, trim it to size and set it on the bottom of the pan. If using lady fingers, cut off the rounded edges and arrange them on the bottom of the pan, placing them rounded crust flat sides down and cutting or tearing smaller pieces to fit into any gaps. Cover the pan with plastic wrap while making the filling.

Make the Batter

1) Into two small containers, separate the yolks and the whites. Cover and reserve the egg whites to make up a total of 4 egg whites for the meringue in the chart below.

2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the cream cheese mixture on medium-high speed until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, about 3 minutes.

3) Gradually beat in the egg yolks and continue beating until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

4) On medium-low speed add the lemon zest, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat until incorporated.

5) Add the sour cream and continue beating just until fully blended, 20 to 30 seconds. Detach the whisk beater and use it to reach down and whisk in any mixture that has settled to the bottom of the bowl.

6) Remove and wash, rinse, and dry the whisk beater to remove any trace of oil. If you do not have a second mixer bowl, scrape this mixture into a large bowl and thoroughly wash, rinse, and dry the mixer bowl and whisk beater to remove any trace of oil.

Mise en Place   * Have ready a 1 cup glass measure with a spout (not coated with nonstick cooking spray) near the cooktop.   *  Into the bowl of a stand mixer, weigh or measure the reserved 3 egg whites and add about 1 more egg white or enough to make up the 120 grams/118 ml/3/4 cup.  1) In a small heavy saucepan, preferably nonstick and with a spout, stir together the remaining 200 grams/1 cup of sugar and the water until the sugar is completely moistened. Cook on medium heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup is bubbling. Stop stirring and turn down the heat to the lowest setting. (If using an electric cooktop, remove from the heat.)  2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the egg whites on medium-high speed just until almost stiff peaks form when the beater is raised slowly (they should curve slightly).  3) Increase the heat on the cooktop and boil the syrup until an instant-read thermometer registers 248˚ to 250˚F/120˚C.   Immediately pour the syrup into the glass measure to stop the cooking.  4) With the mixer off, pour a small amount of syrup over the whites. Immediately beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Stop the mixer and add one-third of the syrup. Beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Add the remaining syrup in two parts, with the mixer off between additions. For the last addition, use a silicone scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the glass measure and scrape it against the beater.  5) Continue beating on medium speed for 2 minutes or until the outside of the bowl is no longer hot to the touch. Then use the whisk beater to fold it into the batter. Use a silicone spatula to reach to the bottom of the bowl to finish folding.  6) Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface evenly.   Bake the Cheesecake   7) Set the pan into the larger pan and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Add about 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the water and stir to dissolve it. (This will prevent discoloration of the aluminum pan.) Bake for 25 minutes. For even baking, rotate the pan halfway around. Continue baking for 25 minutes (30 minutes if using the silicone pan). Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cake cool for 1 hour. When moved the center will jiggle slightly. (Alternatively, bake for 1 hour plus 10 minutes until the center tests 147°F. The center bounces back when lightly pressed and it jiggles even in the center.) The edges will have little cracks and be browned.   Cool and Chill the Cheesecake   7) Remove the pan from the water bath but leave the silicone pan or foil in place to contain any liquid that may seep from the cake. Set it on a wire rack to cool to room temperature or just warm, 1 to 2 hours. To absorb condensation, place a paper towel, curved side down, over the pan with the ends overhanging. Place an inverted plate, larger than the springform pan, on top of the paper towel.  8) Refrigerate the cheesecake for 8 hours or overnight, still covered with the paper towel and plate.   Unmold the Cheesecake   9) Remove the plate and paper towel. Use a small propane torch or wipe the sides of the pan several times with a towel that has been run under hot water and wrung out. Release the sides of the springform pan. If the sides of the cheesecake are uneven, run a small metal spatula under hot water and use it to smooth them.  10) This delicate cake is best left on the pan bottom of the springform.  11) Cut with a wet knife that has been run under hot water between each slice and wiped clean with a paper towel.   Store  Airtight: refrigerated, 3 days; do not freeze, as the texture will become less smooth.

Mise en Place

* Have ready a 1 cup glass measure with a spout (not coated with nonstick cooking spray) near the cooktop.

