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Questions: Strawberry Cream Cake
Posted: 01 June 2009 03:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I found a picture of this strawberry cream cake on the internet. I love the design, and I want to duplicate it. I need advice on two issues: Components and assembly.

Components: For the cake, I’m thinking of either the White Genoise on p. 127 of “Cake Bible,” or the Golden Butter Cream cake (p. 34), baked in a square pan. For the whipped cream filling, I was going to choose either super-stabilized whipped cream flavored with a bit of vanilla, or white chocolate ganache.

Now for the assembly. To get those crisp edges, do I first assemble the whole cake (except for the topping) and trim the sides, or do I trim the sides first and then try to fill it flush with the edges of the cake? I’d like to assemble this a day ahead of time and keep it chilled so that I’m not in a panic the day of the party.

I plan to make this cake in about 7 weeks, so for those of you who might not see this thread right away, please chime in! Any and all suggestions would be most appreciated!

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Posted: 01 June 2009 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I would check out this book if you can.  If I remember correctly, it has a cake very similar to the one in your photo:

http://www.amazon.com/Art-Cake-Modern-French-Decorating/dp/0688141994/

The sides are definitely cut after assembling.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 05:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I have the book “Tartine” and it has a similar cake but in a round format.  But it has the same look on the sides with cut strawberries.  The technique described there will have you wrap acetate around the insides of the ring before you put the first layer.  Then you arrange all the cut strawberries on the side, and the rest of the strawberries in the middle.  Then you add your whipped cream before you add the second layer.  You finish the cake and then chill/freeze it.  You can remove the acetate before serving.

I’m guessing that technique may also work on a square cake but I’ve only tried it on round.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 07:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Jessjose—Was it difficult to execute? From your description, the assembly sounds straightforward. I wouldn’t mind a round cake, either. The main thing is that I want to get those perfect, layered sides.

Do you like “Tartine”? Along with Matthew’s suggestion to look at “Modern French Decorating,” I was also eye-balling that one.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 08:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Christine,

I haven’t specifically done it with the strawberries on the side but we use this technique at school all the time.  You will need either a ring or a springform pan to be able to do this.  Just be careful when you add the whipped cream to make sure your strawberries on the edge remain standing.  The key is you make sure you chill it so that your cream is set before you remove the cake from the mould.  And also, we usually use a blowtorch to warm up the ring a little bit to unmold, or you can use a hot hair dryer which is what I use at home.  If you use the acetate, you may even skip the blowtorch part if you have the entire side of the cake covered.  The acetate will prevent the cake and the cream from sticking to your mould (if the acetate doesn’t come up high enough on the ring, you may still have to heat it up).

As for Tartine, there are a lot interesting stuff in the book.  I just recently bought the book and I haven’t really had the time to make anything from there (I’ve been practicing with cakes from the Cake Bible).  But I specifically remember the strawberry bavarian cream cake because I was originally thinking of making it for a friend.  But I ended up making the Star Spangled banner from the Cake Bible with the strawberry variation, which turned out really well.

Jess

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Posted: 01 June 2009 09:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I just checked my copy of the Art of Cake.  The cake that uses this technique is called “Ray Ventura,” named after a French band leader (also called g?teau fraisier).  They way they do it is as I described—they assemble the entire caked, and then slice off each of the sides of the chilled cake with a hot knife. The components they use are g?noise and cr?me mousseline, which they describe as a cross between pastry cream and buttercream—better for a thicker layer because buttercream would be too rich this thick.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 09:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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should also add that it is a serrated knife so that it can cut through the strawberries.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 09:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Christine, Rose uses the springform method to make her black forest cake, in the showcase section. 

As for components, my personal choice would be for classic genoise (sorry, I realize that wasn’t one of the options).  If you’re going to use golden butter cream cake, I like it best with strawberry puree/sauce served with it.

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Posted: 01 June 2009 10:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Jessjose—Thank you for the description of the book. Another question: Does the acetate release easily from the cake? The advantage of using it is that I would be able to see if the strawberries have moved.

Matthew—Thank you for describing the square-cake technique, and for the book recommendation. Along with “Tartine,” it is on my amazon.com wish-list.

Julie—Thank you for pointing out the black forest cake in TCB. I should have thought to look at it! Out of curiosity, why would you recommend the classic genoise? Do you find that it tastes better than the white genoise? I’m totally open to suggestions!

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Posted: 02 June 2009 06:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Christine, I have paired both the classic genoise and the golden butter cream cake with strawberries, they are both wonderful.  As for the white genoise, I have to admit that for some reason I always have trouble with that cake, so it is never as good as the other two when I make it.  Also, I like yellow cakes better than white in general, more flavor.

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Posted: 02 June 2009 07:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Christine, the sour cream butter cake also goes really well with strawberries and whipped cream

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Posted: 02 June 2009 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Christine, I have used the acetate for mousses and buttercream and as long as the filling has set and chilled, I have never had a problem removing the acetate.

Jess

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Posted: 03 June 2009 02:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I don’t know what acetate is.  Please help!

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Posted: 03 June 2009 10:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Acetate is material that you use to line cake rings or pans.  Check out these links and you’ll see descriptions and some pictures of what it is and its use:

http://www.bakedeco.com/static/list/acetate-liners.htm

http://www.bakingshop.com/sugarcraft/kopykake/kakeband.html

Jess

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Posted: 03 June 2009 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I’m going to put in my 2 cents.  I wouldn’t use a cake with a large quatity of butter in it (like the white genoise) because it will get firm in the refrigerator, and since you are using whipped cream, you will probably want to keep it in the fridge and store it cold.  i would use genoise classique.

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Posted: 03 June 2009 12:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I agree with Bill (and I love classic genoise with strawberries), though I have used whipped cream successfully on the golden butter cream cake and on bittersweet cocoa-almond genoise, which has a lot of butter.  I stabilized the cream with gelatin for the extra-rich genoise, since the sides were frosted and any small amount of watering out would pool on the plate unattactively. Here’s the cake:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/976/

I stabilized with corn starch for the golden butter cream cake, since that presentation didn’t have whipped cream on the sides of the cake, and I figured that any liquid would be absorbed by the cake.  In both instances, the whipped cream remained in good shape long enough for the cake to come to room temp (about 60 minutes), though I didn’t let it sit out any longer than necessary.  I do use 40% cream, living in New England dairy farm country, which helps with stability.  This cream, whipped with no stabilizers at all, will last for several days in the fridge without watering if stored in a plastic bowl.  Not sure if ultra-pasteurized, lower-fat cream would fare as well.  Here’s the cake:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/1064/

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