Brioche Help
Posted: 21 December 2007 01:33 PM   [ Ignore ]
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HELP!

I want to use Rose’s brioche recipe from The Bread Bible, but I have a question on timing. Specifically, step 1 says “One day or up to 2 days ahead, make the dough”, but step 1 covers making the sponge. Do I make the sponge and let it set for 1-2 days, or do I just start all the steps, and have the majority of the resting time take place in step 6?

In other words, do I perform step 1 and then wait, or do I perform step 2 and immediately proceed to step 2?

I need an answer as soon as someone can get it for me. I’ve got another recipe for brioche, but I’d live to try this one. I need to start a test batch as soon as I can, though, so I can get one trial run in before Christmas.

Thanks!

Tom

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Posted: 21 December 2007 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi tmoseley - have you checked the blog?  If not, click on “Rose’s Blog” (just under her picture above), then type “brioche” in the search box.  See if you can find the answer to your question there.

Good luck!

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Posted: 21 December 2007 01:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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TMOSELY;
  Good afternoon & welcome to the forum. I am not certain if I understand your question… but if I do you are confused as to twhether or not you should or can proceed to step #2 concurrently doing step #1. That is after doing the sponge segament do you do the dough segament & layer it on top of the sponge????.
  Tom, if that is the question I would say yes. That is exactly how I do my yeasted lean breads. MZ. Rose states an option in her directions. Here is what I also do Tom, I with-hold approx. 1/2 cup of flour from the “DOUGH” segament…which I will add as I mix ,if the dough is too sticky I add some flour as needed. There will be times when you will use it all up & other times you may not require all of it.
  Good luck in your baking & have a nice day.

  ~FRESHKID. cool hmm

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Posted: 21 December 2007 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I did look at the blog, and didn’t see the answer. I’ll try to clarify.

The recipe in the book says…

1. One day up to 2 days ahead, make the dough. In the mixing bowl, place (sponge ingredients) ... set it aside, covering with plastic wrap.
2. Combine the ingredients for the flour mixture and add to the sponge.

Now, the question I have is, is this correct? The pdf online says

One day up to 2 days ahead make the dough

1. Make the dough starter (sponge) (no mention of setting it aside)
2. Combine the ingredients for the flour mixture and add to the sponge.

These are different instructions. The ones online SEEM more correct. The instructions in the book appear to tell me to make the sponge and set it aside for 24-48 hours before mixing with flour mixture. The instructions online appear to tell me to prepare the sponge and immediately sprinkle the flour mixture on it.

Which of these is correct?

Thanks in advance for your help and advice.

Tom

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Posted: 21 December 2007 02:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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TOM;
  The info in the blog is the same as I explained it to you. You have an option, ie, do it like I mentioned or mix the “DOUGH ingredients subsequently as it says in the book… no differance…your choice. I feel it is much easier to do it all at once. I hope this info helps you.
Good day Tom.

  ~FRESKID.

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Posted: 21 December 2007 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Freskid,

To clarify, you’re saying that personally, you prepare the flour mixture and add it to the sponge immediately after preparing the sponge? If so, this is great, and exactly what I needed.

Tom

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Posted: 22 December 2007 01:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Don’t forget that ‘time=flavor’ where bread is concerned.

I’ve made many of Rose’s recipes, and many times have found it simpler to make a sponge (of whatever recipe) in my mixing bowl, combine the rest of the dry ingredients and sprinkle them on top of the sponge, and then put the covered mixing bowl in the fridge overnight so I can finish mixing the dough and letting it begin the rising stages the next morning. Logistically, this tends to work best for me.

As a general rule, if I recall correctly, many of Rose’s recipes call for a sponge to rise for a span of time (1-4 hours, typically, and extra time is preferred, but 1-4 hours is a reasonable minimum) before mixing in the rest of the ingredients. The main reason for this is flavor development, unless I’m wrong.

When I’ve used the shorter time frames mentioned, the bread is fine, but the flavor isn’t as well developed as it is when the sponge is allowed a longer development.

I’m by no means any kind of expert, but have found Rose’s recipes to be very nicely forgiving with this sort of thing.

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Posted: 02 January 2008 11:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hey everyone, and happy new year!

I’m new on these forums and particularly new to bread baking. Apart from some cinnamon rolls I made two years ago, I haven’t worked at all with yeast. Having sworn absolute fealty to The Cake Bible and its related Deity, though, I decided to take a swing on the wild side and bake the brioche Rose has included amidst everything else.

All would’ve been fine sailing if it weren’t for the fact that my oven is bust- for some reason it can’t hit anything higher or lower than 175 degrees C (350F) on convection mode, which is thankfully all I need to bake cakes and mostly everything else. What I am intending to do to make up for the 425 F preheating for this brioche is to turn the oven on grill mode which will hopefully heat up the baking sheet enough to lend that ‘spring’ Rose mentions in her instructions, after which I will turn the oven back to convection and let it slip quietly back to the 175 region. I know, I know it is thoroughly imprecise, game as I am for a bit of adventure, but does anyone foresee a grave destiny for that glob of dough sitting unaware in my kitchen right now?

Short of getting a new oven, which looks less and less likely since I got my Kitchenaid shortly before Christmas, I hope this method works in the meantime!

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Posted: 03 January 2008 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Joel,
  Are you sure you have the oven temps right?  When I read this recipe, it is 425 for the small brioche or 350 for a loaf of brioche.  It seems like the loaf would be the best choice for your situation.

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Posted: 03 January 2008 10:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Oh hey!

I was using the Cake Bible recipe, which is really one for sticky buns or brioche cake, and all of them stated 425 to heat up the baking stone or baking sheet, and then 375 for the buns or cake. But the information you’ve given me is very reassuring, and indeed I’ve pressed my dough into a loaf pan :D Thank You!

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Posted: 04 January 2008 03:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I’ve justed tasted the brioche and it’s lovely, soft and chewy. The only gripe I have is that the bread tastes sour, almost stale, bleah. I think I must’ve let the dough rise in too warm an area, though it’s been so rainy here for the past two days I wonder how that worked out :p

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Posted: 05 January 2008 02:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Bummer about your brioche.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, though, right?

For what it’s worth, temperature-wise, I made a batch of Sticky Buns today, and baked them in my Texas sized muffin tins (I have two, each holds six muffins). I cooked them at about 350 for about 10 minutes, pulling them out when the tops were nicely golden brown.

They turned out quite nicely, even if I do say so myself. smile

I’ve wrapped each of the leftovers in Pam-sprayed plastic wrap, and put most of them in a ziploc bag in the freezer, and put a few just in the fridge.

I’m hoping that will encourage me to eat them one at a time, instead of inhaling them en masse.

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