* Into the bowl of a stand mixer, weigh or measure the reserved 3 egg whites and add about 1 more egg white or enough to make up the 120 grams/118 ml/3/4 cup.

1) In a small heavy saucepan, preferably nonstick and with a spout, stir together the remaining 200 grams/1 cup of sugar and the water until the sugar is completely moistened. Cook on medium heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup is bubbling. Stop stirring and turn down the heat to the lowest setting. (If using an electric cooktop, remove from the heat.)

2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the egg whites on medium-high speed just until almost stiff peaks form when the beater is raised slowly (they should curve slightly).

3) Increase the heat on the cooktop and boil the syrup until an instant-read thermometer registers 248˚ to 250˚F/120˚C. Immediately pour the syrup into the glass measure to stop the cooking.

4) With the mixer off, pour a small amount of syrup over the whites. Immediately beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Stop the mixer and add one-third of the syrup. Beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Add the remaining syrup in two parts, with the mixer off between additions. For the last addition, use a silicone scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the glass measure and scrape it against the beater.

5) Continue beating on medium speed for 2 minutes or until the outside of the bowl is no longer hot to the touch. Then use the whisk beater to fold it into the batter. Use a silicone spatula to reach to the bottom of the bowl to finish folding.

6) Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface evenly.

Bake the Cheesecake

7) Set the pan into the larger pan and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Add about 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the water and stir to dissolve it. (This will prevent discoloration of the aluminum pan.) Bake for 25 minutes. For even baking, rotate the pan halfway around. Continue baking for 25 minutes (30 minutes if using the silicone pan). Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cake cool for 1 hour. When moved the center will jiggle slightly. (Alternatively, bake for 1 hour plus 10 minutes until the center tests 147°F. The center bounces back when lightly pressed and it jiggles even in the center.) The edges will have little cracks and be browned.

Cool and Chill the Cheesecake

7) Remove the pan from the water bath but leave the silicone pan or foil in place to contain any liquid that may seep from the cake. Set it on a wire rack to cool to room temperature or just warm, 1 to 2 hours. To absorb condensation, place a paper towel, curved side down, over the pan with the ends overhanging. Place an inverted plate, larger than the springform pan, on top of the paper towel.

8) Refrigerate the cheesecake for 8 hours or overnight, still covered with the paper towel and plate.

Unmold the Cheesecake

9) Remove the plate and paper towel. Use a small propane torch or wipe the sides of the pan several times with a towel that has been run under hot water and wrung out. Release the sides of the springform pan. If the sides of the cheesecake are uneven, run a small metal spatula under hot water and use it to smooth them.

10) This delicate cake is best left on the pan bottom of the springform.

11) Cut with a wet knife that has been run under hot water between each slice and wiped clean with a paper towel.

Store Airtight: refrigerated, 3 days; do not freeze, as the texture will become less smooth.

Rose's Baking Basics on Tour: Princeton-Miele, Fall River-Portugalia Marketplace, Paramus-Chef Central, Brooklyn-Four & Twenty Blackbirds, & Philadelphia-Fante's

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Our Rose’s Baking Basics Tour has several special events coming up during the next four weeks. We will be doing a demonstration and powerpoint presentation at Miele in Princeton, NJ on Friday, Nov. 16, 6-9. We had a full house when we did a demo during The Baking Bible tour. And Miele’s culinary staff made about 10 things to taste from the book. You can click on the button below for details.

We will be doing a book signing at the Portugalia Marketplace in Fall River, CT on Sunday, Oct. 21, 11-12:30.

Chef Central in Paramus, NJ is now in Bed, Bath, & Beyond. We will be demoing our apple galette and fudgy praline pecan meringues, with book signing, on Wed, Oct, 24, 6-8:30.

We will be doing a demo and book signing at Four and Twenty Blackbirds main store on Thursday, Nov. 8, 7-9.

Our East coast events for the fall will close with a visit to one of our favorite kitchenwares store, Fante’s in Philadelphia on Saturday, Nov 17, 12-2 for a book signing. (But stay tuned for two or more extra events coming up in December.)

We welcome anybody who brings their Rose’s book collection for us to sign.

