Increasing chocolate peanut butter mousse tart
Posted: 01 May 2016 08:14 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I only have a 10” tart pan and would like to make the chocolate peanut butter mousse tart which is for a 9 1/2” tart pan.  Is there a formula for increasing a recipe to accommodate this change?  Thank you.

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Posted: 03 May 2016 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Freshkid:  Thank you so much for your time and interest.  The peanut butter tart is from Rose’s Pie Bible which is filled to the top of the pan and finished with a two-chocolate ganache.  That book has a pan volume chart.  The 9 1/2” tart is 4 cups, the 10” tart is 5 1/2 cups.  My thought process was finding what percentage 1 1/2 cups is of total recipe of 4 cups.  From that I came up with a percentage of 37.5% and I would therefore increase each item in the recipe by 37.5%.  That sounded a bit high to me so I don’t think that’s the best way to proceed.  Then I found your post and I like your suggestion and feel that is the right way to go. I also discovered today that the tart pan I thought was 10” is actually 10 1/2”.  Using your method for the 10 1/2” pan I would increase the recipe by 110% and that’s what I’m going to do.  I’m so happy to have the solution because many of the tarts in that book are 9 1/2” so you will be helping me each time I make another tart out of that book.  You’re my hero today!  Thanks again so much.

Pielady44

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Posted: 03 May 2016 06:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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FRESHKID:  I so appreciate your kind words and hope to be able to lend a helping hand to another fellow traveler as you did for me. I volunteer in the kitchen on a weekly basis at our local senior center along with many other volunteers who are so generous with their time and talents.  The tart I am making is for the head chef in the kitchen at the center for her birthday on Saturday. All of Rose’s recipes are one step above all others and her favorite dessert combination is peanut butter and chocolate so I think I have a winner here.  I would love to be able to send you a picture of the finished product but this post won’t allow a pdf to be posted.

Thanks again

Pielady44

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Posted: 14 March 2017 05:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I just was in the same boat last night - frantically trying to figure out how to convert Rose’s Peanut Butter Tart for an 11” tart tin!! I only have 9” and 11” ones! This thread provided me with my answer. I increased each ingredient by 10% and it seems to have worked out perfectly! (Except for dimmy me - had to re-mix the crust dough when I realized I added a whole egg - when it only called for a half! DUH!!) So - unlike the 9 UNgrateful Lepers - I will say a big thank you to FreshKid and the lady who originally posted this question!! For the first time ever - I am doing a “pie” for PI Day, and taking it to PI Day event!! And as soon as I find some decent ones I’m investing in 2 TEN” tart forms! I may have to make a smaller one for hubby with the remainder, since I doubt there will be any left! smile

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Posted: 14 March 2017 09:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It’s not advisable to scale a recipe based on the total capacity a pan will hold since you do not fill a pan to capacity.

A more accurate method used by baker’s is to calculate the difference in area between the two pans

First find the area of the circle for each pan
1. Radius is half the distance of a circle.
2. Square the radius (multiply the number by itself)
3. Multiple radius squared by pi
4. Pi is 3.14

Radius of 9.5” pan
9.5 ÷ 2 = 4.75

Square the radius (4.75)
4.75 x 4.75 = 22.56

Multiply radius squared by pi (3.14)
22.56 x 3.14 = 70.80

The area of the 9.5” pan is approximately 71” (70.80 rounded up is 71)

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Radius of 10” pan
10 ÷ 2 = 5

Square the radius (5)
5 x 5 = 25

Multiply radius squared by pi (3.14)
25 x 3.14 = 78.5

The area of the 10” pan is approximately 78”

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Now calculate the difference in percentage between the two pans. 
Divide the area of the larger pan by the area of the smaller pan.

Area of 9.5” pan = 71
Area of 10” pan = 78

78 ÷ 71 = 1.098

You need one full recipe plus an additional .10 (0.98 rounded up is 10 percent.

Since the difference between the two pans is only 10%, you do not need to adjust your recipe.

When the difference is 20% or greater, then scaling the recipe is advisable.

BTW: the only way to properly scale a recipe is if the measurements are in weight.  You cannot properly scale a recipe written in volume. 

Today is 3/14—which is Pi Day.  Happy Pi Day!

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Posted: 15 March 2017 12:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thank you for the detailed and very informative reply! I was pretty pleased that the crust, the filling and the ganache all seemed to be a good amount and a nice proportion for my 11” tin. As you mention - scaling a recipe that’s in volume is near to impossible. :( So I weighed every ingredient as I measured it out, and then scaled up 10% in Grams. Rose will have to update some of her older recipes that were written with the more novice cook in mind (unfamiliar with metric and don’t weigh ingredients with digital scale! OYE!). Trying to figure out the 7 Tbsp of cream cheese was quite the tedious chore! (I got 15 Gr per Tbsp). Yeesh! I’m more used to just whacking in the whole flippin package. Haha! All in all quite a challenging project and a huge success!

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Posted: 15 March 2017 01:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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kuchenbaaker - 15 March 2017 12:46 AM

Thank you for the detailed and very informative reply! I was pretty pleased that the crust, the filling and the ganache all seemed to be a good amount and a nice proportion for my 11” tin. As you mention - scaling a recipe that’s in volume is near to impossible. :( So I weighed every ingredient as I measured it out, and then scaled up 10% in Grams. Rose will have to update some of her older recipes that were written with the more novice cook in mind (unfamiliar with metric and don’t weigh ingredients with digital scale! OYE!). Trying to figure out the 7 Tbsp of cream cheese was quite the tedious chore! (I got 15 Gr per Tbsp). Yeesh! I’m more used to just whacking in the whole flippin package. Haha! All in all quite a challenging project and a huge success!

Kuchenbaker,

You’re welcome. 
I know a lot of baking sites list pan capacity charts as a means to scale recipes, but that approach is neither useful nor standard practice in a commercial kitchen.  Knowing a pan capacity is 4 cups is of no use since a recipe never yields an amount equal to pan capacity. 

You have to guess the amount of batter/dough you need to fill the pan 2/3 full, or should that be 1/2 full, or maybe 3/4 full—geez, how full should that pan be?  It just makes for a lot of confusion that in the end is nothing more than a guess which may or may not work.

It takes a bit of time to learn and comprehend baker’s percentages and calculating area, but once learned and with good notes, you can scale a recipe in a few minutes time.  I keep step by step notes in my baking binder for easy reference.

Your 15grams per tablespoon of cream cheese is definitely in the ballpark.  I use 14 grams/tablespoon based on the package weight of 28 grams = 1 ounce.

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Posted: 15 March 2017 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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All very helpful and accurate info!  I agree - the volume/capacity approach is totally NOT accurate… especially as each cake rises differently! (esp here at 3000 ft!) I have erred on the generous side too often and ended up with overflowing batter, burnt offerings, catastrophic cake failure, and a filthy oven to boot! I should have remembered the oz to gram conversion for the creamcheese since the pkg is 225 gr! But I buy the huge 1 Kg block so I have to weigh each time. Still working on understanding and using bakers percentages. Great to have you in the Forum!

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