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Corn Syrup Substitute?
Posted: 15 July 2009 06:45 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I am not sure whether this has been asked before but perhaps someone on here can help me with this query.  We can’t get corn syrup in the UK but we do have Tate & Lyle’s Golden Syrup,  can this be substituted for corn syrup in recipes?  Not just in Rose’s books but I notice in Shirley Corriher’s Bakewise also, lots of the recipes include corn syrup and I would like to know if our Golden syrup can be used instead, or if not what is the next best substitute?  Perhaps if AnnieMcD sees this she can tell me.

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Posted: 15 July 2009 11:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Jeanette, I think the substitution of Lyle’s will work in many cases, but there may be a few exceptions where sugar syrup temperatures are important, or when lower acidity is important. 

For sugar syrups, I’m thinking the Neoclassic buttercream may not hit the right sugar stage with Lyle’s.  Sugars with “impurities”, like brown sugar, go through the stages (soft ball, hard crack, etc.) at different temps than refined white sugar.

As for the acidity, I’m thinking of how milk can curdle when heated with an acid- I’ve had this happen with acidic sugars, and I’m guessing that Lyle’s may be more acidic than corn syrup.  This is for making caramel or candies where you add milk to hot sugar syrup.

Rose recommends Lyle’s for pecan pie and sticky buns, no problems there.

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Posted: 15 July 2009 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Jeanette

I have tried to substitute golden syrup in recipes a long time ago (not TCB) and they didn’t work out.  I think that golden syrup is thicker and has a much stronger taste than corn syrup.  Basically I now avoid recipes calling for corn syrup.

I have found the following subsitution recipe online.  I’m not sure if it works, but would be interested to hear if it does. 

2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt

Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.

Alternatively, I understand that you can buy corn syrup at some specialist grocery stores like Harrods (and probably the Selfridges Food Hall too I would imagine).  Doesn’t help if you’re outside London though.

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Posted: 15 July 2009 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you ladies for your replies.  I might try the mix you give MelB , OR I will have to try to find the corn syrup in this country, if it is available in London it may be somewhere else! wink

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Posted: 15 July 2009 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Just a note to say that for pie filling specifically (and not for the far-fussier buttercreams), substituting golden syrup for corn syrup has always worked fine for me.

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Posted: 16 July 2009 08:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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If you can find a source for liquid glucose, it’s a good substitute for regular corn syrup. In fact, it’s usually made from corn and the resulting product is a thick, colourless syrup used in commercial baking. Corn syrup is liquid glucose that has been adjusted to a somewhat thinner consistency for home use and some commercial applications. (See Rose’s notes on the main differences p 433 TCB).

Your local chemist may carry liquid glucose or be able to suggest a supplier because of its medical applications. Check with bakeries in your area, too, in case they have it and would be willing to sell you a small amount.

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Posted: 16 July 2009 09:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Carolita, thanks for the info on glucose. I was just about to post a question about that and corn syrup, and you’ve answered it! I can get glucose easily here at the baking supply shops. The other question I have is how much water to add to glucose to make it equivalent to corn syrup? Rose has directions only for how to convert corn syrup to glucose, not vice versa.

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Posted: 16 July 2009 10:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’m not sure I’d bother adjusting for the water, especially if the recipe you’re following only calls for a small amount of syrup. If you look at p 433 TCB, Rose says glucose has 15 to 19.7% water and corn syrup contains about 24%. That provides some guidance, if you decide to add water. The stuff is REALLY thick, btw. Let us know what you decide and how you get on.

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Posted: 16 July 2009 11:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks Carolita. Yeah the stuff is really thick!! I got some when I made Rose’s rolled fondant, and it was hard to get it off the bowl, spoon, me…

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Posted: 17 July 2009 05:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thank you Carolita for that useful information.  I actually have some liquid glucose in my cupboard which I have used once or twice when making a chocolate torte.  I know supermarkets sell it here but in very small containers.

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Posted: 17 July 2009 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Glad I was able to help, Jeannette! Hooray for the forum, where we can usually find a friendly ear and the answers we need.

Shimi, thanks for mentioning that there’s glucose in Rose’s fondant. I could not dredge up from my memory which recipe of hers caused me to buy the glucose I have at home.

Added later: Oh! I just remembered, Jeannette. I bought the glucose initially to make Delia Smith’s chocolate truffle torte from her Christmas book. Is that the one you made? It’s amazing!! And later, I had it on hand when I wanted to make Rose’s fondant. Nice memories.

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Posted: 17 July 2009 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Carolita, what a coincidence!  I nearly put in my last comment why I had bought Liquid glucose, exactly the same reason as you!  I decided not to because I thought no-one would recognize Delia Smith as a cookery writer in the US!  Do you remember the fuss when this recipe of hers was first published?  You couldn’t buy liquid glucose anywhere in the country!  The same thing happened when she used cranberries for the first time,  such is the power of her recipes!  Where are you situated, in the US or the UK or somewhere else?  Anyway, thank you again and nice to know you! grin

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Posted: 17 July 2009 12:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I’m on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Jeannette, but I lived in the UK for four years in the early ‘90s. That’s when I discovered Delia. She’s a treasure. I brought her Christmas book home to North America with me. Also tracked down the lattice cutter in London for her mince tarts, and brought that back! smile

We’re so blessed nowadays with the Internet that I think probably more people are familiar with Delia on this side of the pond than you might suspect.

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Posted: 17 July 2009 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I’m not ashamed to say I learned most of my cooking skills from Delia’s books and programmes!  I have most of her books and make my Christmas cake from her Book of Cakes every year, it has also been used to make my daughter’s and son’s wedding cakes and countless birthday cakes!  As you know, probably, we are more likely to use fruit cakes here than in the States.  My husband and I visited Canada four years ago, we travelled from the east to the west and Vancouver was one of our favourite places along with Banff.  In fact we loved it all, and would love to visit again, what a great country!  I was also there some years ago , before I married,  staying with a cousin in Buffalo but going over the border into Canada where they had a summer cottage, lovely memories.  I hope you have as good memories of your stay in the UK! grin

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Posted: 18 July 2009 05:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I hadn’t heard of Delia Smith before—now I have! It’s one of the things I love about these forums. I’ll have to see if I can find any of her books. Does she have a Web site?
(By the way, I’m located in Wisconsin. I’ve been fortunate enough to visit Canada and England, briefly.)

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Posted: 18 July 2009 06:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Yes Barbara. Delia Smith does have a website, recently updated and having lots of recipes and useful info. contained there. She has written many cookery books, starting in the 1970’s and she has had many very popular TV series.  She is one of the most popular of British cookery writers although she is not a trained cook!  what i like about her recipes is that they are well tested and always work!  Her books have become my most used cookery books,  I always turn to them for guidance even when using someone else’s recipe.

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