Corrections & Enhancements : Rose's Baking Basics

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Any finally proofed and approved by the author manuscript before going to the printer, which includes numbers, has the unfortunate probability of inputting errors once it is published. We thank Linda Carucci, who attended our San Francisco Bakers Dozen book touring event, on her alerting us to an error that she found for the Flaky Cranberry Scones. We confirmed that her inquiry and finding was correct, which was what we had also submitted to the publisher. This triggered us on our first day back from our Western states book tour to check all instances where a volume measurement included 1/3 or 2/3 cup. Here are our corrections, which will show the page for a correction, the recipe title, and the correction.


pg. 123 Apple Cider Cake Doughnuts
BAKING EQUIPMENT: One 6 cavity doughnut pan, LIGHTLY COATED WITH SHORTENING AND
FLOUR OR
well coated with baking spray with flour

pg. 139 Apple Walnut Muffins
all-purpose flour SHOULD BE 1-2/3 cups
apples SHOULD BE 2-2/3 cups

pg. 253 Flaky Cranberry Scones
dried cranberries SHOULD BE 2/3 cup

pg. 254 Flaky Cranberry Scones Make the Recipe Your Own
divide the dough into two equal pieces (SHOULD BE 430 grams each)

pg. 299 Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread
delete the word divided for the instant yeast on the chart

Rose's Baking Basics MEDIA: Heritage Radio Interviews Us

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Last month, we went to Brooklyn, the home of Heritage Radio for a podcast taping with Caity Moseman Wadler, which aired last Friday. Caity asked just the right questions to make it a really fun interview.

Here is the link to Heritage Radio’s website. Our podcast is EPISODE 14: Cookbooks. Our segment is on the last third of the podcast.

EPISODE 14: Cookbooks is also on iTunes.

Elliott also came with us and got to meet Sari Kamin, our publicist with HMH. Sari has her own fascinating podcast on Heritage Radio (see link below).

Heritage Radio’s studio and office are situated inside Roberta’s Pizza. The three of us sat down with Caity and her mom to enjoy a some of Roberta’s great pizzas.

Rose's Baking Basics Tour: Scheduled Events and Event Links

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Our favorite part of book production is having the finished book to bring on book tour. This gives us the chance to highlight all the new discoveries and favorites and to visit with old friends, colleagues, and family.

Our fall scheduled tour with over 20 events in 18 cities is finalized. Several of the events require registration. To see our schedule and a listing of event locations that have links to their websites for either registering or learning more about the event click on the button below.

A Very Special Event for Baking Basics at the Fort in Morrison Colorado

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My dearest friend Holly Arnold Kinney has once again organized a delightful event for our newest book, at her magical Fort restaurant, coming up the evening of Tuesday October 2, presented with the Les Dames d’Escoffier International Colorado Chapter.

$75.00/person includes one signed and personalized copy of The Baking Basics, champagne, prickly pear margaritas, hearty hors d’oeuvres, and dessert. (Free parking)

Space is limited and payment is required in advance to hold your seat. Please reserve by clicking on the PayPal button of their website.

The Fort is located high in the foothills outside of Denver. If you’ve never been to the Fort that alone is worth the journey. Hope to see you there. And don’t be late so you can catch the tomahawking of the champagne!

Questions: Lee@seasonedkitchen.com

Rose's Baking Basics Tour Events: 92nd Street "Y" with Corby Kummer Registration

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Our first major event of our book tour is in New York City, the city where I grew up and lived most of my life. I have known Corby for 30 years, since he interviewed me for an amazing article he wrote for New York Times during the launch of the Cake Bible. Corby is one of the most erudite, brilliant, and insightful speakers I know, so this will be a rare treat. I can't wait to hear his questions and thoughts about baking and the new book. I hope to see you there!

Rose’s Baking Basics Production Phase 16: The Press Reviews

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An author and publisher always have their collective breath held, while they wait to read the major press reviews. Two key reviews that an author wants to be favorable are from Publisher’s Weekly and the Booklist Online. The Publisher’s Weekly review is important because it is the ‘Consumer Reports’ reviewer for the industry. If you get a positive review here, you are likely to get many other good reviews from other publications. The Booklist Online is for the American Library Association.

Here are four reviews that Rose’s Baking Basics has received from Publisher’s Weekly, ALA’s Booklist Online, Eater, and Food & Wine.

