Help with cherry puree
Posted: 16 October 2017 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve been experimenting with making cherry ganache. Any suggestions on making the puree so that it isn’t lost in the chocolae ganache? So far, it’s not coming through very well. I’ve previously made raspberry and orange ganache without a problem, but the cherry needs to be stronger. I am using frozen cherries, thawed, juice saved and also ground up the actually cherries. I have also added sugar and Kirsch. Should I use only cherry juice, but increase the amount and reduce longer?

Also, if I wanted to add more cherry puree to an existing ganache, what is the surest method? Can I safely warm up the ganache in a pan and add either Kirsch or puree? I haven’t had to adjust ganache after it’s made before.

Thank you.

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Posted: 16 October 2017 11:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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krazed - 16 October 2017 03:48 PM

I’ve been experimenting with making cherry ganache. Any suggestions on making the puree so that it isn’t lost in the chocolae ganache? So far, it’s not coming through very well. I’ve previously made raspberry and orange ganache without a problem, but the cherry needs to be stronger. I am using frozen cherries, thawed, juice saved and also ground up the actually cherries. I have also added sugar and Kirsch. Should I use only cherry juice, but increase the amount and reduce longer?

Also, if I wanted to add more cherry puree to an existing ganache, what is the surest method? Can I safely warm up the ganache in a pan and add either Kirsch or puree? I haven’t had to adjust ganache after it’s made before.

Thank you.

If your not using Rose’ method of thawing, saving the juice, then boiling the juice to reduce it, give that a try.  Just google “Rose Levy Beranbaum purée method”

But to be honest, fruit simply doesn’t impart much flavor. Professional pastry chefs and commercial bakeries use flavoring. A bakery emulsion, which is water based, is better than extract.  Alcohol in extract evaporates quickly, so lose both flavor and taste.

Olivenation sells bakery emulsions in every flavor under the sun.  They also sell “super flavors” which are three times more concentrated.  If you’re worried about mixing water and chocolate, research water ganache. 

Another option is using a high quality white chocolate instead of dark chocolate.  White chocolate won’t overwhelm your fruit. But if you go with white chocolate, I wouldn’t recommend anything other than Valrhona.  I didn’t think there was much of a difference between white chocolate. I always used Valrhona.  But one day I was feeling cheap, so I bought callebaut white chocolate.  The ganache was so disgusting I threw out the entire batch. There is definitely a marked difference between brands of white chocolate. For white chocolate ganache, its Valrhona or no white chocolate for me.

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Posted: 31 October 2017 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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The type of cherries makes a difference. If you can find Bing cherries I think they have the strongest cherry flavor. I cook them in a steamer so that the juice falls through to the bottom.

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Posted: 10 November 2017 03:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I have made a delightful Sour Cherry Mousse for filling an entremet. But have not tried choc ganache. I would suggest using sour cherries, reducing the puree very slowly to a thick paste. Even try adding in some dried sour cherry paste. Hector does this “jam” with Mango and Passion for his cheesecakes - which work absolutely wonderfully!! I have also done similar with Apricots - which we love even more!! In addition to the forgoing suggestions to use Baker’s Emulsions, I would see if you can get your hands on some Pure Fruit Concentrates, such as those used by manufacturers of flavoured syrups. I have even sourced some samples from companies that supply food services etc. I got some Raspberry concentrate years ago (from my son inlaw whose company made flavored syrups for beverages) for a white chocolate ganache for wedding cake - it turned out absolutely scrumptious! I have been hoarding the last of it in the freezer for only the most special applications!!  OK Norcalbaker59…. where can I source some Valhrona in bulk wholesale?? I refuse to pay $7 for 100 gr of chocolate. :(

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