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THE CAKE BIBLE E-BOOK is NOW available for purchase on Amazon, Apple IBooks, and Barnes & Noble.

Category ... Rose's Books

The Baking Bible's First Review!

Jul 01, 2014 | From the kitchen of Rose in Epicurious

from the July issue of The Library Journal:

Readers expect perfection from ­Beranbaum (Rose's Heavenly Cakes; The Cake Bible), whose award-winning cookbooks are known for their foolproof recipes and rigorous testing and development. Her tenth cookbook--a timeless collection of all-new cakes, pastries, cookies, candies, and breads--blends American and European traditions and thoroughly explains the hows and whys of baking through commandment-like "golden rules" and meticulous instructions. Novice bakers can start out with easy choices (blueberry buckle) and work their way up to more complex recipes (prune preserves and caramel cream cake roll) that can have as many as five homemade components. Like Flo Braker's Baking for All Occasions, the book contains some unique desserts (pomegranate winter chiffon meringue pie) that won't be found elsewhere. The ingredient glossary, equipment list, resources, and appendixes are excellent. VERDICT Beranbaum successfully bridges the gap between popular home baking collections and professional texts, and her recipes will endure long after novelty baking trends have tired.

Baking Bible Book Production Phase 10

Feb 22, 2014 | From the kitchen of Rose in Epicurious

The Baking Bible Cover.jpg

There is only one moment in book publishing more exciting than seeing the "laid out pages" of the manuscript, complete with all the photos and the final design. That moment is when the actual book arrives. Woody are now in the midst of proofing these laid out pages against the copy edited version. Proofing is a horribly laborious process as one so often sees what ought to be there rather than what is (a great metaphor!). What takes away the pain, however, is enjoying the beauty of the pages.

The offiicial pub date is November 4 but it can be pre ordered now on Amazon: The Baking Bible

The major advantage of preordering is not only being among the first to receive the book but also the deep discount ($28.80 instead of the cover price of $40).

Bread is in the Air!

Feb 20, 2014 | From the kitchen of Rose in Epicurious


Up until this month, the first and only country to publish a translation of my book The Bread Bible, published in 2013, was Czechoslovakia. It was so exciting to see my familiar book cover in a language totally unfamiliar to me and thrilling to get a letter from a reader saying he made the pizza and it was the best he ever tasted.

This month two other countries have joined the list: China, a few weeks ago, and now today I just got the link and cover photo of the Spanish Bread Bible, published by RBA who published the Spanish translation of The Cake Bible a few years ago.

The Chinese Bread Bible Has Arrived!

Feb 12, 2014 | From the kitchen of Rose in Epicurious


Order from Amazon

I don't speak Chinese, but I can tell you that this will be an excellent translation based on the many technical questions asked by the Chinese editors and proof readers.

Here is the introduction I wrote in English:

Introduction to The Bread Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum

The first translation of The Cake Bible took place many years ago for the United Kingdom. The biggest challenge at the time was the difference in flours but I soon discovered the rationale behind the phrase "two countries separated by one language!" The words were the same but the way in which they were used was quite different, for example, cake pan became cake tin.

When I was offered the opportunity to have The Cake Bible and The Bread Bible published in China and translated into Chinese I was overjoyed. Chinese food was the first cuisine I experienced as a child outside of my own home in New York City, when I was a very picky eater, and I adored it. I decided that when I grew up I wanted to move to Chinatown so that I could eat Chinese food all the time. And I read every book I could find on Chinese culture. At one of my first jobs I persuaded a Chinese colleague to teach me the language. Sadly he left before he could teach me only three phrases: the inevitable "how are you?"; "where are you going?"(at my request); and what he must of thought might be useful in polite social conversations where weather is always a safe subject: "rain is falling." This was 50 years ago and I carried these cherished phrases with me all this time.