Publisher’s Weekly August 2018
Best Books    Authors

Rose’s Baking Basics
Rose Levy Beranbaum. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $35 (400p) ISBN 978-0-544-81622-0

MORE BY AND ABOUT THIS AUTHOR   Beranbaum (The Cake Bible) offers solid baking guidance in the form of step-by-step photos and detailed written instructions. The precision-minded author instructs readers to measure cupcake batter on a scale for even distribution; and, for the same reason, she suggests (perhaps too exactingly) cutting raisins in half when making rugelach. A list of potential problems and their solutions start each chapter (the cookie chapter, for example, details how not to burn the bottoms), and Beranbaum provides measurements for each recipe in both grams and volume, because she believes weighing ingredients is more reliable. Many of her recipes are straightforward and accessible for bakers of all skill levels. Chapters on cookies, cakes, pies, and tarts overflow with precise steps for American classics: double-crusted apple pie, zucchini bread, and two thumbprint nut cookies with jam. The cookies section includes a recipe for chocolate chip cookies with both browned butter for flavor and golden syrup for chewiness, as well as “brookies,” a cross between a brownie and a cookie. Beranbaum suggests using canola or safflower oil rather than butter for a layered carrot cake so that the layers can tolerate refrigeration once cloaked in cream cheese. She presents a recipe for chocolate-spangled angel food cake (“Not only is it a favorite party cake, it is also an excellent vehicle for any leftover egg whites you might have in the freezer”); for pies, there is an apple galette (“a free form tart that can be used with many fruits or berries”) and a key lime pie, for which she admits to preferring regular limes to key limes. Beranbaum’s hand-holding is invaluable, especially for those apprehensive about baking. (Sept.)

 

American Library Association
Booklist Online: The best book reviews for public libraries and school libraries, and the best books to read for your book club, brought to you by the ALA.

Booklist includes a very positive review for Rose Levy Beranbaum’s ROSE’S BAKING BASICS in their 9/1/18 issue.

“Beranbaum, author of the classic The Cake Bible (1988), tailors her detailed approach to baking for beginners, with plenty for advanced bakers to benefit from, too. To prepare for the worst without fear, she begins each section (“Cookies,” “Cakes,” “Pies and Tarts,” “Breads,” “Toppings and Fillings”) with a page or two of “Solutions for Possible Problems.” Recipes lead with preheating notes and a very helpful “mise en place” list that explains what to do before even beginning, such as getting ingredients to room temperature. Most recipes include “Baking Pearls,” special notes about working with specific ingredients or tools. Beranbaum does not recommend attempting substitutions on a whim, but she shares tested variations, where applicable. Hundreds of color photographs include both dazzling finished products and a wealth of step-by-step process depictions, such as forming rolled cookies or baking cheesecake and carefully removing it from its pan. With bolstering instructions and heavily tested, highly appealing recipes, this is sure to be a new favorite.”—Annie Bostrom

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Food and Wine.com  

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Stay tuned for next week's Rose's Basics posting: Publisher Weekly's Partners in Crème. 
PW Talks with Rose Levy Beranbaum and Woody Wolston

Lemon Cheesecake Soufflé

The one that almost got away!

The one that almost got away!

Fifty years ago I tasted a cheese cake that was almost as light and airy as whipped cream. I never forgot it. The bakery was in Princeton, NJ and when I moved back to New York City I actually took a bus ride to the bakery trying to persuade them to give me the recipe. They promised they would send it but never did. Finally, all these years later, I figured it out. Instead of adding the whole eggs to the cream cheese batter, I separated them and whipped the egg whites with the sugar Italian meringue style. I added a little extra sugar to compensate for the sugar syrup that sticks to the sides of the pot.

The resulting cake is so fluffy it makes a sound when you put a fork to it.

 Serves: 10 to 12

Oven Temperature: 350˚F/175˚C

Baking Time: 50 minutes (55 minutes if using a silicone pan instead of aluminum foil for the water bath), plus 1 hour with the oven off

Plan Ahead Make the cheesecake at least 1 day before serving.

