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Bread Bake-Off
Posted: 31 May 2009 03:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Julie, my kugelhopf did EXACTLY the same as yours!  I’m so frustrated about my pictures as I don’t know what the problem is.  I’ll try on a different computer later on. 

I think the capacity is 10 cup but, like you, think about 15 mins more proofing would have helped.  My mould is the ‘Bavarian’ and is black inside so maybe that’s why mine coloured a bit more.  Did you have a stone underneath it?

As for the brioche, I left the sponge in the fridge last night, and have now reached the stage where it is in a bag and will leave it tonight again in the fridge.  Rose says this develops the flavour.  I so wish I’d doubled the recipe as the dough is just like silk.  I added 150g butter which is quite a bit more that the recipe but less than the maximum.

Annie

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Posted: 31 May 2009 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I’m now on a totally different computer and made the pictures much smaller. 

Annie

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Posted: 31 May 2009 04:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Apart from the slight ‘wonkiness’ your Kugelhopf looks really good, Annie. The schmear looks very chocolatey, does it taste as good as it looks?  I love the pattern of the bundt tin, the only time I used mine the mixture stuck to the sides spoiling the whole effect!  How did you treat the inside of yours, if you don’t mind me asking?

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Posted: 31 May 2009 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Jeannette, The schmear is delicious.  I think it would make a great cake - twice-baked cake!  I used the Perfect Pound Cake from TCB as the base. 

I use this bundt pan all the time for the Golden Grand Marnier cake which I make often and I really have to butter it well as there are so many nooks and crannies in it.  We don’t have Pam spray here so I prefer to use butter.  Very occasionally a little bit sticks but I then pour ganache on it anyway so no-one notices.  However, with the bread dough, it just popped straight out and the pattern came up beautifully.  I’m just going to have a piece with fresh pineapple for dessert.

Annie

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Posted: 31 May 2009 07:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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I love your Kugelhopf, Annie.  Gorgeous!  Thanks for all the pictures.  I also appreciate you and Julie being candid and humble while sharing your experience.

Here are pics of my croissants.
While rolling out the dough for turn 3,  I heard a “squish sound” (UhOh)  I found that butter had broken through underneath.  I stayed calm, threw flour on it and kept rolling it out until I reached the correct size. (adding flour as needed)  Unfortunately, I ran out of flour halfway through this process and grabbed the white whole wheat flour I had in the freezer. (not knowing how corse it was).  While the dough was resting in the refrigerator, I read Rose’s post about using bread flour.  So I used it for the rest of the procedures.

While rolling out the dough for turn 4, I heard “squishing” sounds with each roll of the pin. (I’m assuming because of the white wheat flour)  It was breaking my heart.  I added at least a cup of bread flour as I continued to roll it out. 

I also had butter breakthrough on my hands as I shaped the croissants.  I just knew these were going to be diasterous.  I put them in the refrigerator over night, let them rise for two hours the following morning then baked them. 

Obviously, Rose’s recipe is fool proof because these came out a lot better than they should have.  My husband and I were pleasantly surprised by the splintering crisp crust as we bit into them.  Everyone at church loved them. (even the lady who said she hated croissants!)

Did anyone else have “squishing” sounds while rolling out the dough?

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Posted: 31 May 2009 08:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Tammy, your croissants look wonderful. I can “see” the crisp crust you are talking about and the texture inside looks so perfect. You know you did a great job when someone who usually dislikes eating that particular food eats it. That is a huge compliment in itself.

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Posted: 31 May 2009 09:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Annie, I’m so glad another computer allowed you to post pics, those are wonderful!  I especially like the look of the slices.  Your shelling wasn’t as dramatic as mine, did you poke the dough with a finger to judge the proofing, or did you go by some other method?  Hard to imagine that you baked a whole cake to make the crumbs, I bow down to your stamina and attention to detail.

Tammy, your croissants look flaky, crisp and delicious!  As Rozanne says, they must have been pretty good to convert a non-believer!  I had a few small spots with each turn where the butter broke through, I remembered reading in one of the bibles (had both the pastry and bread out) that that was what made croissants more tender than puff pastry, so I didn’t worry about it too much.  I just minimally dusted the spot with flour and continued.  It seemed like the dough required a balance of delicacy and strength, as the layers were easy to damage with overzealous rolling/ too much downward pressure.  Did yours shrink when you cut them into triangles (maybe not with the whole wheat flour)?  Which butter did you use?