I knew that none of these limited phrases would help me to understand how faithful a Chinese translation of my books would be to the original. (To my amazed delight, the technical queries that came to me in English from the Chinese proof reader were more meticulously detailed than any I had ever encountered in my own country, so I knew my fears were groundless.) But my greatest concern was that instead of being two countries separated by one language it would be two countries separated by ovens! Several years ago I had been invited by an Egyptian-American food writer to accompany her to China to teach baking at a culinary school where she was teaching French cooking. Unfortunately, she had to withdraw the invitation when she discovered that there were no ovens for traditional Euro-American baking. It is so good to learn that this has changed. And it is so very gratifying to know that the world has grown smaller, that cultural barriers are dissolving, and that I will be able to open new doors by sharing my work and so many of the recipes and techniques I love with the people whose culture I so value.

Cake Bible Debuts on the Oprah Winfrey Network!

Feb 24, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose in Announcements

Thanks for fellow blogger Matthew Boyer who forwarded these links, we can now see The Dotted Swiss Wedding Cake from The Cake Bible being produced on OWN on Anna and Kristina's Grocery Bag and their reviews of the book. I couldn't be more thrilled!

The Cake Layers


Book Review

This brings to mind a funny story from about two decades ago shortly after The Cake Bible was published. I inscribed a book to Oprah and included a note offering to make her wedding cake. Before packaging it I opened up the book, trying to imagine the impression it would make when Oprah opened it, and to my shock all the entire photo insert was up side down! Needless to say I found her a copy that was perfect but apparently a large section of an entire print run was produced this way. A friend said I should save it as it would be worth a lot of money some day. Somehow, I wonder but there they are in the crawl space in Hope.

Oprah sent me a lovely note saying that if she got married she would certainly keep my offer in mind. Someday I'll have to tell the story of how I came close to making President Clinton's inauguration cake!

The Bread Bible in Czech!

Dec 10, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Rose's Books

i just came home to a marvelous surprise from my beloved editor of "the bread bible," maria guarnaschelli. she send me the hot off the press czech edition. the cover photo and inside photos are the same but the language required 100 more pages and i hardly recognize a single word! my name appears as rose levyova beranbaumova with accent marks over both a's. the name of the book ib "bible domaciho peceni"--wonder if domaciho refers to domestic or home. anyway, it is the first time i've seen any of my books in another language because, as they say re the uk edition--two countries separated by one language! back to czech, there sure are an astonishing number and variety of accent marks.
i sure hope to get some feedback from bread bakers in czechoslovakia but please in english!!!

Great Review of "Rose's Christmas Cookies"

Nov 14, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Press Mentions

Just got a wonderful holiday present in the mail--the advance copy of the Decemeber Woman's Day Magazine, soon to be on the stands. On page 136 is a terrific review, by associate food editor Ellen Greene, of my now SEVENTEEN year old book.

It was my wind-down, treat-to-myself book after the exhaustive process of producing "The Cake Bible."

Because of its seasonal name, it is rarely available in book stores but Jessica's Biscuit (800/878-4264) catalogue #D612 and Sweet Celebrations (800/328-6722) are both wise enough to know that these cookies know no season and always have copies in stock! (Though with this lovely mention their supply may run out quickly.)

Of course they are also available on amazon.com (there's a link from this blog under my books)

Crossing the Atlantic by Cookbook

Jul 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Ingredients

Cookbooks, particularly baking books, that cross the Atlantic have the well-earned reputation of being troublemakers. Differences in flour have long been suspected of being the culprit. When MacMillan of London bought the rights to publish my book The Cake Bible in the U.K., I was determined to get to the bottom of this culinary Tower of Babel. A British friend began sending me kilograms of the two basic flours available to British consumers: self-raising and plain, and I started baking. Much to my alarm, the cakes produced with the British flour were unrecognizable from their original models. It was hard to believe that innocent seeming flour could be responsible for such a dramatic difference. The logical way to conquer the problem seemed clear: to retest and redevelop the recipes to work as well as the originals, but with British ingredients. The only place to do this was in the UK with native equipment and native ingredients.