 Equipment One 9 by 3 or 2-3/4 inch high springform pan, lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray, set in a slightly larger silicone pan or wrapped with a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to prevent seepage; A 12 inch cake pan or roasting pan to serve as a water bath

Preheat the Oven   * Twenty minutes or longer before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven. Set the oven at 350˚F/175˚C.    Mise en Place   * One hour ahead, into the bowl of a stand mixer, place the cream cheese, cornstarch, and 25 grams/2 tablespoons of the sugar at cool room temperature (65˚ to 70˚F/19˚ to 21˚C).  * Into another 1 cup measure with a spout, place the lemon zest, and weigh or measure the lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap.  * If using a cake base, trim it to size and set it on the bottom of the pan. If using lady fingers, cut off the rounded edges and arrange them on the bottom of the pan, placing them rounded crust flat sides down and cutting or tearing smaller pieces to fit into any gaps. Cover the pan with plastic wrap while making the filling.   Make the Batter   1) Into two small containers, separate the yolks and the whites.  2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the cream cheese mixture on medium-high speed until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, about 3 minutes.  3) Gradually beat in the egg yolks and continue beating until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.  4) On medium-low speed add the lemon zest, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat until incorporated.  5) Add the sour cream and continue beating just until fully blended, 20 to 30 seconds. Detach the whisk beater and use it to reach down and whisk in any mixture that has settled to the bottom of the bowl.  6) Remove and wash, rinse, and dry the whisk beater to remove any trace of oil. If you do not have a second mixer bowl, scrape this mixture into a large bowl and thoroughly wash, rinse, and dry the mixer bowl and whisk beater to remove any trace of oil.

Preheat the Oven

* Twenty minutes or longer before baking, set an oven rack in the lower third of the oven. Set the oven at 350˚F/175˚C.

 Mise en Place

* One hour ahead, into the bowl of a stand mixer, place the cream cheese, cornstarch, and 25 grams/2 tablespoons of the sugar at cool room temperature (65˚ to 70˚F/19˚ to 21˚C).

* Into another 1 cup measure with a spout, place the lemon zest, and weigh or measure the lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap.

* If using a cake base, trim it to size and set it on the bottom of the pan. If using lady fingers, cut off the rounded edges and arrange them on the bottom of the pan, placing them rounded crust flat sides down and cutting or tearing smaller pieces to fit into any gaps. Cover the pan with plastic wrap while making the filling.

Make the Batter

1) Into two small containers, separate the yolks and the whites.

2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the cream cheese mixture on medium-high speed until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, about 3 minutes.

3) Gradually beat in the egg yolks and continue beating until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

4) On medium-low speed add the lemon zest, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat until incorporated.

5) Add the sour cream and continue beating just until fully blended, 20 to 30 seconds. Detach the whisk beater and use it to reach down and whisk in any mixture that has settled to the bottom of the bowl.

6) Remove and wash, rinse, and dry the whisk beater to remove any trace of oil. If you do not have a second mixer bowl, scrape this mixture into a large bowl and thoroughly wash, rinse, and dry the mixer bowl and whisk beater to remove any trace of oil.