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Posted: 31 May 2009 11:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Here’s the Ricotta Bread I baked. I am not much of a bread baker. I’d like to bake more bread but somehow I am intimidated by it. In case anyone is wondering why I posted the last picture, well I promised my two kids I would. The two tiny (and I mean tiny) bread rolls were made my them. They did the proofing, deflating, shaping etc. They were so excited I didn’t have the heart to say no.

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Posted: 31 May 2009 11:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Thank you so much for all the lovely comments. The savarin-type brioche was really yummy. No special occasion, just the bake-off haha! Hubby and I had 2 each and my daughter had 1; then I had the extra for breakfast the next morning. The texture is so light you don’t realise how fattening these actually are!

Annie, your kugelhopf looks yummy, lovely colour. I love the pattern of your tin, and also of Julie’s tin. I can’t wait to see picture of your brioche. Tammy, your croissants look delicious, flaky with the crisp crust.

Rozanne, your ricotta rolls look lovely. The two little rolls are so cute! Bet your kids were really proud of their efforts, as they should be. You should give the brioche a shot. It was a LOT easier than I thought, and the taste and texture are really wonderful. Although the dough is very soft, it is really easy to work with and shape.

They remind me of the rolls my uncle used to make. He got the sponge starter from a bakery, and did everything by hand. Refused to use my mom’s Kenwood because he said the texture is not the same. He used to add a TON of melted butter while kneading the dough. To this day, his rolls are used as the benchmark of all our attempts at adapting the recipe using yeast. The brioche dough comes really close…guess I just have to add more butter.

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Posted: 31 May 2009 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Thank you shimi. This bake-off has brought me one step closer to baking bread more often.  smile

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Posted: 01 June 2009 12:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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You look like a bread baker to me Rozanne.  The crumb, shape and color is perfect. 
I love that your kids joined us too.  Their rolls are beautiful! I don’t know any kids that know about proofing, deflating, shaping, etc.  Tell them I said congratulations!

Thanks for the wonderful comments on my croissants Shimi, Julie and Rozanne.  I loved learning something new.
Julie,  I’m sure I did get over zealous on my rolling and downward pressure by turn 3.  At the end of turn 2 I was sure I was a natural croissant maker.  LOL  I’ll have to try them again soon to build on what I’ve learned.  I don’t recall the triagles shrinking much when I cut them.  Did yours?  I used 8 oz of Plugra butter.  Which butter did you use?

Tammy

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Posted: 01 June 2009 03:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Wow, everyone’s breads look wonderful! I wish I could taste them all!

My Ricotta bread (with fresh dill) is resting in the refrigerator overnight—on Monday it gets baked into rolls and goes off to a potluck. More about that later!

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Posted: 01 June 2009 09:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Rozanne, such lovely loaves, you are indeed a bread baker!  I absolutely love that your daughters did all the work on those two little rolls, seeing them left me with a big smile.  Please tell them I thought they were lovely.  How did this bread taste?  Lovely photograph, too!

Tammy, I wonder if the differences in our gluten formation affected the butter break-through issue- yours didn’t shrink much when cut, but did break through the butter more, while mine shrank a lot when cut, but didn’t break through so much.  I can see now why Rose adds her germ and bran to the butter, rather than the dough, where it would “cut” the gluten.  Regardless, we both ended up with flaky, tasty croissants!

I used Vermont Butter & Cheese cultured butter - it’s one of the extra rich ones.  I was wondering if a less rich butter might have been more diffcult to roll, but you didn’t use one.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 10:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Rozanne your bread looks wonderful, I don’t think you’ll have any problems with dough in future, you’re a natural!  And your little ones must be taking after you, lovely little rolls.  I bet they tasted good too. tongue rolleye

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Posted: 01 June 2009 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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Tammy, I think your croissants look and sound perfect.  I know what you mean about the squishing noise - I’ve always thought it was just air bubbles breaking as I never get it on the 1st turn.  In any case I think it’s a positive thing.  Isn’t it just great when people say they don’t like something and then taste your creation and have a complete turn-around?  I’m sure the person had never tasted a real croissant before.

Rozanne your bread looks wonderful - did the kids get to eat their own rolls?  I think you have now graduated to bread baker.

Julie,  on cutting into the kugelhopf I discovered the shelling was only at the point where it cracked - most of it had no shelling at all.  The other thing I noticed is that the filling seemed thicker at that point too so I’m now wondering if uneven spreading of the filling was the culprit rather than the proofing.  I didn’t poke my finger into it - I generally test by running my fingertips gently over the top of the dough to feel how ‘puffy’ it is.  I still think 15 minutes more would have helped.

Brioche pictures to follow!

Annie

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