Soupy Blackberry pie
Posted: 09 July 2016 10:12 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Greetings all. New use and first post, and just got into baking pies. In the past couple weeks, I’ve baked six pies, and decided I want to get better at it. I’ve been using Kate Lebo’s book, Pie School, and it’s served me fairly well.

I’m reaching out to you all because I attempted a Blackberry pie, with fresh blackberries, as soon as I cut into the pie, I noticed it was incredibly soupy. Any tips on how to prevent this? Do I need to press juice out first? Any other fruits I should be concerned with. Other than the soup factor, it was still delicious. Thanks for any tips.

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Posted: 10 July 2016 04:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Beer&Pie; - 09 July 2016 10:12 PM

Greetings all. New use and first post, and just got into baking pies. In the past couple weeks, I’ve baked six pies, and decided I want to get better at it. I’ve been using Kate Lebo’s book, Pie School, and it’s served me fairly well.

I’m reaching out to you all because I attempted a Blackberry pie, with fresh blackberries, as soon as I cut into the pie, I noticed it was incredibly soupy. Any tips on how to prevent this? Do I need to press juice out first? Any other fruits I should be concerned with. Other than the soup factor, it was still delicious. Thanks for any tips.

  Good Morning BEER & PI & welcome to our baking forum.. We here are sorry to learn of your recent pie baking disappointment.

I took the liberty of reviewing this recipe from Kate Lebo,s PIE BOOK for a raspberry fruit pie.

I am only going to comment on “THE WHY” your pie failed you as you DESCRIBED…SOUPY.

  Here is why I believe. Notice in the recipe where it specifies the amount of FLOUR…it says “2 1/2 Cups plus 1/3rd cup of flour.
Now then that 1/3rd cup of flour I believe you may have omitted in the fruit mix preparation. This is the ingredient that provides the coagulation of the liquids during baking.
I think you may have either added this amount to the dough flour amount of 2,1/2 cups or either totally omitted it altogether.
This addition should have “DIRECTED” you the reader (the baker) to mix it into the fruit segment with the sugar so that the liquids become extracted & the thickening agent (the 1/3rd cup of flour) could then blend in. I believe in this case you may have omitted it.

  Truthfully my friend, If you did this by accident & omitted this ingredient it isn’t your fault that you sustained a failure.
Simply put this recipe is not only POORLY written but it should have employed “CORNSTARCH”
as the thickening agent….(just my opinion)

  I hope we have helped you today. If not, I enjoyed meeting you this morning.

Enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~FRESKKID.

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Posted: 10 July 2016 12:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks Freshkid. That’s what I forgot. I overlooked the flour. My first thought was cornstarch, but I never saw it in the recipe. I’m used to using it in other forms of cooking, but I’m new to the baking game. I’m sure this is one of many mishaps I’ll have, but hopefully won’t have one like this again.

Thanks again.

B&P

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Posted: 13 July 2016 07:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Dear Beerandpie, I wanted to add on to what fresh kid posted.  You may want to check out using cornstarch or tapioca as a thickening agent.  I have not used flour to thicken my pies.  My research finds most sources say flour tends to blunt the flavor of the pies.  If you are looking for a good source for pies, there are NONE better than Rose’s books, “The Pie and Pastry Bible” or
The Baking Bible”. Both are wonderful because Rose has done the work and tested and retested.  Honestly, if Rose said “While holding the pie, jump from a height of two feet to make the filling flatten out perfectly”, I would do it because she has researched the reasons for it.  Keep baking!  Pies rock!!

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Posted: 05 January 2017 08:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Fruit pie filling must be thickened.  The amount of thickener depends on the type of fruit and the type of thickener.  Some fruit, like apples, contain less juice, and more natural pectin. So you will use less thickener in an apple pie. Some berries, like blueberries, are so inconsistent when baked, you can still end up with a runny filling after using the recommended amount of thickener. N this happened to me on the 4th of July.  My industrious friend ladled out the excess juice and used it for ice cream topping.

King Arthur Flour has an explanation and guide for the various thickeners (link below).  It explains the pros and cons of the various thickeners, as well as a guide for amounts based on the different fruit and type of thickener.

i prefer quick cook tapioca or potato starch to cornstarch.  I find cornstarch too gummy and cloudy.

Some pie tricks I use:

Mix fruit, sugars, spices, thickeners in a mesh strainer set over a bowl.  Let sit for 15 minutes; juices will drain into bowl.  Heat juice in a saucepan (most thickeners require heat to activate), then I’ll add the warm juice to the fruit when I’m ready to fill the crust.

If using a metal pie plate.  Preheat a metal baking sheet for at least 10 minutes before putting pie in oven.  I haven’t had a glass pie plate shattered from placing it on a hot bake sheet, but Pyrex warns against putting glass on a preheated tray. 

Bake pies on lowest rack position.

Bake hot.  I preheated oven to 425 for at least 20 minutes befor putting a pie in the oven.  I bake at 425 for 10 minutes, then reduce to 375.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/guides/pie-baking/pie-thickener.html

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