Coffee Liqueur Raisin Cookies question
Posted: 27 January 2017 03:24 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2017-01-27

I’ve had a bottle of coffee liqueur sitting in a cabinet; I sort of inherited it from my parents, and it dates back to at least the Carter administration, if not earlier. The bottle is so old that I can’t find the product for sale anymore; it’s this: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aphonik/14323585029

I’ve decided to finally do something with the stuff (assuming, that is, it’s still usable). I’m not a really drinker, so I thought I’d bake something with it. I had a few criteria going into the search:
—I was looking for recipes that used quite a bit at a time—if it only called for 1-2 tablespoons it would take forever to use it up.
—I preferred that the use NOT be in frostings or the like. I’m not a frosting person (I don’t care for buttercream or similar textures) so I wanted to mainly aim for a cake or cookie of some sort.

I came across this recipe:
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/19230/coffee-liqueur-raisin-cookies/
“Coffee Liqueur Raisin Cookies”

It looks interesting, but I’m a bit stuck with with one thing in particular: the cup of shortening.

I have to confess to a bit of a mental block about shortening. I never use it for anything. Part of it is irrational—it’s not really that much more unhealthy than butter, which I use judiciously but sparingly, but somehow it seems so (again, irrational). But more, I know it’s there for the texture, but it’s otherwise completely flavorless, and I’m all about baking (and cooking) for flavor.

I also wouldn’t mind making things at least a bit less unhealthy. Would replacing the 1 cup of shortening with 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce and 1/2 cup butter work, or is that too much added liquid from each? (IIRC, butter is about 16-17% water, and the applesauce would have even more)

I’d also thought I might whip the egg whites before adding them, to avoid making the cookies denser with the reduced fat.

thanks for any tips.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 January 2017 08:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1441
Joined  2008-09-27

Coffee Liqueur is best used with anything chocolate. Coffee accentuates the chocolate flavor without your being able to taste the coffee, when used in moderation.

I’m against “healthy” substitutions. They increase the healthfulness by 5%, but reduce pleasure by 30%. Not a good tradeoff, IMO. My mother used to make the most tasteless desserts, using fake eggs, fake butter, fake sugar.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 January 2017 11:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2017-01-27

De gustibus non est disputandum.
Perhaps I should have emphasized this point, but my opposition to shortening is also because it’s tasteless, and other than literal fat adds nothing to a recipe. I’m not talking making this recipe with sugar substitutes, fake eggs, and fake butter. I actually like recipes that are a little lighter—like I said, I don’t care for buttercream at all and that has nothing to do with it being unhealthy.

I’m still talking a half cup of real butter (which is better tasting than shortening), and I think that applesauce is a far more enjoyable taste than shortening, even if it’s not a direct substitute for fat.


FWIW, I also have chocolate-based recipes I was going to use, but I’m looking for ways to get rid of a whole bottle of this stuff and I didn’t want to just go one route.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 January 2017 11:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1441
Joined  2008-09-27

While shortening is tasteless, it often provides better texture than butter does and cookies won’t spread as much. When making chocolate chips cookies, I use 50/50, although I use butter-flavored shortening. Fat is also a flavor-carrier, even when it has no flavor of its own.

I’ve tried the applesauce thing before, and I think it makes an inferior product. Loss of fat usually means loss of flavor in baked goods.

Anyway, you asked for opinions and I gave mine. grin

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 January 2017 12:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2017-01-27

Well, no, actually. I’d asked a technical question about the effect of the water content from the applesauce and butter as compared to the shortening, not whether applesauce would be inferior, as that is a matter of personal taste. You may like what shortening does and dislike applesauce, but my taste is the opposite.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 January 2017 02:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  681
Joined  2008-01-24

I use Spectrum brand vegetable shortening. It works as a good substitute in most recipes that call for traditional shortening. I also usually substitute 1/3 shortening with butter for flavor. Which, doesn’t affect most recipes very much. I have my doubts about the liqueur though. I would taste it and if it doesn’t taste good it is time to toss it. In my experience making recipes from ingredients that you don’t like or aren’t good never leads to a satisfying product.

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 January 2017 04:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  728
Joined  2007-11-18
Scott_R - 28 January 2017 12:01 PM

Well, no, actually. I’d asked a technical question about the effect of the water content from the applesauce and butter as compared to the shortening, not whether applesauce would be inferior, as that is a matter of personal taste. You may like what shortening does and dislike applesauce, but my taste is the opposite.

SCOTT_R:
  Good afternoon & welcome to our baking forum.  I am just replying to your inquiry about your technical question in your post.

  Scott as you know butter has approx. 17.5% water content . Soooo, an adjustment must be made with the shortening. Further Scott butter weighs 8, oz per cup…shortening weighs 6 7/8ths oz per cup & has no water content at all in it’s make~up. more math adjustments must be made. Also Scott I am certain you are aware that Applesauce water content can vary greatly due to the type of apple used & where it is grown & if the manu. added more liquid or not. NOT QUANTIFYABLE.

After you do the culinary math, you then must observe & feel the cookie dough to ascertain if you should reduce the milk liquid in the recipe, or add more liquid of sorts or flour due to the apple sauce problem.

I would be happy to do the math for you if you ask.  If you do all this I hope that you will post the results,ete there are members here that may wish to bake this recipe with your knowledge.

Enjoy the day.

  ~FRESHKID.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 March 2017 12:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  204
Joined  2010-01-18

I am having a good chuckle reading this thread. My first response was to ask SCOTT_R where he lives… we can just all come over and help him polish off that booze in short order. Then he can just bake some nice normal cookies or cake (with real butter - pleeeeeaze!!) tongue laugh I agree with Charles - I too am convinced that substituting “healthier” ingredients is a complete waste of effort, and results in baking of very inferior quality. I refuse to compromise recipe ingredients in my baking, unless I am positive it will result in a better finished product! If I wanted to eat only healthy foods I would have to forget about cakes entirely just eat tofu & salad. :( But cake is what makes life enjoyable. So do like Hector Wong says: make lovely Rose’s recipes (or his!) and enjoy them with discretion (share them with others!). Cheers!

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top