Continue reading "Crossing the Atlantic by Cookbook" »

How can I keep a pie crust from shrinking when I prebake it?

Mar 29, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in General

A pie crust that shrinks a great deal is also one that is tough. This is a result of too much water, too high a protein flour, and or overhandling of the pastry. My cream cheese pie crust in The Pie and Pastry Bible is one that shrinks very little.

But it will help any recipe to allow the dough to relax after rolling and lining the pan for at least 1 hour, covered and refrigerated. Lining the crust with parchment and dried beans or peas until it has set also helps to keep itís shape. A coffee filter, the sort used for coffee urns, is just the right size and shape to line the pastry.

My New Favorite Traditional Challah

Mar 27, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Bread

When packing for a business trip I love to start a large bread for my husband to eat while I'm away. Challah is one of his favorites and since it's one of mine as well, I usually manage to eat a few slices myself before slicing, wrapping and freezing the rest.  This is the one I made before leaving for Barcelona in February. It's similar to the one in "The Bread Bible" with one wonderful difference: I've discovered that adding some old stiff starter instead of the vinegar does wonders for elasticity making it much easier to braid. It also increases the moistness and shelf life and adds depth of flavor. And because it so exceptionally moist for a challah, the ends of the braids hold together well.

If you want to make this recipe and don't have any starter, add 1/2 tablespoon cider vinegar when adding the oil and use the lower amount of salt.

Continue reading "My New Favorite Traditional Challah" »

Corrections: The Bread Bible

Feb 28, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Book Errata/CORRECTIONS

The following is the complete list of errors and corrections from The Bread Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Use the comments below to report anything else you find.

In the CRANBERRY-BANANA-WALNUT QUICK BREAD, page 101, the correct baking temperature is 350 degrees F.

In the crisper flat bialy variation on page 165, Matthew suggests using 1 teaspoon of poppy seeds per bialy or a total of 2 tablespoons/18 grams.

In the PRETZEL BREAD on page 172, step #2..Empty the dough onto a counter and shape it into a ball. Let it sit covered for 1 hour (it will relax and spread out slightly). Divide it into 4 pieces, divide each piece into 3 (total 12 pieces--about 1.3 ounces/33 grams each) and roll each into a ball. Shape each ball into a tapered 4-inch little football,, 1-inch wide in the middle.

In the DUTCH BABY on page 182, Hand Method, after "slowly beat in" add the words milk before "the eggs."

In the ROSEMARY FOCACCIA SHEET on page 205, it may take longer than 20 minutes to form a ball. For the airiest texture and largest holes, allow the dough to double for the final rise and deeply dimple the dough with wet or oiled fingertips just before baking.

In the BUTTER-DIPPED DINNER ROLLS on page 249, the yield is correct as 12 rolls and the dough for each should weigh about 50 grams; page 254, if not using dry milk you can replace the water with 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons of milk.

In the Velvety Buckwheat Bread on page 308, replace the water with 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon/6.7 ounces/192 grams of the water and 3/4 cup/6.5 ounces/182 grams sour cream.

In the RYE BREAD recipe on page 326, on the flour mixture chart, the 2 1/4 cups bread flour weigh 12.3 ounces / 351 grams, and step #2: eliminate the words 'rye flour.' (Rye flour is used only in the sponge on page 325.)

In the PUMPERNICKEL BREAD recipe on page 333, the oven is preheated at 400°F but then should be lowered to 375°F.

In BRINNA'S PUGLIESE on page 347, the water should be 6 tablespoons (not teaspoons). In the GOLDEN SEMOLINA TORPEDO on page 366, step #2: ...whisk together ALL BUT 1/4 cup of the durum flour.

In PUGLIESE on page 363, step #5...until it has increased by about 1 1/2 times, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

in SEMOLINA TORPEDO on page 367, step #6...Preheat the oven to 425˚F, or 450˚F if using La Cloche.

