Golden Butter Cream Cake Formula Question.
Posted: 25 May 2009 07:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I was wondering if anyone has made this cake?  Was it too dry, too moist? 

I was curious cause as I was breaking down the formula for the cake and I noticed that its not quite balanced.  Unless I’m missing something.  The recipe has less eggs than fat, wouldn’t this lead to la ack of structure in the cake?  I noticed the flour and sugar are equal which is odd since most times the sugar is greater than the flour.  Is the cake getting its extra structure from the lack of eggs from the flour???  again I also noticed that the amount of liquid is less than the amount of sugar.  Doesn’t that mean that there’s not enough liquid for the sugar to absorb?  Which would mean that there will be no remaining liquid for the flour to form gluten to provide structure for the cake?  How does this cake recipe work?  Any ideas?

Sorry if I’m asking all these science and formula questions but I’m really trying to figure out the science of cake making.  I blame Bakewise and what it has done to me.  Although it explains a lot, it leaves a lot left to be explained, its like just stepping into the shallow end of a lake and now i wanna go deeper but find I don’t know where to go=P hopefully one of you can shed some light since you’ve been at this longer.  I hope maybe even Rose herself may wonder across here and answer some of my questions.  Is there any way to email her?  I think she would be able to provide a great explanation.

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Posted: 25 May 2009 10:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Dachie, I made this cake recently, and it was lovely- intensely buttery, somewhat dense, yet tender- everyone liked it.  I was going to suggest on your other thread that you give this recipe a try and whip the portion of the cream that is not used to combine with the yolks.  I remember thinking when I read Bakewise’s advice to add whipped cream to cakes, can you just add the whipped cream at the end? Or do you need to make a lot of adjustments for the fat and the water?  I suspect the latter is the case.

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Posted: 25 May 2009 10:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Julie, that’s where I got the idea to add whipped cream to the white cake, from bakewise.  I was gonna whip the cream in the end and incorporate it to the batter.  However, if I add the cream I have to reduce the amount of butter slightly from 4 ounces to 3 ounces.  Which leaves me to wonder can I cream 10.5 ounces of sugar in 3 ounces of butter.  As it is I think 10.5 ounces of sugar into 4 ounces of butter is cutting it close, as I hear it should be from 1/2 - 3/4 sugar to butter.  That’s why I started questioning if I should add another egg white to compensate from the added fat from the whipped cream and just leave the butter alone.  And that got me started on my downward path to but will that extra egg white dry out the cake?  Or will the added fat from the whipped cream counteract the drying effect?  If not should I increase the liquid a smidge?  See what I mean about how confusing everything is getting. 

That’s why I started to look at Rose’s recipe’s and tried to see her formula for success.  And this recipe really threw me off cause there’s just so much out of balance ingredients that I wonder how she compensated for it.  Especially since she only has 2 ounces of eggs which does not = her 5 ounces of fat.  So she has more tenderizer than toughener I would think the cake would end up flat and not rise as much, which I guess would make for a denser cake, but very tender considering the amount of fat she uses which is what you said.  Does the cake have a nice rise Julie?  The other part that really stumped me was that she uses less liquid.  Is the cake on the drier side as well?  Thanks for all your help Julie btw, I don’t know if this science stuff gets on your nerves, but I’m just really trying to figure it out and see if I can tell what kind of cake it will be based on the formula.  I’m glad you baked this cake already so you can tell me the outcome and if it matches my prediction.

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Posted: 26 May 2009 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Dachie, with the Golden Butter Cream cake, there is no issue with creaming the butter and sugar because Rose uses the two-stage method, which mixes the sugar in with the dry ingredients.  I don’t know if that method would work with your other recipe, but that could be a test cake worth trying.  Then you wouldn’t have to continue to fiddle with the eggs/whites. 

My GBC cake was not dry. 

As for the rise, it rises some, mine came up just the tiniest bit short of the height specified in the sidebar, but then my oven tends to run hot and I used pasteurized cream (as opposed to ulta-pasteurized) with 38-40% butterfat, which would have maximized tenderness but could have weighed the cake down a little.

My GBC cake is here: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/1064/

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Posted: 26 May 2009 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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DACHIE:
  Good morning to you. After reading your posts although well written I do not know if I understand your questions about
TCB recipe for Golden butter cream cake. I believe you are questioning the balance of the listed ingredients to each other in order to coagulate into a cake. If this is so then here is the answer. If it isn’t…then please dis~regard what I have say to you.

COMES NOW:

  You are correct in saying this recipe is out of balance. It is so if you intend to mix this recipe in employing the general accepted way of cake mixing…“THE CREAMING METHOD”.  If you employ the featured mixing method which is called the “2 STAGE MIXING METHOD” it isn’t out of balance. You see this method was pioneered in 1941 by the Proctor & Gamble corp to mix out of balanced cake formula’s such as when the sugar in weight exeeds the weight of the flour & other out of balance ingredients. Generaly known as ‘HI RATIO CAKE FORMULA.
  Now then if you wish to employ the creaming method on this cake you must modify the recipe to fit. I am certain you can do this as you have demonstrated to us here that you can think logically very well. If you need assistance & if you ask I will try to help you there.

  Good luck to you & enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~FRESHKID. rolleyes

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Posted: 26 May 2009 06:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I made this cake, exactly as it appears in the cake bible…and loved it.

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