Mise en Place   * Have ready a 1 cup glass measure with a spout (not coated with nonstick cooking spray) near the cooktop.    *  Into the bowl of a stand mixer, weigh or measure the egg whites.     1) In a small heavy saucepan, preferably nonstick and with a spout, stir together the remaining 200 grams/1 cup of sugar and the water until the sugar is completely moistened. Cook on medium heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup is bubbling. Stop stirring and turn down the heat to the lowest setting. (If using an electric cooktop, remove from the heat.)  2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the egg whites on medium-high speed just until almost stiff peaks form when the beater is raised slowly (they should curve slightly).  3) Increase the heat on the cooktop and boil the syrup until an instant-read thermometer registers 248˚ to 250˚F/120˚C.   Immediately pour the syrup into the glass measure to stop the cooking.  4) With the mixer off, pour a small amount of syrup over the whites. Immediately beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Stop the mixer and add one-third of the syrup. Beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Add the remaining syrup in two parts, with the mixer off between additions. For the last addition, use a silicone scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the glass measure and scrape it against the beater.  5) Continue beating on medium speed for 2 minutes or until the outside of the bowl is no longer hot to the touch. Then use the whisk beater to fold it into the batter. Use a silicone spatula to reach to the bottom of the bowl to finish folding.  6) Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface evenly.   Bake the Cheesecake   7) Set the pan into the larger pan and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Add about 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the water and stir to dissolve it. (This will prevent discoloration of the aluminum pan.) Bake for 25 minutes. For even baking, rotate the pan halfway around. Continue baking for 25 minutes (30 minutes if using the silicone pan). Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cake cool for 1 hour. When moved the center will jiggle slightly. (Alternatively, bake for 1 hour plus 10 minutes until the center tests 147°F. The center bounces back when lightly pressed and it jiggles even in the center.) The edges will have little cracks and be browned.   Cool and Chill the Cheesecake   7) Remove the pan from the water bath but leave the silicone pan or foil in place to contain any liquid that may seep from the cake. Set it on a wire rack to cool to room temperature or just warm, 1 to 2 hours. To absorb condensation, place a paper towel, curved side down, over the pan with the ends overhanging. Place an inverted plate, larger than the springform pan, on top of the paper towel.  8) Refrigerate the cheesecake for 8 hours or overnight, still covered with the paper towel and plate.   Unmold the Cheesecake   9) Remove the plate and paper towel. Use a small propane torch or wipe the sides of the pan several times with a towel that has been run under hot water and wrung out. Release the sides of the springform pan. If the sides of the cheesecake are uneven, run a small metal spatula under hot water and use it to smooth them.  10) This delicate cake is best left on the pan bottom of the springform.  11) Cut with a wet knife that has been run under hot water between each slice and wiped clean with a paper towel.   Store  Airtight: refrigerated, 3 days; do not freeze, as the texture will become less smooth.   

Mise en Place

* Have ready a 1 cup glass measure with a spout (not coated with nonstick cooking spray) near the cooktop.

 * Into the bowl of a stand mixer, weigh or measure the egg whites.

 1) In a small heavy saucepan, preferably nonstick and with a spout, stir together the remaining 200 grams/1 cup of sugar and the water until the sugar is completely moistened. Cook on medium heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup is bubbling. Stop stirring and turn down the heat to the lowest setting. (If using an electric cooktop, remove from the heat.)

2) Attach the whisk beater and beat the egg whites on medium-high speed just until almost stiff peaks form when the beater is raised slowly (they should curve slightly).

3) Increase the heat on the cooktop and boil the syrup until an instant-read thermometer registers 248˚ to 250˚F/120˚C. Immediately pour the syrup into the glass measure to stop the cooking.

4) With the mixer off, pour a small amount of syrup over the whites. Immediately beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Stop the mixer and add one-third of the syrup. Beat on high speed for 5 seconds. Add the remaining syrup in two parts, with the mixer off between additions. For the last addition, use a silicone scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the glass measure and scrape it against the beater.

5) Continue beating on medium speed for 2 minutes or until the outside of the bowl is no longer hot to the touch. Then use the whisk beater to fold it into the batter. Use a silicone spatula to reach to the bottom of the bowl to finish folding.

6) Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface evenly.

Bake the Cheesecake

7) Set the pan into the larger pan and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Add about 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the water and stir to dissolve it. (This will prevent discoloration of the aluminum pan.) Bake for 25 minutes. For even baking, rotate the pan halfway around. Continue baking for 25 minutes (30 minutes if using the silicone pan). Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cake cool for 1 hour. When moved the center will jiggle slightly. (Alternatively, bake for 1 hour plus 10 minutes until the center tests 147°F. The center bounces back when lightly pressed and it jiggles even in the center.) The edges will have little cracks and be browned.

Cool and Chill the Cheesecake

7) Remove the pan from the water bath but leave the silicone pan or foil in place to contain any liquid that may seep from the cake. Set it on a wire rack to cool to room temperature or just warm, 1 to 2 hours. To absorb condensation, place a paper towel, curved side down, over the pan with the ends overhanging. Place an inverted plate, larger than the springform pan, on top of the paper towel.

8) Refrigerate the cheesecake for 8 hours or overnight, still covered with the paper towel and plate.