In the PROSCIUTTO RING on page 371, the bread will weigh 1 1/2 pounds/690 grams and in the chart, the meat mixture should be 1 1/2 cups/6 ounces/170 grams.

in THE BEER BREAD on page 376, under the mixer method, it should read: if it is too sticky add in a little flour...

in THE TEN GRAIN TORPEDO on page 396, step #4...knead for 7 minutes. The dough will be dry.

in THE ALMOND FIG BREAD on page 412 There have been some questions about the weight of 75 grams for the coarsley chopped slivered or whole almonds. It is correct. The volume, however is a little under 1 cup. It will not hurt, however to use 1 cup.

in all the SOURDOUGH RECIPES: What I should have written was: If making bread the next day, or if starting to increase the starter the next day instead of if baking....the rational here is that if you, for example, have a weekly schedule of feeding the starter every Monday, but you don't want to start increasing the starter for bread baking until Tuesday so you can bake on Wednesday, you need to let it sit for 2 hours after feeding it and then refrigerate it until Tuesday when you start the increasing process. (All this is far easier to do than to put in to words!)

in the SOURDOUGH RYE on page 453, you will be increasing the starter by 4 times, from 25 grams to 100 grams.

In the SOURDOUGH RYE on page 454, Hand Method, use the same amount of starter as is on the chart above (1 1/2 cups).

In the SOURDOUGH PUMPERNICKEL on page 462 (Mixer Method and Hand Method) use the same amount of starter as is on the chart on page 461 (1 cup plus 2 tablespoons).
on page 463, step 7, oven temperature should be 400°F, and on page 464 step 8 lower it to 375°F. If using sesame seeds, add them after the glaze.

In the SOURDOUGH WHEAT BREAD SEEDS on page 468, after the first paragraph add: "Cover tightly and allow it to sit at room temperature 8 to 12 hours. It will have puffed slightly. Proceed to step 2.
At step 2 add the words "That night..."
At step 4 on the following page add the words "The next morning"

in the PANETTONE on page 513, use only 1/4 teaspoon of fiori di Sicilia (the 1/2 teaspoon listed in the earlier printings is just a bit too intense)

In the CHALLAH on page 517, when making the sponge add the yeast listed in the ingredients.
In all breads, when making a starter that you plan to have sit for more than 4 hours, refrigerate it after the first hour at room temperature.

CANADIAN FLOUR: Canadian unbleached all-purpose and Canadian bread flour perform well in my yeast bread recipes. For quick breads using butter, however, it is necessary to use bleached all purpose flour or the center of the bread will fall and have a gloppy texture on cooling. For more information or specific questions regarding Canadian flour/brands and baking, you can contact editors@betterbaking.com

In the Ingredient Section for Weights on page 572, the listing for dry milk refers to King Arthur's special dry milk at 10 grams per 1 tablespoon. Instant dry milk is only 4 grams per tablespoon. If using instant dry milk instead of King Arthur's use double the volume.

Continue reading "Corrections: The Bread Bible" »

Rose's Christmas Cookies

Feb 28, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Rose's Books

Many people have asked where they can get this book, touted by Tina Ujlaki in Food and Wine Magazine (December 2003) as "...one of my all-time favorite holiday cookbooks."

Fortunately, Jessica's Biscuit carries it all year 'round.

Call 1-800-878-4264. The catalogue number is D612, price: $19.60

A Lovely Love Note

Feb 23, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Rose's Books


Feedback: This seems like a reasonable time to drop a love-note to Rose. Years ago I used to pick up the Cake Bible in bookstores to read and re-read the story of your brother's wedding cake and the snowstorm of 1983. Eventually my husband gave me the book as a gift. The story about your discussion of "sifting" with your (eventual) husband was a gem. It is the stories, I guess, that make me love the book and so, you. The recipes, resource information and photos are the frosting on the cake, as it were. Thanks for all of it. Kathy Mc (devoted fan!)


