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Chocolate Banana Cake
Posted: 26 May 2009 09:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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did you put wax paper underneat the cake and then pulled it out after it hardened??

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Posted: 26 May 2009 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Perfection - pure and simple!!!!!!!!

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Posted: 26 May 2009 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Ski,

My cake turner is just a smidge smaller than the 12 inch round cake board, so I didn’t use wax paper underneath.  I DID use it under my cake turner to catch the ganache as it dripped down onto the counter.  I then just scooped the excess back into the bowl when I was done. 

I slid my bench scraper underneath the cake board to lift it off the turner.

Thanks, Patrincia!

V

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Posted: 26 May 2009 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Beautiful cake, Veronica! You definitely deserved to be proud! Keep us posted on the catering business, if you decide to take up the cake orders…

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Posted: 27 May 2009 02:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Here’s another something interesting.  At least for me.

I’d made a batch of chocolate glaze for another cake last month.  I wasn’t particularly concerned with the percentage of chocolate I used, there was grocery store bittersweet (don’t know the percentages on that brand), and 2 ounces of unsweetened chocolate.  It melted up fine, but I felt like I had to use a spatula to spread it on the cake.  I’d only done a glaze once before, and it wasn’t cute.  I’m thinking the chocolate on that one was too high in chocolate solids (am I saying that right?).

The chocolate I used for this cake was Ghirrardelli’s bittersweet, 60%.  I’ve thawed both bags of leftovers, and look at the fluidity of each bag.  The one on the left is my hodgepode, or higher percentage.  The right is the Ghirardelli.

Vets, is it the brand, the percentages, or what?  I’m marrying the bags together for a test cake tomorrow. 

The square cake is with the first batch.

V

PS, Notice how much glaze is left over from this recipe.

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Posted: 27 May 2009 11:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Veronica, I’m assuming you used the same recipe both times. So it’s got to be the chocolate. Also you used unsweetened chocolate in the first batch and not in the second batch. That could be another reason. Maybe someone else will have a better explanation. Now, I’m curious too.

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Posted: 27 May 2009 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Veronica, the only two things I can think of are the cocoa mass and the temperature.  In TCB, Rose talks about checking for the proper fluidity and temp (tepid) before begining to glaze, and adding cream or chocolate if necessary.  I’m guessing the unsweetened chocolate boosted the cocoa mass too much. Or, it had set up already (too cold).

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Posted: 27 May 2009 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Absolutely beautiful.  My family are not a bunch of chocolate lovers so I don’t coat cakes with ganache very often.  I’ve done it 4 or 5 times in my “baking career”.  I just love the flawless smooth look of the poured ganache glaze.  You did an amazing job!

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Posted: 27 May 2009 03:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I’m thinking cocoa mass as well.  Same recipe, same technique, I even used a thermometer for the first batch. 

There shouldn’t be a problem with me combining the two should there?

Thanks Bill!

Veronica

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Posted: 27 May 2009 04:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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VERONICA:
  Good day. Veronica, like the other members I like the way your choco ganache cakes turned out…very smooth…that is not very easy to do.
Veronica I will only address myself to the posting of today where you mentioned the Ganache that you had to apply with a spatula. I will interpret that to mean rather thick.

  By itself Bittersweet choco when melted is rather thick & will not spread easily into a thin cover over a cake. It is also too crisp
when it’s set. That is the reputation of bittersweet choco. Adding cocoa butter does help especially after tempering the choco. There are other tricks learned prof bakers employ as well….like using a choco glaze instead. But I think you did a very good job.
Good luck & enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~FRESHKID.

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