Is it safe to leave shelled eggs in the oven with a pilot light overnight?
Posted: 04 May 2009 02:12 PM   [ Ignore ]
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In the Cake Bible, for the Chocolate Oblivian Truffle Torte, Rose says that “The eggs may also be heated by
placing them still in their shells in a large mixing bowl in an oven with a pilot light for 3
hours or up to overnight.”

In my food safety course they said that eggs should not be out at room temperature for more than 2 hours or 30 minutes to 1 hour when it’s 85?F or hotter without refrigeration.

Is it safe to leave the shelled eggs in the oven overnight?

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Posted: 04 May 2009 03:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I-LOVE-CAKE:
  Good afternoon. I did read that recipe. What I do not understand is this. If following Miss Rose’s TIP on page 85 bothers you….why can’t you do it the way she suggests in the 2nd paragraph of the directions on page 85. question  I do agree with you about having concerns about sanitary conditions with foods that can spoil easily as I have taken that course as well.
Good luck & enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 04 May 2009 03:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thank you Fresh Kid. If it is safe to leave the shelled eggs in the oven overnight then I will use that method because it will save me some time. If not, then i’ll use the double broiler method she suggests to heat the eggs.

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Posted: 04 May 2009 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hello, I think there is a difference between shelled and unshelled.  I would not leave eggs that have been taken out of the shell out overnight.  I’m not sure about the safety of leaving them out overnight, either, but if you do try it, make sure to leave the eggs in their shell.  You can change egg temps quickly by placing them (still in their shell) in a bowl of warm or hot water, depending on your needs.

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Posted: 04 May 2009 03:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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As Julie mentioned I have also placed the eggs in hot tap water to warm them up. I have also left eggs (in their shells) out on my countertop overnight whenever I plan on baking first thing in the morning. I have never had anyone get sick from it. Knock on wood….. smile

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Posted: 04 May 2009 04:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Health Departments in the US do not recommend leaving eggs at room temp. I think it is a judgement call since it partly depends upon how fresh the eggs are and how they have been processed. It is difficult to know how old are the eggs you buy in a grocery store. I believe the ‘consume by’ date on egg cartons can be as much as 60 days from the production date. In Europe most stores do not refrigerate eggs but Europeans also focus on selling fresher products than the US food industry. I would say that if you can be reasonably sure that your eggs are fresh (say about a week old) the risk is quite small.

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Posted: 04 May 2009 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
  Good day to all, & good evening to our European members. If concerned about if your eggs are reasonably fresh enough to consume. You can tell by placing the eggs in a large pot of cold water.  If the eggs lay flat they are considered fresh.
  If the small end begins to point upwards up in the middle (45 degrees) between flat to pointing straight to the sky it has begun to go stale. They can still be used. When they continue getting closer to pointing to the sky…. THROW THEM OUT!!!!

  I hope this info will help you with your food safety concerns.  Remember that foods that have much ACIDS in them can stay out of the fridge much longer than other foods before they go stale & harmful if consumed. In that case consider all foods should be under 40 degrees or over 140 degrees or they will be in theory begin to attract bad bacteria that spoil food.  The time the food is left in between these parameters are accumulative, meaning 1, hour for now out, then in the refridge then later an additional 1.5 hours outside of the refridge that is now 2.5 hours. Sooo, when we buy our foods in the super market we do not have any idea THE ACCUMULATIVE time it has been left outside the refridge.
  Good luck to You’all.

  ~FRESHKID. cool hmm

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Posted: 04 May 2009 05:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thank you for all the responses. I asked an instructor at the local Culinary Arts school and she said it doesn’t sound right to her. It would be nice to save time and place the eggs in the oven overnight, but I think I’ll stay on the safe side and use the double broiler method.

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Posted: 04 May 2009 05:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I forgot to mention that I don’t leave eggs out overnight during summer, only in winter and fall. My kitchen is pretty cold.

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Posted: 05 May 2009 12:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I remember that years and year ago I was acquainted with a visiting scientist from Poland. When I had dinner at his place, I was surprised to a carton of eggs sitting on the counter and even more surprised when I found out that he never refrigerated eggs. He was suprised to hear that I always did!

He didn’t get food poisoning during his visit, as far as I know. Still, I don’t leave my eggs out for a long time.

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Posted: 05 May 2009 04:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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This is a very good question and comes up frequently.  If you run a commercial bakery or food establishment then you need to follow the usda or local health dpt sanitation and food handling recommendation.  Salmonella grows outside of the uncracked egg, if the salmonella grew and covered the egg shell during the extended warm period then it is more of an issue of disease spreading thru your kitchen from your hands touching around utensils and other non refrigerated foods.  A typical cake gets baked hot and long enough to sterilize it even any salmonella.  at home where you typically bake one cake once and then and don’t constanly handle nor stock the same ingredients continously then the salmonella or such won’t have a constant medium to live and reproduce.  Just think, supposelly the salmonella is all over your oven, the oven gets sterilized when you preheat it.  Also, your salmonella hands get washed, and so on.

I never use eggs that are close to old, so one night of hot won’t rot it.

Rose recipes are designed for the typical home baking environment, so if using a commercial environment then you should follow the sanitation class rules.

Glad you are making the oblivion, it is a Cake Bible signature! And I don’t seem to run out of different ways to decorate it…

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Posted: 05 May 2009 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Also, there is a difference between European and American eggs, which may explain why Europeans leave them out and we don’t- European eggs have a coating left on them, American eggs do not.  I forget if this is a natural coating or an added one, but it affects the egg’s ability to keep at room temp.

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Posted: 05 May 2009 10:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Hector, speaking of eggs, you’ve mentioned before that you always use frozen egg whites and yolks. Do you bring them home from the grocery store and separate and freeze them immediately? Do you freeze them all in one container or do you freeze them individually? I like to buy the pasteurized eggs for the frostings in TCB and have started freezing them. But, I haven’t thawed and used them yet.

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Posted: 09 May 2009 02:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Farm wives have been leaving eggs out at room temp for eons.  I leave them out overnight on occasion… I buy them 3 dozen at a time (depending on my baking projects, sometimes it’s 6 dozen).  If I’m running tight on fridge space and it comes down to eggs vs. chicken in the fridge, the eggs come out for a day.  No harm.  (my kitchen is 70F year round).

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