Wafers for frozen lime meringue pie
Posted: 06 July 2017 10:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m new to baking so my question may look silly… what are wafers? Brands I see in stores are with fillings. Something tells me they will not be any good for pie crust… could someone show me a suitable brand?

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Posted: 07 July 2017 01:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yoki - 06 July 2017 10:38 PM

I’m new to baking so my question may look silly… what are wafers? Brands I see in stores are with fillings. Something tells me they will not be any good for pie crust… could someone show me a suitable brand?

  YOKI:
    Good morning. Welcome to our baking forum. Yoki, judging from your limited information in your request for advice or suggestions, I will give you my answer based on my opinion of your written request

  If you want to use the mentioned WAFERS to crush & mix with melted butter, sugar & ete to employ for a PIE Crust You can use the mention wafers by removing the fillings. Many bakers do. You can not remove the fillings & crush the entire wafer as well. You can use what I use it is called VANILLA wafers (NABISCO is a brand) & crush those very easily. They are very popular for a cheesecake base together with a graham cracker crust as well. Yoki, just use your culinary imagination.

I hope my post will help you make the right decision for yourself.

Have a nice day yoki.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 07 July 2017 02:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Freshkid, thank you very much for your reply!

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Posted: 07 July 2017 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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To get the best crumbs for your pie crust, put the wafers into a plastic bag, seal it well, but remove excess air from the bag.  Using a rolling pin, crush the wafers in a rolling motion, into the desired consistency.

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Posted: 07 July 2017 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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To get the best crumbs for your pie crust, put the wafers into a plastic bag, seal it well, but remove excess air from the bag.  Using a rolling pin, crush the wafers in a rolling motion, into the desired consistency.

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Posted: 07 July 2017 08:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yoki - 06 July 2017 10:38 PM

I’m new to baking so my question may look silly… what are wafers? Brands I see in stores are with fillings. Something tells me they will not be any good for pie crust… could someone show me a suitable brand?


A wafer is any thin, unadorned cookie. They are typically dry and crunchy. Some wafers are more candy like than cookie. Benne wafers and florentine lace wafers are two examples of candy style wafers.

The type of wafer that is traditionally used for piecrust is a thin, dry, crispy, unadorned cookie.

A dry crispy cookie is used because it will absorb the butter and when baked, hold together so the pie won’t fall apart when sliced. If the cookie has icings and/or other additions, it may crumb when sliced.

The most common wafers used for a crust are vanilla wafer, chocolate wafer, or a gingersnap.

The most common brand in the grocery store is Nabisco.

Nabisco Nilla Wafers
Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafer
Nabisco Gingersnaps
MiDel Gingersnaps

Other options include:
Oreo cookies. However you have to scrape out the filling before using.
Graham crackers

The type of cookie you use should complement that filling. I use gingersnaps when making Keylime pie because the ginger really complements the lime. For coconut pie, I prefer the chocolate wafers.  So don’t be afraid to experiment. Just because a recipe calls for a vanilla wafer doesn’t mean you have to use vanilla.

 

 

 

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Posted: 13 July 2017 01:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thank you for your replies and advice. I got Nilla Vanilla Waffers. I will finally try to make that pie

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