I'm going to put this up near my computer monitor for inspiration as I work on my new cake book. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Frosting for 90 Degree Weather

Feb 09, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Wedding


Dear Rose,

I hope you can help me with my dilema. My daughter is getting married in
August. The wedding reception will be outdoors in Illinois. She has picked
cupcakes instead of a traditional wedding cake. The problem is the
frosting....it is usually around 90 degrees and humid. Our baker usually
uses some crisco (yikes!) in the frosting.

I can not do crisco...no matter what the outside temp is...pls help with any
suggestion on how to decorate the cupcakes, what ingredients to use and

I am planning on ordering your book, "The Cake Bible."

Thank you soooooo very much.


the best frosting for 90 degree temperatures is the mousseline buttercream but i think the silk meringue might hold up well too. the easiest and safest would be to use a curd such as lemon curd.

Pizza Praise

Feb 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Bread


Feedback: Last night we had some friends over towatch the Super Bowl game. I decided to try the pizza recipe on page 189 of The Bread Bible. Although it contradicted everything I thought I knew about making pizza dough, it turned out to be the best pizza I have ever made. My guests all agreed. I strongly recommend it to all.


Thank you so much Hank for sharing your experience and encouraging other people who might be doubting Thomases to experience this amazing pizza!

Silicone Baking Pans

Feb 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Equipment


Dear Rose,

I have an older copy of your "The Cake Bible" that was written before
the advent and proliferation of the silicon baking pans. In general,
what changes to the baking process should I consider if I use these pans?



There are actually very few changes necessary. It is important to realize, however, that no substance on earth that I know of is 100% non-stick. Because silicone happens to be the most nonstick substance, if it is prepared properly (with oil and flour) it will release the cake perfectly with no crust stuck to the pan.

It is best to allow the cake to cool in the pan on a rack until warm or room temperature before unmolding it.

Deep fluted tube pans, as they are now, do not conduct the heat well to the center of the cake and may require as long as 20 minutes extra baking. But this is a relatively new technology and is continuing to evolve. For small cakes and the standard 9 x 2 inch cake I feel silicone has no equal. The cakes rise more evenly, with no need to wrap the sides of the pans with cake strips, and the texture is lighter and more even though the actual height of the cake is slightly lower.

Read about my association with Lékué Silicone pans and bakeware from Spain.

Layer Cakes Rising Higher Than the Pan

Feb 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in General


Hi rose! I love your book.

The issue I'm having is that in your Book The Cake Bible, you say to use 9 inch x 1 1/2 inch round pans for making the All Occasion Downey Yellow Butter Cake. I followed your instructions to the letter. The layers rose above the tops of the cake pans. Did I do something wrong? Should I just be using the 9x2 inch pans instead?

Thank you!


It's okay if layer cakes rise a little above the sides of the pan as the structure can still support it. The real indication is if the finished height after unmolding is the same as I specified. The batter may be a little too much for the 1 1/2" high pan but it is not enough for the 2 inch high pans.

Sourdough Starter

Feb 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Sourdough


Rose (I feel as though I know you since reading your book since Christmas),

In making our own starter we followed the directions day by day, my wife and I are both engineers so lists and organized plans are VERY helpful. The starter didn't appear to follow the double a day that you mentioned. This may have happened while we weren't looking and then deflated. At the 5 day point, we decided to keep with the daily routine. At the 10th day, the starter does look a bit more energetic.

Do we need to mature the starter by feeding it every 3 days at room temperature or should it be in the fridge? How much should we be feeding, 60g of flour and water without removing any while it is matured? Should we remove a cup before we start expanding it?

We would both appreciate even a quick response. The description that starts at the end of page 429 "for example ......" confuses us when we follow the instructions in the last paragraph of page 433.

Thank you in advance for the help,


because sour dough is an alive entity it is not something the you can nail down hundred percent.