Unmold the Cheesecake

9) Remove the plate and paper towel. Use a small propane torch or wipe the sides of the pan several times with a towel that has been run under hot water and wrung out. Release the sides of the springform pan. If the sides of the cheesecake are uneven, run a small metal spatula under hot water and use it to smooth them.

10) This delicate cake is best left on the pan bottom of the springform.

11) Cut with a wet knife that has been run under hot water between each slice and wiped clean with a paper towel.

Store Airtight: refrigerated, 3 days; do not freeze, as the texture will become less smooth.

 

Peaches and Cream Kuchen Preview from "Rose's Baking Basics"

We don't want you to miss the season so we're offering this special recipe right now while the peaches are at their peak.

PEACHES AND CREAM KUCHEN is excerpted from ROSE’s BAKING BASICS © 2018 by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Photography © 2018 by Matthew Septimus. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

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"ROSE’S BAKING BASICS" BREAK THROUGHS PREVIEW

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When Michael Batterberry and Food Arts Magazine were still alive, and I had a new book coming out, he would always ask me if there were any new break throughs and there always were! He would then do a full page, featuring them in the magazine. So I am continuing the tradition by offering here a sampling of the top tips and techniques you will find in my newest book. 

Two of my most valued additions to this book are that on the charts, the grams come before the volume, and right after the chart there is a "mise en place" (set up of ingredients). The recipes are written exactly the way in which I bake. We love working from this new format.

* My favorite caramel sauce with amazing flavor and smooth texture that keeps for months:

* The best flour for pie crust and how to tenderize bleached or unbleached all-purpose flour.

* How to unmold tarts that have stuck to the bottom of the tart pan the easy way (what took me so long to figure out this ridiculously simple method)!

* How to keep the bottom crust of a custard pie such as pumpkin from getting soggy.

* How to use pie crust scraps to make the best rugelach and why it is the best.

* How to make cake strips for any size cake pans.

 * How to never ever risk over-whipping egg whites and why it’s fine to add the sugar and cream of tartar right from the beginning.

* Neoclassic Meringue—cousin to Neoclassic Buttercream. How it’s possible to make either one without a thermometer.

* How to salvage broken mousseline buttercream.

* How to make the silkiest smoothest dulce de leche the easiest way.

Neoclassic Mousseline Buttercream Has Arrived

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Our queen of buttercreams has a new version. A couple of days ago, Jean asked on our Ask a Question page if the neoclassic method used for the neoclassic buttercream could also be implemented for the mousseline buttercream. This method eliminated the need for a temperature reading by replacing the sugar and water mixture with a sugar and corn syrup mixture. When the mixture reaches a full boil it automatically is the perfect temperature for heating the egg yolks.

 

I first offered neoclassic buttercream in The Cake Bible 30 years ago and in the years following, I had not found a favorable result using the same method for Italian meringue. But when testing recipes for Rose’s Baking Basics I was inspired to revisit the technique, altering the ratio of sugar to corn syrup and it worked.
Thanks to Jean’s request we decided to give the new neoclassic Italian meringue a try for the mousseline and after two tests: Eureka!
To prevent the mousseline from becoming curdled, the temperature range for combining the butter and egg white meringue is a couple of degrees higher than for my classic mousseline. This is because it uses less egg white for more strength, and also, while the temperate of the syrup is close to that of the classic one, it is a little lower and therefore a little less stable. Also, we found it beneficial to increase the amount of sugar and corn syrup slightly, compared to the new neoclassic Italian meringue because this also increases stability needed for incorporating butter into it.

Mousseline

Makes: 450 grams/2-1/4 cups (Double the recipe for two 9 inch layer cakes or one 9 by 13 inch sheet cake.)

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Mise en Place

* 30 minutes to 1 hour ahead, set the butter on the counter at cool room temperature. The butter needs to be 65˚ to 68˚F/19˚ to 20˚C.

* 30 minutes to 1 hour ahead, in a small bowl, weigh or measure the egg whites, and add the cream of tartar. Cover with plastic wrap.

* Have ready a 1 cup/237 ml glass measure with a spout by the cooktop.

Make the Mousseline

1) In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the flat beater, beat the butter on medium-high speed until creamy, about 1 minute. Set it aside in a cool place (no higher than 70˚F/21˚C).

