Sturdiest Stand Mixer
Posted: 13 June 2017 02:12 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone, I have been a lurker on her for a couple months but only recently made my account and I have to saw, I love the friendly and knowledgeable community we have here smile

I have been making some attempts at cookies and cake lately where instead of using normal wheat flour I am trying to use rice flour/coconut flour while keeping the recipes as close to original as I can. So far it is going pretty well, I am working on adjusting the for the moisture as a couple batches of cookies came out kind of soggy and not very fluffy on the inside, not the desired result from a coconut cookie. The cakes are having a similar issue, but since they require so much more batter I am using more flour which makes the batter thicker and thicker. So thick that is broke my old stand mixer. Now this was only a Hamilton Beach mixer that was purchased from a car boot sale but nevertheless I am now in search of a new one.

What would you all suggest as a sturdy stand mixer that has the engine power to churn through some thick batter? I am thinking that it might be time to drop some serious dough (haha) and pick up a Kitchen Aid. Thanks in advance for any suggestions you lovely people might have.

I ended up taking FRESHKID’s advice and have bought myself a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer. I didn’t want to break the bank too much so I purchased a used mixer from http://www.for-sale.co.uk/kitchen-aid-food-mixers that works just like new. I have to say, I feel really stupid for this silly mistake but now I am going to be trying different mixtures with my Kitchen-aid and hopefully I will get better results smile

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Posted: 13 June 2017 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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BillNomPong - 13 June 2017 02:12 AM

Hi everyone, I have been a lurker on her for a couple months but only recently made my account and I have to saw, I love the friendly and knowledgeable community we have here smile

I have been making some attempts at cookies and cake lately where instead of using normal wheat flour I am trying to use rice flour/coconut flour while keeping the recipes as close to original as I can. So far it is going pretty well, I am working on adjusting the for the moisture as a couple batches of cookies came out kind of soggy and not very fluffy on the inside, not the desired result from a coconut cookie. The cakes are having a similar issue, but since they require so much more batter I am using more flour which makes the batter thicker and thicker. So thick that is broke my old stand mixer. Now this was only a Hamilton Beach mixer that was purchased from a car boot sale but nevertheless I am now in search of a new one.

What would you all suggest as a sturdy stand mixer that has the engine power to churn through some thick batter? I am thinking that it might be time to drop some serious dough (haha) and pick up a Kitchen Aid. Thanks in advance for any suggestions you lovely people might have.

  BILL NOM PONG:
  Good Morning. Bill, the reason you are not having good results in your attempt in baking is that you are not employing a “WHEAT FLOUR” this flour combined with water & agitated develops GLUTEN which is the supporting structure for your baked product. Yes Bill, you can incorporate other flours like rice flour & even coconut flour but only a measured limited amount..

  Biil the reason your mixer broke is you over~heated it. The machine could not mix a bunch of “CLAY”.

You can sub rice/coconut flour “UP TO A CERTAIN AMOUNT’ together with a wheat flour such as cake flour, pastry flour & or All purpose flour to gain success for your baked product.

  Bill a KITCHEN AID mixer is a mixer that most home bakers use.

  Good luck in your baking & enjoy the day.

  ~FRESHKID

 

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Posted: 14 June 2017 03:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Ahh, thank you for your explanation. I will have to start with a light mixture and see how much rice flour I can get away with. I have wanted a Kitchen Aid Mixer for a while now, I think this might finally be the time I break and get one. Thank you again!

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Posted: 22 June 2017 01:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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BillNomPing
I bake a lot, several times a week.  I also bake a lot of gluten free.  For medical reasons I’ve been gluten free about 10 yrs.  It is incorrect to say you must limit the amounts of gluten free flours in baking.  You can in fact bake just about anything with 100% gluten free flours.

You just have to understand how gluten free flours react to moisture, fat, and heat.  You also need to add a binder since there is no gluten .

I converted the Orange Glow Chiffon cake from Rose’s Heavenly Cakes to gluten free.  A regular chiffon is a challenge to bake because the gluten structure is so delicate it frequently collapses during baking or while cooling.  Even Rose notes in her discussion of this recipe that she inserts a flower nail into the cake batter to disperse heat and provide support to keep the cake from dipping or collapsing while baking.  Rose states not to worry about a dip in the top. So in the absence of gluten, baking a gluten free chiffon cake is even more challenging than a wheat flour version.  Yet, you can in fact bake a delicious and beautiful gluten free chiffon cake.

Below is a photo of my gluten free version of the orange chiffon.  I baked in 8” x 2” rounds. The cake layer on the left has the top crust; the cake layer on the right is after I removed the top crust.  I hate crust so I cut it off all my layer cakes regardless of whether it’s a wheat cake or a gluten free cake.  You can see not only did my gluten free cake rise to the full 2” height of the pan, but there is no dip.  I didn’t even use the flower nail during baking.  This cake is full of orange flavor and is very light and airy—and in all honesty, you cannot tell that’s it’s gluten free.  Blending several gluten free flours together I think is the key for great gluten free baking.

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