The last paragraph on page 429 of my book referred to an already established starter. The last paragraph on page 433 is referring to one that is not yet mature.if you have an active starter as I mentioned at the bottom of page 433 if you don't plan to use it for several days feed it to double it, let it sit one hour, and then refrigerate it.
as I wrote, for the first two weeks feed it at least three times a week.if you are not feeding it every day you need to refrigerate it between feedings. I wrote that during maturing you need to keep a minimum of 1 cup. In answer to your question how much to feed it, I wrote that you need to at least double it, so this depends on how much you keep. You can do it by a eye, or as I prefer, by weight.

By way of encouragement, everyone who has written to me about problems starting a sourdough starter has, with patience, arrived at a successful one. What follows is one person's very helpful suggestion which I have not tried myself but suspect will work brilliantly:

"... i had a asked for advice earlier about a sourdough culture that was
going flat and not responding to the feeding after 2 days. the trick i had
about using a 50/50 mix of organic rye and bread flour during the next
feeding to reintroduce more wild yeast into the sourdough did the trick of
waking it back up. it responded right away and i just went back to normal
bread flour feedings. i haven't had any troubles since in case anyone in
the future has this problem"

The Cake Bible and the New Cake Book

Jan 15, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Rose's Books


I am thinking about purchasing The Cake Bible. When is the new book coming out and what will be different? Should I wait for the new one or should I purchase both of them?

I'm a novice to pastry making. Will there be a new pastry book also or am I safe to purchase The Pastry Bible?

Thank you for a very informative site.


i would highly recommend getting the cake bible and here's why: last year i did a revision but the only things i felt needed changing were the chocolate recommendations and the equipment and ingredient distributors. chocolate is now expressed in % of cocoa mass rather than manufacturer and some of the chocolates i recommended no longer exist! the recipes, however, have become classics as the book has survived for close to 18 years now and still going strong. i found there was nothing i wanted to change with the exception of the burnt almond milk chocolate ganache as the chocolate bar used to make it is no longer being manufactured so i replaced it with another delicious milk chocolate ganache (lesson learned not to have a product-dependent recipe!)

the cake bible is filled with explanations about how cake baking works which is ideal for beginning and advanced bakers who want to know more and have more control over what they are doing.

the new cake book will be entirely different with emphasis on the visual (some aspect of every cake will be pictured) and contain all the new ideas that have come about over the past two decades since the cake bible.

re the pie pastry bible, if i ever do another on the subject it will be many years from now! but do check out the new pie crust that's on the blog. it's a variation of the cream cheese pie crust but uses heavy cream instead of water and is more tender and more delicious.

I'm Awed and Humbled

Jan 14, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Rose's Books


I'd like to thank you for publishing The Cake Bible.
As someone who always loved baking but never went to culinary school, I read many highly rated cookbooks but grew increasingly frustrated when recipes were excellent (or not) but failed to explain what was going on. Your book answered so many questions! You should have seen me devour it from beginning to end so many years ago.

Here is what I've done since then:http://www.mirabellecatering.com/

That is your lemon curd in those pictures, your genoise, your mousseline, your ladyfingers, your meringue swans, your pistachio marzipan (heavenly!), your raspberry sauce (ditto), your chocolate leaves, etc etc etc.

Though I certainly reference other books now as well (I'm sure you recognize some of Alice Medrich's creations, and Martha's) and sometimes use their recipes, the vast bulk of what I do is still from your book (second volume - the spines break in no time!) And I would not approach those other sources with the same confidence, had I not absorbed such a basic understanding from you.

I'll have plenty of questions to send in the future, since discovering this blog, but for now just wanted to say thank-you with all my heart.


this has to be among the most validating letters i've ever received. and encourages me all the more as i submerge deeper and deeper into my first new cake book since the cake bible so many years ago. your work is exquisite and i've put in a link so everyone can see it. if i can take any credit for making your imaginative artistry more delicious i'm very proud indeed. and icing on the cake is that you acknowledged the empowerment of information and how it makes it possible to absorb so much more when you have a base of understanding. it is a life-long process and an undying thrill.
thank you heidi!


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