2) In a small heavy saucepan, preferably with a nonstick lining, with a spout, stir together the sugar and corn syrup until all of the sugar is moistened. Heat on medium, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves and the mixture begins to simmer. Stop stirring and reduce the heat to low. (On an electric range remove the pan from the heat.)

3) With a handheld mixer, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar on medium-low speed until foamy. Raise the speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form when the beater is raised slowly.

4) Increase the heat until the sugar and corn syrup has reached a rolling boil with the surface covered with large bubbles. Immediately pour the syrup into the glass measure to stop the cooking.

5) Beat the syrup into the egg whites in a steady stream. Don't allow the syrup to fall on the beaters or they will spin it onto the sides of the bowl. Use a silicone scraper to remove the syrup clinging to the measure and scrape it onto the bottoms of the beaters. 

6) Lower the speed to medium and continue beating for up to two minutes. Refrigerate the meringue for 5 to 10 minutes, until 72˚F/23˚C. Whisk it after the first 5 minutes to test and equalize the temperature.

7) Set the mixer bowl containing the butter in the stand and attach the whisk beater. Beat the butter on medium-high speed for about 3 minutes, or until it lightens in color and is between 70˚F/21˚C and 72˚F/23˚C.

8) Confirm that both the creamed butter and the meringue are both within 2 degrees of each other.

Scrape the meringue into the butter and beat on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Beat for about 2 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. At first the mixture will look slightly curdled. Continue beating until it becomes a uniform, creamy texture.

If it starts watering out or continues to be curdled, check the temperature.

It should feel cool and be no lower than 70˚F/21˚C, no higher than 73˚F/23˚C. If too warm, set it in a bowl of ice water, stirring gently to chill it down before continuing to beat the buttercream by hand until smooth. If in doubt, it is best to remove a small amount and try beating it either chilling or heating it slightly.

If too cool, suspend the bowl over a pan of very hot water (do not let the bottom of the bowl touch the water) and heat for just a few seconds, stirring vigorously when the mixture just starts to melt slightly at the edges. Dip the bottom of the bowl in a larger bowl of ice water for a few seconds to cool it. Remove the bowl from the ice water and beat the buttercream by hand until smooth.

If the mixture breaks down and will not come together, it can still be rescued. See our posting: When Tragedy Strikes Your Mousseline Buttercream.

9) Gradually beat in the vanilla and optional liqueur.

Store Airtight: room temperature, 1 day; refrigerated, 3 days; frozen, 2 months.

 Notes

* High fat butter is a great help for decreasing any initial curdling of the mousseline.
* It is best to avoid making meringue on humid days.
* The mixer bowl and beater must be entirely free of any fat, which includes oil or egg yolk.
* If doubling the recipe it’s fine to use a stand mixer for the egg whites if you have a second bowl. Add the heated sugar and corn syrup mixture in 3 parts with the mixer off. Then beat each part for several seconds and scrape the sides of the bowl between each addition. Use a silicone spatula to remove the syrup clinging to the measure and scrape it onto the bottoms of the beater.  When pouring, be sure to avoid letting the syrup hit the beaters so that it doesn’t spin it onto the sides of the bowl.
* The mousseline becomes spongy and fluffy on standing which is lovely once on the cake. If you don’t use it right away, whisk it lightly by hand to maintain a silky texture before apply it to the cake. Do not, however, rebeat chilled mousseline until it has reached 72˚ to 74˚F/23˚C to prevent it from breaking down.

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Finally It’s Here: The Ideal Oven Thermometer!

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This well-designed thermometer the BlueDot alarm thermometer and it’s produced by Thermoworks, the same wonderful company that makes, among other things, my favorite instant-read thermometer the Thermapen.

What makes the BlueDot so special and valuable is that it comes with a downloadable Ap which means that you can read the temperature on your IOS device (and soon Android as well) from up to 95 feet.  But what is more important to me is that it graphs the range of temperatures as the oven fluctuates.

The BlueDot is accurate +/- 3.6˚F/2.0˚C at a range of 248˚F/120˚C to 392˚F/200˚C which is the range of most baking.

 

You can also purchase an inexpensive stainless steel grate clip that works perfectly to attach to an oven rack to hold the probe in place.